GETTING IN DEEEP! Seminar Report Development Education across the European Union

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GETTING IN DEEEP!
Development Education across the European Union
Monday, 24 September 2007
2.00 p.m. - 4.00 p.m.
Voluntary Services Belfast
Facilitator:
Adam Davies
Advocacy Officer
Development Education Exchange in Europe Project (DEEEP)
Seminar Report
This seminar was supported by:
Contents
Page
Acknowledgements
2
Introduction
2
Purpose
2
Objectives
3
Presentation: Getting in DEEEP!
3
Facilitator information
15
Further resources
16
Appendix A: Participant Expectations for Seminar
17
Appendix B: Participant feedback
18
Appendix C: Participant list
19
Appendix D: Concord Draft Position Paper on Development
Education
20
1
Acknowledgements
Many thanks to Adam Davies, Advocacy Officer with the Development Education
Exchange in Europe Project (DEEEP), for his facilitation of this seminar. The
Centre also thanks Irish Aid for financially supporting the seminar as part of the
Centre’s Capacity Building in Development Education project.
Introduction
This seminar was organised by the Centre for Global Education and facilitated by
Adam Davies as part of the Centre’s Capacity Building in Development Education
project, a three year initiative supported by Irish Aid. The aim of the project is to
enhance practice, improve communication and strengthen capacity in the
development education sector in the north and south of Ireland.
The project consists of three key activities:
• A bi-annual development education journal: Policy and Practice: a
development education review
• An annual development education conference
• A bi-annual series of seminars focusing on aspects of development education
practice.
This report documents the content of a development education seminar, the first
in year three of the project, designed to support development education
practitioners by focusing on a topical aspect of their work. The proceedings of
previous seminars are available on request from the Centre
([email protected]) or from the Centre’s web site
(www.centreforglobaleducation.com).
While some development organisations enjoy close links with partners in the
European Union, many have a limited knowledge of development education (DE)
work at an EU level and / or have limited connections with European partners. The
Centre organised this seminar to enable local development non-governmental
organisations (NGOs) to become more closely aware of DE policy and practice in
Brussels and become more actively involved in DE activities sponsored by DEEEP
and its working groups.
The Centre recognises that many colleagues from the sector could not attend the
seminar in Belfast and has compiled this report based on documents provided by
Adam Davies and the seminar discussions.
Purpose of Seminar
This workshop aims were to enable local DE practitioners to become more aware
of, and engaged with, development education structures and organisations
operating across the European Union. It explored current DE trends across the EU
and in individual member states, explained how development NGOs are
coordinated on the European level, recommended methods of advocacy for policymaking at the European level and described the current state of DE/AR initiatives.
2
Objectives of Seminar
1. To present an overview of how European NGOs are structured and coordinated
around development education.
2. To examine how leading EU development organisations – CONCORD (European
NGO Confederation for Relief and Development), Development Education Forum
and Development Education Exchange in Europe Project (DEEEP) - interconnect.
3. To discuss the current state of national development education policies across
Europe and how they relate to DE policies in Brussels.
4. To consider why and how local development NGOs should get more involved
with European development structures, particularly in development education.
5. To agree next steps for strengthening relationships between Irish development
networks and those operating at an EU level.
3
Presentation: Getting in DEEEP!
Objectives of the presentation
DEEEP 2
Development
Education
Exchange in
Europe
Project
GETTING IN DEEEP!
Development Education across the
European Union
Monday, 24 September 2007
2.00 p.m. - 4.00 p.m.
Centre for Global Education, Belfast
1. To enable local DE practitioners to become
more aware of, and engaged with, development
education structures and organisations operating
across the European Union (EU).
2. To demonstrate how Irish practitioners can
become more actively involved in DE practice
within the EU.
This project is co-financed by the
European Union
Structure of presentation
1. Why get involved at the EU policy level?
2. Some EU Development Education ‘trends’ and
political commitments
3. How are development NGOs structured and
coordinated around the issue? (CONCORD, Development
Education Forum and DEEEP)
4. EU development policy and structure. How can we
put Development Education higher on the EU agenda?
Question 1
Have you been involved in the
past in EU level work?
If so, what have your
experiences been?
5. Example of EU policy making through a multistakeholder process – developing a DE/AR EU framework
Why get involved at the EU level?
Question 2
Why do you want to get
involved in Development
Education advocacy at the EU
level?
• EU policy can provide guidance and frameworks to
guide national policies
• A strong EU policy can be used as a powerful policy
tool at national level
• Funding – European Commission provides 20% of
total public investment in development education /
awareness raising and 30 years of experience in
sector
• You are already involved in it! Representatives
speak on your behalf
4
European public awareness of
development (1/2)
1) There is no aid fatigue but public vastly
overestimating their government’s aid spending
1
Some EU Development
Education ‘trends’
2) 82% of EU citizens have never heard of the
MDGs
3) 5 EU members that have invested the most
in DE/AR over the past 15 years are on verge
of / have already achieved 0.7% ODA/GNI
Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Sweden and
Belgium = approx. 80% of the total amount of official
investment across the 27 Member States.
European public awareness of
development (2/2)
4) OECD Dev. Centre Research: Positive
correlation between better awareness and higher
expenditure on global education and information
activities.
In other words… higher spenders have in general higher
ODA/GNI ratios, and show signs of slightly better awareness
“if [citizens] were better educated and more informed regarding
global development issues, they could provide informed, critical
support to reformers in their countries, so as to foster more
vigorous, more efficient and coherent development co–operation
policies..” (OECD Development Centre, 2005)
Some figures of spending on DE (2004)
The overall annual DAC members’ budget for public information,
communications and development education is approximately
€230 million* or 0.26 % / ODA.
UNDP recommend 3% / ODA for DE
• The Netherlands spends almost €4 per person (€64m/pa)
• Norway €2.50, Sweden €2.29 and Belgium €2
• Compared with €0.04 in Japan, €0.08 in Australia, and €0.12 in
Germany
• EC spends about 20% of total public investment in DE
(€30m/pa)
* NGOs research sees this figure as inflated, and realistically
around € 95m
Existing European DE/AR Political
Commitments
2001
EU Council of Development Ministers
Resolution on Development Education
2002
Maastricht Declaration
2003
Palermo Process
May 2005
‘Brussels Conference’ : European Conference
on Awareness-Raising and Development
Education for North-South Solidarity
2005
DE/AR a priority in European Consensus
on Development
July 2006
Helsinki Conference on European Development
Education
Jan 2007
DE/AR a priority in 18-month (2007-8)
Programme on development policy of the
EU Presidencies of Germany, Portugal &
Slovenia
2
How are development NGOs
structured and coordinated
around the issue?
(CONCORD, Development
Education Forum and DEEEP)
5
What is CONCORD?
CONCORD’s confederative membership
Individual relief / development NGO
CONCORD is the European confederation of relief and
development NGOs
National Platform (22)
• 42 members (22 National Platforms and 20
International networks)
• Representing over 1600 European relief and
development NGOs
NGO Network (20)
Social, Environmental, …
CONCORD
Why the members join CONCORD
Civil Society Contact Group
• Advocacy (29%)
• Improve the quality of their activities (26%)
• Increase access to funding (25%)
What does CONCORD represent?
CONCORD’s membership
42 members = 22 National Platforms + 20 International networks
• Representation of development NGOs at EU level
• Forum for exchange and networking
• Powerful tool for common NGO actions in Europe
• ‘Natural’ interlocator for EU Institutions on
development issues
• A confederation lead and owned by the members
What CONCORD is not..
ΜΚΟ
Ελληνική Επιτροπη Μη Κυβερνητικων ΟργανωσεωνΓια Την
Ανάπτυξηllenic Committee οf Non Governmental Development
Organisations
NGO
Belgian Platform
Platform
Current CONCORD Priorities
•
•
•
•
A think tank
A donor
Centralist
Implementer of projects
How is CONCORD organised?
GENERAL
ASSEMBLIES
• to increase political impact
• to increase the engagement and
capacities of the members
• to strengthen strategic alliances with
other actors (in the EU and in the South)
ADVISORY
GROUP
BOARD
CORE GROUPS
Policy Forum
Development
Education
Forum
OTHER GROUPS
Aid Watch
Funding for
Development
& Relief
Trade
Enlargement,
Food
Neighbourhood,
Security Pre-accession
Cotonou
(FDR)
3 focus areas
- More & better aid
- Policy coherence for development
CONCORD
SECRETARIAT
SUPPORT + COORDINATION +
COMMUNICATION
- Civil society engagement
6
Development Education Forum (DEF)
Development Education Forum (DEF)
43 European NGDO platforms and
networks
DEF Steering
Group
The DEF’s membership extends beyonds CONCORD’s
membership to include ‘observer’ representatives from
Romania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia and Lithuania.
Funding
WG
Advocacy
WG
+ Direct
links with
CONCORD
Board
+ TRIALOG
+ FDR WG
School
Curricula
WG
Code of
Conduct
WG
=> Truly pan-European working group
Next DEF meetings:
• 24-25 October 07, Brussels
• May 07, Slovenia
SUPPORT + COORDINATION +
COMMUNICATION
Policy
Educators /
Practitioners
Development Education Forum (DEF)
Pete Davis, Oxfam, UK
UK Representative
([email protected])
The 4 principal membership DE networks of the UK:
Coalition of Aid and Development Agencies, Northern Ireland
(CADA), Northern Ireland, Stephen McCloskey, Coordinator
([email protected])
DEA - Development Education Association England
Hetan Shah, Director ([email protected])
IDEAS - International DE Association of Scotland
Kadie Armstrong, Coordinator ([email protected])
What the DEF works to do (1/2)
1) Increase the European public’s critical knowledge and
understanding of the causes and consequences of global poverty
and inequity and our global interdependence
2) Embed development education and awareness-raising in
relevant national and EU policies, and in formal, non formal
and informal education systems
3) Undertake development education and awareness-raising
activities in a coherent and coordinated fashion, including
promoting coherence between the different stakeholders, and
between the national and EU levels
CYFANFYD Wales. Dominic Miles, Coordinator
([email protected])
What the DEF works to do (2/2)
4) Ensure that there is the participation of civil society and
that their perspectives are considered in every stage of the policy
development, programming and evaluation processes, and that
there are structured and transparent mechanisms for effective
dialogue between NGOs and public institutions.
5) Raise the capacity of teachers and trainers delivering
development education and strengthen the link with education for
sustainable development.
Some of the DEF activities in 2007
Position Paper – on stance on DE, our guiding principles, and
includes national and EU level policy recommendations to the EU
Member States and the EU Institutions.
School Curricula Report (& synthesis) - on the status of DE in
the formal education sector and school curriculum in EU countries
Code of Conduct on Use of Images and Messages CONCORD endorsed and developing a users manual
DE Mapping of strategies across EU – funding levels, how DE
is integrated in NGO platforms, whether national strategy, etc
Lobby letter to Ministers of Education
Training seminars
7
What is DEEEP 2?
DEEEP Overall objectives
DEEEP 2 is a 3-year programme (2006-9),
co-financed by the European Commission and
initiated by the CONCORD Development
Education Forum.
To increase the capacity of the European NGDOs to
raise awareness, educate and mobilise the European public
for world-wide poverty eradication and social inclusion
Aim:
To strengthen capacities of non-governmental
development organisations (NGDOs) to raise
awareness, educate and mobilise the European
public for worldwide poverty eradication and social
inclusion.
Target:
1) European Union (27 countries) NGDOs.
2) EU and Member States’ Institutions
In addition to DEF support activities…
To increase the co-operation between NGDOs and
with other civil society actors in Europe to maximise
effectiveness and impact of development education and
development awareness
To establish and improve strategic partnerships
between NGOs and European institutions and Member
States, increasing their political support for development
education and development awareness
Co-operation with other programmes
DEEEP also provides
Coordination and networking
National Training / Seminars (6 year)
Annual Development Education Summer School
(weeklong training for development educators (EU and
outside EU).
26 June – 2 July 2007, Hosted by MVRO – Slovak
NGDO Platform. Focus on MDGs
Information and documentation (DE Times
newsletter, www.deeep.org website)
Inclusion of NGOS from New Member States and
acceding in DEEEP2’s activities and working groups
Basic breakdown by EU Institutions
European
Commission
(EC)
3.
e.g. DG Dev, RELEX
European
Parliament
785 MEPs
DEVE Comm.
Council
of EU
Intergovernmental
& 6 month rotating
Presidency
MAIN FUNCTIONS
EU development policy and
structure
1. Power of
initiation of
legislation
1. Legislation (with
Council of EU)
1. Main decisionmaking body
2. Budget
2. Managing and
implementing
Community policies
and programmes
3. Scrutiny over
European
Commission and
Council of EU
2. Legislator (with
the Parliament)
3. Executing the
Community budget
4. Ensuring that
Community law is
applied
3. Coordination of
broad economic
policies of Member
States
Council: Most powerful
& most easily
influenced from
national Capitals
8
European Parliament (EP) level
Where we can influence EU policy
European
Commission
(EC)
Who are the Northern Irish MEPs?
European
Parliament
Council
of EU
785 MEPs
Intergovernmental
e.g. DG Dev, RELEX
DEVE Comm.
& 6 month rotating
Presidency
Jim ALLISTER
Non-attached
Who is best placed to
influence these institutions?
Bairbre de BRÚN
Confederal Group of the European United Left Nordic Green Left
National
Platforms
(NGOs)
National
Platforms
(NGOs)
LOBBYING
NOT ONLY
FROM
BRUSSELS!
DEEEP can
support /
provide entry
points / lobby
with National
Permanent
Representatives
James NICHOLSON
Group of the European People's Party (Christian
Democrats) and European Democrats
European Commission (EC) level
European Commission (EC) level
What policy is behind the annual EC calls
for proposals? 4 Policy levels
EC Financial perspectives
1. Development Cooperation
Instrument (DCI)
2. Non State Actors (NSA)
New structure of funding for external
relation
programme 2007-13
Heading “Europe as a global player”
3. Multi-annual strategy 2007-10
4. Annual Action Plan 2007
5. Call for Proposals 2007
European Commission (EC) level
New Structure of Funding for External
Relations (2007-2013)
6 Instruments:
•Development Cooperation Instrument
(DCI)
Budget every 7 years
Rationalised & simplified
About 50 billion euro (2007-13)
Development Cooperation Instrument
Budget:
€ 16 897 million for the 2007-13 period.
Covers 48 countries in Latin America, (Central)
Asia, Middle East, South Africa
Divided into
• European Neighbourhood and Partnership
Instrument (ENPI)
1. Geographic programmes
• Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA)
specific strategies
• Human Rights Instrument
2. Thematic programmes – actions are
• Stability Instrument
complementary to geographic programmes
• Co-operation with Industrialised countries
related to country-
Note: Africa, Caribbean, Pacific (ACP) countries are
covered by a separate European Development Fund
(EDF), not part of the External Relations Instruments
9
Development Cooperation Instrument
5 Thematic Programmes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Human and Social Development (‘Investing in
People’) (1,060 million)
Environment and Sustainable Management of
Natural Resources (804 million)
Food Security (1,709 million)
Migration and Asylum (384 million)
Non-state Actors and Local Authorities in
development (NSA & LA) (1,639 million)
Covers: All third countries, except industrialised /
pre-accession
Non-state Actors Programme (NSA)
Objective B: AR & DE activities in EU
and acceding countries
Eligible actors: both ‘Non State Actors’ (NSA)
and Local Authorities from EU and acceding
countries
Experience: Min. 3 years for NSAs (2 years in
New Member States (NMS))
Co-financing rules: EC max. 75% (NMS =
max. 90%)
Size of projects: EC contribution 100k-1m euro
(NMS = min. 25.000)
Duration: 1-3 years
Non-state Actors Programme (NSA)
Specific references to development
education
• Focus on countries where there is low
awareness of development cooperation
issues
• Provide support to partnership from
different Member States
Non-state Actors Programme (NSA)
Replaces old 2002-6, EC NGO co-financing
budget line (former B7-6000) for 2007-13
Why this thematic programme?
Specifically focuses on NGOs (85% allocated to
NGOs and other non-state actors (e.g.
political foundations, unions…) in EU and
partner countries
(Objective A) Funds work in developing
countries (+/- 82%)
(Objective B) EU and acceding countries on
promoting awareness raising and
development education (+/- 14%)
Non-state Actors Programme (NSA)
Strategy paper 2007 - 2010
The first 4 year strategy – relating to DE
• Public support for the MDG agenda
(focus on Sub-Saharan Africa)
• Coherence for development (trade,
migration, security)
• Media and development
• Special attention to New Member States
Non-state Actors Programme (NSA)
Performance indicators for DE
1. Increase public awareness on global interdependencies
between the EU and developing countries
2. Changes in attitudes and improved public
understanding of difficulties facing developing countries
3. Degree of integration of development issues into
formal and non-formal education systems in Member
States
4. Move beyond solidarity during humanitarian crisis to
support for long-term, structural development
processes
5. Extent of mobilisation in New Member States and
acceding countries, including through networking,
campaign work, exchange of experiences and best
practice
10
What DEF/DEEEP is working for:
What DEF/DEEEP is working for:
EU level: Call to all EU Institutions
Development of
an overarching EU
DE/AR
Policy
Framework, that reinforces national DE strategies, or
provides the stimulus for the development of national DE
strategies, through a multi-stakeholder process
Substantial increase in public funding for DE – move
towards and beyond 3%/ODA (UNDP target). Also avoid tension
of funding partition between DE in Europe and development
activities in developing countries.
Closer collaboration and structured, transparent and
strategic dialogue mechanisms between NGOs/CSOs and
EC, regarding policy making decisions, programming, etc.
Recognition of important role of CSO in development policy.
EU level: Call to all EU Institutions
Activities which ensure an enlarged-EU dimension by involving
NGOs from the new Member States, including actions that
facilitate exchanges of experiences and networking between
NGOs from the 15 ‘old’ Member States and the 12 ‘new’ Member
states.
Make
eligibility
criteria
are
NMS-favourable,
encourage the participation of NMS NGOs
and
Strengthen integration between DE (mobilisation of
citizens in Europe) and direct actions in the South.
Important to have DE/DA activities also in the South.
Also encourage activities which foster cooperation between NGOs
What DEF/DEEEP is working for:
How DEF & DEEEP are influencing this
Specifically to the European Commission (EC):
At the EU level..
EC is a major player in DE/AR - 20% of total public investment
and 30 years of experience in sector. BUT no EC/EU policy!!
2007
-> Place DE / AR at a higher policy & strategic level than just be
a small component of the NSA Programme.
1. Develop strong lobby tools to support work (new DEF
position paper/Vision of DE for the next 20 years, (joint)
lobby letters, briefings, etc).
Ensure the inclusion of international development issues
in all other EU awareness raising campaigns and
educational programmes
2. Raise awareness of the issue and putting it on the political
agenda (face-to-face meetings with EC, EU Presidencies,
Member States, MEPs, NGO partners, multi-stakeholder
process, etc).
Make development education/public awareness-raising a
cross cutting theme in all thematic programmes. For
example, awareness component attached to food security,
human and social development, or migration thematic
programmes,
3. Identifying strategic entry points.
4. Support national level advocacy actions & initiatives.
20082008-9
The big push…
European Commission (EC) level
Reminder of 4 Policy levels
1. Development Cooperation
Instrument (DCI)
2. Non State Actors (NSA)
programme 2007-13
3. Multi-annual strategy 2007-10
4. Annual Action Plan 2007
5. Call for Proposals 2007
How you can get involved!
It is up to us to put development
education on the political agenda!
1. Contact your CONCORD DEF Representative
and discuss the issue
2. If it is not already, place DE/AR as a priority
for your National Platform and in your Mission
Statement
3. If there is not one already, form a working
group within your NP on DE/AR
4. Join a DEF subgroup (Advocacy, Funding School
Curricula, Code of Conduct). You can be a member of
working groups and not be the DEF representative.
11
How you can get involved! (2)
5. Contact DEEEP (www.deeep.org) for advice
and support on lobbying on your national DE
strategy and on school curricula
6. Organise a meeting with representatives of
the Ministry of Development / Foreign Affairs
and the Ministry of Education to discuss how to
develop stronger, more coherent DE policies,
together with NGOs, and the inclusion of DE in
school curricula
4.
Working towards a European
Development Education
Strategy Framework
An example of EU policy making
through a multi-stakeholder process
7. Sign up to a thematic mailing list and also
receive the newsletter (www.deeep.org)
Existing European DE/AR Political
Commitments
2001
EU Council of Development Ministers
Resolution on Development Education
2002
Maastricht Declaration
2003
Palermo Process
May 2005
‘Brussels Conference’ : European Conference
on Awareness-Raising and Development
Education for North-South Solidarity
2005
DE/AR a priority in European Consensus
on Development
July 2006
Helsinki Conference on European Development
Education
Jan 2007
DE/AR a priority in 18-month (2007-8)
Programme on development policy of the
EU Presidencies of Germany, Portugal &
Slovenia
The multi-stakeholder process (2/3)
3. July 2006 Helsinki Conference (organised by Finnish
NGDO Platform to the EU, CONCORD with support of
the Finnish MFA and the EC)
Conclusion: the need for a specific long term European strategy
framework for development education, common at both
national and EU levels, was reaffirmed, and that it should be
developed through a multi-actor process
4. 16 November 2006: ‘European Development Education
Multi-stakeholder Taskforce Meeting’, Finnish Ministry
of Foreign Affairs and CONCORD DE Forum organised
Conclusion: Agreed that a representative Steering Group across the
stakeholder groups be formed that would be given the mandate to
develop proposals to take the European Strategy Framework
forward
The multi-stakeholder process to date
1. 2005 Brussels Conference on Awareness-Raising and
Development Education for North-South Solidarity
(jointly organised by Belgian Development Cooperation DG and EC)
Conclusion: Comprehensive and coherent DE/AR strategies should
be designed, or where existing reviewed and strengthened, at both
national and European levels, in an inclusive fashion with key
stakeholders
2. March 2006 CONCORD – EC DG DEV joint meeting on
how to proceed with the DE Strategy
Conclusion: Decision to set up a multi-stakeholders group involving
European Institutions, Committee of Regions, Council of European
Municipalities and Regions, Member States, North-South Centre,
OECD and CONCORD
The multi-stakeholder process (3/3)
6. 22 May 2007: Second Multi-stakeholder Steering
Group meeting, Min. Foreign Affairs, Luxembourg
Conclusion: Hire an external consultant to write first draft of 10
page ‘European Consensus on Development Education and
Awareness Raising: A Vision for the 21st Century’, based on
inputs from all stakeholders.
7. 21 September 2007: Third Multi-stakeholder Steering
Group meeting, European Commission, Brussels
Conclusion: Discussion and agreement on European Consensus on
DE/AR, and policy recommendations.
8. 9 November 2007: Unveiling of European Consensus
on Development Education, EU Development Days,
Lisbon
5. 22 February 2007: First Multi-stakeholder Steering
Group meeting – confidence building and draft plan
12
Who is involved?
Who is involved?
Balanced Steering Group across stakeholder
groups
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Current, Past and Future EU Presidencies (Finland,
Germany, Portugal, Slovenia)
MFAs from some other EU Member States (Ireland,
Luxembourg, Slovakia, Poland, Czech Republic)
The European Commission
The European Parliament
NGOs (CONCORD DEF)
Local Authorities and Municipalities (Council of European
Municipalities and Regions)
The North-South Centre of the Council of Europe
Media
Development Centre of the Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Global Education Network Europe (GENE)
Youth Organisations (European Youth Forum)
Secretariat / facilitators:
Wider plenary group
Over 150 interested development education/awareness
raising people from across wider civil society, local and
national government, academia, media and
international institutions
Truly a multi-actor process
Meet annually
Chair
What form will it take?
European Consensus on Development
Education and Awareness Raising
(DE/AR): A Vision for the 21st Century
Aims to ensure greater European public understanding of
development issues
Demonstrate added value of working through a
multistakeholder process
Follow up to the European Consensus on Development
(2005)
What form will it take?
European Consensus on Development
Education and Awareness Raising
(DE/AR): A Vision for the 21st Century
1) The 10 pp. Consensus/Vision (not legally binding) that
aims to ensure greater European public understanding of
development issues
-> November 2007 unveiling and demonstrate joint
collaboration ‘added value’
2) Consensus and full annexes
-Concepts and Methodologies of DE/AR used by all
stakeholders
-roles and added values of all stakeholder groups
3) More legally binding commitments
General agreement that:
Target: Balance of policy makers and
practitioners.
Aim: Document to be a tool aimed to support
the work of all the stakeholder actors (for NGOs,
it will be a lobby tool)
Emphasis: On quality, highlighting best
practice, and will be self-critical and forwardlooking.
It will not be simply a mapping exercise.
Proposed structure
European Consensus on
Development Education and
Awareness Raising (DE/AR):
A Vision for the 21st Century
1) The Development Challenge and Commitments
2) Common objectives
3) Common values
4) Common principles
5) Target groups
6) Current state of DE/AR in Europe and
highlighting the added values of each stakeholder
group
7) General and specific policy recommendations
13
Overall objective
Goal
Goal
Overall objective
To contribute to the eradication of poverty and exclusion
worldwide by promoting human rights, social justice and
sustainable development, including the pursuit of the
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other
international development commitments, through
strengthened European development education and
public awareness and active engagement.
Specific objectives
- To increase the European public’s critical knowledge and
understanding of the causes of global poverty and inequity and our
global interdependence.
- To further promote the embedding of development education and
awareness-raising in relevant national and EU policies, notably in
EU New Member States, Acceding and Candidate countries), and
in formal, non-formal and informal education.
- To encourage the implementation of development education and
awareness-raising programmes and activities in a coherent and
coordinated fashion, including between the different stakeholders,
the national and EU levels, and coordinated with Southern
partners.
To deepen European public awareness and promote a
critical understanding of international development,
solidarity, and issues related to global interdependence;
and to encourage European citizens to be aware of and
realise their rights and responsibilities to behave as
global citizens, and to influence more just, democratic
and sustainable national, European and international
policies and lifestyles.
Lessons learned so far
Through the process the momentum for the
development of DE/AR policies at EU level and in some
Member States has increased
Through this support, the Member States have signalled
to the EC that it must take DE/AR seriously
Used 6 month EU Presidencies to good effect & worked
to put DE/AR higher up the political agenda
New role for NGOs? Leading and facilitating a multiactor work process involving governments,
intergovernmental organisations, etc upstream of the
strictly institutional framework and agenda.
Thank you
More information, contact me:
Adam Davies, Advocacy Officer
[email protected]
14
Facilitator Information
Adam Davies is the Advocacy Officer of the Development Education
Exchange in Europe Project (DEEEP).
DEEEP aims to increase the capacity of European Non-Governmental
Development Organisations (NGDOs) to deliver development education (DE)
via methodological exchange, training, improved networking, elaboration of
common policies and common projects.
Aims of DEEEP
1. To increase capacity of the European NGDOs to raise awareness, educate
and mobilise the European public for world-wide poverty eradication and
social inclusion;
2. To increase co-operation between NGDOs and other civil society actors in
Europe to maximise the effectiveness and impact of Development
Education and Development Awareness;
3. To establish and improve strategic partnerships between NGOs and
European institutions and Member States, increasing their political
support for Development Education and Development Awareness.
Adam Davies, Advocacy Officer, DEEEP
15
Further Resources
2007 Development Education and the School Curricula
-A report on the status of development education in the formal
education sector and school curriculum in countries of the European
Union; http://www.deeep.org/english/europe/school/reportv16.pdf
2007 Development Education Forum Code of Conduct on Use of Images and
Messages; http://www.deeep.org/english/code/index.php
DEEEP: Developing European Public Engagement for the Eradication of
Poverty through Education and Reflection
-Leaflet describing DEEEP’s aims and objectives; includes contact
information and useful web links;
http://www.deeep.org/english/about_deeep/what_is_deeep/leaflet
_deeep2_en.pdf
European Consensus on Development Education and Awareness Raising
-Multistakeholder EU Consensus Statement (second draft available
October 5, open to comments until October 22, available by request:
[email protected])
Report 2007 on Development Aid: Europe fails to live up to its promises
-Informative, well-organised report on aid inflation in each individual
EU member state;
http://www.concordeurope.org/Files/media/internetdocumentsENG
/Aid%20watch/1-Hold_the_Applause.FINAL.pdf
Working to achieve the Millennium Development Goals through greater
European public engagement in the fight against global poverty: A
Position Paper by the CONCORD Development Education Forum (open
to comments through October 8; available by request:
[email protected])
© Centre for Global Education 2007
Report compiled and written by Jenna Coriddi
The views expressed in this report are those of the workshop participants and can
in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of Irish Aid.
The workshop was supported by Irish Aid:
16
Appendix A:
Participant Viewpoints on Development Education in the EU and
Expectations for the Seminar
“Although aware of European networks, I feel there is a lack of consensus
within the EU on what DE is and how to do it. There is a wide variation,
which has become more of a challenge with expansion”.
“I feel that colleagues in other countries are more advanced in their
methodologies and target audiences and think that working with other
European actors would be fascinating”.
“There is always a bit of a gap between what happens centrally in mainland
Europe and what happens here. I am curious to see how developed their
networks are”.
“I don’t think there is a great partnership linking the European Union and
the local level, and would like to learn how we can strengthen it”.
“It is useful to explore common positions on development education and
how effectively they can be implemented across Europe”.
“Developing a common development education strategy is very much a
process, and it can sometimes seem to be a Pandora’s Box”.
“Being able to track progress domestically and internationally is key”.
“There is a challenge of coordinating European level initiatives with local
understanding, NGO activities, etc”.
“Networks on the island have the capacity to dedicate staff to work within
EU affairs; utilising networks is important to reach an international level,
work effectively across borders and better organise local platforms”.
“I’m interested in whether CONCORD has a structured link with the
Directorate General for Trade [of the European Commission] and the level of
policy coherence among EU member states”.
“I hope to learn more about how EU development education activity is
relevant to us, how we can better use publications and sift through the mass
network of organisations and information that currently exists”.
“I want to know if CONCORD is dominated by an overseas aid agenda or if it
truly recognises the importance of local development education initiatives”.
17
Appendix B:
Participant feedback
“European bodies are far better structured than I realised; they are
bureaucratic, but that’s the EU. It’s important to remember that people
come and go, but as long as strong, self-sustaining structures are in place
for policy and platforms, progress can be made”.
“It was a very detailed presentation with a thorough explanation of issues”.
“The seminar provided the importance of having umbrella organisations to
coordinate, etc. and the power of having one voice in terms of the European
Union”.
“As someone new to the sector, it proved very useful”.
“The seminar helped me to understand the structures of the European Union
and development education at a European level”.
“I found interesting the introduction of methods for strengthening relations
between DE networks on mainland Europe and Ireland, such as contacting
DEEEP for advice and support on lobbying and information on the
Development Education Forum”.
“Some good thoughts came up but we will need time to elaborate and
implement ideas regarding integration of our organisations and European
organisations”.
“I found the most useful part of the seminar to be the overview of
structures and different groups and how best CONCORD and DEEEP can
impact on the European Union and its development education policies”.
“The seminar was useful because I had very little understanding of
development education NGOs and policies across Europe before this
session”.
18
Appendix C:
Participant List
Neil Alldred - ICTU
[email protected]
Jenna Coriddi – CGE
[email protected]
Orla Devine - British Red Cross
[email protected]
Mariclare Gallagher – Concern
[email protected]
Gerard McCann - St. Mary’s Univ. College
[email protected]
Stephen McCloskey – CGE
[email protected]
Roisin McEvoy - University of Ulster
Nora McQuaid – CGE
Christine Patterson - Save the Children
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Astrid Perez Pinan – DICE
[email protected]
Deirdre Rainey – Trocaire
[email protected]
Apologies
Matthias Fiedler – DICE
Carol Healy – NUI Galway
Bobby McCormick – VSI Ireland
Emily Slater – ActionAid
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Lucy Whittle - Waterford One World Centre
[email protected]
19
Appendix D:
Progress FINAL DRAFT – FINAL COMMENTS BY 8
October 2007
Status SECRETARIAT – DEF MEMBERS
Last update 18/9/2007
CONCORD Development Education Forum
Working to achieve the Millennium Development Goals through greater
European public engagement in the fight against global poverty: A Position
Paper by the CONCORD Development Education Forum (October 2007)
Context
The Europe Union – now at 50 – is a global player, the world’s largest multilateral
donor with commitments to increase its external assistance, with the aim of improving
both quality and effectiveness. With this role, comes a responsibility and moral
obligation to help define and promote a socially responsible world free of poverty,
based on the principles of sustainability, justice and equity. European governments
have stated their commitments to meet their obligations for achieving the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) and other UN targets (including 0.7% of ODA / GNI) by
2015, and it is a moral imperative that these commitments are both honoured and met.
Governments and politicians have a responsibility, but so do European citizens. We
believe that all European citizens must be given opportunities to become aware of and
understand their rights and responsibilities as global citizens so they can fulfil their
potential to effect change for a more just and equal world.
We, the CONCORD Development Education Forum (DEF), believe that development
education contributes effectively and productively towards raising greater awareness
among European citizens. This is essential for building a true ‘constituency’ that not
only encourages and pressurises our governments to meet their international
development commitments and targets, including the MDGs, but contributes to
greater public scrutiny and informed discussions on ever-improving each nation’s
development co-operation work and humanitarian aid programmes.
We welcome the increasingly positive political recognition of this important body of
work, including in the EU Council of Development Ministers Resolution on
Development Education (2001)i, the Maastricht Declaration (2002)ii, the Palermo
Process (2003), the Brussels Development Education Conference (2005)iii, European
Consensus on Development (2005)iv, the Helsinki Conference on European
Development Education (July 2006)v, and the 18-month (2007-8) Programme on
development policy of the EU Presidencies of Germany, Portugal and Slovenia
(January 2007)vi.
This Position Paper outlines the CONCORD Development Education Forum’s stance
on development education, our guiding principles, and includes national and EU level
recommendations to the EU Member States and the EU Institutions.
We, the Development Education Forum, specifically work to
•
Increase the European public’s critical knowledge and understanding of the
causes of global poverty and inequity and our global interdependence.
20
•
Embed development education and awareness-raising in relevant national and EU
policies, and in formal, non formal and informal education systems1.
•
Undertake development education and awareness-raising activities in a coherent
and coordinated fashion, including promoting coherence between the different
stakeholders, and between the national and EU levels.
•
Ensure that there is the participation of civil society and that their perspectives
are considered in every stage of the policy development, programming and
evaluation processes, and that there are structured and transparent mechanisms
for effective dialogue between NGOs and public institutions.
•
Raise the capacity of teachers and trainers delivering development education and
strengthen the link with education for sustainable development.
Our guiding principles
•
Development education and awareness raising are distinct from public relations (PR),
publicity and fundraising.
•
There must be the inclusion of a rich diversity of experiences and perspectives, in
particular from voices from the global South and often-marginalised groups in society,
such as minorities, youth, and women.
•
Development education should be carried out wherever possible in partnership
with civil society organisations (CSOs) in Southern partner countries, and also
with migrant and diaspora groups in Europe. They should have the right to be
included at each stage of joint planning and delivery processes, in the best
interests of equity, inclusiveness, authenticity, and shared responsibility for impact
and future developments.
•
Quality standards must be promoted and adopted, as well as an international exchange
of best practices. Impact assessment and evaluative processes must be translated into
practice, and disseminated to all stakeholders.
Why stronger European public awareness of development is
necessary
1. Opinion polls clearly show in EU countries that citizens consistently and
unambiguously support more solidarity and justice at the international level in
the fight against poverty and civil conflict: There is no aid fatigue. They also
show strong support for increasing their government’s overseas aid to help meet
the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), despite vastly overestimating their
government’s aid spending2.
1
We use the widely accepted UNESCO definition that distinguishes three types of education:
a) Formal education is the hierarchically structured, chronologically graded educational system running
from primary through to tertiary institutions.
b) Informal education is the process whereby every individual acquires attitudes, values, skills and
knowledge from daily experience, such as from family, friends, peer groups, the media, and other
influences and factors in the person’s environment.
c) Non-formal education is organised educational activity outside the established formal system that is
intended to serve an identifiable clientele with identifiable learning objectives.
2
A recent poll in the UK found that the public estimated that 18.55% of government spending was on overseas
aid. The actual figure is only 1.3%. (2006, ActionAid UK, Opinion Poll on Public Attitudes to Aid,
(http://www.actionaid.org.uk/doc_lib/poll_summary.pdf)).
21
2. However, there are disappointing levels of European public awareness of poverty
and development issues, and more specifically, EU development cooperation
policy and targets.
→ 82% of EU citizens have never heard of the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs)3
3. At the same time, we note that the 5 Member States (Denmark, Luxembourg, the
Netherlands, Sweden and Belgium) which have invested the most over the past 15
years in DE/AR (approximately 80% of the total amount of official investment
across the 27 Member States) are the countries which have achieved, or are on the
verge of achieving, the objective of 0.7% ODA/GNI4.
4. It is a democratic right that the general public are adequately informed of
development cooperation policies and practices, so that they can hold their
governments to account to show that their taxes are being put to tackling poverty
consistently and effectively, while also promoting social development. Actions
and evidence of impact should be communicated clearly to the public, and be
made easily accessible through a range of media.
“if [citizens] were better educated and more informed regarding global
development issues, they could provide informed, critical support to reformers in
their countries, so as to foster more vigorous, more efficient and coherent
development co–operation policies..” (OECD Development Centre, 20055).
General recommendations to the European Institutions
1. Development of an overarching EU Policy Framework through a
multi-stakeholder process
We believe that lack of an overarching European development education strategic
framework, which mutually reinforces and compliments Member State development
education policies, is a significant policy omission. Without such a self-challenging
framework or policy, ownership by citizens and media on the European Union’s own
external development co-operation policies and programmes is considerably reduced,
affecting levels of understanding about EU policies in developing countries and in
Europe.
Given the significant role that the European Commission (EC) plays in development
education/awareness raising (DE/AR) within Europe (currently providing 20% of
total public investment and 30 years of experience in sector), we call on the EC to
take the lead to develop an overarching coherent strategic framework for DE/AR at
EU level that reinforces Member State national DE strategies, or provides a stimulus
for the development of national DE strategies, and is open to all stakeholders.
Furthermore, at the Helsinki Conference on European Development Education (July
2006), organised with the support of the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs and the
European Commission, the need for such a multi-actor European strategic framework
3
June 2007 Special Eurobarometer 280 “Europeans and Development Aid” poll
(http://ec.europa.eu/commission_barroso/michel/speeches/docs/ip/2007/EurobaroEN.pdf).
4
OECD Development Centre research shows awareness does increase significantly as a result of global education,
awareness–raising campaigns, public debate and media focus. In short, the OECD countries that spend more on
development education/awareness raising (DE/AR) have in general higher ODA/GNI ratios, and show slightly
better public awareness on development issues.
5
2005, Mc Donnell, I. and Solignac Lecomte, H.-B., Policy Insights N. 13 - MDGs, Taxpayers and Aid
Effectiveness, (http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/50/42/35310784.pdf).
22
was reaffirmed. To take forward this process and to jointly formulate a European
Consensus on Development Education / Awareness Raising: A Vision for the 21st
Century, the CONCORD DEF currently co-chairs the European Development
Education Multi-stakeholder Strategy process, involving current, past and future EU
Presidencies, Member States, European Institutions, and inter-governmental and civil
society organisations. We believe this process is a significant follow-up to the
European Consensus on Development, as well as to strengthened channels of
democracy between citizens and institutions (a specific contribution to Wallstrom’s
Plan D for Democracy, Dialogue and Debate). We look forward to the EU’s and EC’s
continued support and political will to take forward this European Consensus process
and to realise such a common EU overarching policy framework that benefits all
stakeholders.
2. Substantially increase public funding for DE towards 3% of ODA
The overall annual DAC members’ budget for public information, communications
and development education is approximately €200 million or 0.26 % / ODA. It is
urged that the EC and Member States move towards or beyond a figure of 3% of
ODA, as proposed by the UNDP and the Brussels Development Education
Conference (May 2005). This increase in funding also implies a commitment to
raising standards for achieving the necessary quality, efficiency and effectiveness of
development education and awareness raising activities.
Particular focus on the needs of EU New Member States
Since 1 May 2004, there have been 12 new members to the EU, who were formerly
net recipients of external assistance. They have agreed firm commitments to increase
their external aid substantially in the coming years to achieve 0.10-0.17 % ODA/GNI
by 2010. However, due to a number of very specific reasons, there are low levels of
current public support for development cooperation6. In these contexts, it is very
important to strength civil society and to engage in greater public consultation and
development awareness work to find out more about what people think about the role
and responsibility of their countries in Europe and in the World.
A popularisation of global interdependence and celebration of different cultures
through mass media, especially TV broadcasting, would contribute towards raised
awareness, and recognition of collective development needs, as well as the
distinctions between and within nation states.
Therefore, the EU institutions should constantly promote the development targets and
encourage the New Member States’ governments to achieve them, not just for the
targets’ sake but for the sake of greater international solidarity and justice.
We believe that without the EC and national governments’ financial support for
public awareness activities and development education projects, there is little
likelihood that these ODA targets will be met. Furthermore, as the EU has also set
collective ODA targets (0.56% ODA/GNI by 2015), the credibility of the European
Union both internally and internationally is at stake. Europe has a responsibility to set
global examples, to honour political and economic commitments, and share its wealth
and resources. It must be committed to the eradication of poverty while supporting
sustainable initiatives and investments that increase the provision of opportunities for
all.
6
Furthermore, awareness raising campaigns within the New EU Member States should address the
difference between former communist propaganda about internationalism and need for international
solidarity and development awareness.
23
With an increase in population of the European Union by over 100 million since
accession of 12 countries since 2004, the existing budget is under considerable
pressure to meet a growing need for development awareness raising and education.
The body of work is rightly, becoming more professional in its research,
methodologies, outputs, and practical delivery, in all countries, and this should be
matched by phased increases in funding to ensure that quality and effective
application to sound educational criteria remain paramount.
Furthermore, to enable and encourage NGOs in New Member States, special
assistance must be given towards achieving effective development education and
awareness raising in new and future Member States, EU funding conditions must be
adapted in their favour. This includes modifying current thresholds on financial
capacity requirements, allowing lower access levels, and adapting current eligibility
criteria so that NGOs/CSOs and other voluntary sector organisations are not excluded
from applying for grants through lack of certain kinds of experience or legal standing.
Specifically, the experience and eligibility criteria for New Member State NGOs
should be reduced to 2 years, with funding from the state and other donors applicable
as co-financing sources, as well as private sector funds or donations, for several years
during an initial transition phase.
Special recognition and support should be given for dedicated programmes of
training, both within the development education sector, and in key institutions such as
formal, informal and non-formal teacher training colleges, centres for professional
education, etc. that can contribute to the spread of high quality development
awareness raising and education.
The CONCORD DEF is pleased that special attention towards the New Member
States has been recognised, particularly the European Parliament Development
Committee’s decision in September 2005 to allocate an additional 10 million euros
specifically to DE/AR actions in the New Member States. This additional priority to
NMS has been continued in the EC Non State Actors Thematic Programme, and we
hope that this investment and growth will be maintained.
3. Continue NGO capacity building and supporting pan-European
coordination structures
It is important that there is continued political and financial support to strengthen the
capacities of NGDOs in Europe to deliver development education, to act as
multipliers and mobilisers of European citizens, as well promote the development and
adoption of quality standards and best practices relevant and applicable in all EU
Member States, to improve processes, quality and efficiency.
Priority should be given to supporting planning, training opportunities, promotion of
quality education bench marks, partnership, mutual learning and peer exchange of
strategies and experience, in development education and awareness-raising;
particularly between New EU Member States, Acceding and Candidate countries, and
countries seeking to strengthen national support mechanisms. In this context, targeted
projects such as DEEEP and TRIALOG, with an acknowledged positive impact on
European NGDOs and CSOs, should receive further support from the European
Commission and other public sources.
4. Adopt Codes of Conduct on use of images and messages to respect
human dignity
Development education, public awareness and media strategies should be based on a
model of solidarity and global interdependence. This means aiming to work with
24
Southern partners at all stages of the relations, whenever and wherever possible. It
also means avoiding the general publication or display of passive, dehumanising or
stereotypical images of the South, in line with best practice and the recommendations
of the Code of Conduct on Images and messages. The CONCORD approved Code of
Conduct on the Use of Images and Messages7 provides a framework on which
organisations can build when designing and implementing their public
communications strategy. The Code and user manual offer a set of guiding principles
that can assist practitioners in their efforts to communicate their organisation’s
programmes and values in a coherent and balanced way.
The values of human dignity, respect and truthfulness as outlined in the Code, must
underlie all communications. CONCORD’s DEF members work to ensure that NGOs
in their countries are committed to the guiding principles, and will translate them into
internal policies and procedures. Through adopting the recommendations of the Code
of Conduct on Images and Messages, it becomes possible to promote a more inclusive
and representative understanding of issues such as human and child rights, poverty,
people’s livelihoods, aid and development.
We call on the Member States and European Institutions to adopt similar codes of
conduct on the use of images and messages in all relevant internal and external
communication and publicity campaigns to ensure that respect and dignity are
ensured.
Specific recommendations to the European Commission
1. Ensure the inclusion of international development issues in all other
EU awareness raising campaigns and educational programmes
In order to ensure that European citizens are aware of and understand their rights and
responsibilities as global citizens, the principles and practices of development
education and the need to mobilise support for global justice must be reflected in all
relevant EU awareness raising campaigns, and educational programmes. This includes
reflecting international poverty, human rights, and development issues in the
European Communication Policy, the EC Youth in Action Programme of DG
Education and Culture, and other relevant initiatives related to European citizenship.
2. European Commission Integrated
Education / Awareness Raising
Strategy
on
Development
In addition to leading the process to develop an EU overarching strategic framework
for development education / awareness raising, the European Commission must build
on its long standing experience in supporting and financing CSO development
education projects and develop its own integrated strategy, which should compliment
and reinforce national strategies.
3. Mainstreaming public awareness and mobilisation of European
citizens and development actions in partnership with CSOs in
developing countries across the EC programmes and external
instruments under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI).
Deepening public understanding and mobilising of citizens’ support for global justice,
environment, human, women and child rights, peace, and development within the EU
external actions is a vital and cross-cutting concern for all thematic programmes.
7
CONCORD Development Education Code
(http://www.deeep.org/english/code/index.php).
of
Conduct
on
Images
and
Messages
25
Therefore, a public awareness-raising component should be explicitly included in all
thematic programmes and their respective strategies, and not only related to the work
of Non State Actors and Local Authorities, and education on development.
CONCORD believes that such mainstreaming is a step towards placing development
education at a higher strategic and political level than just a component of the
NSA/Local Authorities Thematic Programme.
4. Evaluate and learn experiences of EC funded DE activities
The importance and need for rigorous monitoring and evaluation of development
education activities, in order to improve their efficiency but also importantly their
impact, has been political recognised, in particular in the EU Council of Development
Ministers Resolution on Development Education (2001)8. Nevertheless, although the
EC has had over 25 years experience of funding European DE/AR activities through a
number of different NGO co-financing budget lines, the last public evaluation was
conducted nearly 20 years ago.
We call on the EC to provide access to internal EC evaluations on these activities and
to ensure that these evaluation results are fed into current and future programme
planning and guidance to improve efficiency and quality, including the Annual Action
Plan of the Non State Actors Thematic Programme. Furthermore, the budget for
evaluation of EC DE/AR should be additional to funding allocated specifically to
DE/AR activities.
We recognise that impact assessment in education is notoriously difficult to confirm
over medium and long term periods. Examination systems dwell on received
knowledge and the interpreted results of individual and group research, study and
debate. But attributing people’s values, attitudes and behaviours to specific catalysts
or sources of ideas and opinions is a risky business. Emphasis on certain types of
skills development can influence value systems, e.g. conflict mediation, critical
thinking techniques, problem solving. But the environment in which people can be
empowered to become positive, compassionate and active global citizens has always
been influenced and constrained by those who wield the greatest power and control
over political processes and economic wealth.
Evaluation and impact assessment procedures in development education should be
integrated within the planning of projects and actions, and above all be realistic,
relevant, measurable, and time specific. The practice of evaluation should be
simplified, with the most effective measures publicised and made readily accessible;
through on-line and published communications. Finally, it is essential that any
evaluation programme does not disrupt or postpone implementation of current
projects, or inhibit the growth and range of work currently being planned. It should
run alongside current work and plans. We recognise that impact assessment in
education is notoriously difficult to confirm over medium and long term periods. We
call on the EC to launch a regular periodic and long term process to improve criteria
and impact mechanisms.
Specific recommendations to the European Parliament
1) The CONCORD Development Education Forum (DEF) welcomes and supports the
decision by the European Parliament Development Committee’s decision in
8
Point 13: (a) firstly of development education and the raising of European public awareness of development
issues with regard to the implementation of the budget heading for NGO co-financing (B7-6000), (b) secondly,
with regard to the means of information on cooperation with the developing countries implemented by the
Commission where heightening public awareness is concerned. Such an evaluation should enable a further
increase in the efficiency of these information and awareness-raising policies in the future.
26
September 2005 to allocate a one-off additional 10 million euros specifically to
DE/AR actions in the EU New Member States. We are delighted that particular
attention has be played to strengthening the capacity of NGOs in New Member States
to deliver quality development education. We call on the European Parliament to
ensure that this remains a priority and that increased funds are allocated towards
development education in Europe at least until the end of the current Financial
Perspective.
2) We call on the European Parliament to take forward our concerns through
undertaking an own initiative report on the importance of development
education/awareness raising in Europe towards achieving and surpassing the
Millennium Development Goals, with particular emphasis on public awareness raising
in New Member States.
3) We encourage the European Parliament to continue to support existing and
upcoming initiatives NGOs, including promoting audiovisual presentations promoting
awareness of development issues within the Parliament, etc.
4) We urge the European Parliament to lead by example, and to take up Fair Trade
products within all the canteens, cafes and restaurants.
National level recommendations to Member States
1. Where these do not already exist, design and implement comprehensive and coherent
development education and awareness raising strategies at national and European
levels.
2.
Move towards a figure of 3% of ODA for DE/AR, as proposed by the UNDP and
the Brussels Conference (May 2005). This increase in funding also implies a
commitment to raising standards for achieving the necessary quality, efficiency
and effectiveness of development education and awareness raising activities.
3. Promote methods for integrating awareness-raising and development education
within school curricula and in educators training – teachers, instructors, educators,
parents, journalists (in formal, non formal and informal education systems)9.
a.
Ensure that there is proper inclusion of the global dimension in school
curricula and in whole school practice (the notion of “whole school” relates to
all aspects of schooling; the learning and study elements, the institution, the
school environment, its place within the community, organisational,
governance and planning procedures, the classroom, subject curricula, teacherstudent relations, school democracy and student representation, etc.);
b. Develop a stronger development education focus for younger children, and
early years learning, in association with nursery/kindergarten and primary
school teachers, and education and child psychologists.
c. Endorse provisions for systematic review and monitoring procedures.
4. Allocate appropriate human and financial resources to development education and
awareness raising training: both initial and in-service teacher training, training and
9
Item 6 of the Helsinki recommendations arising from the European Conference on Development Education in
2006 states that; “Integration of global and development perspectives into education systems requires the
development of coordinated strategies by Ministries of Education and Ministries of Foreign Affairs, and other
relevant Ministries, Civil Society actors, Local and Regional Authorities, and national curriculum bodies...
Particular emphasis and resources should be allocated to … both initial and in-service teacher training, and training
of DE trainers.” (http://www.kehys.fi/Materials_DE_030407).
These key recommendations reinforce the main messages arising from the EU-wide survey on development
education and the school curriculum conducted by the CWG during 2006.
(http://www.deeep.org/english/europe/school/StrategiesNov2005.pdf).
27
professional development of development education trainers, and also non-formal
education specialists.
5. Strengthen regular dialogue between the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, civil society actors, local and regional authorities, and national curriculum bodies,
to ensure that there is greater coherence between development education and formal and
informal education systems.
6. Encourage and support mechanisms for exchanges of best practices in
development/global education and education for sustainable development between the
government, NGOs, and other stakeholders, as part of the overall need to raise both
quality and standards in development education and awareness-raising.
The CONCORD Development Education Forum works to deepen European public
awareness and promote a critical understanding of international development,
solidarity, and issues related to global mutual dependence. It aims to foster the
participation of all citizens in the European Union, in worldwide poverty eradication,
and the fight against exclusion. We seek to encourage and influence more just, equal
and sustainable economic, social, environmental, human rights based, national and
international policies. The CONCORD Development Education Forum is made up of
43 European NGDO platforms and networks, and extends beyond CONCORD’s
membership to include representatives from Romania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia and
Lithuania, making it a truly pan-European working group.
See CONCORD Statement on Development Education and Awareness Raising,
November 2004 (http://www.deeep.org/english/europe/concord/statement/index.php)
Development education is an active learning process, founded on values of solidarity,
equality, inclusion and co-operation. It enables people to move from basic awareness of
international development priorities and sustainable human development, through
understanding of the causes and effects of global issues, to personal involvement and
informed actions of European citizens and public institutions. The concept of development
education is a complex and multidisciplinary, taking different forms across the EU, including
awareness raising, formal, non formal and informal education, life-long learning, campaigning,
advocacy, training and learning. It involves a diverse range of players, predominantly nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), civil society organisations (CSOs), trade unions,
educators, the media and public institutions.
i
Resolution 13323/01 of the Council of the European Union, 8 November 2001,
(http://www.deeep.org/doc/resolution_en.doc).
ii
In November 2002 in Maastricht, Netherlands the Europe-wide Global Education Congress, which brought
together governments, parliamentarians, civil society organisations and local and regional authorities from the 45
countries of the Council of Europe agreed a “European Strategy Framework for Increased and Improved Global
Education to the Year 2015”, known as the “Maastricht Declaration”.
iii
European Conference on Awareness-Raising and Development Education for North-South Solidarity, Brussels,
19-20 May 2005. (http://www.euforic.org/awareness-sensibilisation/)
iv
Adopted 20 December, 2005, 2006/C
46/01 (http://ec.europa.eu/development/body/publications/docs/consensus_en_total.pdf)
v
July 2006 Helsinki European Development Education conference
(http://www.kehys.fi/Materials_DE_030407).
vi
Strengthening the European Union’s role as a global partner for development : The 18-month
programme on development policy of the EU presidencies of Germany, Portugal and Slovenia (January
2007
–
June
2008)
(http://www.bmz.de/de/presse/Downloads/broschuere_triopraesidentschaft_englisch.pdf).
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