Jan – March 2011 Shari Alexander Scott Harper

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Jan – March
2011
Shari Alexander
Scott Harper
Benny Lile
Dinah Wallace
National
Movement
• Mathematics
and English/
Language
2010
• 39 States & 2
Territories
have joined
Common Core
Standards
Initiative
KY’S VISION
“…from a teaching-focused-classroom
to a learning-focused-classroom…”
Dr. Holliday, Commissioner of Education
#1 Priority is STUDENT LEARNING
New Standards in English/Language Arts and Math
(Fewer, Clearer, Higher.. For all students to be college/career ready)
Revised Accountability Model
(Achievement, Gap, Growth, College/Career Readiness, Graduation Rate,
Program Reviews, EPAS system, End of Course Assessments)
Improve Effectiveness of Teaching and Learning (CHETL)
Balanced Assessment/Assessment Literacy (CASL)
Puts the Pieces Together - Nationally
Creating the National Common Core Standards in
Mathematics and English/Language Arts has been a
collaborative effort between state departments of
education, teachers, experts in a wide array of fields,
and numerous professional organizations based on
national work & research from:
 best work of states and high-performing nations
 frameworks developed for the National Assessment
of Educational Progress (NAEP)
 academic research of Marzano, Stiggins, Fullan, and
others
 curriculum surveys & assessment data on collegeand career-ready performance
 Input from educators at all levels and from a variety
of subjects
Puts the Pieces Together - KY
Leadership Networks Vision
Every school district in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
has a knowledgeable and cohesive leadership team that
guides the professional learning and practice of all
administrators, teachers, and staff so that every student
experiences highly effective teaching, learning and
assessment practices in every classroom, every day.
Result = Every Student Proficient
and Prepared for Success!
Puts the Pieces Together - KY
Overview of P-20 Leadership Networks
• Research based approach to delivering large scale professional
development and professional learning communities
• Focus on building district and school level capacity
• Investment and commitment to change at the classroom level
• Focus on highly effective teaching and learning
 Content Leadership Networks
• Focus on teacher and teacher leaders
 Administrator Leadership Networks
• Building level administrators
 Instructional Supervisor Networks
 Superintendents Network
 Higher Education Networks
Teacher Content Leadership Work
Standard/Benchmark
Deconstructing Standards -
Knowledge
Reasoning
Skill
STANDARDS/TARGETS/METHODS/COMMUNICATION OF RESULTS
Product
Standard/Benchmark: __________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Type:
q Knowledge
q Reasoning
q
q
Skill
Product
Learning Targets – Teacher Friendly Language
What are the knowledge, reasoning, skill or product targets underpinning the standard or benchmark?
Knowledge Targets



Reasoning Targets



Skill Targets



Product Targets



“I Can” / Learning Targets – Student Friendly Language
What are the knowledge, reasoning, skill or product targets underpinning the standard or benchmark?
Knowledge Targets



Reasoning Targets



Skill Targets



Product Targets



Page 1
Teacher Content Leadership Work
Standard/Benchmark
Deconstructing Standards -
Knowledge
Reasoning
Skill
Product
Assessments
How will I assess to promote the learning and audit the achievement of the targets and standard?
Assessment(s)
q FOR/Formative 
Assessment(s)
q FOR/Formative 
Assessment(s)
q FOR/Formative 
Assessment(s)
q FOR/Formative 
OF/Summative
OF/Summative
OF/Summative
OF/Summative
qq
qq
qq
Selected response
Ext. written
response
Personal
Communication
qq
qq
qq
qq
Selected response
Ext. written
response
Performance
Personal
Communication
qq
qq
Performance
Personal
Communication
qq
Performance
Communication of Results
How will I communicate the learning and the achievement?
Assessments FOR Learning / Formative
resulting in reporting of learning/growth
q
q
FOR/Formative –
Report
OF/Summative Grade
q
q
FOR/Formative –
Report
OF/Summative Grade
Assessments OF Learning / Summative
resulting in grading of achievement
q
q
FOR/Formative –
Report
OF/Summative Grade
q
q
FOR/Formative –
Report
OF/Summative Grade
Page 2
Common
Core State
Standards
(CCSS)
Kentucky
Core Academic
Standards
(KCAS)
Common Core
Standards
The Common Core State Standards focus
on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting
in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time
needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to
give students the opportunity to master them.
Common Core Standards work - National
•http://www.corestandards.org/
Common Core Standards work at KDE – now adopting
as KY Core Academic Standards
•Program of Studies being updated to reflect adoption of CCS –
571 page document is on web for public review
http://www.education.ky.gov/users/otl/POS/POS%20with%2
0CCS%20for%20public%20review.pdf
•http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Instructional+Resources/
Curriculum+Documents+and+Resources/CCS+Resources
Mathematics Standards—
how to read the CCSS documents for Mathematics
Simple
overview
provides all
key
information
at a glance.
Click for close up…
Overview: The
math standards
start with a
one-page
overview
highlighting
what is most
important.
12
Simple
overview
provides all
key
information
at a glance.
Click for close up…
Overview: The
math standards
start with a
one-page
overview
highlighting
what is most
important.
13
Fewer standards to address
KY 4th Grade Math
5 big ideas
CCSS 4th Grade Math
5 domains
23 understanding
standards
10 clusters
78 skill and concept
standards
28 standards
15 pages
5 pages
Examples make standards more concrete
Represent and interpret data.
• Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in
fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems
involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using
information presented in line plots. For example, from a
line plot find and interpret the difference in length between
the longest and shortest specimens in an insect collection.
14
KCAS Progression Document
Operations and
Algebraic
Thinking
Domains

Clusters


Use the four
operations with
whole numbers
to solve
problems
Gain familiarity
with factors and
multiples
Generate and
analyze patterns
Number & Operations in
Base Ten


Generalize place
value understanding
for multi-digit whole
numbers
Use place value
understanding and
properties of
operations to
perform multi-digit
arithmetic
Number & Operations:
Fractions



Extend understanding of
fraction equivalence and
ordering
Build fractions from unit
fractions by applying and
extending previous
understandings of operations on
whole numbers
Understand decimal notation
for fractions, and compare
decimal fractions
Measurement and Data



Solve problems involving
measurement and
conversion of
measurements from a
larger unit to a smaller
unit
Represent and interpret
data
Geometric measurement:
understand concepts of
angle and measure angles
Geometry

Draw and
identify lines
and angles,
and classify
shapes by
properties of
their lines and
angles
Mathematica
1.
Make sense of problems and
1.
Construct viable arguments
1.
Use appropriate tools
1.
Look for and make use of
l
persevere in solving them.
and critique the reasoning of
strategically.
structure.
Practic
2.
Reason
abstractly
and
others.
2.
Look for and express regularity in
2.
Attend
to
precision.
In Grade 4, instructional time should focus on three critical areas:
es
quantitatively.
2.
Model
with
mathematics.
reasoning.
1.Developing understanding and fluency with multi-digit multiplication, and developing understanding of dividing to findrepeated
quotients
involving
multi-digit dividends
Students generalize their understanding of place value to 1,000,000, understanding the relative sizes of numbers in each place. They apply
their understanding of models for multiplication (equal-sized groups, arrays, area models), place value, and properties of operations, in particular
the distributive property, as they develop, discuss, and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to compute products of multi-digit
whole numbers. Depending on the numbers and the context, they select and accurately apply appropriate methods to estimate or mentally
calculate products. They develop fluency with efficient procedures for multiplying whole numbers; understand and explain why the procedures
work based on place value and properties of operations; and use them to solve problems. Students apply their understanding of models for
division, place value, properties of operations, and the relationship of division to multiplication as they develop, discuss, and use efficient,
accurate, and generalizable procedures to find quotients involving multi-digit dividends. They select and accurately apply appropriate methods to
estimate and mentally calculate quotients, and interpret remainders based upon the context.
2.Developing an understanding of fraction equivalence, addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators, multiplication of
fractions by whole numbers
Students develop understanding of fraction equivalence and operations with fractions. They recognize that two different fractions can be equal
(e.g., 15/9 = 5/3), and they develop methods for generating and recognizing equivalent fractions. Students extend previous understandings about
how fractions are built from unit fractions, composing fractions from unit fractions, decomposing fractions into unit fractions, and using the
meaning of fractions and the meaning of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.
3.Understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties, such as having parallel sides, perpendicular
sides, particular angle measures, and symmetry
Students describe, analyze, compare, and classify two-dimensional shapes. Through building, drawing, and analyzing two-dimensional shapes,
students deepen their understanding of properties of two-dimensional objects and the use of them to solve problems involving symmetry.
Grade Level Span…Math Sample
Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
3.OA.1: Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the
total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For
example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can
be expressed as 5 × 7.
3.OA.2: Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret
56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are
partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56
objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For
example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a
number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.
3.OA.3: Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word
problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and
measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations
with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
(Note: See Glossary, Table 2.)
3.OA.4: Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or
division equation relating three whole numbers. For example,
determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in
each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = 􀃍 ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?.
Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between
multiplication and division.
3.OA.5: Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.
(Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.)
Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known.
(Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found
by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 =
30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 =
40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) +
(8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)
3.OA.6: Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example,
find 32 ÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied
by 8.
Multiply and divide within 100.
3.OA.7: Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as
the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g.,
knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of
operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all
products of two one-digit numbers.
Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain
patterns in arithmetic.
3.OA.8: Solve two-step word problems using the four operations.
Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing
for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers
using mental computation and estimation strategies including
rounding. (Note: This standard is limited to problems posed with
whole numbers and having whole-number answers; students
should know how to perform operations in the conventional order
when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order -Order of Operations.)
Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
4.OA.1: Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret
35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7
times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative
comparisons as multiplication equations.
4.OA.2: Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving
multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and equations
with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem,
distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive
comparison. (Note: See Glossary, Table 2.)
4.OA.3: Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and
having whole-number answers using the four operations,
including problems in which remainders must be interpreted.
Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing
for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers
using mental computation and estimation strategies including
rounding.
Gain familiarity with factors and multiples.
4.OA.4: Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1–100.
Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors.
Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1–100 is a
multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given
whole number in the range 1–100 is prime or composite.
Generate and analyze patterns.
4.OA.5: Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule.
Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in
the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the
starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and
observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even
numbers. Explain informally why the numbers will continue to
alternate in this way.
Write and interpret numerical expressions.
5.OA.1: Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions,
and evaluate expressions with these symbols.
5.OA.2: Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers,
and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them.
For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then
multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 +
921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to
calculate the indicated sum or product.
Analyze patterns and relationships.
5.OA.3: Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify
apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form
ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from the two
patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane. For
example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 0, and
given the rule “Add 6” and the starting number 0, generate
terms in the resulting sequences, and observe that the terms in
one sequence are twice the corresponding terms in the other
sequence. Explain informally why this is so.
Grade Level Shift Document
Concepts New to Grade Level
4.OA.4

Determine prime and composite numbers (1-100).
4.NF.3b

Decompose fractions in more than one way, justify decompositions using
visual models, multiple representations of fractions.
4.NF.3c

Properties of operations with mixed numbers with like denominators.
4.NF.4c

Multiply fractions by a whole number, using visual fraction models and
equations to represent the problem.
4.NF.7

Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100.
4.MD.3

Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangle.
4.MD.4

Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in unit fractions.
4.MD.6

Measure angles in whole number degrees using a protractor. Draw angles
of specified measure.
4.MD.7

Use angle measures to decompose angles. Solve addition and subtraction
problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and
mathematical problems.
4.G.2

Classify two-dimensional figures based presence or absence of attributes
(parallel or perpendicular lines).
Grade
th
4
Concepts Moved From Grade Level
Kindergarten

Attributes of basic three-dimensional
objects (spheres, cones, cylinders,
pyramids, cubes, triangular and rectangular
prisms); apply these attributes to solve
real-world problems.

Identify basic two-dimensional figures in
different orientations.
rd
3 grade

Attributes of two dimensional shapes and
shapes that share attributes can define
larger categories.

Represent and interpret data-bar graphs and
pictographs (also 2nd grade).

The actual process of learning to read a
thermometer does not have a standard. It is
considered a life skill and is also introduced
in science.
th
5 grade

Identify and graph ordered pairs on a
positive coordinate system (Quadrant 1).
Emphasis on preparing students for college and
the careers of the 21st Century
Anchor
standards
serve as
the spine
for all ELA
grade
levels
18
ELA Standards—
how to read the CCSS documents for ELA & Literacy in
Social Studies/History, & Technical Subjects
College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards
ELA
– 4 sets: Reading, Writing, Language, and Speaking and Listening
– Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects—2 sets: Reading and Writing
– All of the standards within the grade bands are linked to these anchors with
building complexity as the grades increase
Strands
Within each set, the anchors are divided into strands.
Grade Bands
The ELA anchors are grouped K‐5 and 6‐12. (6‐12 only for Social
Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects).
Standards
The standards within grades and grade bands provide further
specificity in a developmentally appropriate progression toward
meeting the expectation of the anchor.
Appendices with exemplar texts,
performance tasks, student work
Literacy skills are integrated into science,
social studies, and technical subjects
20
Literacy skills are integrated into science,
social studies, and technical subjects
21
Supporting the
Common Core
Implementation
The
How &
How Well
We know what the
research says Classrooms headed by “most
effective” teachers have
student achievement gains of
53 percentage points over the
course of one year versus
classrooms led by the “least
effective” teachers averaging
gains of only 14 percentage
points.
CHETL – KDE Site
http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Ins
tructional+Resources/Highly+Effective
+Teaching+and+Learning/HETL+Com
mon+Characteristics.tm
The Characteristics of Highly Effective Teaching and Learning
create a common point of reference for discussing effective
practices in teaching and learning by describing the role of the
teacher and student in an exemplary instructional environment.
The document is divided into five components.
Learning Climate
Classroom Assessment and Reflection
Instructional Rigor and Student Engagement
Instructional Relevance
Knowledge of Content
Each of these components is supported with a list of
characteristics of effective teacher practices and student
actions. The Characteristics are based upon some of the most
current research findings from several resources.
CHETL – KDE Site
http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Ins
tructional+Resources/Highly+Effective
+Teaching+and+Learning/HETL+Com
mon+Characteristics.tm
CHETL – KDE Site
http://www.education.ky.gov/KDE/Ins
tructional+Resources/Highly+Effective
+Teaching+and+Learning/HETL+Com
mon+Characteristics.tm
Assessment for Learning
Classroom Assessment for Student Learning
(by Rick Stiggins, Judith Arter, Stephen Chappuis, and Jan Chappuis)
makes the distinction between assessment
of and for learning.
 The purpose of assessment of learning is to
summarize the achievement status of individuals
and groups at a point in time.
• "assessment of learning“ "summative assessment"
• Classroom-level summative assessment usually
have grade or a statement of level of mastery.
Assessment for Learning
With CASL the major focus is assessment
for learning—
 Research shows that assessment for learning
practices can dramatically improve student
motivation and learning.
 Assessment for learning strategies address the
information needs of both teachers and students.
Assessment for Learning
Five Keys to Quality Classroom Assessments
Stiggins, et al.
(2004), p 13
Let’s take a
closer look
at the
Common
Core State
Standards
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