advertisement
PAGE
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
8
News Views:
Latest Israel, Jordan Battle Places
Americans/ British In Predicament
By FRANK SWISKEY
Sarajevo, Pearl Harbor, powderkegs that have set the world arlame
during the twentieth century. A
Jordanian fortress known as Qualigilya may well be the tinderbox for
another inferno of world conflict
and destruction.
Qualigilya, only eleven air miles
from Tel Aviv, capital of Israel, was
on October 10 and 11 the scene of
a retaliation raid by units of the
Israeli forces. Usually an outburst
of this sort could be written off as
a border incident, but there are
factors in this case that make it
Impossible to do so.
The factors that make this an
issue of concern are 1) Israeli and
Arab officials describe Qualigilya as
the biggest battle since the ArabIsraeli war ended in 1948. This
coupled with fact that neither side
attempts to play down the incident
as per usual policy constitutes the
first factor.
The second factor or reason is
that the conflict arises at a time
when the prestige of the Jordanian
government and King Hussein is at
an all time low with the people of
Jordan. The Amman or Hussein
factor of Jordan is faced not only
with the problem of a troublesome
border but they are also threatened
by the internal disintegration of
Jordan itself. Internal unrest has
already caused Ave Amman cabinets
to resign in the last ten months.
In the forthcoming general election
in October, Hussein fears he may
lose control of the governing houses
of Jordan.
The third reason that enters the
picture is the question of how
strong Jordan will be in the next
few months. Should the country
falter, it has stated it will call in its
Arab neighbors, notably Iraq to
keep Israel from gaining control.
The Israelites have stated that they
will resist any attempt of this
nature.
The fourth factor that appears is
the fact that the retaliation at
Qualigilya marks a shift of Israeli
military operations to the Arab
triangle. The important point here
is that the vulnerable Haifa-Tel
Aviv corridor lies directly opposite
it. Here the country of Israel is
only eleven miles wide. An invasion
at this point could seriously cripple
Israel by cutting it in two and capturing its capital city.
Qualigilya incident emphasizes the
different stands taken by the United
Nations and Israel on the subject of
dealing with attackers that cross
the armistice line of 1948. The
United Nations represented by Dag
Hammerskjold maintains that Israel
has no right to cross the truce line
not even to punish raiders.
The Israeli government claims
that the U.N. recognizes both the
right of self defense and reprisals
for premeditated acts of aggression.
They also stress that their appeals
to the U.N. for action went unheeded and that they must fight to
protect their people. Over half the
Israeli population lives close to the
danger line.
The quarrel has left both the
United States and Great Britain
on an island of quicksand. Great
Britain has two important military
outposts in Jordan that are essential
in the defense of the near east.
Should Jordan fall, Great Britain
would lose no matter who won. The
United States has vital pipe lines
for oil that stretch across Jordan's
wasteland. We face the same problem as Britain, that is, war will
destroy vital links in West's defense
chain of the near east. The question
facing Britain and the United
States is simple. Oil and Truces or
War and Final settlement either
way.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER
IS
1S56
CarlsonSuggests POlmf Oae* *jAe SxcAan^e
NATALIE LEMOINE
Higher Teacher Prom the Keystone, Bya chemical
Uses . . . Usually versatile as a
tonic for low spirits and a depresanalysis of a woman.
sive for high spirits . . . Is probably
Retirement Age Accepted
Symbol . . . Wo.
Atomic weight . . . 120. the most effective income reducing
William S. Carlson, President of
the State University of New York,
presented a plan to overcome the
present shortage in teachers, at the
annual meeting of the Association
of New York State College Faculties
last week. His plan was aimed at
changing the mandatory retirement
age for teachers.
Renewing his call for a re-examination of the university's faculty
retirement policy, Mr. Carlson
pointed out that the extension of
the present retirement age from 65
to 70 could, over a period of time,
increase the supply of teachers by
as much as 12 per cent.
In his speech President Carlson
was referring to the recent action
of the University of Oregon in raising their retirement age to 72. This
action Carlson believes to be "a
straw in the wind," and he expects
that "all institutions may be headed
in this direction."
Previously the mandatory age for
teacher retirement in New York
State was 65. Having reached that
age, despite his ability and despite
the serious shortage of teachers, the
teacher is bound to retire. President
Carlson's plan would remedy this
situation.
Commuters Schedule
Wednesday Meeting
Barbara Rohrer '58 announces
that the Commuters' Club Social
Meeting will be held Wednesday.
The meeting will be in Brubacher
Upper Lounge from 3 to 5 pin. The
program will include entertainment
and refreshments will be provided.
All commuters are invited to attend. The club is especially anxious
to meet the apartment dwellers who
are considered commuters.
Physical properties . . . Boils at
nothing but freezes at anything.
Melts when perfectly treated and
very bitter when not too well used.
Chemical properties . . . possesses
a great affinity for gold, silver, platinum, mink and precious stones.
Violent reaction if left alone. Able
to absorb a fantastic amount of
food. Turns green when placed beside a better looking specimen.
Occurrence . . . Found wherever
man exists.
Juniors Open
Queen Quest
John Stefano '58, President, states
that there will be a Junior class
meeting Tuesday at 10 a.m. in
Diaper 111. At this meeting nominations will be opened for Junior
Prom Queen. Further nominations
may be made all day Wednesday
until 4 p,m. at the Election Commission box in upper Husted. Friday, October 26, run-off elections
will be held for the selection of five
finalists. The queen will be elected
from among these five on November
9 and the prom will be held that
evening.
Those who signed up to work on
the 1956 Pedagogue will work Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
and all day Saturday. These meetings will be held in Brubacher.
Check with the main office for the
room number.
Donald McClain '59, President,
urges all Sophomores to come to
the class meeting Tuesday at 10
p.m. in Room 349 in Draper. Along
with the discussion, there are three
financial motions which are to be
considered. These motions include
funds for both rivalry events and
the class newspaper, The Gremlin
Gazette.
agent known.
The Minnesota D a i l y reports
progress on their Campus Chest
Drive.
"Would you like to contribute . . ."
The underclassmen eyes the young
woman behind the booth coldly—
suspiciously.
". . . to Campus Chest?"
She smiles femininely. His bow
tie smacks him under the chin.
Aw, plee-z-z-ze?"
Clink!
Meanwhile back in the Commons.
"Hey, handsome."
The tall, suave senior slowly removes his pipe from his puckered
lips. Eyebrows atilt, he "Hmm?"s.
"Would you like to contribute . . ."
A pretty young thing trails her
fingernails down his arm.
". . . to Campus Chest?"
His lips go in a kind of grin, and
he speaks, and his words are calm.
Then, clink!
Get the point, "gang"? Let's
make with the "Clink!"
Smiles Begins Program
With Hallowe'en Party
Mary Knight '57, announces that
Smiles is starting off its program
this year by holding a Hallowe'en
party at the Clinton Square Neighborhood House October 31. Those
interested in helping Smiles for that
evening may contact Joseph Fosegan '59.
All students who wish to try out
for Smiles and have not signed up
should contact Mary Knight through
Student Mail.
The nominations for re-election
of Treasurer are: Freida Fairburn
and Connie Olivo, Sophomores, and
Sue Russel, Mary Ruffles, Juniors.
All voting members will receive
through Student Mail a ballot which
is to be returned to Miss Knight
within two days.
HAVE A REALCKMLUeaGMictf,/
Z.461
H J KaixaMi M ; Co . WUuVtu a.ku,. .V (.'.
NEW
YORK, F R I D A Y , O C T O B E R 2 6 ,
1956
VOL.
X L I NO.
18
Students Elect Parade Leads Students To Bleeclcer Stadium For Oswego Soccer Game;
"Who's Who" Dance A t Brubacher Hall Tomorrow Night Climaxes Weekend Events
State College graduates are returning this weekend
Nominees loday
for the fourth annual Homecoming Weekend. The two
day affair opens tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Page Hall with a
concert, announces Eileen Lalley '58, Chairman. The other
scheduled events include a reunion of alumni, parade, soccer game, open houses, reception, and a dance.
The concert tonight in Page Hall features the "Songmasters," a vocal quartet. Music Council, which is sponsoring this vocal group, states that no admittance fee will
Members of Student Association
cast their ballots today to select 28
Seniors whose names will be submitted to "Who's Who in American
Colleges and Universities" as State
College candidates for the national
honor.
Vote Absentee
Sara Jiino Duffy '57, Chairman of
Myskania, announces that all balloting for today's election will be
done absentee since this morning's
convocation
is
non-compulsory.
Students may vote at the desk in
Lower Draper Hall between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m.
Candidates
Names appearing on the ballot
are: Carol Allen, Joseph Anderson,
Beverly Andy, Robert Backer, Beth
Beehler, Sondra Brill, Robert Burns,
Marie Calao, Marie Carbone, Jan
Champagne, Barbara Davis, Domin
ick DeCecco, Marilyn DeSanta, Sara
Jane Duffy, Peter Dykeman, Richard Erbacher, Richard Feidman,
Tito Gugiielmone, Patricia Hall,
Lenore Hughes, Barbara Hungerford, Alan Hutchinson, David Kendig, Betty King, Ann Kinsler,
David Kleinke, Marcia Lawrence,
Sheila Lister, James Lockhart,
Frank McEvoy, Mary Knight. Bernice O'Connor, Mary Pagidas, Clyde
Payne, John Reiners, Bruno Rodgers, John Rookwood, Mary Ann
Schlotthuuber, Nancy Schneider,
Paula Segal, James Smith, Peg
Smith, Elizabeth Stapleton, Trudy
StecnmtT, Joseph Swierzowski, Bet
ty Van Vlack, and Everett Weier
miller,
Dorm Field Events
Both contests will tuki place on
Dorm Field with the soccer game
commencing at 0:30 a.m., immediately followed by Men's Football.
AMIA rules will be used for the
football game Men playing varsity
soccer, basketball and junior varsity
basketball may not participate.
Tiie rivalry score at present stands
at 7-1 In favor of the Sophomores,
who defeated the freshman class in
softball and debate. The frosh
scored one point for their cheering
at the softball game.
be charged.
Tomorrow afternoon also many of
the sororities and fraternities are
planning open houses for graduate
students and alumni.
Tomorrow evening at 6 p.m. a reception and punch party for faculty,
alumni, graduate students, Seniors,
and
their dates will be held at Herbert
' s . The admission price for this
informal
party will be $1.25.
B
° b Brown and his orchestra will
provide the music for the Homecoming Dance tomorrow night from
9H aP-m.
to 12 midnight at Brubacher
l1
' Refreshments will be served.
All freshman women will be allowed to remain at the dance until 12
midnight.
Committees for the weekend are:
Invitations, Marilyn Leach, Lorraine Kozlowski;
Arrangements,
Gayle Petty, Donald Rice; Hospitality, Mary Shelton, Joseph Barton;
Promotion, Frieda Cohen, R o s s
Dailey; Clean-up, Richard Bartholomew; Publicity, Patricia Gearing,
Thomas Watthews, Juniors.
T n e Alumni Reunion will be held
tomorrow at noon in the Ingle
R o o m 0 f p j e r c e Hall. At this time
a ] ] r e t U rning persons will register,
a n d cof f ee W JU h e s e r ved. Faculty
attend this affair
members
may
immediately following' this reunion
forming in
tne paracje
W JU o e g m
iront
o f B r u D a c n e r jjall at 1 p m
- p n o s e t hat will participate will be
( h e cheerleaders twirllers a band
Myskania members who' will be
spuonsored by
m
costume
noats
p i e r c e Brubacher and Saylcs Halls
and each claas'^hich
wU,
march'
behind its banner. The parade will
terminate at Bleecker Stadium
where the State soccer team will
play the Oswego squad. The band
under the direction of Charles
stokes, Professor of Music, and the
twirllers
entertain during
half
time.will
Chrysanthemums
will the
be
sold by the Junior Class during the
game for $1.00.
Students Hear
Journalist Today
New Ballot
This year, the names appearing
on the ballot which are preceded by
an asterisk are those who have been
recommended by a committee com]X>sed of both administration and
Above, Eileen Lalley (center) points out the final program of Homestudent members. The others
3is appearappear coming- events to Donald Rice, Patricia Gearing, Ross Dailey and Marilyn
ing on the ballot were nominated Leach (seated left to rifrht).
by Student Association. All candidates must reach the quota, which Student Council:
will be determined by the number
of students casting ballots and the
number of people to be elected.
Tomorrow Women's Soccer and
Men's Football are scheduled as the
Rivalry events, announces Joseph
Anderson T>7, Chairman of Rivalry.
Both events are worth two points,
and combined cheering is worth one
point. Myskania will judge cheering; members of Women's Athletic
Association and the Association of
Men's Intramural Athletics will umpire the games.
WAA rules will be used for
Women's Soccer, and the rival
teams will wear different colored
gym suits.
Discover the difference between "just smoking" and Camels!
ALBANY.
'TT«
Alumni Return For Annual Homecoming Weekend;
Music Council Presentation Opens Activities Tonight
Rivalry Schedule
Spotlights Sports
You'll find Camels taste richer, fuller, more
deeply satisfying. The exclusive Camel blend
of quality tobaccos gives you smooth smoking.
You're sure to enjoy Camels, the most
popular cigarette today. They've really pot if!
ews
State
Council Passes Inventory Motion,1956 Pedagogue'7 Goes To Press
By EMIL POLAK
Lee DeNike 59, Acting President,
announces that Forum Bpard of
Politics will be in charge of the
Convocation program at 10 a.m. this
morning in Page Hall. Mr. Emmet
O'Brien, of the Gannett News Agency, will speak on "The Political
York State." Mr.
Scene m
New
O'Brien a newspaper personality
a t t e n d e d b o t n the Republican and
Democratic nominating conventions
Democratic nominating conventions
this summer. This is the first in a
series of Convocation programs that
will be planned by various organizations. Forum will also conduct a
poll in the Convocation to determine
the political sentiment of the student body.
Explanation of Compulsory
Convocations
Students wlt.i assigned seats who
do not
attend legislative convocations will be subject to penalty,
states Marilyn Leach '58, Chairman
of the Convocations Committee.
The students voted to have compulsory assemblies themselves last
spring
open
••<— -'during
••••<*
» - assemblies.
— > , , ; „ . . ™The
,..
students also voted upon the penalties to be used if anyone with an
assigned sea*- cut a compulsory assembly. The penalties consist of a
warning for the first cut, removal
of the Pedagogue from your student
tax card for the second cut and a
one dollar fine for each additional
cutAny students submittini excuses
via student mail are asked to address them to Marilyn Leach '58.
The
excuse will
be accepted
the student
is told
otherwise.unless
Miss
Leach will not answer letters. "*
Student Council convened Wed- in a process of reorganization, it
nesday evening with Clyde Payne was reported, but will have to work
'57, President of Student Associa- out matters accordingly.
tion, wielding the gavel. Included in
Sheila Monahan '58 read the prothe agenda were committee reports, posed amendments to the Student
Camp Board report, Pedagogue re- Association Constitution. After dis;
ports, "-the hearing
of' Association
Student
'
* - - - < - " - - of
- cussion, •-•
• • Council
• passed a
Men's Intramural Athletics' inven- motion recommending to Student
tory, discussion of amendments to Association that the amendments
the Student Association Constitu- be adopted. They will be brought
tion, and discussion of a proposed before the student body at the ConHospitality Committee.
vocation on November 9.
Council passed a motion to allow
Council also discussed the need of
the Parents' Weekend Committee to having a Hospitality Committee,
go ahead with its plans for the Over forty athletic teams come to
weekend. Richard Feldtnan "57 re- State each year in addition to many
ported that President Collins has guests. Also the committee would
expressed consent, and
, , that
, the, facilitate matters when visitors artentative date is March 15 through live. Council recommended Student
The tentative
program
three mema17. faculty
reception,
State includes
College Union
bers toBoard
act to
as appoint
coordinators
of
Revue,
'
tours of "'"'"
the school,
' ' '* and ath- Hospitality
'
Committee,'••
letic events between parents and
students. The faculty is to give their
support, Also mentioned was the
fact that although this year the entire student body will be allowed to
invite their parents, in following
years only parents of freshmen will
be permitted to take pan because
By ART PLOTNIK
of the increasing enrollment.
This article is the first of a series seen, doing a mere three hours ol
Appointed to the Student-Faculty
Members of the class of 1958 vote
Committee by Student Council was dealing with categorized students math homework is the worst sin
absentee today to select the five
Theresa Bell '58. Next year's Activ that fall under a variety of horrify- since Eve bit the apple.
finalists for Junior Prom Queen.
ities Week is to be held at the be- ing stereotypes. The series will preThe truth ol the stereotype? Too Balloting began yesterday, and will
ginning of the college year, and will sent the nature of the "type," the much
of
it
i.s
true
for
the
weak
heart
be managed by live chairmen and truth of the generalization, and pos- to endure. Of course it would be rid- continue at the desk in Lower Drapa coordinator, it was announced.
siblo remedies of the situation. This iculous to say that female mathe- er from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.
Robert Levy, Graduate student, weak; The female mathematics maticians become animalish . . . Second Election
read the Cam]) Board rules and an- major.
The five candidates who reach
jusl a coincidence, I suppose. The
nounced that at their Board meeting
This type is an animal with long monkey-like responsiveness might the quota in uxiay's election will
next Tuesday, the lakeside develop- lunny ears, she kicks up at any- be explained by pointing out that it compete against each other in a secineiil will be discussed. On November thing she hears . . . these song lyrics is lady-like to be polite, attentive, ond balloting to be held on Novem18. the Camp Board and Myskania come close to describing the typed and industrious—that is, it's lady- ber 9. The victor of that election
are sponsoring a guided tour lor female math major. Is it not logi- like to be monkey-like. The poor will reign as Queen of the Junior
tho student body.
cal that a woman choosing a career grooming of the poor girl is grossly Prom, and the four runners-up will
Beth Beehler '57 reported that generally associated with males exaggerted in the type, but is appar serve in her court.
work on the '57 Pedagogue is pro- would resemble an animal? And I
A t , nercentuaj' eve Another Twenty-One Candidates
JJuniors
un
of this
tills ooVncWence
^ * " ' "f P*""i»rhaos
„a.. h ans ~"The"""hign
The h i I
thei; live fingressmgg satisfactorily. The 1956 have actually seen too many ol
i o r s will select their
Pedagogue will go to press on Mon- category "kick up" at anything they
. c o d ( / ' hon{ev/ork
*, alists from this list of 21 candidates:
Js
day.
hear. .
"Good morning," says the e x a ( f f f e r a t e d h l l t U I . e s e n t neverthe- M a r y Bradley, Barbara DeFrancis,
Raymond Castillo '57 and Ross prof, and BOOM—out comes the . °°
Sally Harter, Gretchen Hurd, Joan
Dailey '58 represented the Associa- pencil, a twelve pound notebook,
'
Kopczu, Patricia Kennedy, Mary
tion of Men's Intramural Athletics and an expression with division signs
The remedy, If it is desired, is a Ann Kuskowski, Lorraine Kozlowat the meeting. The inventory was instead of dimples. Scraggly hair simple one. If the admittedly few ski, Eileen Lalley, Marilyn Leach,
read and accepted by Student and unshaven legs are pathetically women who fall under the exact Suzanne Lieberman, Patricia McCouncil. Council defeated the pro- associated with the lady logarithim type would read a little Freud or Grath, Tina Melillo, Marilyn Noyes,
posal of having a representative of . . . who wants to groom when there Kinsey, they may realize that there Mary Picciano, Gayle Petty, Beverly
Council act in an advisory capacity are three hours of math problems to are other things in life besides Ross, Florine Skutnik, Arlene Sluon the Bourd. The organization is toy with: And from what I have math.
sarz, Bernice Tyler, Ann Vincent.
Animalistic Attributes Associated
With Mathematics Major-ettes Juniors To Select
Queen Finalists
STATE C O L L E G E
STATE COLLEGE N E W S .
PAGE 2
Just The Facts
J
To know or not to know that is the question. Whether
'tis nobler to know the truth or to exist in ignorance. At
the fall leadership conference one of the major topics of
discussion was the formation of political parties at State.
Since this was one of the planks in Clyde Payne's platform last spring he was the main proponent of the idea.
He suggested that in the formative year each person who
desired to run for an office start a designating petition
suggesting him for a particular office. This would make it
necessary for people to have a degree of support for their
program before they could be nominated for office. In this
way people would not be nominated on their personality
alone. It would also force the candidate to propose a more
universally accepted platform. If the person were elected
he would then have a group behind him to help him bring
his platform into existence the year he was in office.
Unfortunately there is another way of keeping the
party together and that is through party patronage. The
party in power could make appointments from among
members of its own party and consequently the talent and
ability of many people in the opposition party would be
lost. The opponents of the party system also felt that
there were not enough major issues per year to keep the
party alive.
The group at the conference felt that the cons outweighed the pros and so they voted to recommend an expansion of the existing election commission rules. They
advocated a liberalization of campaign procedures in an
attempt to arouse greater interest in the campaign and
the candidate.
"Question of the Week."
Do the cons out-weigh the pros? What do you think?
Here W e Sit .
Freedom of speech is a liberty which we are ail guaranteed in the United States. Unfortunately we take it for
granted too often. If it was a privilege we had to fight for
we might respect it more. We must make use of this
privilege.
We are all individuals and WP all have ideas, some
are good and some bad, but the more ideas you have to
choose from the better the solution you can come up with.
The various branches of our student government are
formed so that individuals can get together and discuss
their different ideas. These ideas must also be based on a
solid background of facts. We have delegated to the people on Student Council and Student Board of Finance this
duty to discuss our common problems and through this
analysis of several ideas to come up with a sound solution
to our problems of student government and student
finances.
We have elected all of you because we feel that you
are people with a sound knowledge of our constitution and
our functions and because we think that you can mix this
knowledge with good ideas. We have selected you as the
best qualified to combine these two factors.
By this time of the year you should all be familiar
with your office. The trial meetings are over. Now it is
time for each of you to enter the discussion and to come
forth with your carefully throught-out ideas. Do not be
afraid to voice your own convictions.
At Council meeting Wedneseday night we saw an evidence of this open discussion when the AMIA came before
the group. A difference of opinion was indicated on the
proposal to have a representative from Council help the
group when the motion was defeated by a vote of thirteen to nine against. Unfortunately when the discussion
came up on constitutional revision not a sound was
heard. What happened? No ideas, or no background on
the subject?
VOL. XL I
M e m b e r ? of t h e N E W S
11 jj m a n d T u e s d a y fro-n 3 to 0 p i n ,
S c h l o U h a liber 2-0012, K a i n p f 2-0070
The undergraduate
published every Friday
Association
newspap'-'
"'
ol i h e College
at
2-3328,
KM
11
Phones
if
ruk
•.ear
'. <
'
Lawrence
MEWS
Hoard
[or
fur the S'udent
i:<IUor-ln-Chief
I'uMii- Itiilati
Kdilnr
UuMni'b!, A d v e r t l u l n g M a n a g e r
L l r e u l t t U o n I tlllm
MARC'IA I.AWKKNCE
KKITII V \ N I M H I
M A B V ANN S C I l X O T T H A i m t l l
J O V C K .MI.VMKMANN
Aikocl&te I dlloi
A - , o i n l i ! I ''Mor
wrruen
Feature Editor
J O « I I'll s ' M H F K
Kpuitt, Editor
A H i l l l It F U ) T N I K
KOHKK'I KAMI'*
' miMiil.int S p o r t * l.illlui
JOSKI'll SWIKIWOWHKI
_^_
" .' ' Mall I'hotojiapller
W i l l Altll G1I.U.TTK
A l l ' c o m i h U i i l c a i l o i i n s h o u l d be a d d r e s s e d to t h e eiljior a n d m u s t be s i g n e d .
Names
w ' » he w i t h h e l d on r e q u e s t . T h e H T A T E C O L L E G E N E W S a suri.es o o r e s p o n s i b i l i t y
for o p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d In I t s c o l u m n s or c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , a s s u r n e x p r e s s . o n s do n o t
necessarily
reflect i u
Strand
T h e Mountain w i t h
Spencer
Tracy, Robert W a g n e r and Claire
Tievor. I n Vista Vision and T e c h n i color. T h e plot concerns itself with
two brothers, one good, the other
evil, and their search for a wrecked
all liner. Filmed in t h e French Alps,
it h a s some beautiful and spinetingling shots of the two m o u n t a i n
climbers in action. Take along a girl
who's afraid of heights. She'll probably grab hold of t h e closest t h i n g
at hand—you! Also showing is T h e
Search for Bridey Murphy. It's about
a supposedly reincarnated woman.
T h e ads say it's "Not for weak
h e a r t s or slow minds." Are they implying it's for slow h e a r t s and weak
minds? Could be!
Palace
Leo Tolstoy's War a n d Peace with
Audrey Hepburn, Henry F o n d a a n d
Mel F e r r e r . In Technicolor a n d
VistaVision. T h e familiar story of
Czarist Rcssia and Napoleon's u n successful invasion of t h a t country.
Bring your lunch. It's t h r e e - a n d - a half hours long. Special s t u d e n t
r a t e s for this one.
Madison
Bus Stop with Marilyn Monroe.
In Technicolor and Cinemascope.
In answer to an oft heard question"
"Do we ever see t h e movies we write
a b o u t ? " the answer is yes. We saw
this one and Marilyn is at her best.
A very funny picture about a very
unusual courtship. T h e second feature is Raw Edge. Ha! We saw this
cue too—and it's a real cornball
western!
Delaware
Storm Center with Bette Davis.
Brian Keith and Paul Kelly. Bette
portrays a librarian who refuses to
remove a book stamped subversive
Site's fired, called a Red and her
library burned. All champions of t h e
downtrodden will appreciate this
one
Colonial
Away All Boats! with Jeff C h a n d l:-i and Julie Adams. Cofeatured is
Star in the Dust.
'o-mmutweation<i
views.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ^ _ _ _ _ —
1
To t h e Editor:
In reference to the grossly u n i n formed or misinformed i which was
it?) s t a t e m e n t in the Common
S t a t e r last week concerning t h e
S t u d e n t Exchange p r o g r a m : I submit t h a t the Common Staters just
did not know what they were talking about.
To say t h a t no positive suggestions or airing of new views and
id :as followed the weekend < which
incidentally was five days) is strictly a bare-faced prevarication. I m mediately following the five day exchange to t h e University of Connecticut the exchange students (Sue
(Continued
on Page $, Column'f J
NEWS.
FRIDAY, O C T O B E R
26,
1956
1956
Greeks Honor
Past Members
With Receptions
By ART PALAZZOLO
2-0120
Tevherh:
26,
KafuteU KapeM
l o (he Editor:
News pulls have .shown the "Comm o n - S t a t e r " to be the most widely
read article in the paper. Written
by two Seniors, selected for their
able independent viewpoints, it traditionally expresses humorous viewpoints on affairs, and interjects
worthwhile comments on s t u d e n t
g o \ e m i n e n t . Considering its nature,
an occasionally poor or mediocre
column is to be expected. This year's
lo'iumn is not occasionally poor It
is consistently poor.
An example of their poor s t a t e ini nis was the innuendo last week
in n ^ a r d to l'rosh voting. Deliberalily trying to confuse the actual
tarts, they referred to the m a t t e r
ii-. a "Railroad." This, despite the
In -I that the writers must have
t u n aware t h a t the decision was
cail'ied almost seven lo one, by n
huge majority of the upperelassnen downstairs.
One must look to the actions of
the writers in order to appieciate
what appears ulierc each week
Their weekly complaints lose value
in light of their lack of a t t e n d a n c e
and discussion at S t u d e n t Council
and Convocations, and from any
st.r' ol reliable participation in stuili nt government this year. This,
coupled with innuendoes and lies,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
haphazard writing, and a tinker toy
a) prouch to cullr ;e life makes the
ESTABLISHED MAY 1S16
n a d i n g ol the " C o m m o n - S t a t e r " a
BY THE CLASS OF 1918
chore instead of a pleasure.
The writers should find out w h a t
i actually happening arotu.J here,
Second Place ACP alio exhil.H some p o s i l h e action beNo. 19 lt,! c they produce their next weekly
October 20, 1850
gr.pe.
MnfT m a y he r e a c h e d M o n d a y m i l We-ine.srlay (rum 7 lo
David Kendls '51
First P l u e CSPA
MAitu;
FRIDAY, O C T O B E R
Music Council Slates Songmasters;
Male Quartet To Vocalize Tonight
PAGE
D & A Sponsors
Oral Readings
From Literature
Music Council will present t h e
S o n g m a s t e r s , a m a l e quartet, in
D r a m a t i c s a n d Arts Affiliates will
P a g e Hall a u d i t o r i u m tonight a t
„ ,,„
,.
,.„,.,
,»
p r e s e n t t h e Class in Oral I n t e r p r e t tS aZn t ?a '57,
^ £ President
l ° ^ f %of XCouncil.
l l ? ^ T:h i s ation in an evening of readings
from literature Tuesday, 8 p.m. in
evening's p r e s e n t a t i o n will initiate Draper 349, states Marcia Meiselthe
activities
for
Homecoming m ^ ' ' 5 7 , " c h a i V m a n of If^WicTtyTor
Weekend, as well as initiating M u - 0 l - a l Readings
sic Council's own concert series
T h e readings, which will be d i Admission to t h e evening's perElizabeth Ann Stapleton '57, t h e
formance is by s t u d e n t tax; general rected by Agnes E. F u t t e r e r , P r o Vice-President of K a p p a Delta sofessor of English, include:
admission is $1.50.
rority, reports t h a t K a p p a Delta is
Members
of
t
h
e
q
u
a
r
t
e
t
are
J
o
h
n
1. A selection from
"Nicholas
h a v i n g an Alumni Coffee Hour t o Pettersson, first tenor; Jack Prig- Nickleby" by Charles Dickens, read
morrow between the hours of 4:30
more,
tenor;
J
o
s
e
p
h
Frederic,
b
a
r
i
by Paul Powelsland '58 a n d coached
a n d (i p.m. This event is being held
tine; and I v a r Ivarson, bass. Ac- by J a n i c e C h a m p a g n e '57.
in honor of the r e t u r n i n g alumni.
companying
the
group
is
Helena
Monday evening Potter Club will be
Kaprielian. T h i s vocal q u a r t e t a n d
2. "Anne of the T h o u s a n d D a y s "
the guests of K a p p a Delta for a
their accompanist is currently on its by Maxwell Anderson, read by P a t col fee hour. T h e coffee hour will
fourth sell-out N o r t h
American ricia K e n n e d y '58 a n d coached by
be held a t 8 p.m., alter the sorority
tour. Much of their popularity Nancy G a d e '57.
meeting.
stems from their recordings, t h e
3. " T h e G r e a t Lover" by R u p e r t
quality and m a n n e r of their p r e s Chi Sigma T h e t a is holding an
entation and a wide and varied pro- Brooke, r e a d by Marjorie S c h w a r t z
Alumni Tea tomorrow after the socgram. T h e group is currently r e - '58 a n d coached by B a r b a r a Maaloe,
cer game Palma Longo '59 h a s been
Graduate Student.
cording for King Records.
pledged,
reports
Vice-President
T h e Songmasters will open their
Sheila Lister '57.
4. A selection from "No T i m e for
Pictured above are " T h e Song Masters," J o h n Pettersson, Jack I'rig- p r o g r a m with Rogers' " T h e Time
T h e president of Sigma Phi Sig- niore, Joseph Frederic and Ivar Ivarson. Helena Kaprielian, pictured in For Making Songs Has Come." O t h - S e r g e a n t s " by Mac H y m a n , read by
N o r m a n C h a n c e r '58 a n d coached
ma, Paula Segal '57, informs us t h e foreground, is their accompanist.
er selections will include: B r a h m s '
by J o a n Ginsburg, G r a d u a t e S t u t h a t Barbara Sampler, J a n i c e M a n "O Heavenly Shepherdess";
the
dent.
ning and Deborah Klein, S o p h o Negro Spirituals, "Go Down Moses"
mores, were pledged last Monday.
and "Little David," a
rhythmic
5. "A Worn P a t h " by E u d o r a
Spiritual, 'Dry Bones"; selections Welty, read by Marilyn Leach '58
Annual Alumni Banquet
from " O k l a h o m a " by Rodgers, and and coached by Paula Segal '57.
the "Mikado" by Sullivan. T h e
J u n e Studley '57, President of
0. " T h e Love S - n j of J. Alfred
group will also present Schubert's
G. mm;; Kappa Phi reports t h a t the
"Wither," "Night and D r e a m s " and Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot, r e a d by
a n n u a l Alumni Banquet will be held
Bv MARV F I T Z P A T R I C K
"The Erlking"; along with "To Joseph Flynn
and coached by
tomorrow at the T e n Eyck Hotel
T h e school h a s been saved. R u m - and their design is to invite all of You" by Strauss, and an Appala- Lillian F e r r a r a
at 1 p m . Following the banquet
there will be an Afternoon Tea in ors have been circulating around t h e college to attend its J u n i o r chian M o u n t a i n Song, the " W a r 1 on n ol tii" returning alumni at the school t h a t a subversive group Prom, November 9. T h e S.I.B. may faring Stranger." Miss Kaprieliiin,
bad begun the u n d e r m i n i n g of s t u - be feared n o longer or discussed in t h e accompanist, will render Debusthe sorority house at 3:30 p.m.
dents and faculty by openly adver- hushed whispers a.s the Sinister In- sy's "Prelude" from "Pour le piano,"
Th • men ol Sigma Lambda Sigma tising its group in t h e halls. Every- filtration Board. We hereby declare "Danseuses De Delphes," and " J a r will i;e honored a I a coffee hour where was seen the stigma of the it to be the theme of the J u n i o r dins Sous La Pluie "
T h e Songmasters have appeared
M •id ay at 8:30 p.m. at tne sorority party's designs Posters swam be- formal, a Serenade in Blue.
lore the worried tyes of i t i n e r a n t
at other S t a t e Teachers Colleges In
hi USf
intellectuals and plodding profs on
Our note on Lcroy Holmes last past years Their lours have exT h e S t u d e n t Christian Association
A an Hut chins oti
'57 their respective way.-, to class. A week
ft sid cut
brought numerous queries, tended as far west a.s California Sing will be held on December 1G,
re, lor s I'm S e in 1 L i ibd i S i g m a special committee was put on t h e Now it may be disclosad along with and as far north a.s Newfoundland
19iG a;. 7 p.m. in Pa,;e Auditorium.
Wl 1 \ •el •oin e t h e i r a l u m n i b ack t o - case and now t h e details of t h e t h e rest of the fantastic facts, t h a t and British Columbia.
T h e Christinas Sing is a n a n n u a l
S.I
B.
caper
may
lie
disclosed
to
mi irr w bv lioldin
a b ilfet dinncr
this glorious celebrity of the bandThis new male q u a r t e t is m a d e up affair here a t S t a t e CoLcge. All t l u
at 5:30 p.m. in their honor at tiie the public.
leading world will favor the Circle el lour artists, each of whom has group houses, sororities, fraternities
fraternity hou..e. J o s . p h SwlerzowOur "subversives' a r e the J u n i o r s Inn i t h e chosen site of this m e m - achieved distinction in his own and C o m m u t e r s ' Club usually p a r sk; '57 is t'.'.e chairman and Robert
orable occasion i on t h e aforemen- right They offer a program of wide ticipate.
Slimson '57 has c h a r . e of the erHoned date with his benevolent variety and popular appeal. Their
Each group has or elects a song
ran .ements.
beats.
repertoire includes classics, sacred
leader and chooses two solids, e i t h i r
f.ongs and spirituals, fol c songs and
or
semi - traditional,
I'ratcrnil v or."e "r.i
We saved the price of admission Lieder, ballads and sea chanteys, traditional
until last i not that it wi.l shock you medleys and modern tunes. Many which they will sing. Each group
Al| h a Pi Al ill . fl- I'.C! n i i v a n but money is the least ol your woi- of their a r r a n g e m e n t s have been will sing their first song and it they
n o u i n d Hi lie .V u f f ( r s for t h e
are selected by the j u d ^ i s to sing
rics
now t h a t the destruction of t h e created especially for them.
a
I'd
y e a r T i n V are: I I'L'SU en l , Edv.
in the finals, they will sing their
college
is
no
longer
a
p
p
a
r
e
n
t
!
Barbara
Hungerford
'57,
C
h
a
i
r
a o n e , ', 1 • Vi'.e P •e.iid ;nt, R i c h a i d
second song. An admission fee of
T
h
r
e
e
filly
is
cheap
if
you
consider
m
a
n
oi
i
l
u
Myskania,
Warnings
Sl.air.ls V i; Hoi SJ Man .1 e .". R o n a l d
$5.01) is to be paid. This fee is to
Committee,
announces
that
six what you'd have to pay if the
He.'.ili ;•(•!•: 57.
help defray the costs of Lie sing-lreshmcn have rccci..(i t.vi warn- school was overtaken by moneylanitors, trophy decorations, pi..nj
Also. P i i i ; i ' : | . est i . 'J il ' i:is If O'l- ings for violation ol State College mongers Iroin the East
moving'.
p e v ; '1 i '• s u r e i . J. in •.-, Sii l i b : R e - irailil ons Hie second nine o l i e n d If we add the f a d s up we find
Robert
Women must wear while blouse:.
Ky c i e ; , i , ar • Kenneth. Gilford.
i iird.n i Secre . ! ', R )''('! i
Mt.'Ultgh, and t h a t the J u n i o r Prom may prove
T h e following people, members ol and black skirts nicl a e.s, iuclud.ng
S i i 1 Ci i.'.irip.i 1 l i e n '.; e M m - ! h v f'rol ,n ho, .lames
even more exciting than the rumors the class of 1957, have been addetl the song lead T . Wi.ether the group
S e n i o r s . ( .'li II i n n W i l l a m S. ll'. i - !, ii n o d Young
M.s , liungi rlord also a n n o u n c e s about it. A great band, the beautilul in llie Dean's List for the spring wear short i i I ng >,c".e.l blouse••
or; C u U ' d a n . 1'. III 1J . m m I', ,~iJ i
Circle Inn it's all very elemen- Mmester.
i s h fl I i I e n discreti in. Uni.orm
P a r l a - I.'-ii i wi In : hiueii have received
I llll'l'l
1 )ir< el.): D T . K I
Rove warnings lor violation of S t a t e tary, (io.
i; f i l l
A n t ii
i n e u i .rial . Rob
Seniors whose n a m e s have been il y R desiivd, Men ivjuicl wear da;!'
Tin
ret i ivi rs ol t h e
F i a t rn i • Cu-.ll 1 Ri I'- ,i-l .,1 ve l: a liti ins
addetl a r e : Betty Rae VanVlack, Mills and ties.
ai e Joseph Hickey
Henry
S o n h: s r. i ll - , . 1 - A l ) s. i hn i- warning
Doris Vriidenburg, Everett WeierT h e t n t r a l l c e ice and th;' n..ir.e of
Ji 111 ii'.-,; Col J ' e s p , id- an 1 Paul R a MII 'I lie penalty for
John
l i e i l;ci
llliller, Nancy Whitenack.
Bruce your song h a Icr and also the initio
Ihi'ee
v\..filings
is
a
public
apology
S.i
niii'i.;
;ir.
)
11
i
.
l
•
Willis,
and
Charles
Wl.lsey.
nig Si e n
ii;
ol l ne Mings that you h.ive sclec e l
, n.i lo Studenl Association. T h e r e will
S a ; h 1. i e ,
L a v ll
Historian.
For the spring semester last year, are to l.e s nl. I ) D iri \ Vriulc.ib.l'g
be
one
up
lo:
v
m
a
d
e
this
morning
S n,; 'i.di 1. li'.li )1 I'c ;.< i lit II i lia.'i s t u d e n t s ' names appeared on '57 by November l(i. If t i i a e is a
in Con , (• ation.
..or
the Dean's List a.s compared with dup Rule of . ny song yo i will bo
asked t i change them.
:(7ii lor tlie fall semester.
Nancy Gatle ">7, Direc or ol PubA sheei explaining how the judges
licity lor "Dr. Knock," iinnounces
will make their decision will be
t h a t tickets for ' h e play will be on
lorlbc.iiiiiiig.
sale today and all next week in
Lower Draper. T h e price of admission
is your student lax card or one
It, R O B E R T BACKER
(('out in in il I ill ill I'mji .'. ('nl until ii)
dollar.
B a r n h a r t , Betty Van V ack anil Jim
leit
r
a
t
.er
squeamish,
but
along
I'.v.
,inl
l
i
n
e
an
article
Dial
is
Wi
T h e ji.'ay, a French farce by Jules Loekhurti met with Student Count ll
in ess. nee an uUi'ni,".l at surreal- aine ,t g utluatc from the Univerwhere the many benelits lo both
Ism; thai i •, a liiul Iv unrealistic sity ol Sikiwiki, who hud just l i n - Roiiiain, is scheduled lor perlorni- schools o) the Exehan e Program
ii u r . u i HI \tilli touches of familial' isliel his master's in j e l - l h i n g , and aiiees on November 2 and ',i "Di were discussed and agreed upon.
Next Monday at 4.15 p.m. in t h e
,ii.l uiri i.is ml iin.tfp' i which at - v. a > i Hiding his roller-skates on the K n o c k " lias been reviewed as ' o n e Student Council meetings are open
an tin lis ii il > trram el' lluiughl. I al surface ol Roy Roger's head ol the gieate.st and inosl pointed ol lo ail Where were tne Common Upper l,oiin"e at Bra a g.er, F iitim
It
l.'c told me that Guy lombartli, Flench l a n e s . "
ol P o n t i c ; will pres nt Lea O'Br.en,
1
i
SI a l e t s ?
ii' a g . ' I a ,sie s
W! l!
1 l
al
mother, was playing a
Demo rata' Candidate 1 ir United
v. n l i my e A e r e o \ i r, broken beer bottle al G a r b a g e Can
u u
Student Council felt the benefits Slate.-, Representative D Congre s,
Pin I Hi II e [-vim
I'lolcssoi ol
1 c o n e a l o s s a t ! I I . e - l i •,l in :«..!' . 1 . A l l e y
English, is directing the play and derived from the program were val- announce.-, Lie DeNike '30, Acting
which
I 11)1111' d i a l e \ ill , o i i r d u JJ BY then ii was too late to turn .Rani's Leonard, Assistant Professor uable enough to discuss witli tlie C h a i r m a n He wil s e . k on I e
o n .- e m ! , I l i . i l II h id la •n i . g u i g i n back, because my pall) Was blocked
re I ol tlie s t u d e n t body, so a well D iiii era tic Outlook ot tha 1P5U
nl En, llsh, is technical director
sn k
. e n a n i n Willi ll W i s O I K large by a group o| Ireslimeu eating the
publici/eii meeting was called invit- c o i i p a i i ii
,\! o • M y o n e ha I be oine very tinned Nations building in a m a n T h e lirbt production is being pre- ing all interested students to atMr O'Brien, w i n writ s leuturo
] erturlicii b e a u :• I'l 'lit in Ilu i n i d - hole in the Nurobi Desert in far i.enli d early in the season .so I bal tend Again, tlie "well informed"
d'e oi (il ecu s licet w: i w t h e E l l l - Norlheasleriisoiitherii
Pakistan. I Ihe S t a t e College T h e a t r e will be Common S t a t e r s were conspicuous aril lei in scleral leading newspi.e Si tie Building lumping rope laid lo proceed because they had
|.aper , is a l o i m r President of tr.o
able In give ihe college a longer by 11lcir absence.
v, lib S.i. b.i, the orange elephant. taken oil my leg. and were using
subsequently, a full report of ihe New Y. rk St ite L e p s . a t i v e Corresseason
ot
theatrical
I'liiertaininent,
'I , i onlv i i n ; wrong with tins was it to sign tlie creed ol foul play
Exchange to Conn, was published in pondents. He i.i nisi a r a d i j a n d
stall - Dr. IVItll.
Hi it tlie rope was around Simba's and put it on my head the wrong
was
the SUUi College News, which prov- televi ion cun.iiicntut.T and
nee''.
way.
In the play there will be many ed in itself t h a t ihe program was elected to I e ulird an.l 84th ConBut it was r a t h e r hard straddling unusual effects used. Abstract set- more t h a n 'just a good weekend gresses, ri presenting tlie 32nd disHere is where 1 decidetl to see my
trict of New York S t a l e in t h e
sewer cover's father, but suddenly my own body, since I now had be- lings, designed by Mr. Leonard; away from NYSCT."
Could it be t h a t tlie Common House of Representatives,
I r e a l i / i d that a snake was crawl- come a chamelllon and turned into m a n y two dimensional card board
achieved Staters didn't know what they were
ing around my small Intestine. But a crocodile named Auliy. However, c u t - o u t s ; sound effects
T h e Herald Tribune F f i i m h a s
that wasn't too bad, since my in- this wasn't as bad a.s Hie urchins through s t r a n g e methods; and a talking about last week? Could be. been cancelled u.v conference offiJill) laiclllntrl
testine was in the cuspidor in Ihe playing pool with my eyes in a 1902 Penard car. all play a major
cials. It is hoped t h a t it will be held
role
Exchange Student 1050 next year, states DeNike.
corner by the r u t s pen. At first I smoke-lil.ed pig-sty.
T h e sororities and fraternities of
S t a t e this weekend are featuring
social events for the r e t u r n i n g a l u m n i . Coffee hours, teas, a n d d i n n e r s are on the program. During
the coming- week several sororities
are p l a n n i n g coffee hours for fraternities.
Yeah, yeah, "Season of mists a n d mellow so forth"—and then they
flunk out.
Gammost- State*
By PAGIDAS and McEVOY
He who disputes with t h e nondiscerning must have s h a r p answers.
G e r m a n Proverb.
VERBAL BOUQUETS
From those who are aware of their strength of convictions. Cognizant.
of the facts, we previously postulated our oninions. Our opinion should
not be construed as a vehement condemnation of any particular thing,
but r a t h e r our interpretation of w h a t h a s transpired.
In regard to last week's cpistl" to the editor, we congratulate the
one member of M.yskania who worked ; t the c a m p and all who \isitetl
the c a m p before the deed w.n -i n >d
It is our opinion t h a t .
1 Myskanin members are s i n n ; : •;] to I;; more t h a n ordinary
students and able to cope with their s h a r e of extra-curricula)
activities, which through their position are greater than tin
ordinary Merit, is worthier than lame.
2 Myskania should be able to ;:o more t h a n act in a judicial
capacity i.e., Abe Lincoln split logs.
H Other groups boast greater membership, but Myskaiiia art
the leaders of the school. Monkey see. monkey do is what
we're driving at.
4 We don't count the sightseeing trip the group look before Hit
deed was signed as any particular endeavor ol manual clforl
or spirited interest
VERBAL K O t ' Q l ' E T S
To Student Council who had the Hospitality Committee on lln
agenda ha this week. Speaking of hospitality, we seem to be lacking
it greatly here at Slate with the .Student Union Hoard's decision to bai
outsiders troin attending dances unless accompanied by S l a t e .students
VERBAL BOUQUETS
To those who lostered the idea, based on our esteemed Education
22 theories of reward motivation, that ol giving lollipops lo students
attending class meetings. Shrewd publicity.
Attendance at assemblies would be fabulous if tin same principli
were applied for convocations, only tlii.s time supplanting lollipops with
coffee. It must be that .service without reward is p u n i s h m e n t .
VERBAL BOUQUETS
Congratulations to the two thousand s t u d e n t s who contributed eight
hundred dollars to Campus Chest. Maybe the student enrollment should
be increased.
OSTRACISM
Storming the Bastille has become strictly pa.sse a.s anyone will tell
you who has tried to enter or leave an assembly a l t e r the designated
hour. He who hesitates is lost.
OUTWARD BOUND
Psychological warfare and power of suggesetion may take their trill
with the "Uncle Sam wants You" posters appearing around mid cm
exams and freshman marking period. II your m a r k s are low you ca.i
be patriotic.
MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION
A pencil sharpener.
QUESTION Ol THE WEEK
We wonder Who's Who?
Co//ege
Calendar
FRIDAY, OCTOBER ?.(>
l():(j;)aiii. Non-Legislative Convocation, Page Hall.
10:00 a.m. Veterans' Society Meeting, Draper :I40.
8:30 p m
Music Council Concert, Page Hall
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27
9:30 a.m. Rivalry Soccer ami Football Games, Dunn Field.
12:00noon Alumni Reunion, Pierce Hall,
1:00 p.m. Homecoming Weekend Parade, Brubacher.
2.00 pan. Slate vs. Oswego Soccer Game, Bleecker S t a d i u m .
6:00 p.m. Homecoming Weekend Reception, Herbert's.
9:00 p.m. Homecoming Weekend Dance, Brubacher Hall.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 20
4:15 p i n . Forum of Politics Speaker, Brubacher Upper Lounge.
11:30 p.m. Statesman Literary Magazine Meeting, Brubacher Hall.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30
7:00 p.m. Newman Club Classes, Draper 111.
7:35 p.m. Primer Magazine Meeting, Brubacher Hull.
K:0() p.m. Oral Interpretation Readings, Draper 349.
8:30 p.m. Newman Club Classes, Draper 111.
8:30 p.m. Statesman Literary Magazine Meeting, B r u b a c h e r Hall.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31
7:01) p.m. Newman Club Classes, Diaper 111.
7:30 p.m. Outing Club Meeting, Brubacher Hall.
8:30 p.m. Newman Club Classes, Draper 111.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
7:30 p i n . S t u d e n t Christian Association, First L u t h e r a n C h u r c h
8:30 p.m. S t a t e College T h e a t r e Presentation of "Dr. Knock."
3
Student Discovers "SIB" Ruse;
Exposes Wild Facts to Public
Ch airman hissues
Sing Information
Committee Posts
Warning List
Dean Adds Seniors
To Scholarship List
Students Reserve
Production Seats
G»t One Coffee Black, Sit Down,
Introduce Y ourself To Surrealism
GaMununtcaUonA,
House Candidate
To Give Speech
PAGE 4
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
Survey Studies
Shopping Habits
POfUHf Que* *lUe Cxckanqe Student Council Committee Offers
Amendments lo SA Constitution
By NATALIE LEMOINE
It's in the book. These are actu- What sweeter a death could be
The Watch-dog Committee out of
Lewis Carr '57, President, states ally city and state laws,
found?
states the following proposthat Distributive Education Club is
A good little freshman was hur- Council
Under Michigan law, inmates in
conducting a survey of the down- state prisons are supposed to pay rying to class in a state of extreme ed constitutional revisions: "Convocation" will be inserted in place
town Albany and Central Avenue
their own room and board. Not agitation. "Please, Ood, don't let of "assembly" wherever necessary.
district this week to study the shop- for
me be late," he murmured as the
ARTICLE VI
ping and transportation habits of much different from going to State. class bell began to ring in the dis"Kibitzing" at a card game —
shoppers.
Executive Department.
tance.
Section 4 (i): Amend to read: "To
Thirty-five students from the club bridge, poker, or solitaire is against
At that moment he tripped and direct social activities affecting Stuare questioning shoppers in the the law in Emporia, Kansas.
dent Association as a whole except
An old Boston, Mass., ordinance fell flat on his face.
stores and on the streets at various
"Please, God," he exclaimed in an those delegated to other organizahours of the day. Two questions will forbids baths without a physician's
injured voice as he picked himself tions."
be asked the shoppers: Would you authority.
shop downtown more often if the
Section 4 ( n ) : Delete and insert
Centralla, Washington, requires up, "I didn't say push!"
stores were open more than one all male residents to grow beards
new (n) to read: "Investigate im(From The Racquet t o
evening a week and what transport- between the dates of June 20th and
peachment charges in manner preSome quaint definitions from the scribed under Article VIII, Section 5.
ation did you use to get to the shop- August 4th.
McGill Daily.
ping district.
Section 4 (o): Delete.
(From The Spectrum)
Section 4 (p): Delete.
This survey will contact the necChewing
gum:
Substitute
for
selfPreviously Student Association
essary 15,000 shoppers that the Al- Ode to a Kiss.
confidence.
only had the power to direct four
bany Chamber of Commerce has Our doctors with warnings so
Undergraduate:
Pre-med
student.
requested. Answers will be used by
social activities.
gloomy,
Experiences: Are almost unpleasretailers and other businesses in Say germs in girl's kisses abound.
ARTICLE VII
ant; but make you grow up.
making future plans for improved But if these bugs kill,
Judicial.
service.
Drudgery: See under study.
Section2 (1) to read: "On petition
Then draw up my will.
Just out and just wonderful!
Tho beautifully new Be/ Air
Coupe with Body by Fisher
SEE THE W CHEVROLET TODAY!
IT'S SWEET, SMOOTH AND SASSY!
Chevy goes 'em all one better—with
a daring
new departure
in design (looks longer and lower, and it is!), exclusive new
Turboglide
automatic
transmission
with triple turbines,
and a bumper crop of new ideas including
1USA
B7
CHEUfl
U l t l
*270h p, englno also available at extra cott. Also
Romjot luol ln|«clion engines with up lo 283 h p . In
Corvello
and passor.Qer
car models,
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 2 6 , 1 9 5 6
fuel
New right down to the wheels it rolls on—
that's the '57 Chevrolet!
By now you know it's new in style. But
Chevrolet's new in lots of ways that don't
show up in our picture. It's new in V8
power options that range up to 245 h.p.*
Then, you've a choice of two automatic
drives as extra-cost options. There's an
even finer Powerglide-and new, nothitiglike-it Turboglide that brings you TripleTurbine take-off and a new flowing kind of
going. It's the only one of its kind!
Come see the new car that goes 'em all
one botter-the new 1957 Chevrolet I
Only Jranchised Chevrolet dealers
a new V8
injection!
of 25 members of Student Association, within one week of election results, to recount ballots of any class
or Student Association election in
open meeting."
This is a new amendment to this
section.
ARTICLE VIII
Permanent Commissions, Impeachment and Succession to Office.
Section 1: Same.
Section 2: Delete.
Section 3: Delete.
Section 4: Change to Section 3.
(Content to remain the same.)
Section 5: Change to Section 6.
a. Amend to read: "Violation of
the Student Association Constitution
and/or its By-Laws."
b. Remains the same.
c. Change to number 3.
Section 6: Change to Section 5.
(Content same.)
Section 7: Change to Section 2.
(Content same.)
Section 3: Change to Section 4 (c).
Section 4: 1—Amend to read "faculty advisors."
Section 4, 3, c—Amend to read:
"All other business deem necessary by a % majority vote of Student Council or by petition of 100
members of S.A.
BY-LAWS
Section 1 a
(Last sentence >: Amend to read :
"Freshman elections shall take place
not earlier than the 3rd Friday in
October nor later than one week
prior to Campus Day, the 3rd Saturday in November."
Section 1. d. 3: Delete.
Section 1 (ii: Amend to read:
"Upon petition of 25 members of
Student Association within one week
of publication of election results,
I he ballots of any Student Association or class office, shall be recounted by Myskania in an open
meeting.
Section 3. (e) 1: Amend to read:
Financial motions I exceeding $500)
shall be made in Student Council
and posted for at least one week before being voted upon by the Legislative convocation.
Section 4. b: Insert "Myskania in
place of "Student Council."
Section 4. f: Delete "or on the
petition of an organization."
Section 4. g: Delete.
Section 4. h: Change to read letter (g). Amend to read: "By petition of 100 members. . . ."
Registrar! Submits
Total Enrollment
Final registration figures released
by the Registrar's office for the regular session show an increase in enrollment of 120 over last year's total. The b r e a k d o w n of registration for the fall semester of the
1956-1957 school year is as follows:
freshmen, 362 females, 209 males,
total 571; Sophomores, 284 females,
227 males, total 511; Juniors, 232
females, 191 males, total 423; Seniors, 187 females, 104 males, total
351; Graduate Students, 62 females,
126 males, total 188; Special Students, 14 females, 10 males, total 24.
The total enrollment is 2,068 of
which 1,141 are females and 927
are males.
-COLONIALCentral Avenue Near Quail St.
I''ri.-Sal.
Oct, 2(1-27
AWAY A M . BOATS
Jeff Chandler - Julie Adams
STAR IN T H E DUST
Mamie Van Doren - John Agar
Friday from li:,')() p.m.
Saturday from 1 p.m. Contln.
Tho now Bel Air 4-Door Soc/an—one of
20 iltiking new C/ioWei,
display this famous trademark
Sun.-Mon.
Oct. 28-2IJ
THE EDDIE DUCHIN
STORY
Tyrone Power - Kim Novak
(iUN T H A T W O N
THE W E S T
with Dennis Morgan
Sunday from 2 pin. Contin.
Monday from 0:30 p.m.
See Your Authorized Chevrolet Dealer
Tu7"-M~'fuu7'
~()Tt.'w-Nov"l
WE'RE NO ANGELS
Humphrey Hugart - Joan Bennett
PETE KELLY'S BLUES
with Jack (Dragnet) Webb
Dally from 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER
26, 1056
PAGE 8
Beware Freshmen! Silence Spells Board Schedules Student Trip To Warrensburg;
Doom — Tuning Tones Tell Tale Student Body Discusses Permanent Camp Location
By WILLIAM FRANKONIS
State College students are being
afforded the opportunity to gain
Listen, as you walk through the only the depressing, dreary silence
first hand information on the colhalls of various dorms. Listen to the of study. Yet, in your pity, seek to
lege camp, according to Robert Levy,
melodic strains of music issuing enlighten those who are cloaked in
^
* . , -V.
Graduate Student and Chairman of
forth from a scant number of rooms. silence. Remind them of the eager
the College Camp Board. The group
Freshman rooms, to be particular. anticipation of the Sophomore muIf I
is sponsoring a trip to the WarrensListen, and support my claims that sic lovers. Remind them of the
burg campsite on Sunday, Novemthe dulcet tones emerge from too "stunts and sings," "the frolics and
ber 18 for all interested students.
few rooms. Woe the unsuspecting dances" that lie in the near future.
Tour Camp Area
Dawns the light yet, freshmen?
freshmen!
Buses will leave the main enSoon comes the day, young In this "great big puddle," are you
trance of Brubacher Hall at 8 a.m.
friends, when companions and still "in a muddle?" Is your brain
Students will be charged a two dolSophomores will be privileged to still "in a fog?" Beware "little
lar transportation fee, and it is
laud the talent of your vocal chords. frog." The Ides of March may not
suggested that each bring his own
The sound of young, eager voices be upon you, but the November ears
lunch. Members of the Camp Board
will resound through the atmos- of the Sophomores are!
will conduct tours of the camp area
phere at State. Everywhere will joyfor those attending.
ous voices be raised in song as "arm
Open Meeting
Sm&tfin arm," gay, young souls stoutly
On a date yet to be announced,
carry on the traditions of State.
Camp Board will conduct an open
But woe the indolent freshman!
meeting to discuss the location of
Think back, upperclassmen. Think
the permanent camp. It is hoped
back to the days of yore when you
students who do make the trip will
too were honored to exercise the
The picture above shows the up-to-date progress on the addition offer their recommendations at this
tones of your golden voice. Rememto the farmhouse at Camp Dippikill.
meeting.
ber, with nostalgia, that you are no
Students interested in traveling to
longer thus honored. Think of the
In the last issue of the News a
the Warrensburg camp may sign up
happy hours spent in song, and envy typographical error occurred in the
at the desk in Lower Draper and
those who are about to ascend the first paragraph in the article conbuy their ticket for the bus. Reserillustrious stage of melody. But pity cerning the requirements for teachvations open today and will conthe unsuspecting freshman!
ing certification. The paragraph
tinue through Friday, November 16.
Pity those from whose room comes should have read:
Work Continues
not the gentle sound of song. Pity
Oscar E. Lanford, Dean of the
Last weekend, a work party of
By WINIFRED YOUNGS
those from whose domain emanates College, announces that the New
eleven traveled to the Dippikill
There
is
a
certain
group
at
State
bulb
that
wouldn't
fit.
Ah,
to
be
a
York State Education Department
camp where they laid foundations
has revised the requirements for College which enjoys exclusive priv- teacher!
for a washroom, put up siding on
permanent certification for teach- lieges such as playing a rousing
Saturday morning, a drifting the addition to the farmhouse, being of all academic subjects. Re- game of basketball at 10 a.m. on a n r o m a of Aunt Jemima's pancakes gan work on its roof, and demolishquirements for Commerce and Saturday morning, swimming Trues- gently awoke the silent sleepers, ed the old barn located in the conschool librarians have not been re- day nights, and jaunts to Camp They bounded up to greet the newstruction camp area. A sink was
vised.
Johnson. The group to which I re- d a y i t r i e pancakes, the mouse, and also installed in the kitchen. The
After September 1, 1958 a provi- fer is the Winsome Albany Ath- 2n fellow group members who were picture at the left shows the progThe religous clubs plan a variety
just coming in. The new arrivals, ress of the work being done on the
of activities for the coming week, sional certificate, which may be letes, of course!
field for five years, and a permanannounce the club presidents.
May I propagandize a bit? OK, while longing for a day in the coun- farmhouse addition.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- ent certificate, which requires a now take this trip to Cam]) "J" that &% had lacked the pioneer spirit
ship will hold its regular meeting at littli year of study will be available. the group made last weekend. Aside necessary to make an overnight deal
Brubacher Thursday,
announces
from such obvious advantages as of it. They brought all sorts of
Lucy Schneider '58. Roy Shaffer, a
going where you couldn't possibly things with them, including a bathmissionary from Kenya, Alrica, will
see your homework, and letting i n B suit. Talk about the ingenuity
speak on the importance of world
your roomie clean up for open ° f women: Lee used this to go swimmissions.
house, it was just plain nice out ™ng , m e e t Dr. Hood's newest pneumonia patient). Then with the three
Three meetings will be held next
Newman Club will hold a testiin that country atmosphere.
fires that burned so bright (?), the week in connection with the curmonial dinner for Father Richard
On
Friday
night,
State's
campfire
campers satisfied their ravenous ap- rent drive to reorganize The StatesDinneen, former chaplain and a welgirls headed for Chatham (that's petites. Far be it from me to attempt man, State College's former litercome for Father Starks, new chapThe scene was Western Avewhere the camp is, for you unfortu- to describe the luscious, thick, juicy ary magazine, announces Joseph
lain, October 4, announces Bernice
nue on a Friday night. The charnate uninitiates' information i. Ac- . . . hot dogs.
Flynn '58, Acting Chairman. The
O'Connor '57. The tickets which
acters involved were Bob, Hercording to the little mouse that was
Business - Advertising Staffs will
Something
about
the
meal
(or
are $3.75, may be purchased in Lowman and John of Sayles Hall
scrabbling around the walls, they perhaps the hours State women meet on Monday and Tuesday nights
er Draper.
and Jean and Mary Ellen, tittle
had a real cool time. Some Miss Sivkeep)
engendered sleep, and so many at 8:30 in Brubacher Hall. Mary
Newman Club is holding classes
did the guys know that one was
,
,
r. i
KeeiJf eimeiiueieu sieep, IUIU au many Ann Schlotthauber '57, Acting Pubon the topics of ethical living and
a disc-jockey when the females
insky dragged a hap ess Sophomore the
. energeticfe^frosh keptt batting
Qf
the lic Relations Editor, will preside.
doctrine of the Roman Catholic
picked them up, and gave them
all the way to town to buy a lamp- balls around, but isn't that just like The Circulation-Exchange Staff will
Church, announces Bernice O'Cona ride to Partridge Street, but
meet on Thursday and next Mona freshman, anyway?
nor '57, President. These classes are
after all the formalities of Retday at 8:30, states Susanne Russell
Did
this
sound
like
a
pleasant
held on Tuesday and Wednesday
Veterans
To
Discuss
ting acquainted were over and
'58, Acting Circulation Editor.
event?
In
spite
of
what
it
may
have
evenings at 7 and 8:30 p.m. in
the girls left Partridge a half
Any upperclassmen and freshmen
sounded
like,
it
really
was.
So,
the
Draper 111. The time at which the
Society s Constitution moral of this story is: you too caninterested
hour after arriving, Mary Ellen
in helping with the humelass is taught on Tuesday evening
had taken a request to play "A
will be reversed on Wednesday eveThe Veterans Society will hold a be a Winsome Albany Athlete. Ap. or magazine, regardless of writing
Casual Look" for the three on
meeting today in Room 349, Draper plication blanks obtained in Page ability, are asked to get in touch
ning.
her Saturday night show.
with Flynn.
Hall at 10 a.m. to discuss the pur- 0001.
The next regular meeting ol NewSaturday night, and doubts
man Club will be held Thursday at
pose
of
the
organization
and
revifaded as "Mary Ellen Calling"
7:30 p.m. in the large dining room
sion of the Society's constitution.
"
tame on the air. She wasn't
at Brubacher Hall.
fooling about the disc jockey
Robert Murphy '58, President of
by Chester Field
Rev. Hughes will speak on the
IT'S FOR REAL!
bit, and she faked the guys
the Society, announces the appointtopic, "What Are the Essential Difright out of their undershirts.
ment of Patrick Cahill '58 to the
ferences Between Church of the
The acquaintance has proposition of Social Chairman.
Catholic Tradition, Reformed Tradgressed to a point now, that
The Veterans Society is open to
ition, and Pentecostal Tradition,
Mary Ellen is going to play
all
veterans who are attending State
and What Is the One, Holy, Cath"Music For You" by the SaylesCollege and all members and nonolic and Apostolic Church" at the
men on her show, next Saturmembers are urged to attend this
Sunday meeting of the Canterbury
day at 7:15 p.m. on station
meeting.
Club, at 7 p.m. at the Cathedral
WABY, Tune in and hear our
Guild House, states David GoldSaylesmen give out with strains
berg '57, President.
of "Two Hearts" and "All
The Westminster Student FellowAlone."
ship meets Sunday at the Madison
By the way, the acquaintance
53 N. Lake Ave.,
Avenue Prebyterlan Church, acii plLitonic because Mary Ellen
Near Washington Ave.
cording to Margaret Can' '58. The i, going to see her latest love
2 UARBERS
topic under discussion will be "11 I
mil in Notre Dame this weekWe Aim To Please
Marry a Roman Catholic." The purend.
pose is to discuss the problems inTHOUGHTS FOR TODAY $1.98
volved in a mixed marriage and
I met a man with a rather large head
how they may be met.
The Student Christian Association
Who looked at me and finally said:
You are cordially
will hold a meeting Thursday at
"If ever you're caught
invited to join
7:30 j).in. at the First Lutheran
Without any thought
Church, 101 Western Avenue Doc217 Western Ave. Albany, N. Y.
tor Carlyle Adams, a religion editor
And you think t h a t you ought
for the Albany Times-Inion will
Phone U-8(il0
T o be thinking a thought,
speak on "A Christian's Duty in
l i n y one from mo before it's too late.
Politics."
T h o u g h t s for today, only
one-ninety-eight."
Pay only the
nationally advertised
D E U C ATESSKN
"A reasonable price," I said and bought
prices—NO extras
T h e following brainy, thoughtful thought:
AND
Dean Reveals
Rules Changes
For Certificates
College Females, Mouse Travel To
Camp Johnson For Restful Day
Religious Clubs
Plan Activities
Committee Plans
Periodical Revival
"/? Carnal
look"
JOE'S BARBER SHOP
Gerald Drug; Go.
Lansing Bros.
China Club
S A N I) VV I C H
S II O P
Featuring A Complete Line ol Your Favorite
SANDWICHES, SALADS, OMELETTES
and ASSORTED COLD CUTS
MAYFLOWER
200 Central Avenue
LANSING BROS.
58 State St. - 3-2012
open Thurs. till 9 p.m.
Castleton - Lenox
lianciscan - Rosenthal
Syracuse - I'liittrldge
Noritake Ansberg
Royal Doultoii - llavlland
Royal Crown Derby
FAINT PLEASURE AIN'T PLEASUREI
T a k e your pleasure big! Smoke t h e cigarette
t h a t gives you more of what you're
smoking for . . . more real enjoyment, more
real rich flavor . . . more smoking
satisfaction. Smoke a Chesterfield and
enjoy it t o the hilt!
Smok* for r a o l . . . »mok« Che»t#rfl«ldi
O 1 l««rU A HIM*
Twbttic© 0s
(•AGE
6
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 2 6 .
1956
STATE C O L L E G E NEWS,
State Varsity Club Keglers Bow Girls Inactivity
To Siena College In First Setback Causes Alarm
The going- got a little rougher for
the Varsity Club keglers as they
faced the powerful Indians of Siena
College last Tuesday night at the
Loudonville College bowling alleys.
The middle contest found the I n dians sweating out a 12 pin victory
thanks to the efforts of Bill Arcari's
225 and Dave Carpentier's 221. Irv
Peterson and Dick Wemple were the
bi^ headaches for State in this tilt
as they turned in scores of 205 and
On the return trip home the Peds 194.
found themselves unable to talk of
as much as one victory. Siena boast- Clean Sweep
ed of their 4-0 sweep of the Statesmen.
The night's finale ended with the
Indians making it a clean sweep by
Siena Takes First
a 881-788 count.
The result of the first game made
For Siena, Dave Carpentier flashthe locals forget all about their
conquests of the last two weeks as ed the biggest smile as he looked
the defending champs of the Capi- back on his 606 triple.
tal District Intercollegiate Bowling
Wemple carried aw ay t he triple
League showed their winning form. honors for the Teachi;rs a > he split
The totals on the first game score the maples for 541.
sheet read Siena, 926; State, 849.
Scores
Bob Coleman of the Indians must
have felt a little funny with his 141 Sullivan
187 142 163 492
game pitted along side his team- Lorrichio
144 151 165 460
motes' efforts of 204, 189, 209, and Peterson
137 205 160 502
183. Despite the opening loss Joe Ketchum
211 178 123 512
Ketchum gained State's personal Wemple
170 194 177 541
laurels for the night as he sent the
maples flying for a resounding 211 Totals
849 870 788 2507
high single tally.
Siena
926 892 881 2699
State College offers a wide program of athletics for women. Practices and inter-dormitory events are
sponsored every afternoon and evening in many sports, including hockey, soccer, archery, volleyball, and
tennis. In anticipation of the increased enrollment, the Women's
Athletic Association ordered new
equipment for all of these activities. The managers of each activity
are trained to provide instruction
or to act as referees. At present
ihij- program is standing idl \
Potter Gridiron Squad
Gains Intramural Lead
By JOE SWIERZOWSKI
Potter Club climbed to the top of
the wide open Intramural Football
Loop Wednesday as they struggled
through an 8-0 conqueset of the
powerful Vet gridiron squad.
The Club, which won its third
game of the season last Thursday
against Sayles by a 19-0 tally, found
ground a pretty scarce commodity
Wednesday afternoon.
A bad hike from center found the
men from State Street on the top
end of a 2-0 score at the midpoint
of the contest. The pigskin was deflected off the Vet signal caller and
made its way to the end zone much
to the delight of the EEP rooters.
Last week there were no more
than 35 girls at Frosh Frolic. There
were not enough interested girls to
accept a play day challenge from a
nearby college. Less than two per IJrierly to Millet
cent of the women's enrollment have
A pass from Briefly to Millett late
shown interest in sports this year.
in the final quarter broke the back
Have the women of State Col- of the team that has always been
lege become lazy? Have they be- feared in IM grid circles.
come so engrossed in their studies
To add insult to injury, it was the
that they have forgotten to exercise fust time any Vet saw a member
their bodies as well as their minds? of the opposition cross the white
Hey, everybody! Here's a new stack of
NW7
marker they had so ably defended
to this point.
APA, second only to the men of
Potter in the standings, continued
tueir winning ways as they downed the Hopeless, the Hapless and
tlie Humps. The good losers (perfect
in fact) found plenty to smile about
however, as they scored for the first
time this season. The score, APA, 31;
Humps, 2.
Kampf Collects 3
Bob Kampf turned out to be the
big man for the Madison Maulers
as he tallied three TDs. Two passes
from Walker and an errant throw
which hit him paced the way for his
triumphs. Walker to Anderson added six more and just for a change,
Walker ran one down field for another count.
The Humps, who scored on a safety, proved their ability to take a
lost on the chin and entertained
their supporters (both of them) with
a bit of hilarious play late in the
final period.
SLS gained their first win of the
season as their version of the Sischo
Kid ram rampant. Bob caught two
offerings from La Rochelle in their
31-7 win over College Heights.
Sloan to Sischo and LaRochelle to
Dudley accounted for the other big
tallies of the frat men. College
Heights, which put up a good fight:
and held the SLSmen to a 8-7 score
ac half, were paced by Frick who
ran both the TD and PAT.
Next week's big game will .send
undefeated Potter Club against an
undefeated APA squad in I he battle
lor league leadership.
Next Week's Schedule
Modnay—Sayles- APA
Tuesday—College Heights-Hump:*
Wednesday—Vets-SLS
Thursday—Potter-APA
WHEN SMOKE FOLK get together, the chatter
matter is fine tobacco. Naturally, that means
Lucky Strike. Luckies' taste is worth talking
about because it comes from fine tobacco—
light, mild, good-tasting tobacco t h a t ' s
TOASTED to taste even better. As for the
Stickler, you call the minutes of a smokers' convention a Light-up Write-up. Speaking of lightups, have you tried a Lucky lately? You'll say
it's the host-tasting cigarette you ever smoked!
"IT'S
TOASTED"
to taste
better 1
Standings
Putter
4
it
8
APA
3
1
(i
li
Vets
3
1
SLS
1
2
2
Sayles
1
2
2
Kli
1
1
2
College Hri hts
0
0
3
Humps
0
3
n
minus '-j for lark of officials
Varsity Pleases Coach;
J V Recruits Needed
Coach Dick Sauers was very pleased with the progression of his varsity hoop squad during the past
week and pictures high competition
lor starting berths ci.uie November
J) In scrimmages during the week.
!hi' hoop.-ters began to show an enll lUenill ! spark and were really
beginning to lose their -iinimer
kinks.
In our thoughtlessness last week,
we omitted I he n a m e ol Jerry Davies, high scorer ol last year's .JV
sqracl, Iroin the list of those on this
year's squad ol varsity men. Jerry is
the only member of last year's JV
on the varsity this year.
.IV Practices Scheduled
For all I hose still interested m
I n in J out lor the J V, practices w ill
b- held e w r y week da\ night from
(i to 7:30 in I he Page Ciym It is
linl too late to get ill shape, as the
o| i inn;: dale is not. mil ll No\ ember
FOOD TO EAT,
KamfLJj Ko-mmentl.
In a few weeks, the fate of track
will be determined here at State,
Last year an attempt at building up
our intercollegiate sport program via
the track line was made and the
apathy that evolved brought it to
an abrupt but possibly temporary
halt. For a while, there was a large
charge of interest in track, as witnessed by the accumlated names on
the sign up sheet. As the season
wore on, it faded and only one intercollegiate match was run off
Final Fence
Now, the final fence is to be
crossed. If the interest that was
shown when the idea of track originateel returns, the sport could have
a long term on our campus. It's up
to you who are interested. Let's
build our sports program up and
make ourselves known more around
the State Watch for announcments
on the fourthcoming A A Board
A.A. Board:
Group Seeks
To Determine
Fate O f Track
T h e S t a t e College Athletic Advisory Board h a s begun plan:- lor a
meeting ol all interested .indents
to help determine the quest!
il
whether or not sufficient interest is
present to continue tnu k and field
on an intercollegiate basis At Has
meeting also the group i- planning
to find out what other pos lble
spring sports State students would
be interested in seeing run on an
intercollegiate level.
., ,, ,
Bused on last y e a r s ex e ..- .
the Board at present does n
1
jtisiificd in including track ni next
year's budget. S u i t e the live member group will soon begin work on
the 1957-58 budget it must determine in the very near future whether or not its inclusion in next year's
budget is justified.
To Determine Future of Track
This interest will be measured by
the e n t h u s i a s m at this e
ng
meeting, tentatively scheduled lor
the week of November 11-18. II the
iiuere,,. is not p r e s . n l . track will
be discontinued and the group will
then seek suggestion lor possible
..
meeting, and show up. The future
of track rests in your hands, the
hands of the men of State. We have
the administration's approval for
spring sports, now we need your
approval,
spring Sports Push
, , , , , , • .
We think it is generally agreed
tna
K t h e , s l ) r l n " " P 0 / * 8 Program
could s t a n d a boost
- A l o n S s l d e oi
track, we'd like to see tennis earn
a varsity letter. We were amazed at
the interest shown thus far in the
current AMIA tennis tournament
being run off on the Washington
P;u'k, « m r t s at the present time
Wt
' believe there is enough interest
h e r e ilL s t f l e l
° turn tennis into a
varsity sport. Some of those interra cl
"'
have been playing tennis lor
^nlv some time now. and the ques" o n "< <•'»»'* w o u l d not Involve as
many men a s . s o m e other sporte.
We believe I his should be brought
into the AA Board meeting also.
Early Bird Gets The Worm
You may think it sort of early to
be pushing spring sports, but there
is much lo be done in developing
any sport that is going to go on a
level of v a r s i t y.
Opportunity
knocks but only once, and the early
bird has a better chance of gelling
the worm
^ ^ _ _ /
\ j O U U
C
II
/ U/l
Tannic
/ Cllll/5
T
f
I U U I
In
III
„ p n I
IIUIMCI/l
'i , , N, ••••• Hills ol Albany, the
Washing!, i. Park tennis area, was
thee rem "I can line tennis aeho:: thru,.' Ill- past week as the
li:.l round ol the iinnu.il tall tenni tournament neared completion.
s ' i'ii matches were p a v e d over Hie
*
'
'•
( J , ^
t, ,„,„.
, w( ,,. ( , , W ( | ,,„.,,,„.
<
'"^^
u m n r ] . m v d m , Uv„ oUI
|h].
4|s
|()
v ln
n|llv
un)
„ h l . s „ m . b l e n d e d the distance,
^ ' ^ K a l | 1 | ) 1 ,.,„,,. t l . o l „
behind
( j n M T | | | 1 | S u | ] l v ; m l 0 w j„ one ol
'lh.', ,|,,M.,S| matches, 3-ti, (i-3, 8-0. In
n i ( . other three setter, Bob Gebh n d l also had to deleal a first set
I •'• as he came on to win a 1-b.
H-i <i-3 m a r a t h o n Iron, Ed fraws.
I'm- Whitewashes Miller
P a n Miller M'lK-ml
he <„>
wh.lew.isInn, ol he Inst, im i d . s
h e w aJui;
, sh.,1
out In was
Ge extended
e P
,-ill
[,.('
I.orieelno
s p r i n g s u b s t i t u t e s M) that it can be
In tii i set a '.oust Garry Lewis,
; in work immediately on '.he inch; tail wi i:l on to win. 7-n, U-- 'hick
Slon of these suggested new com. l •; ,.(.•' made lasl wol k ol Pete liarto the S t a l e i n t e r c o l . e g l a t e sport
I)' data with a li-1, (>-4 victory, and
scene.
,lim Sallord beat Carl Schrader by
Seek Two Answers
, identical score Hank Aceto won
AA Board Will seek to answer two ,,, (|(-hiiili inmi Dave Pitkin and
questions a t this meeting,
s t u Orl.ni received a bye into the
1. Is there enough ml resl lo it nd rn aid
justify the inclusion o, track in next
* ^ ™ ^
™ £ k ^U
the
>'«"•« uudBct/
.'
|_ s l u j W | 1 l h u s far, tennis looks
'>. What new spring sports would
id al S t a t e
.students be interested in seeme run
on an intercollegiate ba. is?
T h i s plan has the approval ol Dr.
Collins, President of the (...lege.
Because ol the long range i Heel
- , : i - . \ No. Lake Ave.
based on this meeting s. u.lenl . are
.Near Washington Ave.)
urged to discuss this m a i l e r thor"JIMMY" Hair Stylist
oughly and to make then de ish.ll
known at this gathering. I he lilture
Telephone 3 -0741)
of track is a t stake.
CLEANER,
<yA. I. Co,
i' KODUCTDF
FRESHER,
SMOOTHER
I
(J/w itynuxvKvn, duvaa:<>-K.(r>rui<wiu AMERICA B I.UAU1NQ M AN U KAC T U l< Kl< Of
twice bulge the nets for the entire
output of scoring on the part of
the purple.
Nctminders Shine
It was a case of great goal-tending in the clutch as both sides lost
scoring opportunities to the great
saves made by both goalies. The
game was saved by 3-star winner
Tito Guglielmone with a spectacular
save in the final period after P a n ther goalie Nichols twice robbed
Bob Backer of a goal.
Also scoring in the Plattsburg
tilt were Joe Hickey who was the
recipient of the one star award and
Bob Backer who gained the two star
recognition.
The Oswego Lakers will put their
record on the line at 2 p.m. tomorrow when the orange and green
invade Bleecker for the homecoming game following the parade to
the stadium.
Bench Bits: Joe Garcia won't
smoke any other brand of cigars as
long as the win streak keeps up . . .
State has outscored the opponents
by more than two to one, having 17
goals to the opposition's eight . . .
Tito Guglielmone has a goals against
average of 1.6 while Bob Backer
has an average of 1.4 goals per
game . . . that big game tomorrow
is the last of the season in Bleecker
as the Garciamen hit the road for
the last three . . . the three star
award Saturday went to Guglielmone, the two star to Backer and
tin one star to Hickey; Wednesday's game saw Lederman t.ike the
three start award. Dunham the two
Mar, and Middlebury's goalie Nichols the one star . . . when the frosh
had a class meeting and couldn't
g"L to the game the attendance almost vanished . . . how about that,
iipperelassinenV Must be that the
COMPLETE AND AWAY. Marry Millet of Potter Club latches on only spirit lies in the class of 'fiO . . .
absence of Wiermiller
and
to a Brierly pass, good for a lirst down, as Ron Steiner of the \ els tht
rushes up lo make the tag. .Action takes place in Wednesday's game Koiibeck caused a lag in the State
a I lack la.st Wednesday.
Hon bv Poller, 8-0.
The classy pupils of Joe Garcia
last Wednesday set the stage for
the big game against Oswego by
On television or not, the Cisco tipping the Panthers of Middlebury
Kid is still a star. This week, the in a 2-1 squeaker in the privacy of
spotlight falls on State's Cisco Kid, Bleecker Stadium.
Bob Sischo of the SLS football
Coming on the heels of a 3-2 oversquad. Bob scored three touchdowns
in SLS's 31-7 win over College time conquest of host Plattsburg,
Heights, and also received credit the third victory in as many games
for a safety when his kickoff was boosted the season record of the
Peds to 4-1 and assured the purple
run into the end zone on purpose.
Second spot this week goes to of an Improvement over their 2-7
another Bob, Bob Fierro of Potter showing of last fall.
The big gun in the latter pair of
Club. In all of Potter's games thus
lar, this speedy end has been a wins was Warren Dunham, who
highly efficient player on the re- bagged the winner at the 8:52 mark
ceiving end of Rookwood and Bri- of overtime at Plattsburg before
taking charge on Wednesday to
erly passes.
BOOKS
DIVINE COMEDY
LYRICS OF OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN
D
AGE OF EXTRAVAGANCE
R
BUT WE WERE BORN FREE
A
POWER OF POSITIVE LIVING
S
SATCHMO
ABE LINCOLN
T
DICTIONARY OF AU/MICAU
I
C
R
E
FREDERICK REMINGTON'S BUCKSKINS
D
DOG PRINTINGS
U
TROUT FLIES
Q
ART KAPNER
STATE
IXSl'K.IXt
'/•; .1/ IA
BE ELITE!
ALL T Y P E S of
CIUAKBTTS8
7.S Slide SiIc«i
INSURANCE
S-147]
Albany, N. Y
LITERATURE
BOOK
PRINTS
NEW YORK WATER COLORS
And
PRINT
N
VOIR
C I G A R E T T E S
PAGE 7
By DAVE MILLER
AT THE
SNACK BAR
1956
Booters Set Sights On Oswego State After Slapping
Plattsburg, Middlebury For Three Straight Victories
Felicia's Beauty Salon
ALUMNI TO MEET,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 6 ,
S
SALE
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
PAGE 8
FRIDAY. O C T O B E R
26, 1936
News Views:
Campus Chest
"Primer" Editor Director Seeks
Presidential Candidates Concentrate Plans Meeting; Placement Files Campaign Ends;
Elmer C. Mathews, Director of
Final Efforts In Three Key States Sets Deadline Teacher
Placement, announces that Announce Result
all Seniors and Graduate Students
By JOHN YAGER
Csmpftirn Windup
With election day less than two
weeks away, both President Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson are concentrating their final efforts In
three key states. These states, New
York, California, and Illinois, control 104 of the 266 electoral votes
that are needed to win the election. The Republicans have the edge
in New York and California while
the Democrats have the lead in
Illinois. These are not the only
states to watch in this '56 campaign.
There will probably be close races
in Florida, Virginia, Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky.
The "States' Rights" Party has a
better than even chance to carry
Virginia. The Democrats received
a boost in Kentucky this week when
Governor Chandler came out in
support of Stevenson. His support
means that the state workers will
now come out and work for a Democratic victory. There are two senatorial seats at stake in Kentucky
and political analyists feel that the
Democrats and Republicans will
each capture one. Stevenson carried
Kentucky in '52 by 700 votes and is
expected to do much better this
year. Florida is leaning toward
Eisenhower as is Massachusetts. Due
to the strong party patronage that
the Democrats control in Pennsylvania, they should carry that state.
Ohio appears to be a toss-up.
of the farmers. There is considerable unrest in the farm areas. Most
of the criticism has been directed
against Secretary of Agriculture
Benson rather than President Eisenhower.
The Democrats have concentrated
their efforts in two different areas.
Stevenson has been active in the big
cities on the East and West coasts,
while Kefauver has been concentrating his efforts in the farm belt.
He is extremely popular in this
area. The Democrats feel that as in
'48, they can hold the normal Democratic states and pick up enough
electoral votes in the farm belt area
to win the election.
The main issue of this campaign
has been the hydrogen bomb tests.
Stevenson maintains that an international agreement should be reached to cease all such tests while
Eisenhower has emphatically opposed such a move. The issue became an explosive one this week
when Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulganin sent a message to the President advocating an end to all hydrogen bomb tests. Both presidential candidates have criticized Bulganin for interfering in U. S. internal affairs. It is expected that
the issue of the hydrogen bomb will
continue to be a dominant one
throughout the remaining days of
the campaign. Even our scientists
The Republicans have campaign- seem to be split on the issue.
ed on a slogan of "Peace and ProsWhen the votes are all counted
perity." Vice-President Nixon has
been doing most of the campaigning, this year, you will probably notice
although President Eisenhower has that the voters have tended to shift
stepped up his campaign activity in away from voting a straight party
recent weeks. Their campaign has ticket. This tendency will be noticed
been based on the Eisenhower rec- particularly in New York, Kenord. The major problem that the tucky, Oregon, Pennsylvania and
Republicans have run into is that Massachusetts. Watch for it.
Kathleen Monsees '57, Literary
Editor, announces that Primer, the
literary magazine on campus, will
hold its first regular meeting
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in Brubacher Hall.
Dr. Shields Mcllwaine, Professor
of English and Chairman of the
Department, will speak briefly on
what has been the function of
Primer in the past, and the standards it has established for itself.
Some selections from past Primers
will also be read. A story by William
Smith '57 entitled "Marbles," which
last year won the Leah Lovenheim
Prize annually awarded each year
by the English Department, first appeared in Primer '56. All those interested in literary, critical, art and
business work, regardless of year,
are invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
A second meeting will be held
sometime in November. At this time
specific staff assignments will be
made.
The deadline for short stories,
poems, and essays, of any type,
whether serious, critical, or humorous, is December 3. Students are requested to send material to Miss
Monsees '57 via either Student Mail
or the Primer box located outside
the girls' locker room in lower
Draper. All are welcomed to submit
material, regardless of class year.
Pseudonyms may be used if desired
as long as the Literary Editor has
•means of contact with the actual
person.
This year's editors are: June
Frankland, Editor-in-Chief; Miss
Monsees, Literary Editor; John
Beiners, Art Editor, Seniors; Frieda
Cohen '58, Business Manager.
will be required to file registration
papers with the Teacher Placement
Bureau during this current semester. This includes all Graduate Students who will be eligible for a degree on a certificate by January
1957, June 1957, or August 1957.
Seniors and Graduate students
may secure registration material in
Room 101, if they have not already
done so. The material should be returned at the earliest convenience
of the student. This will be followed
by an interview with Mr. Shostak,
Assistant in Teacher Placement.
Arrangement for an interview can
be taken care of when the registration material is returned.
Registration with the Teacher
Placement Bureau may begin as
soon as possible.
Outing Group
Sponsors Films
Two movies are to be presented at
Wednesday night's meeting of the
Outing Club, states David Kleinke
'57, President. The movies, "Ski New
York" and "New York in Winter"
will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in Brubarher Hall. Both the films are in
technicolor. Admission will be free
to all students at State and skiers
are particularly welcome and urged
to attend.
Students are reminded that bicycles are available for their use on
every Saturday. All those who wish
to take advantage of this opportunity are requested to sign up on the
Outing Club bulletin board. The
bicycles can then be obtained in
For the present, any additional Brubacher from the Outing Club
information concerning Primer may member in charge of checking them
be obtained from Miss Monsees '57. out.
Campus Chest, a week-long fund
raising campaign ended Friday.
Heading the campaign for this year
were Gayle Petty, Lloyd Seymour,
and Margaret Rochford, Juniors,,
and Anne King '59.
Treasurer, Miss King, reports t h a t
thus far $852.08 has been collected.
This total falls short of the $1500
goal and far below last year's total
of $1291.05.
Sayles Hall, the sororities and
fraternities all contributed very
generously. Contributions of freshman dormitories and those of students living off campus lagged behind. The Chinese Auctions, auctioning off late permission slips for
girls, sorority and fraternity members to wait on tables, and Spanish
dinners proved very successful.
The Campus Chest funds are distributed on an international, national, and local plan.
As all contributions are not in
yet, the following allocations are
subject to change: World University
Service, $398.10; University of Athens, $159.25; United Negro Scholarship Fund, $159.25; and the Albany
Community Chest, $79.61.
Meeting To Discuss
New Teacher Group
A number of persons have shown
interest in starting a local chapter
on campus of the national organization known as FTA, or Future
Teachers of America. It is an
organization for those who wish to
gain practical teaching experience
and belong to a national group of
people with the same interests.
All students, particularly freshmen and Sophomores, are invited to
a meeting Tuesday night in Brubacher to discuss the forming of
such a group. If you are interested
and can not attend see David Miller '60.
WINSTON scores top marks for flavor!
WINSTON
TASTES GOOD /
•
^
v,
LIKE A
CIGARETTE
SHOULD,
with
WINSTON
ii
I
r
m.
• What's all the shouting about? Flavor!
Full, rich flavor — in a filter smoke! Yes,
and Winston's exclusive filter — a filter that
docs its job so well the flavor really comes
through to you, Here's a filter cigarette
college smokers can enjoy! Get Winston!
n. J . REYNOLDS
TOBACCO C O . ,
Switch to WINSTON Americas best-selling, best-tasting filter cigarette!
WINSTON.SALEM, N . C.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Vol. YLI, No. 19
(1956)
This issue numb er does not exist due to misnumbering of other 1956
issues.
Download
Related flashcards

Religion and politics

36 cards

Royal families

18 cards

Languages of Guinea

22 cards

Forms of government

29 cards

Monarchy

23 cards

Create Flashcards