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Conduct Teachers Are Eager To Marry ,
Psychologist Tells Male Population
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City Wide Poll
••• Inter-Fraternity - Inter-Sorority i Continued from Page l, Column If)
Council is now making plans for Center tomorrow from 9:30 a. m, to
the annual Christmas Ball to be 3 p. m. The committee in charge of
held Friday evening, December 10, this consists of Arliene Zeilengold
at-the Auranla Club.
'49, and Fleta Wright '52.
Thursday
afternoon
Seminars
Music will be furnished by Fred
Clute and his orchestra from have been planned, extending to
Johnstown. Dancing will be from Thanksgiving, according to Miss Si9 pin. to 1 ajn., and all dormitory mon. They will consist of a series
of programs entitled "The Ameriwomen -vill havo 2 o'clock hours.
can Negro" and will be under the
The ball will be semi-formal, and direction of James Butts and Dantickets will cost $3.00 per couple, iel Joy, freshmen. The first meettax included. The dance is open to ing featured Negro religion and an
all State College students, not just explanation of the customs, revival
sorority and fraternity members.
meetings, baptism, and testimony.
Co-Chairmen for the affair are Also discussed was the effect of reHelen Cook and Richard Zeller, ligion on the folkways of the AmSeniors; The various committees in- erican Negro. The sequence will
clude:
Arrangements,
Abraham continue with a program on Negro
Trop '49; Orchestra, Mary Jane music, and a final meeting on the
Peris '49; Bids, Jean Totman '49; Socio-Economics of the American
Chaperones, Marvin Wayne '49; Negro.
Concessions, Thomas Lisker '49;
Christian Lievestro '50, reports
Publicity, Earle Jones '50; and Dec- that
final arrangements with Staorations, Ever son Kinn '49.
tion WROW are being completed
* * * *
for the weekly radio show about to
Tomorrow Phi Delta will cele- be produced under the direction of
brate the 25th aniversary of its IGC. It is expected that the startfounding at State College with a ing date and time of the fifteenluncheon to be held at Wagars at minute show will be announced next
1 p. m.
week.
Ethel Bisland Wachter '25, and
Marie Townsend Moore '27, will read
the history of the sorority from the
acquisition of its first house in
May, 1924, until the purchase of its
present house in December, 1946.
Officers of the active alumni
chapter include: President, Mrs.
Wilford Jenkins '29; Vice President,
Mrs. Kenneth Ford '47; Secretary,
Mary Elizabeth Christman '42;
Treasurer, Frances Smith '28.
* * * *
According to Abraham Trop '49,
President of Kappa Beta, the fraternity has leased a house at 288
Quail Street.
The duplex house will accommodate about 13 men, and plans have
been made to occupy the house November 15. It contains five bedrooms, a living room, kitchen, and
breakfast nook.
* * * *
Dr. Ellen Stokes, Dean of Women,
has announced that the quota of
freshman girls accepted into the
sororities during first semester has
been raised to 20 girls. Th'; second
semester quota of 5 girls remains
the same. This increase of 5 invitations per sorority Is due primarily
to the large number of girls in the
freshman class.
An International News Service
release found in the Watertown
Daily Times, Watertown, New York,
recently, was headed, "Psychologist
Recommends School Teacher as
Bride." The young hopefuls of State
College should well heed the words
of Dr. James F. Bender, director of
the National Institute for Human
Relations who listed, in the press
release, ten reasons—purely intellectual—why schoolmarms make
better wives than women who don't
teach school.
Dr. Bender, a widely-known psychologist, urges men to marry
school teachers because his studies
have led him to the conclusion that
they are "lovable, eager to marry,
and less 'yak-ity-yak-ity' than most
other women."
These are the reasons he gives:
1. They are above average in
health, beauty and intelligence.
2. They have a deep affection
for children.
3. Thay are eager to marry, and
wish to bear two or more children.
4. They have well-protected jobs,
safe during a recession.
5. They have nice voices and
don't talk too much.
6. Their regular hours and fre-
'48 GradsflFind
Varied Positions
quent vacations permit them to be
good housekeepers,
7. Their studious habits and
common sense are invaluable to
young men starting in business or
a profession.
8. Their high ideals make them
lovable, tender, sympathetic and
understanding beyond the average.
9. They are established in jobs
and ready for marriage at the golden age for it—22 to 25 years.
10. Divorce is rare among teachers.
SMILES Painting Party
To Be Held At Home
According to Alan Campbell '51,
President of "Smiles," more State
students are asked to aid in the
tutoring and athletic departments
at the Albany Home. Those Interested should contact Susan Panek
'51.
Campbell also announces that
there will be Painting Parties to be
held at the Home Chapel, one, tomorrow at 9 a. m. and the other,
Thursday, Armistice Day, also at 9
a. m.
Refreshments will be served at
both occasions.
(Continued from Page 3, Column 1)
High English; Adrienne Iorlo, Oppenheim, English, Art; Mary Van
Voorhis,
Voorheesville,
English,
Latin; Eloise Worth, Brldgehampton, English; Estelle Slegel, Altamont, English, Spanish; Eileen Abrams, Bell Telephone Laboratory;
William D. Baldwin, Homer, English,
Drama; Marie Balfoort,South New
Berlin,
Mathematics,
Science;
Kathleen Bell, Westport, Commerce;
Hazel Engdahl, Westfield, English;
Rita Shapiro, Middleton, Social
Studies; Anne Donovan, Poughkeepsie, English; Grace Jones, Jefferson, English, Mathematics; Rita
Brizel, Oneonta, Commerce; Elaine
Clute, I.B.M., Albany; Beverly Bistoff, Springfield, Commerce; Sylvia
Fisher,
Middletown,
Commerce;
Mary Larson, Falconer, English;
Doris Hawks, Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; Jean Henry,
Colton, Spanish, Mathematics; Myra Rosenberg, Bronx, Commerce;
Evelyn Stephen, Newton Falls, Science; Paula Tichy, East Isltp, Science; Carmella DeLesio, Richburg,
Mathematics; Paul Blerwlsch, Red
Hook, Elementary.
CHESTERFIELD IS BUILDING
ANOTHER FACTORY
BECAUSE ALL OVER AMERICA MORE MILLIONS
OF SMOKERS ARE ASKING FOR
*
*
*
+
Leslie Webber '49, has been appointed as editor of the sorority
booklet which is to serve as a guide
for the freshman girls in selecting
a sorority. It will be similar to the
fraternity
booklet,
"Prospectus,"
and will include officers, location
of the sorority houses, capacity of
the houses, dues and restrictions to
joining the sorority.
The booklet will be distributed
next week, and every freshman girl
will receive one through student
mail.
Pi Omega Pi To Send
Newsletter To Alumni
'Slam' Styles
Quartet
Have Yourselves a Ball!
DON DICKINSON, Mgr.
2444
MAKE YOU t i t THE kULLMiU. CIGARETTE
f:fo:*ttffa::
Copyright w-tw, LiooFff * Mvut TO&ACCQ CO.
..j/ufb&Gffc
ALBANY. N E W Y O R K ,
ews
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER
"DON'T
PASS
THE
BUCK"
VOL. XXXIII NO. 8
12, 1 B 4 8
Religious clubs Morning's Assembly To Feature
r\t
LJ
"
H \ / *•
Queens UF Harmony, Voting
Chairman Asks
Student Dollars Schedule Talks, a ^ \
For Campus Chest Panel Discussion
Will Distribute Funds
Among Orsanizations
OF City And Nation
Campus Chest Drive opens at
State today and will run until November 19, according to Ruth Smith
'50, Chairman.
In a statement released last week
Acting President Nelson urged all
students and faculty personnel to
support the drive. "The Campus
Chest is patterned after the Community Chest which supports so
many worthwhile services. We, the
faculty and students of this college,
are being given the opportunity to
take part in carrying to a successful
conclusion a drive for funds.
Nelson Supports Drive
"The truly educated person is
never one who is concerned solely
with himself but one who sees the
needs oi his fellow men and one who
grasps opportunities for participation in charitable services. It is my
belief that the Campus Chest Drive
for this college is truly of importance and that those responsible for
its development have
thought
through their problems and are definitely worthy of the support of
both faculty and students."
Last year the funds collected during our Campus Chest Drive were
divided among the World Student
Service Fund, Red Cross, Infantile
Paralysis Foundation, Albany Community Chest, American Cancer Society, Tuberculosis Association, and
SMILES. This year there is just as
great a need by our national relief
associations and a greater one by
the World Student Service Fund,
according to Miss Smith.
Plan Aid To Europe
WSSF plans to send books, equipment and medical aid to students
and faculties in Europe and Asia
this year, to augment the governmental policies of sending food and
heavy machinery. It is the only national organization pledged to give
aid to university people in all parts
of the world regardless of race,
color, and creed.
All those concerned with State are
being asked to contribute a dollar
to this cause. Miss Smith has appointed members of her committee
to canvass every dormitory, sorority
and fraternity liou.se and members
of the faculty.
Special committees to reach commuters and anyone not living in a
group house have been appointed.
As last year, a contest is being held
to determine the first group house
which reports 100r; cooperation.
Area Colleges Plan
Monthly IGC Meeting
Clifton Thome '49, President, has
announced that at its first meeting
last week, Pi Omega Fi formulated
its program for the coming year.
One of the features of the contemplated plans is a Newsletter which
will be .sent to all Alumni and aLso
to all first year Commerce teachers.
Pi Omega Pi, in conjunction with
Commerce Club, has also tentatively scheduled a business conference
to be held at State during the first
part of second semester.
In addition, numerous speakers
are planned to enlighten students
on conditions in the commerce
field and public school systems.
ollege
State
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S , FRIDAY. N O V E M B E R 9 , 1 S 4 8
pAtnc s
• „>«"''
"Is Unity Desirable in America,"
was the topic under discussion at
last week's meeting of Inter-Group
Council. This group also initiated
the first in a series of broadcasts,
called, "Ballad for Americans," on
WKOW at 9:45 p. m. last night.
At the Area College Meeting, Mrs.
Hose Freund of the Albany InterRacial Council acted as moderator
and it was decided to hold an Area
College Meeting each month. Judith
Oxenhnndler '51, Chairman of the
Inter-Collegiate
Committee, announced that a program committee,
composed of the members of the
participating colleges, would meet
Monday night to set up programs
for the following meetings. The
members of this committee who
will represent Statu are: Arlcne
Zeilengold '49, Fay Richards '51,
and Barbara Angell '52.
Featured on the program sponsored by IOC will be State students,
members of the (acuity and guest
artists. This program Is written and
produced by Christluan Lievestro
'50.
Hillel and Newman Club are
sponsoring lectures in the near future; a panel discussion on "Comparative Religions" is to be held
with members of the various Religious clubs acting as speakers and
Student Christian Association has
several district functions planned.
Paul Ilton, noted journalist and
archeologist, will speak to Hillel
November 21, at 8 p. m., in the
Lounge. His subject will be "(Palestinian Art Treasures" and an exhibit will accompany the lecture.
Newman Club is sponsoring
Father Jeremiah Smith as the
speaker in the second of a series
of lectures at the Playhouse, Sunday at 3:30 p. m., on the topic,
"Israel and the World." The meeting is open to the general public.
Representatives of Catholic, Jewish, Christian Science and Protestant groups will conduct a panel discussion on the topic "What I Believe" in an effort to create a better understanding of different religions. Dr. Frances F. Colby, Instructor in English, will be moderator of the discussion.
Friday, the Capitol District Council of the Student Christian Movement will hold its fall banquet at 6
p. m. at St. Peter's Episcopal
Church. Reverend William Berger,
who has spent much time working
among men of the lumber industry, will be the chief speaker of the
evening. Tickets which cost $1.75,
may be secured from Barbara
Houck '49.
w
Pi Gamma M u
Schedules Trip,
Elects Members
Sororifies H o l d
O p e n Houses,Parties Staged
Pi Gamma Mu will sponsor a trip
to the Phillip Schuyler Mansion tomorrow, at 1:30 p. m., according to
Marvin Wayne '49, president of the
organization. Wayne also has released the list of new members recently elected to Pi Gamma Mu.
Several sororities have made plans
for this weekend, including open
houses and date parties. Kappa
Delta, Psi Gamma, Gamma Kappa
Phi and Phi Delta will participate.
Kappa Delta will hold a date
party from 8:30 to 12 p. m. tonight,
according to Jean Hotaling '50,
Chairman. The committees are: Arrangements, Joan Erlandson, J e anne Bowen and Marjorie Southwick, Juniors; Refreshments, Barbara Smith '50, Emily Rose and
Willa Hcllwig, Sophomores; Receiving, Jcanette Teal, Fay Richards
and Marilyn Strehlow, Sophomores.
Psi Gamma has scheduled an
open house for tomorrow night
from 8:30 to 12 p. m. for State
men. The co-chairmen are Patricia Brady and Rita Bissonette,
Sophomores.
Mary Jane Peris '49, President,
has announced that Gamma Kappa
Phi will hold an open house tomorrow night from 8 to 12 p. m The
committees are: Decorations, Lois
Prescott '51; Refreshments, Christina Sanzo '50, and Ethel Heath '51.
Fhi Delta sorority will hold a date
party tonight from 8:30 to 12 p. m.
All State students are invited to
accompany the group on its trip to
the historic site, according to
Wayne, and all those interested
should meet in front of Draper at
the specified time. The only expense
involved will be bus fare of ten
cents. In case of rain, the trip will
be postponed until Saturday, November 20.
The newly elected members of Pi
Gamma Mu have been chosen from
tlio.se who have attained the required twenty hours of B work in
the field of Social Studies. They
include: Morris Gerber, Graduate;
William Balm. William Brayden,
Bruce Brenner, Dorothy Butch, Carl
Byers, Joseph Carosella, Stanley
Schwalik, Richard Clark, Beverly
Caplon, Clifford Crooks, Charles
Frail, Robert French, Marion Furlong, John Jennings, Laura Kaplan,
Doris Nielson, Abraham Trop, Norene Thorson, June Youmans, Peter
Youmans, Seniors; Francis Andreone, Henry Dombrowski, David
Durkee, Seymour Fersh, Peter Havey, Betty Hutton, James Lawson,
Pierce McGrath, Leonard Skolnick,
The Sophomore class will hold a Earline Thompson, Harold Vaughn,
party tonight in the gymnasium Lyle Walsh. Juniors.
from 8:30 to 11:30 p. m., according
A formal initiation for the new
to Donald Ely, President. Zeb
Frouty and his orchestra will fur- members will be held Wednesday in
nish the music, with Bill Hazelton the Lounge at 4:30 p. m. Refreshcalling the square dance numbers. ments will be served.
The evening's festivities will include round dancing, square danc- Clinton Square House Holds
ing, group singing, refreshments and Food, Article Sale Tomorrow
entertainment. There will be no adThe Clinton Square Neighbormission charged, but only Sophomores will be admitted to the party. hood House at 174 North Pearl
Heading the various committees Street, one of the settlement houses
are: Arrangements, David Wether- aided under the auspices of Comby, William Reynolds; Refresh- munity Service, is holding a sale of
ments, Gerald Dunn, Jay Miller; food and articles made by the chilDecorations, Lois Prescott; Enter- dren. The sale will be conducted
tainment, Jane Cook; Publicity, Vir- from 10 a. m. until 4 p. m. tomorrow, according to Stuart Goldman
ginia Szatkowski.
Mr. Frank Carrino, Instructor in '51. All State students arc invited
Spanish, and Dr. Joseph Lccse, In- to attend the affair, and to inspect
structor in Education, and Mrs. the house, which will be open to
all visitors.
Leeso, will act as chaperones.
Sophs To Hold
Party
Tonight
KDR Will Hold
Party At Pierce
girls' locker room) to a reception
held for the members of the cast by
the Dramatics and Arts Council and
there we surrendered him to Ids admirers.
Next we swooped down on a group
composed of Virginia McDowell,
Norman Roland, and Dion Allen,
who were earnestly talking to a
group of State .students.
"One afternoon in New England,"
said Dion Allen, portrayer of Guildenstern, "we played as the second
feature in a movie house! The marquee read 'Rachel and the Stranger
starring Loretta Young . . . Macbeth 1:30!!'"
"In Montreal the audience tossed
footballs across the auditorium during the performance! Shades of
State College, We thought, as we
turned to the speaker, Norman Roland, the Banquo of Macbeth. "One
night," he continued, "it was so bad
that in the middle of his soliloquy
Junior Class To Vote;
Frosh Will Apologize
The "Queens of Harmony," a
group of local high school girls, will
present the program for today's assembly. Also scheduled is discussion
on the request of the Directory
Staff for an additional $125. I n cluded on the agenda are three
freshman apologies and elections by
the Junior class to fill two Student
Council vacancies.
As the feature event for this
morning's program, Inter-Group
Council will present the "Queens of
Harmony," a group of five Negro
girls from the Albany Union Baptist
Church, who will sing modern spirituals and other popular tunes.
The business discussion today will
center on the motion made by Dorothy Parr '49, Co-Editor of the Directory, for an additional appropriation of $125.
Will Elect Representatives
The Class of 1950 has two Student Council vacancies to fill due
to the election of William Lyons to
the Vice-iPresidency of Student Association, and the resignation of
Anthony Prochilo. Candidates for
the office are: James Cafaro, Richard Feathers, Albert Holliday, Ruth
Matteson, Catherine Noonan, and
Earline Thompson.
At Student Council meeting, held
Tuesday night, Robertson Baker '49,
reported that the new furniture in
the Commons will have identification tags put on it.
Present Memorial Report
The report of the War Memorial
Committee was also presented. Harold Vaughn '50, gave the report of
the investigation of a scholarship.
He said that to give a scholarship
of $500 per year, a capital investment of at least $20,000 would be
necessary. Audrey Koch '50, gave
the report of the group which investigated organs, and stated that
several instruments are within the
range of possibility.
(Continued on Page e,Golumn t)
The Ingle Room at Pierce Hall
will be utilized by the Gamma
chapter of Kappa Delta Rho for
the annual "KDR Manor" rush
party, which is to be held tomorrow
night at 8 p. m.
Carroll Galltvan '50, Chairman of
the affair, has announced that the
Ingle Room will be decorated in the
fraternity's colors of blue and orange. Gallivan lias also announced
that Miss Margaret Fahy, a vocalist with several local bands, will be
featured in the entertainment.
The committees are: Favors, John
umors, rrosh nan
Bropliy '49; Decorations, Robert
Merrill and Robert Van Dam, Seniors; invitations, William Blasberg Get-Together Party
'49; Arrangements, Donald Ely and
A Get-Together Party, sponsored
William Isley, Sophomores; Chap- by the Junior and freshman classes,
erones, Mervin McClintock, Gradu- will be held tonight from 8 to 11:30
ate.
p. m. in the Commons for members
of these two classes only. Dancing,
entertainment, refreshments, bridge,
pinochle, and ping pong will highlight the evening's activities.
General chairman of the affair
is Marie De Carlo '50, assisted by
the committee heads, which include:
Entertainment, Anthony Prochilo
Hamlet stopped and turning to the '50, John Bowkcr '52; Refreshments,
audience said. T am under the im- Jovce Dodge '50, Marilyn Smith '52;
pression thai the doors to this the- Fu'blicity, Edith Minch '50, Robert
ater are NOT locked.' During the Work '52; Cleanup, Rose Mary
same week Miss Webster had to Willsey '50, Raymond Sanderson '52;
make four speeches to the audience Decorations, Robert Frasca '50, Mitrequesting their cooperation while chell Burkowsky '52.
the actors were performing. Honestly, the audience we found here Freshmen Receive Warningi
was mosl courteous."
For Violations Of Traditions
Miss McDowell admitted that she
A third warning from Myskanla
too thought we were a most, receptive audience. As the evening pro- for a violation of a State College
gressed we were amazed to discov- tradition has been received by
er that this charming girl who car- Betty Adams '51. Raymond Homic
ried off the difficult role of Ophelia and Shirley Ripley, freshmen, have
was also a sister to Roddy McDow- received second and third warnings.
A public apology in assembly, which
ell of Hollywood fame.
We left the reception contentedly is the penalty for a third offense,
feeling that the evening had been will be given by the three fresha success. From the over-all view it men in this morning's assembly.
Ross Federico, Ann Hahn, Mary
l- evident thai we appreciated and
respected the Margaret Webster Beckerle, Eli Ballin and Joan Titus,
freshmen, have received second
Players and that they appreciated warnings.
and respected us.
Websfer Troupers Pass Approval On State Audiences;
Tell Of Varied Experiences Encountered While Touring
By EARLE JONES
The last curtain had dropped and
a satisfied audience was demonstrating its loud approval. Amid the
confusion of removing make-up and
changing from costume into street
dress, we hung around listening to
the performers' opinions of the audience and were very pleased at
what we heard. Apparently State
College audiences aren't as bad as
they have been painted—that is,
when the price is high enough.
We cornered Joseph Holland and
told him how much we enjoyed his
fine performance as Macbeth. Contrary to the expectations derived
from his stellar exhibition, we found
Mr. Holland a quiet, unassuming
person with a very pleasant voice
and a radiant personality. During
the course of our conversation he
showed quite an interest in the
dramatic courses offered at Stale
and seemed amazed that we did so
much with so little. We led Mr.
Holland over to the lounge (viu the
S A To Debate
Financial Motion
J
Frosh Pl<
PAGE *
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 12. 1 9 4 6
STATE C O L L t O - NEW*. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 12. 1 * 4 6
PAGE 3
-,-.....—.. . , „
Charity Abroad
"Don't pass the buck. Give it to Campus Chest."
This is the familiar slogan which is heard all over
the country during Campus Chest Drives. This is
also the slogan to which we should hearken during
State College's Drive which starts today and continues until next Friday.
The argument may be advanced that charity begins at home but the cause for which this money
is intended should make us realize the importance
of our individual contributions. The World Student Service Fund uses the money to send books,
equipment, and medical aid to those students enrolled in colleges abroad. Certainly, we need such
items in our U. S. colleges but it's a matter of comparison. The WSSF is unique in its help to students and receives the largest portion of its income
from American students and faculties.
However, this money is not only given to WSSF.
Last year it was divided among the Red Cross, Infantile Paralysis Foundation, Albany Community
Chest, American Cancer Societies, Tuberculosis Association and SMILES.
The canvassers have been appointed for each
group house and throughout the school. Last year
approximately $700 was collected and this year the
goal has been set at one dollar per student. The
drive has already gotten off to a good start—$46
has been collected. How about it, State College?
Shouldn't we give one hundred percent to support
the drive?
"Don't depend on your neighbor. Give YOUR
Dollar."
M i n d Changed?
Despite t h e downpour Tuesday
night a considerably large crowd
came out to see the AD plays. Those
who were honestly Interested were
rewarded with an evening of good
entertainment.
The first play, a comedy directed
by Tink WittPenn, had some good
moments and certainly a fine underlying theme of brotherhood.
However Miss WittPenn's offering
fell down because of a minimum
of action for such a large cast
and the length of time necessary
to change sets between scenes.
The audience, consequently lost
the
mood.
Nevertheless, Tom
Lisker gave the play vitality, and
Ross Federico endowed the title role
with a humane quality; the comical
faces of Ed Carvin were enjoyed by
all.
Then came the shock of the evening: S...X reared its unfortunate
head in Page Hall. Perhaps we were
in the wrong, but we interpreted
the play as a drama; but all around
us fellow students still had water
gurgling in their ears and gargle
in their mouths. It's too bad that
Dave Shepard didn't change his line
to "Goodbye out there" so the audience might have taken the hint
and left. I n spite of this, the play,
ably directed by George Christy,
turned out successfully with excellent performances by Dave Shepard
and Joan French.
If this mass hee-hawing continues, the nasty rumor may get about
that we are all a bunch of Mongolian idiots. I t could be that AD ought
to offer Mother Goose for the uninitiated and Mack Sennett for the
more "advanced" humorists in the
student audiences; or are these too
deep?
". . . At least they enjoyed it,"
said Dave Shepard. "They laughed."
Sure, they laughed, but then so do
hyenas.
Advice *la A 4*odU
This poem was written to a
freshman by her father.
If you can do your Math when all
about you
Are planning dates and other light
affairs;
If you're content in dungarees and
loafers
When pumps and evening gowns
your roommate wears;
• * *
If you can wait for mid-semester
markings
Without a fear of warnings in your
heart;
And feel that Student Council and
Myskania
Are really poeple God has set apart;
» * «
If you can bear to sit through boring lectures
And yet think education's quite the
thing;
If in your speech you're most precise and proper,
And ribald songs you never never
sing;
If you ?an stretch your usual allowance
Without an S.O.S. to Mom or Dad;
You neither smoke nor drink . . .
need I go farther?
(And these are habits you have
never had;)
* **
If you can meet a tall, good looking Sophomore
Without a glint of conquest in your
eyes;
If you are never whistled at or
hubba-ed,
Or if you are, at least can feign
surprise;
Toward the beginning of the year, two editorials
were printed which urged the students, graduates,
and faculty to take advantage of the new cafeteria
plan which was suggested by the administration.
With this plan, meals could be secured in the cafeteria for $100 per semester.
# * +
At the time, 88 persons registered to participate
If you can keep all rules and reguin this program. The general feeling was that they
lations
could take care of themselves and feed themselves
And never take a cut or make a
at the times they desired and at the places they
slip,
desired. Those persons eligible did not want to
You may be quite content at State,
my daughter,
feel that they would have to lose their freedom and
But even so you're what they call a
tie themselves up for institution food.
D
Two months have passed and those people eliR
gible for the program have had sufficient time to
I
P.
make up their minds and form their opinions as to
what they would like to do. The same advantages
a« were presented early in the fall are available if
a sufficient number of persons are interested.
At least reconsider and think it over . . . perhaps
it was not such a foolhardy idea after all. Only
By DAVE DURKEE
] SO persons in the program are necessary for its
Overconfldence has lost a football formulate a modified labor law. The
operation.
game; and now it seems that over- same can be done in regard to the
confidence has lost an election. Civil Rights issue—by appointing a
However, disregarding all theories two-sided commission willing to lison why or how it happened the fact ten to all representative views. Aremains that you, the voter, did it. mong the other problems confrontDramatics and Arts Council should be congratu- To use the words of Edward J. ing the new administration is the
lated for bringing to the State College audience Flynn, "you're the boss."
one of price control. With labor
the Webster troupe and performances of "MacTwo remarkable points about the claiming that they put the new
beth" and "Hamlet."
political upset are that the presi- president into office, will he be able
to accomplish an effective price
D&A was criticized last year after the perform- dent carried the ball, unlaudcd and control without wage control? One
alone;
and
that
he
made
very
few
ance and flop of the Eddie Dowling show. This commitments. It's the latter that alone is not sufficient.
year they concentrated their efforts on one big per- will make his inauguration unprecThen with the expected federal
formance and certainly secured for us one of the edented in U. S. history.
As it aid to education, housing bill, and
best possible guest artists that they could with stands now he can either say to hell extended foreign aid, plus a billion
with the Dixiecrats or coerce them dollar deficit coming up next June,
their current budget,
back into the Democratic fold; he the tax situation will make even a
can apoint his chiefs and depart- New Dealer's head swim.
ment heads with a free mind; but
Yes, if tho new administration
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
above all he can look up the avenue plans wisely and acts wisely it may
and say, "now we can go ahead." not only mean the continued sucEstablished May 1916
Yes, he can say that, but will he cess oi the Democratic party but
Gy the Class of 191 8
do that, or more .specifically, will he the demise of the GOP. If the
be able to do it? Though he has a platform of the party-elect is carRATING—ALL-AMERICAN
Democratic majority in both the ried out, it will attract more SocialNovember 12, 1948
No. 8 House and the Senate there is ists to its fold whereas the ProgresVol. XXXIII
the Republican and Southern Dem- sives should realize that their "proI>lsl r i b u t o r
Member
Collegiate Digest ocrat coalition to be feared—a pos- test" vote nearly nave a victory to
Associated Collegiate Press
Tho untlargrnriuato newspaper of I h • N e w Y o r k S l i i l u C o l - sible team-up on the Taft-Hartley the party furthest from their ideals.
lege for Touchers; published i-vcr,\ F r i d a y o f t h e c o l l e g e and Civil Rights issues.
Although With increased expenditures for
year by the NEWS Hoard lor ill • Student
Association.
Democratic party fervently housing aid, aid to education, and
P h o n e s : I'ulver, Spencer, a n d furlong, 'J 1)1.11; l.aiidait, the
Troy, 275-W; Walte and Jerue, s-tr.W. Members of the pledged repeal of the T-H law and health and medical plans looming
news staff may lie reached Tuesday ami Wednesday from a continued fight for civil rights, a before us, what could be more bene7 to 11 :Iill P. M. lit 3-IM07.
majority of only 2 million votes does ficial, In the view of the Socialist,
not indicate that the former should than to take from the "haves" to
The News Board
be immediately thrown out or that give to the "have-nots"? The trend
the latter should be hastily summed has definitely set In.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JEAN PULVER
+ * *
PUBLIC RELATIONS EDITOR up and Incorporated into law. It's
ELSIE LANDAU - definitely
true
that
action
Is
needed
I
guess
we
all
have our theories
MANAGING
EDITOR
J E A N SPENCER
SPORTS EDITOR on these two points and many oth- on the election outcome but I'm inROBERT VAN DAM
CIRCULATION MANAGER ers carried in the Democratic plat- clined to believe that regardless of
VIRGINIA WAITE
MARION FURLONG
ADVERTISING form, but the closeness of the popu- how the voter felt before Nov. _,
AUDREY JERUE
A D V E R T I S I N G lar vote should signify that precau- when he closed that curtain he
GLORIA DONATO
BUSINESS tion and analysis are sorely needed. just thought that things weren't so
RODNEY FELDER
B U S I N E S S One alternative of the President's bad as they were pictured and as
ROSEMARY STODDARD
EXCHANGE EDITOR is to cull a "cooling off period" be- long as hit was making out, why
RUTH COOKINGHAM .
- A S S O C I A T E EDITOR tween management and labor In should he leave the boat. As long
BERNADETTE FREEL
A S S O C I A T E EDITOR which both sides can get together as Lhe majority felt that way, then
SHIRLEY WILTSE .
.
.
.
A S S O C I A T E EDITOR in an even-sided conference, and we must be fairly well off.
. . . 3)on'i flelax Ijet . . .
Thanks . . .
(Zommon-Sta&i
. . . And 1Uuf Still £<u4fU
By Tony Praohllo
The Common-Stater is given the widest latitude as
author of this column, although Ms viewpoints do
not necessarily
reflect those
of the STAT_ COLLBQH
NEWS.
CORRECTION, PLEASE
Everybody's on my neck asking "where this boy
gets his nerve" writing about taking it easy on the
parties. This calls for an explanation. I t seems that
the proof reader at tho printer's didn't think I could
mean such a thing, but my statement was, "I'm all
for a little immoderation in the way of celebration."
He knocked off the "im" on the word. I could never
have been in a position to say otherwise; because I
like a "good time" as well as the next guy.
Now, this is the point: We were careless; we made
too much of a good thing. Be sure you don't overimbibe. Know when to stop,, so that you don't make
a fool of yourself before outsiders.
AND, while we're at it, I'd like to make it clear that
the article was not referring to the Sophomore class
only. Ever since I wrote that little letter concerning
warnings (which I meant in all sincerity), you Sophs
seem to think that I'm out for your skins. I'm not.
I'd have nothing to gain in so doing. The article was
directed to every class. We should all get the lowdown; that's why I used the word "We". I included
myself, who am as much to blame as everyone else.
So let's make up; shake and be friends.
SUCCESSFUL COMEBACK
Well, D and A has certainly vindicated itself in the
eyes of State students. The Margaret Webster group
was terrific in the performances of "Macbeth" and
"Hamlet." Orchids go out especially to Joseph Holland
and Alfred Ryder, who played the two title roles.
After the evening performance, we sat and chatted
with the members of the cast over punch and cookies
in the Lounge. I was amazed to discover what really
swell eggs they are; it was quite a shock to find real
people after the impressions they made on the stage.
They expressed their appreciation for such fine
audiences and for what they considered a warm welcome. Hope we see them again next year.
DON'T STOP HERE
I have always been very intolerant of intolerance
in social organizations on campus. To my mind, the
place for religious expression and segregation (one
ol many regions of intolerance) is in the religious
clubs, such as Hillel, Newman and SCA. But this
segregation has extended to other campus groups.
In the past, some of these groups have made attempts at changing their basic precepts so that everybody can be included in their society, but due to
the influence of outside organizations, alumni, etc.,
their attempts have been thwarted.
Now, finally, the Phi Delta girls have announced a
change in their pledge requisites, so that they may
admit Catholics. That's swell. Maybe their lead will
be followed by others who have the gumption to do as
they feel they should, rather than be bullied by outside pressures. Are social groups for Americans or
are they for minority groups only?
The ball is rolling. I hope it doesn't hit a stone wall.
B!G-TIME
Dr. Nelson lias given permission to the Senior class
to investigate the possibilities for moving the commencement exercises to a place more suitable than
Page Hall. This is a move that has been all too longin coming. It will certainly be nice to have at least
both your parents see you graduate, and it'll be even
nicer to be able to invite a couple of friends besides.
Get a great, big place, Seniors.
A REAL FRIEND
I had an interview today with Dr. Morris, the College Psychologist, about my curriculum, extra curricula, future possibilities, etc. She doesn't give out
with any of this "you should, or ought to, or you'd
better not," stuff. She puts everything in such a way
that you find yourself doing just what she has found
out for you.
Why do I boilier writing about it? Because I want
t.t recommend her to anyone else who'd like some
good solid advice. Whether It's poor grades or for
some personal problem, go to her. She'll welcome the
chance lo help you.
Jones, Noonan
^V'll P 1
*
Comtdy,
I
X
"Who' Hoppens At RPI" Answered By NEWS Innovation
Wingate Resigns,
^s ^xcnan9e ^sues From American Universities Flood P.O.
I
tragedy
Greek, English Sets
Keefe To Head
Primer '48-'49
Been feeling a bit lonely lately?
Has the atmosphere of ye olde cap' o f colleges all over the U.S.A., don't create quite as much dlsturbital city been making you feel par- though principally from our own a n c e < d u e principally to geograph
tlally burled, or at least isolated? 0 ld New York And If you're the i c a l d i s t a n c e s of major female InstL
^*%u"^JtST&
o f
^
regular
-"*-" wh0 ha°'« * * SfiBi S S l ^ f K t
Staff Plant To Bond
ha
To Lend AtmOSDhere
habituees? Of course there's P« y ° u ' d b e „ interested to see be of interest.
Printer Fill. V i r . n r i * .
IO L e n a / - u m e s p n e r c
their college's rag is like, out-of-state colleges range from
r r i n t C r , THIS V a c a n c i e s
a l w a y s a c e r t a l n a m o u n t o f a t m o . what
Advanced Dramatics students, s P h e r e «* tt»tfs what you call it), Anyway, it wouldn't do any harm. t h e university of Georgia to Walla
v
m
reslKnatlon of Gifford
Earle Jones, and Catherine Noonan, w h a t w l t h notes and drawings on If they attend a teacher training Walla, Washington, and Include W inaate '49 as EdUoi-ln-Chlef of
the
Juniors, will direct two plays, Tuesblackboard, Forum holding its institution in this state, you may Bennington, Notre Dame and the Plit£er the'staff a t its last meetday in Page Hall. Miss Noonan's informal debates In the corner, and be sure their collegiate curricula are University of Southern California. i n
amended
t n e c o n s t itution in
play is a romantic tragedy and Mr. everyone in general shouting thru being covered, for all eleven New However, this list can be just as o r d e r t o e n a b l t h e i u n i o r s t a f f t o
Jones' is a Greek comedy. The plays t h e windows (barred, incidently, for York State teachers' colleges news- long as you want it. If there is any b e e l l g i b l e f o r t h e ^{^ I n t h e e i e c _
will begin at 8:30 p. m.
protection, not detention).
How- papers are received, as well as one college whose paper you would like t i m s f O n 0W ing Joseph Keefe '49
ever, now something new has been from Trenton.
to see, just drop a note to Rosemary w a s c n o s e n a s Editor-in-Chief to'
According to Mr. Jones, his play added. Leaning massively against
But of course there are other Stoddard, Exchange Editor of the s u c c e e d wingate
tells the story of "the face that the far wall is what is known as schools, which must not be ignored. NEWS, telling her the name of the
.
., ' ,
. . H n r l fh_
launched a thousand ships." His an Exchange Rack.
The story of State College women school and its address; if there is J £ a i e ™ « ° V n ' s r i l ^ f ' . ' , p n i
cast includes: George Christy '49, T h i s latest addition to the P.O.'s may be followed In the current files any spirit of cooperation in the Jopen.
^ °Arline
I ™
_? «S_
S X ™
Zeilengold
'49,
was
Martha Downey, George Kline, limited capacities includes the jour- of RPI, Siena, Union—even Syra- college, immediate action Is prom elected to fill the position. To take
Fred Kneorzer, Sophomores, and n a i j s t i c endeavors and masterpieces cuse. And though our men's doings ised!
over in the capacity of chairman of
Sue Danzis '52. Heading committhe committee investigating the new
tees
for theJoan
play French
are: Martin
,
constitution, the staff chose Jean
'50, Sets;
'50, Bush
CosIneson '49. Christiaan Lievestro '50,
tumes; Joseph Keefe '49, Lights;
RPI Judges Choose Zelanis
of Public Relations, will cooperate
Rhoda Riber '50, House; Phyllis
Maid O f Honor At IF Ball
with IGC and other campus activWitt Perm '50, Makeup; Jeanne Vaities.
lachovic '49, Publicity; Joseph CruBeautiful girls in swirling
cilla '50, Props and Sound.
Posters, which will define the
gowns, distinguished looking esstandards by which the manuscripts
corts in tuxedos and dark suits
To the Students:
The romantic tragedy has its set- To the Editor:
submitted for publication in Primer
stood still and tense in the
ting in a lord's headquarters during
Having been personally affected
We're hard-working people here will be judged, will be hung
crowded ballroom awaiting the
the reign of Queen Elizabeth, ac... T , , ..,
. . ,.
...
at State—we don't stay long if we throughout the buildings Monday.
decision of the judges. Eyes were
cording to Miss Noonan. Her cast m ^ l f ' J f e e l l t s a b o u t t i m e t h i s
bright with anticipation, faces
aren't willing to knuckle down. On . Activities intended to acquaint
includes: Joseph Keefe '49, An- problem, which has faced the enflushed with excitement. Who
thony Prochilo '50, Joseph Purdy U r e student body for a long time
. , _ , . .
interested freshmen with the magawas going to be queen? Who
'51, and Henry Smith '52. The com- (particularly
now!) should be
the whole, we appreciate efforts dis- z i n e a n d l t g f u n c t l o n a w i l l b e c o n .
was going to be the maid of
mittee heads are: Sets, Phyllis Witt brought to our attention. It's a displayed by fellow students, but ducted by Alvin Feldman '49.
honor? Who were the most
Penn '50; Lights, Joseph Crucilla grace! A shame!
Tuesday night at the AD plays was primer has announced that the
beautiful girls attending this
'50; Props, Jeanne Valachovic '49;
I am referring to the strange disball from communities far and
hardly an example of any such printer of this year's magazine will
Costumes, Marjorie Lyons '50
of
posters,
near? And suddenly the tense
House
l o a n F a r r e l l "5(1 • M i k p i i n appearance
"We-muuB
o i numerous
numerous
posters
sportsmanlike
appreciation. The per- b e bonded so as to avoid any rewhich have
anticipation turned into cheerMartin Bush '50 PPublicity
Joan
**en put up at considuWlclt
an
,
,,
,.
currence of the trouble last year,
French '50
y. J°
ing applause as the judges ane rable effort and work, to adveriormance put on by the audience
,
.
/
tise various affairs. Just because a
, could
' , t lnot be, followed or
The Primer Staff wishes to pubnounced the winners. And who the stage
service
he
has
rendered.
Wingate
was
such
that
the
performance
on
l
i
c
l
y
L
h
a
n
k
Q
l
f
f
o
r
d
w
l
n
g
a
t
e
f
o
r' t h e
poster is "cute," would look nice in
could describe the feelings of
enjoyed.
w i l j t a k e a pOKition resembling that
someone's room, brings back a pleasthe State College girls as they
of
Granted, the disturbance was not
^itor-emeritus. in this way, the
ant memory, etc., etc., is no excuse
saw State's own Janette Zelanentirely the fault of State students. staH feels that it may use his
for that person to come along at
is '51, ascend the stage, escorted
The outside trouble can and will be know edge and still leave him free
some inconspicuous time and "lift"
by the judges, as Maid of Honcurbed. However, the disturbance f o r h l s w o r k the poster. If he wants it, the least
or to the Queen of R.P.I.'s ancaused
by members of our own SA
.
he could do is to ask the party who
nual Inter-Fraternity Ball. In
The New York State Congress of put it up, or at any rate, have the
is not understandable nor is it to y J S U d l A l d $ ODOnSOTS
commemoration of her beauty
be tolerated. Lack of intelligence on
"
Parents and Teachers will sponsor, decency to wait until the affair in
Janette was presented with a
as one of its educational projects, question has occurred,
the part of students might be at § * u c l e n t P h o t o
Contest
large bouquet of yellow tea roses.
an essay contest for Juniors and
f
a
u
l
t
b
u
t
we
believe
it
was
rather
<J*U°-«»*
m
o
t
O
V
OnieSl
And then, to the music of
Seniors in all New York State Col- I f >'ou c l o u b t t h a t t h l s problem
a case of very bad manners
The Visual Aids Class of the Art
Duke Ellington and his orchesleges for Teacher Education. Stu- exists—just tell me—what happenAll members of SA are invited to Department will sponsor a student
tra, the Queen and her court
dents are required to write on one ecl t o a11 t h e Posters advertising the
attend the Tuesday evening work- photography contest from Decemwaltzed with the judges, climof the following topics: "The P.T.A. hockey game between the Dog Patch
shops of AD. As invited guests they D e r 6 t o I 5 ' A11 photographs subaxing the coronation ceremony.
and the Beginning Teacher," "My Dames and the Slobbovian Bachelor
should behave as such! AD is a mitted will be placed on display on
Bo s?
Function in My P.T.A.," "Does the >' Where have all the coke botminiature theatre lab—the AD stu- U l e second lloor of Draper at this
c s telli
of Ul
P.T.A. Mean Better Teachers?", "
ȣ
e WAA coke-er
dents and their casts are working l i 'ne. The winners will be judged
"The P.T.A. Looks Forward." A - o n e ?
Playhouse Displays
week after week to learn the many b.v t h e s t a t p students who will cast
prize of $25 will be awarded the
j L ^
^
theatre crafts. They are NOT put- their votes for the best pictures,
i n C 0 nsidwinner of the con est in each of the
Hutchins Watercolor ting in long hours purely out of The committees in charge of the
t
f »h
h
make the
t.
vanity, as some students seem to contest are: Introductory Publicity,
New York State Colleges for e f S a n d m l g h t , l k e t h e m t h e m s o l v e s ,
Miss Ruth Hutchins, Assistant believe. The grind of presenting two William Dumbleton '50; Specific
ieacneis.
b u t i t , l l s o r u i n s e n t j r e advertising
Professor of Fine Arts, is exhibiting u l a y s e v e r y two weeks requires Direction, Jean Ashcraft '49; PostThe essay contest rules issued by schemes,
paintings at the Playhouse and the more r 6 a l interest and hard labor ers, Geraldlne Rennie '50; Assembly
the P.T.A. are:
S o CQme
m
let's cut it out. Albany Institute of History and Art. than a desire to make a public dis- Features, Pearl Pless '49, and StuAt present her watercolor "Con- p l a y o f o n e s e lf.
art Goldman '51; Cillectlng and
1. The essay contest opens Octo- Okay?
Peaved.
necticut Tree" is on display along
Returning, Harold Vaughn '50; Arber 1, 1948 and all contestants must
with watercolors by 16 other mem- If those students who persisted in ranging Exhibit, Anne Hermann
file manuscripts with the local facbers of the Albany Artist Group at being "rude" Tuesday night had .g0. Hanging and Removing, Roseulty committee not later than Febthe Playhouse.
spent one hour working on the pro- m a ' r v Stoddard '50
ruary 1, 1949. Essays are to be
At the Albany Institute of His- d t u c t i o ™; « ^ Jhe.V had come back•
given to Miss Ruth Roberts, In:;:::::;::i::i::r::n;:"::::
tory and Art, Miss Hutchins is »
afterwards in time to see the _,.._.. ti.1: .
structor in English, Room 32, Rich,,.„„.i„„ th,._„ , „ o t o ™
i « , „ „ H n a r f , conflicting anger and disillusion- ;•;
ardson Hall, by that time.
^
At the nextregular meeting, which S ^ H n ^ M „ ^ ^ ^ « S _ _ ^ m«nt of the casts and crews, per
2. E:
approx
scripts
o your
side of
_7trt$-m<fs
double sp
President of Also represented at the show are continue to expose hard-working j;;j
Audrey Jerue
home address and name of college
!"?
shopping
must be typed in upper left hand the club, has announced that the Dorothy Bennit, State graduate and casts to the treatment received by j..j
coiner of each sheet of manuscript. "Gypsies," Dr. Caroline Lester, As- former president of D&A; Chris- Tuesday night's performers. Wheth- H
sistant Professor in Mathematics; tian Lievestro '50, Louis Utter, head er or not the workshops continue H
3. The local faculty committee Dr. Margaret Hayes, Assistant Pro- of the Art Department in Milne last depends
_ __
upon the audience behavior <<
. . . this I easyi fjf)v>
will select the five best essays and feasor in Education; and Miss Ma- year; and Robert Emerick, a grad- during the rest of this season. You [
submit them to the State Congress bel Jackman, Instructor in Library, uate of Milne.
economical May.
a n , a l l we lcome, IF you've come to {'
Chairman,"Mrs. Charles" L. "chap- will present a humorous account of
^
_ is being
^^
^^ before learn with your fellow students up
The
show
held
Give
MAGAZINES
man, by March l. The judges, rep- their travels last summer. Included C]H*istmas 'this y e a r V ' o r d e i ^ t h a t there on the stage.
resenting the State Congress will in their travels was a trip to Guat the works may be up for sale at
at Spatial \f
Callirine Donnelly '40,
! •
make the final selection of the win- amala and a short stop In Havana, Christmas. This Is the first Christlow Christmas Rates.
ning essay and announce the win- Cuba.
President,
mas show held by the Albany Artist
"
m u a b , m t A ) H 1 15
Group.
1)&A Council.
'
'
'
Also included on the agenda are
Write or phone us today
4. All manuscripts, .submitted for singing, dancing, and refreshments,
and we'll Hike euro of
final selection of the winner, will A" faculty members and Spanish
ordering1 your gift subt •
become the property of the New students are especially urged to
scriptions for you.
ft
York Slate Congress of Parents and attend.
H
Teachers
absolutely
::;
Note—If, in the opinion of the
n o (•luii'gv t o y o n
judges, essays show lack of research,
for our service.
thought or knowledge of the 'P.T.A.
Fraternity Jewelers
mowmont, the Slate Congress reFHONK 11813
BADGES,
STEINS,
RINGS
serves lhe right to withhold the
award. Resource material will bo
JEWELRY GIFTS, FAVORS
made available in the college library.
STATIONERY,
PROGRAMS
CI-UB PINS,
KEYS
'MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
Tel. 4-6419
MEDALS
TitOPIIIES
GommuHicatiotU
Gosntnu+ucatia+U
PTA To Offer
Prize For Essay
Spanish Club Hear
Guatemalan Gypsies
III
• '
College
Calendar
IUIDAV, NOVEMBER 12
8-11:30 p.m. Junior-freshman get together in Commons
B:30-11:30 p.m. Sophomore class party In gymnasium,
8:30-12 pin Kappa Delta Date Party.
8:30-12 p.m. Phi Delta Date Party.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13
11-11 pin. "KDR Manor" at fugle Room in Pierce
Hall.
8-12 p.m. Gamma Kappa Phi Open House.
8:30.12 p.m. Psi Gumma Open House.
SI NDAY, NOVEMBER 14
4:00 p.m. Newman Club Holy Hour al Little Grotto
on Ontario and Yates Street.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10
7:30 p.m. Meeting of Christian Science Orgtmizalinti in Room 109, Draper Hall.
8:30 pin. AI) plays in Page Hall Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
1'- noon
SCA Chapel at Unitarian Church; Joint
Jennings to speak on "Tomorrow."
Till KSDAY, NOVEMBER IH
7:30 p.m. SCA nicelinu in Lounge; Discussion on
"What I Believe."
; » ; * " •
>'•
'
•
•
•
; • ' .
L. G. Balfour Co.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
State College Co-op.
OTTO R. MENDE
TNI
C o l . l . - U - -KW-L-K
lOS - B N T R A L AVE.
Write or Call
CARL SORENSEN
188-etW CENTRAL AVENUI
WATKRFORD,
NEW YORK
Tel. (ill
J It l . . .
?5*-rr****"--
ALBANY, N. Y.
»._r7ft;_M_>Y_wm<a«-aft>tV«.
Authorized UopraseiUative fur
TIME, LIFE, FORTUNE
,;i_i_E_i_E_;ii_:::E:!__:i-iiEt:i;i
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S . FRIDAY. NOVEMBER
STATE C O L L I O E N C W S , FRIDAY. N O V E M B E R
PAOK 4
Green Gremlins
Take Hockey Tilt
For Three Points
12, 1048
State Drops T w o ,
Slides T o Second
JlookiHf
By HARVEY MILK
Waa-Jfoo
As the IM football season finished, rain had a lot to do with the changBy MICKEY SEAMAN
many comments have been made ing of games. But there is no ex- The Engineers from RPI squared
as to the merits of this year's cuse, as was stated last week, for matters for the season by taking
At the WAA Council meeting held
league. Likewise there were many the Rivalry committee not schedul- two out of three games from the on Wednesday, delegates to the anState
keglers
Wednesday
night
at
criticisms.
ing their events early in the year
nual conference of the New York
Trying to summarize these have so we can schedule ours. Also why the Playdium. This defeat dropped State Women's Athletic Association
Defeat Freshman Girls,
the
Statesmen
into
second
place,
resulted in the following sugges- can't we play several games on Satappointed, final plans for
Scoring 3 In
two games behind pace-setting Si- were
tions and opinions.
urdays?
cheerleadlng tryouts were approved,
ena.
The
varsity
squad
rolled
a
totThe Sophomore girls garnered the
We have to go a long way back to
There is the other side of the
and routine business was discussed.
al of 936 to take the first game, but The
class of 1951 three more rivalry And when any intramural football picture, too.
conference will be held in SyrRPI
came
back
to
grab
the
last
points when they defeated the team went undefeated, untied and This year the overall quality of
acuse on December fourth and fifth.
two
games
by
a
wide
margin.
freshmen Tuesday in t h e annual unscored upon. Looking through the the teams was high; for the first
Eleanor Adams, Ruth Matteson, and
hockey game, by the score of 3-0. NEWS flies we could only find time more than one team used set This setback was a costly one for Ruth Smith, Juniors, will represent
PaEe Kail field was the scene of v a 8 u e reports due to the lack of plays and they helped "organize" State because It dropped them out State College. The conference is
the hiehest scoring rivalry hockey s P a c e devoted to sports; however, it the games. The rules have been of the lead for the first time in four conducted to further social, physigame in years as Hicks and Thur- *s rumored that in 1937 or '38 some changed to make the game faster weeks. Siena took advantage of cal.and moral welfare of students
low teamed up to push across three t e a m w e n t unscored upon. This and smoother. Although there were State's misfortune by sweeping by encouraging participation in
coals for the green and white team. v e a r Potter Club was unscored upon several complaints as to the calibre three games from Albany Law sport and recreational activities acB
*•• .. ,. ' in the regular- season. However, this of the refs we have to give them a School. This three.game victory as- cording to the highest standards of
The first half opened wnn ine y e a r p o t t e r p l a y e d five g a m e s a n d h a n d p f o r fche flne j o b t h e y d l d a n d sured them of undisputed posses- sportsmanship.
frosh in green territory until ine d i d nQ( . m e e t a U o f t h e f r a t e m i t y W e can say they were a great imCredit Lists Posted
sion of first place.
middle of the period when a canOTt e a m s W e a r e n o t t a ] d n g a n y c r e d i ( . p r o v e m e n t o v e r l a s t y e a r - s whistleAll fall sport activities will end
Individual
honors
went
to
Lyle
sticks against center half back, Ful- f r o m p o t t e r b u t t h e w a y m f o o t _
tootm_
Walsh who rolled a three game tot- at Thanksgiving. Credit hour lists
ler, seemed to turn the tide and the b n s c h e d u l e w a s m a d e a l l r i v a h . J fc
Lackine
al of 538 including high single game will be posted on the WAA bulletin
Sophs took command of the field h p f w . p n t eh p f r a t ., r a m . t n „ h . l t
n»misiasm liMuang
and never again relinquished con- ^ r f V Ja sJ l t i m T a n Z r frats
were L ° ° k i n g T k f** 1 ^/ e a r s B« unes of the evening, 214. Bob Dickinson board during next week. All credit
ts w e
f„«i „ » mP * i™ twn ShorMv-sus- i n t h e s a m e l e a g u e w a°s ta 4 2 w h e n as compared with last years, one was the only other Statesman to winners should check these lists and
™
i ° , the veUow team
'
would find one thing missing-en- crash the 500 circle although Hank should notify captains if some error
n t h ? second half
Potter nosed out SLS for the cham- thusiasm. Last year, one can re-Farley's 206 effort was second best has been made.
pionship.
member, large crowds were at each in that division.
Lists for the winter sport leagues
Wnat l a m
First Goal Scored
trying to say is that a n d e v e r y g a m e i e v e n the games
will be posted next week. Dorms,
I
hlnk
The second half got under way t
°"e of the faults of this that decided the cellars of the Next week, State will battle Siena, sororities, or individual groups who
with still no score and two teams year's football league was the way i e a g u c s . T n i S year you could have and this will undoubtedly be one of wish to enter teams should indicate
which looked as balanced as those t n e teams were picked for the counted the amount at any game the better matches of the season. this on the lists. These include basIt will be an all-out duel for first ketball, and bowling, as well as the
which fought to 0-0 ties and 1-0 and leagues. It is true that many inde- o n y o u r
flngers.
place.
2-0 victories in the past two years. Pendent teamsi have fielded better
ping pong tournament list. It is
With the beginning of the second outfits than the frats but it has
*
t t h
n
been
State
1 2
3 Tot.necessary that this information be
half came the substitutions and the been a common fact that more of s u n „ h
, fc*
given to the captains before vacar
t
Walsh
214 173 151 538
commencement of the Soph attack, a rivalry exists between the frate. a l l b t h e s e . . u n 8 U n g » n e r o | s but I Carosella
tion so that schedules may be ar171 144 — 315
B
Betty Hicks came in a t right inner For this reason ].wouldi like.to Me
ranged in order that leagues may
w n k e t o m ention t h a t t h
McDonald
179 152 161 492
(that's on the forward line, and in as e fiivt mprovement foi next
get under way immediately after
m
Dickinson
182 160 158 500
the first few minutes of play pushed year's IM football league the acted- j
[M ^ . , d
vacation.
Mullin
190 147 145 492
across the initial score from the uling of the big-4 in the same ^ n e d if backs like Amyot and Sad- Farley
Approve Payment
— — 206 206
center of the field, past fullbacks league.
o w a y d e c i d e d n o t t o b l o c k Q1. l f t h e
The Council approved payment of
Farwell and Juengling and goalie Suggestion No. 2
forward walls decided to take it
Totals
936 776 821 2543 four dollars to Bill Murphy '52, for
u
Something
be done to stop
Haggerty.
" " ~ t u ; "~ "should
"'
injuries sustained in intramural
easy. I t must be remembered that
RPI
1 2
3 Tot.football. This money is taken from
this
year.
Every
week
one
could
look
tories
possible.
Another
fact
that
a
Thurlow Scores No. 2
another "forfeit" league as we had the Schicks and Powells made vic- Jones
177 157 130 464
the joint MAA-WAA Contingency
Following
ium- forward to one or more forfeits. i 0 t 0f people forget about is the de- Dojka
Following her
her up
up in
in a
a iew
few min
200 160 155 515
Fund.
utes, left wing "Hee-Hee" Thurlow W n y d o n ' t the captains make some fense p i a y of the line. These men Davenport
180 202 213 595WAA will hold its next Council
took a pass at the edge of her al- kind of a rule that any team who m a k e up the "unsung" heroes and Mara
166 161 174 501
meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at
ley, brought it across the striking forfeits two games be dropped out they make football
Kalohn
172 181 244 597
Pierce Hall at 7:30 p.m. At this
circle, dangerously close to the end oi t n e i e a g U c. It is a shame for one
time, captains for winter sports will
line, and shoved it across the goal t e a m to get all set for their game
Totals
895 861 916 2672 be appointed.
for the second score for the Soph o n j y to find the other team could
girls Hicks came through in the n o t n e i d s i X m e n . i t can be noticed
closing minutes of the game with t n a t the forfeits were mostly by
another tally again down the center l e a m s that had already lost several
games. The
of the
field.
" ' only answer to
' " the
" question seems to be that a lot of men Due to the sudden outburst of
Muddy Field
only want to play for winning teams. rain Wednesday the play.off game
One of the lighter moments of Can we all win?
between KB and Potter Club has
the game came in the second half Suggestion No. 3
been postponed. Also the game bewhen Thurlow came over to the alIt has already been forgotten tween the "A" League stars and the
ley fast to take a drive from Harris that several "incidents" arose dur- 'B" League stars, and the rivalry
and slipped into Sonia Stepanian
left halfback
'" " "•'•'— •••••went
rushing
thusias
swan
...ptains of the respective
earth
leagues from all the teams in each
Some of the more outstanding
loop except the two first place
features of the game, on the abili- FINAL INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL teams (KB and Potter). The rosters
ty side, was the defensive work of
are as follows:
STANDINGS
the backs of both teams. The score "A" League
"A" League
Won Lost Points
for the team shows not poorer '*
0
10
Captain—King
,a
defense- work
back1
8 Ends: Colpoys (Angels), Poulos
. . - - for the frosh
,
f : Angels
4
2
6 (Gents), Cortese (Finks).
field but the strength of concerted p i n k g
3
3
4
Centers: Hubbard (Gents), and
teamwork which comes to the Sophs R a m b l e r s
2
4
2 Clark (KDR).
with the experience of having play- 0 e n t H
1
ed. Ltogether
for na uonr
year. This
This was
5
0 Backs: Amlow and Duff us (AngL\
r~..
W:IS KDR
,.
evidenced by the straight line that "B" League
Won Lost Tied Pis els), Etch (Gents), King (Finks),
advanced when the Sophs were in •KB
8 DeOrcgorlo (Ramblers).
0
control of the ball as opposed to VanDerzee
0
"B" League
0
the irregularities in speed of the*H & E
I
5
Captain—George
frosh line; although it was easily •Saints
0
4
Ends: O'Brien (H&E), Powell and
noted that individually the frosh St. Mary's
0
2 Stevenson (VDZ).
are skilled players and should run •SLS
1
Centers:
Ludlum (H&E), and
1
all over the class of '53.
•KB-SLS and H&E-Salnts games Chagares (VDZ).
will not be played because of the Backs: George and Bayer (H&E),
Who's Who
lack of time. They do not effect Roulier (SLS), Brown (Saints), WiHere are the line-ups for the two 1st place.
ley (VDZ)
teams as they started the first half:
FROSH
SOPHS
Merry
left
wing
Thurlow
Favillc'*
left inner
Weller
Gemmell
Patterson center
Kamke
right inner
Reenter*
Rapp
right wing
Bcnested
.Stepanian
left hulf-b
Harris
Fuller
center half
Re id
Juengling
right half
Steur
Farwell
Skidmore left full-b
Baldlno
Bradshaw right full-b
Haggerty
goalie
Jul
•Hicks for Rechter in second half
"State" Representatives
Corner of
••Racine for Favllle in second half
JACK BROPHY
2nd Half
Rain Postpones
Playoffs, Rivalry
Thirst for Refreshment
Relishes Ice-Cold Coke
Twelve Teams Vie Potter Booters
S A Cheerleader W a l s h Clarifies
SpottUfkt
In Bowling League
Nip Angels, 2-0
Tryouts Tuesday Contingency Fund;
By PAUL BUCHMAN
Men's Intramural Bowling will
starts
its
1948-49
season
next
WedA highly touted Potter soccer
State College Cheerleaders for the
If you're trying to find Kenny nesday. The matches will be held
1948-49 season will be chosen a t Lists Procedures
George, captain of this year's bas- at Rice's at four o'clock. The league team had their offense curbed last
Saturday as they squeezed by a
tryouts totoeheld Tuesday at 7:15
ketball team, just look for a large
p. m. in the Page Hall Gym. All
Lyle Walsh, Vice-President of group of people that are laughing has grown to twelve teams as commembers of the student body are MAA, has issued the following In- uproarously; he'll probably be right pared to eight teams last year. A
new feature of the league will be
urged to attend the tryouts.
formation regarding the MAAin the middle causing it all. That two teams from the faculty.
WAA contingency fund.
Is the impression Kenny gives when
Any girl who has attended the
The MAA-WAA contingency fund
WAA cheerleadlng practices, re- is set up within the Student Asso- you first meet him, and a very Potter Defending Champs
Potter Club, undefeated last year,
gardless of the number of hours ciation to render financial assist- pleasant meeting It was.
which she has completed, will be ance to those members of MAA and George is a native Albanian; he will be defending the championship
eligible to compete. Three State WAA who are injured in athletic grdauated in 1943 from Philip trophy they took. This year their
College cheers, the Locomotive, the events sponsored in whole or InSchuyler High School, where he line-up includes many men from
State Fight and the Team yell will part by either organization and who was president of the Senior class. last year's team. Last season's runbe used as a basis for judgment. In require medical attention. Rivalry He immediately went into the U. S. ner-up, VanDerzee, will also field
addition, each girl will be asked to is not an MAA-WAA sponsored Army Air Corps, was in for two and a veteran team.
This year's teams and their cappresent one cheer of her own
one-half years, and when dischargprogram.
choice.
ed, returned to his studies at State. tains are as follows:
Obtained From Surplus
Now a Junior, he is majoring in 1. Jerks—Dick Feathers
In accordance with the WAA ConThis fund is obtained from any Mathematics, and minorlng in Phys- 2. Beavers—Don Burt
3. SLS—Les DeWeerdt
stitution provision for cheerleading, surplus of MAA or WAA budgets ics.
4. VanDerzee—Bill Engelhart
as many as six Varsity members each year. Running on a tight bud5. Potter—Bob Reno
may be chosen and six Junior Var- get for the past few years, the fund Made All-Albany Teams
sity members. Judges will include has not been increased and at presHe was active in athletics both in 6. KDR—Dave Durkee
Miss Isabel Johnston. Director of ent it amounts to $542.64. It is High School and here at State. He 7. KB—Abe Trop
Woman's Physical Education, Coach easily seen that the fund cannot played three years of varsity base- 8. Gents—Don McDonald
Merlin Hathaway, and the four stand too many major injuries. ball, basketball and track at Schuy- 9. Fools—Gordon Bennett
Senior members of WAA Council, Serious injury can be avoided so ler, and in his Senior year, All-Al- 10. Fearless Five—Bob Van Dam
Juanita Evans, Bev Sittlg, Elsa .please participate with caution. bany teams in those three sports.
11. Faculty 1—Mr. Gibson
Moberg and Mickey Seaman.
12. Faculty 2—Mr. Gibson
Prior to making claims for bills
His participation in sports at
According to Manager Rockhill,
through this fund it is suggested
A final practice will be held that the Medical Insurance plan, if State is not limited to Varsity the following matches are scheduled
Saturday morning at 10 o'clock in possessed by the claimant, be used. teams, for he is a member of "The for Nov. 17, next Wednesday:
the College cafeteria. Credit in
Ham and Eggers Association," and Alleys
Teams
cheerleading will be given those Procedure Outlined
plays intramural athletics with 3-4
Jerks vs. Faculty 2
girls who have completed ten hours
The procedure for any members them. But he is known best about 5-6
Beavers vs. Faculty 1
of practice.
of MAA or WAA injured, or who school for his outstanding work as 7-8
SLS vs. Fearless Five
VanDerzee vs. Fools
Members of Student Association suspects he/she Is injured, while a team player in Varsity basketball 9-10
Potter vs. Gents
should remember that the final test participating in any athletic event and baseball. He has played Varsity 11-12
KDR vs. KB
for a good cheerleader lies in herofficially sponsored, in whole, or inever since his freshman year, but 1-2
ability to lead cheers before the part, by MAA or WAA, is as follows: doesn't particularly care to talk a1. He should report the injury, as bout the first two years, when "we
varsity rooters. To insure that the
best possible cheerleaders are select- suspected Injury, Immediately to the had just about enough boys in
school to field a team—but nothing
ed, as large a turnout as possible official, or officials, in charge.
more."
2.
Efforts
should
also
be
made
to
should attend the tryouts to supreport the injury to Miss Johnston,
port those who are competing.
Mr. Hathaway or Mr. Gibson, or, if Remembers Utica Game
unavailable, to a member of MAA Kenny likes to remember last
W A A Fencing Club
or WAA Councils so that competent year's Utica game, as the "Pads"
beat the "Utes" in a hard fought,
medical care may be provided.
To Start Play Tomorrow
3. If immediate medical attention close contest in which team work
Fencing Club meetings get under- is necessary and it is not possible made the difference between victory
way this Saturday at 1 p. in., ac- to report the injury as mentioned In and defeat.
"We were at our peak for that
cording to captains Audrey Eveleigh "2" above, medical attention should
'50, and Marilyn Allen A. 'Practices be obtained and the Injury reported one. But this year's team ought to
be better yet. Our spirit has never
will be held In the Milne Gym, but as soon as possible.
been higher, and lf the student body
the girls will first assemble in the
will get behind the team, they'll
back of the Page Hall auditorium. Method of Payment
Payment for medical expenses in- have something worthwhile to cheer
For the first two weeks, the meetings will be for organization and curred and charged under this fund for. This year they'll see a better
brand of basketball.
learning of the fundamental skills. shall be handled as follows:
1. The bill shall be made out by
After vacation an instructor from
George bemoaned the fact that
LaSalle will be present to give in- the doctor rendering the medical most students at State have a disattention
and
shall
be
given
to,
or
structions and helpful hints. New
torted conception of the part athequipment has been purchased by mailed to, the person receiving the letics plays In the school program.
medical
attention.
WAA and will be for the use of
"Anyone," he said, "can go out for
2. The person shall present said
those learning fencing this year.
bill to Miss Johnston, Mr. Hatha- a Varsity sport. But once you go
way, Juanita Evans or Charles out for that sport, you are barred
Take Your Choicel
Frail at his/her earliest convenience. from Intramural competition in
3. Any bill loss than $100 maythat sport. When you come right
Think you can pick ten winners?
This week we are offering a carton be approved In a joint meeting of down to it, Intramural athletics are
more exclusive than Varsity sports."
of Chesterfields to State's top foot- MAA and WAA Councils.
4. Any bill in excess of $100 George works nights at the downball expert. Just fill in what you
think will be the score. The person must be approved in a joint meet- town Trinity Boys Club, and couplwith the most winners gels the ing of MAA and WAA Councils and ed with his school hours, basketball
prize. In case of a tie, the person also must be approved by Student practice, and work, he has a very
who picks tlie closest scores wins. Association In a regular or special full schedule.
Ballots must be left In the NEWS assembly.
Ken got married In 19'15, just bemail-box by 5:30 p. m. today.
fore he returned to school. He says
Name
Class
that his wife Is expecting a "son" in
March. "Don't Jusl write child," he
Army
Pennsylvania
pleaded. "What do you want to do,
Cclumbln
Navy
PATRONIZE
jinx me?"
Alabama
Georgia Tech
Bayor
Tulane
OUR
Mississippi
Tennessee
Notre Dame
Northwestern
Cornell
Dartmouth
ADVERTISERS
SMU
Arkansas
UCLA
California
Oregon
Washington H. .
Where all the Students Meet
TRI-C0RNER
DANCE
Mai I'appln & Orchestra
8:30
H. F. Honik.l & Soi
Pharmacist*
Established 1006
Phone 4-2036
117 Central Ave.
ALBANY, N. Y.
DIAL 4-1126
GEORGE POULOS
WALT SCHICK
Ask fur It either way . . . both
trade-marks mean the same thing.
COLLEGE FLORIST FOR YEARS
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1LBANY COCA-COLA B O T T L I N G COMPANY
@ 1V4It, 111,, Com Lul
ROUND TRIP FARES
BOSTON. . . . $6.75
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SYRACUSE . .
4.05
ROCHESTER .
BUFFALO . . .
6.60
8.10
BINGHAMTON.
4.70
0NE0NTA . . . 2.55
WATERT0WN.
PLATTSBURG.
6.50
6.15
UT2CA
ITHACA . . . .
3.80
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ELMIRA . . .
6.30
BENNINGTON.
2.25
MONTPELIER .
MONTREAL . .
8.30
9.90
WASHINGTON
10.55
I'lus I I . S. Tax.
'via Vermont transit,
Every Saturday Night
Hufretthmenta Sold
Frequent
Schedules
Comfortable
Coaches
Dependable
Service
AdinisHion 50c
Home Made ICE CREAM
C1REYHOUND TERMINAL
SODAS - - CANDY — SANDWICHES
Trinity Methodist
Luncheon Served Daily
I.AKK & LANCASTER
BOTTLED UNUER AUTHORITY O f THE COCA COtA COMPANY BY
—Special Attention to Sororities and Fraternities
strong Angel team, 2-0. Potter's offence clicked early In the first period as Jim Juisto ibooted the ball
through the goal posts. The play
started deep in Potter territory with
the ball being advanced to Angel
territory; then Al Kaehn passed to
Juisto who scored.
The remainder of the first period
saw the ball change hands many
times with neither team being able
to score. The Angels' defense tightened considerably and Potter found
it difficult to advance the ball beyond midfield.
Angels Threaten
Midway In the second period the
Angels began to sweep downfleld
and for the remainder of the period
knocked at Potter's door but were
unable to score. During the flurry
a perfect try for a score was thwarted by the efforts of Harvey Clearwater, Potter goalie, who deflected
the ball which just missed going
through the goal-posts.
Last Half Deadlock
The second and third periods
found both teams in a virtual deadlock. Defense became the outstanding feature of play in these two
periods with both teams threatening but unable to score. By winning
this game Potter needs only one
more victory to clinch the championship.
1:80
Florist & Greenhouse
ONTARIO & BENSON
PAOE 8
12. 1048
OPEN DALLY AT I A. U.Z
350 Broadway
Phono 4-(ll(![>
GREYHOUND
• M * COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
•TATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1948
PAOB •
^QCiilttf
tffffffffffftS
Dr. Watt Stewart, Professor of
Social Studies, will publish an article In a forthcoming issue of the
Hispanic American Historical magazine. Ke has also been named to
the General Committee on Latin
American History of the American
Historical Association which will
study and record the procedure by
which microscopic films may be
taken of Latin America.
Today, Dr. Stewart will speak at
Union, under tne auspices of the
International Relations Club, on
the topic. "Rogues and Revolutionaries in Central America."
Mr. Edward Sabol, Coordinator
and Director of Field Services, attended the 37th Annual Conference
of the New York State Association
of District Supervisors at the Hotel
Syracuse, Syracuse, November 5 to
7. The theme of the conference
centered about rural education in
the world of tomorrow. Featured at
this meeting was a speech by E. R.
Van Kleek, a graduate of State and
now Assistant Commissioner for
Instructional Supervision. He spoke
on'"Improvement oi Rural Education, 1948-49."
Dr. Charles L. Andrews, Professor of Physics; Mr. Arthur P. Jones,
Instructor in iPihyslcs; Mr. Marvin
J. Pryor, Instructor in Physics; and
Miss Anna R. Olive, Assistant Professor of Physics, attended a meeting of the New York State Section
of the American Physical Society in
Corning, N. Y., November 5 and 6.
Friday, those attending the conference took a trip through the Corning Glassworks.
Dr. Caroline A. Lester, Assistant
Professor of Mathematics, has been
appointed Associate Editor of the
American Mathematical Monthly,
published by the Mathematical Association of America. In this capacity, Dr. Lester will be in charge of
preparing for publication the papers that are submitted to the magazine.
Dr. Joseph Leese, Professor of
Education, will speak at Freshman
Orientation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on the topic, "How to
Study in College," Monday, at 7:30
p. m.
Assembly Today
Includes Quintet
(Continued from Page 1, Column 5)
Gerald Dunn '51, President of
Election Commission, presented to
the Council several recommendations of the Commission, which include:
1. The editor of the Frosh Handbook should be elected within one
month after the beginning of the
second semester, from the Sophomore class.
2. After nominations for all offices
have closed, one additional day
shall be given to allow for withdrawals.
,3. Any candidate for a class office
who has not paid his class dues by
the time nominations are closed,
shall be eliminated from the ballot.
These recommendations were approved, and will take effect Monday.
Slait To Dibate In Brooklyn
Edward Kurlander and Walter
r'armer, Sophomores, will represent
State College at a debate in Brooklyn on Tuesday. They will uphold
the affirmative stand on the question of Federal Aid to Education,
while Brooklyn College will defend
the negative side of the question.
Come Bidee, Buyee Boxee
At Chinese Auction Monday
Whether or not you talkee
chinee, you'd better go to the
Commons Monday at noon and
see if you can get any bargains
at the Chinese Auction. The
Honorable Sparkee Vaughn will
be Auctioneer.
Your name doesn't have to be
Hwang Ho or Peking Pete to
make you eligible to bid. The
only reason they call it a Chinese Auction is because you
won't know what you're getting
until you get there. (It's a well
known fact, you know, that the
Chinese are short on words and
long on surprises.)
Rare bits of paraphernalia
and privileges will be virtually
given away to the highest bidder, so don't miss a single sweet
second. The buy of the clay is
a surprise package, the contents
of which will be known only after purchase. A word to the wise
is sufficient, so, if you go steady,
have your nickels ready.
A goal of ten dollars has been
set up, which will be used to
purchase a rivalry bulletin
board.
Cross To Give Study Seating
Concert-Lecture For Graduation
Music Council will present Milton Cross, noted commentator, author, and music critic, in a concertlecture, on the evening of December 2, according to Jean Munro '49,
President.
Cross is known from the Saturday afternoon radio program, which
he conducts from the Metropolitan
Opera House. He also has several
other programs, including "Metropolitan Auditions of the Air" and
"Piano Playhouse."
Miss Munro states that in the
program given by Music Council,
Cross will discuss the opera and
take his listeners behind the scenes
of the Metropolitan with his experiences and anecdotes of the stars
that he has known. In this project
he will be assisted by a quartette of
young opera stars who will sing
excerpts of the opera he discusses.
The audience will learn something
of life backstage.
The administration has granted
permission to the class of '49 to
form a committee to study the problem of inadequate seating facilities
for graduation and report on what
solution to the problem can be
made at the present time.
If an adequate solution can be
worked out, it will be followed this
June and in years to come, until the
plans for added facilities materialize in the new building plans now
being considered.
The committee has already begun
work and expects that they will
have a complete report ready by
the first of the year. Investigations
are being conducted concerning the
Armory, the Palace theatre and
out-door ceremonies here at the
college.
Rodney Felder '49, has been appointed chairman of the committee, and iPatricia Rourke '49, has
been appointed secretary. Other
members of the committee include
Michael Capuano, Joseph Amyot,
Dorothy Kern, Marvin Wayne, Arllne Zielengold, Audrey Schmay,
Jean Hoffman, Joseph Francello and
Jean Munro, Seniors.
"CHESTERFIELD is
building another big,
new factory (or us
smokers who like the
MILDER cigarette...
//
It's Nft cigarette.'
(^£PcS&^fy^
RADIO'S FAVORITE SON
Dr. Gertrude Douglas. Assistant
Professor of Biology, who retired
June 14, 1948, has taken a position with the Bernice P. Bishop
Museum, Honolulu. Anyone who
wishes to contact her may write to
her in care of B. H. Bond, 2146
Damon Street, Honolulu, T. H.
TBHFIRLD'S
• FREY TIME
Stat* Painti 'Horn*' Chapel
SMILES held two painting parties at the Albany Home for Children this week, November 6 and 11.
General clean-up and washing of
the walls took place Tuesday and
the painting began yesterday.
Alan Campbell '51, has announced
that a mailbox has been attached to
the SMILES bulletin board. He asks
that any suggestions for improving
the organization be dropped In, so
that they may be used.
"T
1 wish I could take you in my Navion
plane over the big, new factory Chesterfield
is building at Durham, N. C. It's a honey. It
will help supply the ever-increasing demand
for the MILDER cigarette.'"
'Portraiture At Its Finest"
EAST
TO
COMES
TAKE
YOUR PORTRAIT
OPEN 8:00 to 6:30 DAILY
Evenings by appointment
TRLEPHONE 4-0017
Oil MADISON AVENUE
Z-444
Potter Club, SLS
Schedule Parties
For Frosh Men
Frats Select Hoedown,
Club '52 A s Themes
For Weekend Affairs
Edward Eldred Potter Club and
Sigma Lambda Sigma, State College fraternities, have planned traditional rush parties, "Club '52" and
"Hillbilly Hoedown," respectively,
for this weekend.
Potter to Hold "Club '52"
Potter Club's "Club '52," which
will have a night club theme, will
be held tonight in the Commons
from 9 p. m. until 1 a. m„ according to Chairman John Morley '49.
Harry Llttler's orchestra will play
for dancing. There will be refreshments and entertainment. Freshmen women attending will be able
to stay out until 1 a. m.
Heading committees for the Potter Club parly are: Richard Feathers '50, Decorations; Marvin Lansky '51, Refreshments; and Edward
White '51, Entertainment.
To Present "Hillbilly Hoedown"
The SLS rush party, "Hillbilly
Hoedown," will take place at Osborne Road Community Hall, tomorrow, from 8 p. m. until 12 midnight, according to General Chairman Richard Hayford '49. Guests
will meet behind Draper Hall at
7:30 p. m. for bus transportation to
the party.
Chaperones for "Hillbilly Hocdown" will be Mr. Charles Chase,
'47, and Mrs. Chase; Mr. Arthur
Soderllnd '47, and Mi's. Soderlind,
and Edgar Tompkins. Heading committees are; Peter Havey 50, invitations; Morton Thayer '49, Transportation; Harold O'Meara '49. Refreshments; Donald Taylor '50,
Decorations; Harold Mills '49, Entertainment; Charles Towey '51,
Music.
MAKE ^ l i i l ^ T H K
Uij>)/ijiii ivin, Usairt << Mum I'UMI • .i i;n.
\jfi!^
ALBANY, NEW YORK. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1948
'i-V Show Proves Explosive}
Sophs Entertain NEWS Staff
What with "Pean Julver,
"Whirley Shiltse," "Uncouth
Rockingham," and "Fernadette
Brail," not to mention the murder of a well-known member of
our society, the Soph Lack-oTalent show in the P.O. last
Wednesday night was howling.
(That is, the cast howled and
the audience hooted.)
Mary F'enzel played the lead
with touching reality, arid Jerry
Dunn didn't move at all. He just
stayed dead during the entire
performance. One by one the
members of the NEWS staff
giggled as they became aware
of slight similarities between
themselves and characters in
the skit. This was not coincidental.
Miss M.F., not of E.D. fame,
won first prize as least lack of
talent; Mr. J.D. won second
prize as most lack of talent; and,
Mr. B. Jablon third, for a mellow voice.
Among
the
unrehearsed
events of the evening was the
explosion of the cider, intended
for the staff.
THE
BUCK"
VOL. XXXIII NO. 9
Milton Cross, Concert-Lecturer,
To Appear In Page Auditorium
Opera Quartette
To Sing Excerpts
Juniors Elect;
Two Vacancies
Filled on Council
Commentator To Tell
Behind-Scene Stories
O f Metropolitan Life
Two representatives to Student
Council from the class of '50 were
elected last Friday to fill the vacancies which have occurred tills fall.
Earline Thompson was elected on
the second distribution and Ruth
Matteson was elected on elimination by a very close margin over
James Cafaro on an elimination of
the second distribution.
The vacancies occurred a.s a result of the election of William Lyons
as Vice-President of Student Association and the resignation of Anthony Prochilo from the office.
Tabulations
91 X 100
Quota
Milton Cross, commentator of
the Metropolitan Opera Broadcasts,
will be presented at Page Hall,
Thursday, December 2, at 8:30 p.m.
by Music Council. A quartette of
young opera stars, who will sing ex.
cerpts of the opera Mr. Cross discusses, will accompany and assist
him.
MILTON CROSS
+ 1
Cross, who Is makng his first
personal appearances in lectureconcerts this season, will talk about
opera. Cross will take his listeners behind the scenes of the Metropolitan with anecdotes of the
. stars he has known.
3034
Gains Fame As Announcer
2 + 1
A musician himself, Mr. Cross be1 la 2 2a 2b
Candidates
came an announcer In radio beCafaro .... 1300 1600 1614 2016 2820
cause of his diction and knowledge
Feathers . 1200 1200 1212
of music. He has become known
Holllday . 1200 1300 1312 1616
the world over for his own method
Matteson.. 1600 1700 1716 2020 2828
of linking great music to the listenNoonan .... 800
er. He also wrote the book, "ComThompson 2800 3100 3034 3034 3034
plete Stories of the Great Operas."
Blanks .... 200 200 208 410 414
4
4
4
Eight Sophomore reporters have
Sixteen Seniors have been elected Loss
been promoted to the position of Places First In Poll
a.s a result of the election held in
Throughout the United States
9100 9100 9100 9100 9100 Sophomore Desk Editors as a reassembly October 15 to select rep- Total
sult of elections held this week by and Canada, Milton Cross has been
resentatives to "Who's Who in Amthe State College NEWS Board. consistently placed first in the
erican Colleges and Universities."
Junior and Sophomore additions "Musical America's" annual poll by
The following students were electhave also been made to the sports music editors and critics of the
ed: Robertson William Baker, James
daily newspapers. In other polls he
stalf.
Urell Brophy, Cathrine Mary Donhas always led the nation as the
Desk
Editors
for
the
yew
1948-49
nelly, Rodney Otto Felder, Cathnation's outstanding
announcerinclude
Cecelia
Battisti,
Goldie
erine Su/.anna Grant, Barbara Hope
commentator.
He
has
been acThe annual Inter-Collegiate As- Brenner, Jane Cook, Gerald Dunn, claimed by these polls as the greatHouck, John William Jennings,
Mary
Fenzel,
Dorothy
Mann,
Eusociation
Conference
is
being
held
Robert Elwyn Kittredge, Donald
est popularizer of opera through
Gene Langsley, Jean Gertrude Mc- at Brockport State Teachers Col- gene Fetrie and Evelyn Wolfe.
his commentaries on the Saturday
Ntw
sports
staff
members
from
lege
this
weekend.
State
will
be
Silent period regulations concern- Cabe, Agnes Jeanne Mclntyre, Jean represented by Robert Kittrduge '49, the class of '50 are Diane Webber broadcasts from the Metropolitan
ing sorority and freshman women Ann Pulver. Joyce Honey Simon, chairman of the delegation; Aud- and Andrew Rosetti and those Opera.
will be waived during these parties. Robert Louis Tucker, Robert Ken- rey Koch and William Lyons, Jun- members added from the class of
Reserved seats for this concert
Rushees and sorority women may neth Wilcox, and Joseph Louis iors; and Gerald Dunn '51.
'51 are Paul Buckman. Patricia Jai, will be priced at $2.40; general adtalk while attending the fraternity Zanchelli.
Harvey Milk, Jay Miller and Robert mission at $1.80; and student tickThe purpose of ICA is to further Reno.
functions but there will be no
The results of the election were
ets at $1.20. Tickets may be purcooperation
among
the
various
double dating of sorority members withheld until this date because ofDue to tlie Increased amount of chased at various music stores in
and rushees after the parties.
ficial word had not been received State Teacher Colleges in matters news this year, a NEWS constitu- the vicinity and at the State Colfrom the organization us to wheth- of student government, sports, and tion change was made which allows lege Co-op.
er the entire list of sixteen had to discuss mutual problems which for the election of eight Desk Edibeen accepted, The quota for each arise.
tors instead of six. From the eight
college is determined by the enrollTopics of discussion this year are Sophomoi'2 Desk Editors chosen,
ment, .Stale's quota Is supposedly to Include student government, ar- three Associate Editors for next
fourteen but because the college has rangement of assembly programs, year's NEWS Board will be anan organization ol thirteen Seniors student, finances, and intercolleg- nounced on Movlng-Up Day this
A "Gruel Icebreaker" will be held chosen as the outstanding members iate sports. The sports are especial- year. From these three, the EditorMonday, ul If p.m., in the Commons, of the class, the organization has ly oi interest I his year, for a plan in-Chief or Co-Edltors-ln-Chlef are
for the purpose of having graduate allowed the leniency of electing two formulated by Dunn, 'whereby at elected.
Assembly today will feature a
students mid faculty members get aclclil lonal representatives.
least six games will be played with
Tlie Desk Editors and Sports Staff speech by Dr. Charles F. Gosnel,
The names and records of those four oilier State Teachers Colleges, members were chosen on tlie basis N.'W York State Librarian and Secto know each other, according to
Malcolm I'appin, chalnnnn of the people chosen to represent the col- will be discussed,
of interest and ability shown since retary of the New York State FreeSteering Committee. The evening's lege will be published in the publidom Train Committee, on the subEuch school will have on display try-outs began.
program will include songs by the cation of the organization, "Who's various items of general interest.
A banquet, in honor of tlie newly ject "The Constitution as a Human
Choralettes, mi SC'AG contest and Who Among Students in American Included in the State display are elided Desk Editors and staff Document." Due to tlie absence of
addresses by several members of Universities and Colleges."
copies of the Frosh Handbook, the members, will be held Sunday at John Jennings '49, President, and
the faculty. Co-chairmen of the afWilliam Lyons '50, Vice-President
MAA Manual, the Prospectl of In- 6:30 p. m., at Herbert's.
fair are Jean Sears and Malcolm
of Student Association, Mary Eade
ter-Fraternity and Inter-Sorority
H i l l e l W i l l Present
i'appln.
Councils, plus various keys which A r t Classes To Exhibit '51, Secretary, will preside over the
assembly. Announcement will be
are awarded by the groups on camFeatured al (he party will be (lie Paul llton In Lounge
made of the results of election of
pus.
Also
included
will
he
an
exSCAG conlesl. Those attending
Student Photo Display two Junior members to Student
tensive
display
of
jewelry,
banners,
the parly will be asked to guess
Mr. Paul I. lltnii. author, journalCouncil.
the meaning of SCAG and the ist, and archaeologist, will appear shields, and other items loaned by
The An (i class Is sponsoring a
At Student Council meeting Wednumber of graduate students en- in the Lounge Sunday evening at the Slate College Co-op.
Photographic Kxhlblt the week of
rolled at Klale College. A prize Will It p.m. under the auspices of Hillel.
The representatives will make u December 0-11, on second floor, nesday night several committees
be awarded for the closes! guess.
report t<> Studenl Council upon Draper, according to Miss Ruth made reports und the freshmen
Marvin Wayne '•!!), President ol
their
return,
Hutchlns, head of the Art Depart- members presented a skit. Shirley
Faculty members who will take Hillel, has announced that Mr. Ilton
Wiltse 'SO, Editor of the State Colment.
pint in the program Include Dr. Ro- will tell of various experiences lie
lege Handbook, made a report conThe Show is dselgned primarily cerning the financial status of the
bert W. Fredericks, Professor of has had while traveling In Pales- Futterer Lists One-Act
in
exhibit
the
works
of
any
State
line.
Mi.
llton.
who
has
been
exKdunitinn, Mr Harper F. Ben My,
Handbook and made suggestions for
Instructor in Education; Dr. C. O. cavating and doing research work Plays For ED Production students who have snap-shots they the naming of the editor for next
would
care
to
enter.
The
entries
tSiui111, Professor ol Education; Dr. In Palestine lor over twenty years,
year's Handbook.
Three one-acl plays will be pre- may be of any size or subject, either
Margaret I,. Hayes, Professor of will also have on display an exhlhJohn O'Connor '50, Auditor of tlie
Education; Dr. Floyd E. Hendtick- II of valuable Items such us gold sented January 111 by the Klemen- mounted or unmounted, but must Class
Board of Finance, reported
lie
the
work
of
the
student
submitlury
Dramatics
class,
according
to
ornaments
und
coins,
dishes,
vases,
son, Assistant Professor of Educathat Dr. Robert Burgess, Professor
tion; Dr. Joseph Leese, Instructor and hollies, some ol which were Miss Agnes Eullerer, Assistant Pro- ting them. Miss Hutchlns suggested of Library, will be faculty member
that students who are veterans
in Education; Dr. Ralph B. Kenney. used (lining the lime of Abraham. fessor of English,
might have snaps taken over-seas, of the Finance Board.
The
dramas
to
be
produced
will
Assistant Professor of Education;
Al t h e p r e s e n t llllie, M r . l l t o n is
that might be of Interest in the
Reporting for the Student Faculty
be
"Husband
For
Mag,"
by
Julia
Dr. J. Allen Hicks, Professor of Ed- preparing a book on "The Bible tuul
Committee.
Chairman
Clifton
Carson;
"Journey to showing.
ucation; Dr. Robert B. Mason, As- Archaeology," in which he will dis- Bralnal'd
Entiles should be given to Harold Thome '4U, stated that the faculty
sistant Professor of Education; Dr. cuss the books of the Bible In order Camden," by Thornton Wilder; and
Kennelh J. Frasure, Assistant Pro- relating to biblical Incidents with "The Feast of Ortolans," by Max- Vaughn '50, who Is In charge of
(Continued on Page 0, Column 3J
collecting pictures for the exhibit.
iVontiiuudon I'diiiii, Column k> archaeological dialings.
well Anderson.
Grads To Meet
racu Ity A t Party
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
HOLLYWOOD
State College News
"DONT PAAS
N E W S Names
Desk Editors;
Sports Writers
Press Bureau
Releases List
For'Who's W h o '
State To Attend
ICA Conference
Assembly Today
Features Gosnel
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