State Ne ege ws

advertisement
State
Voi, XXI, No. 3
ege Ne ws
STATE
Banquet Fetes
Twenty Years
Of 'News' Life
Cabman FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, OCTOHER 9, 1936
HEADS ASSEMBLY
Deno To Conduct
Business Meeting
Student Assembly to Feature
Parliamentary Practice
And Business
Program of Entertainment to
Feature Speeches by
State Alumni
T o d a y State college w i l l conduct
its first assembly for student business authorized by the constitution
and not, as the occasion happens to
demand.
Tiic final event (if the twentieth
anniversary celebration of tlie State
College NEWS la scheduled for tomorrow night when the anniversary
banquet will be conducted. It will
take place in the college cafeteria
in llusted hall, and will begin al
6:00 o'clock.
(iuesls (if Cornier classes who were
meinlici's ul' the .\Tv. s stall' anil
board at that l i m e w i l l lie present.
These w i l l include among others
Thomas I'. Fallon and Dr. W i l l i a m M.
French, uf llie olnss ul' 1020, (leorgc
John Deno, president of the
Bice, '.'!-. Borniird Kei'bel, "X.i, Ah'illll
Student
association, who
will
Lewis. '.').'., Pan Van l.eliv.'in, '.'!",
preside nver
today's
business
Carolyn
Siinonof,
lintli
Fdiiiiiuds,
llssriiilil v .
and (Helm L'tigcrcr, meiiiliers ul' the
class (if lll.'lli.
The program uf the Imuijucl " i l l
include shiiil c iii
. i l l s by the momlie is nl' former X ' B W H boards and
Iheir eXperioni 'C.H ill eiiiineel inn with
their actual N'KVVS work, ami the
ways in which Ihis t r n i i i i n g has
Ciyde and Hulihan Will Supervise
Campus Day Athletics
aided them in their work Mince leavi n g Stale college.
The eiitel'lnin
student
Council
has
appointed
meiil eiiaiinittee is also planning In
siuni directors I'r
nch of the
present a program of comedy sluts
l'i iir classes In supervise the indi
d e p i c t i n g various phases id' NTvvs
! v idtinl class •stunts lo lie given on
and routine,
I Cainpiis Day.
The following slu
A
special
birthday
cake
will
deiiis
have
been chosen:
senior,
occupy a position uf honor at Hie
Mary I.am ; j u n i o r , I lorotliy I Inner ;
speakers' table. It will hear twenty
sophomore, Charles Sella I'l'er; and
ealnlles, ami w i l l lie cut by Dr. A.
I'll simian, b'olierl Klll'pell.
It. Id iiliacher, president.
The a l h l e l i c directors have also
H a r r y (lumaer, '.'17, editor in-chief
been
selected.
They
are
Helen
of the N'KWH, w i l l he toast master of
('lyile,
'.'17, director
of
women 's
the hampiet.
The arrangements for
al hli I ics for the day, and Kdward
the event are being completed by
I lulihaa,
'.'17, director
of
men 's
Virginia
Sloel, and Fred
Dexter,
a l h l e l i c events.
seniors as co-chairmen, who w i l l be
The athletic events in the a f t e r
assisted by Hie f o l l o w i n g heads of
iiii-ni mi the campus of Page hall
committees:
arrangements,
Charles
will begin l he program.
The eve(Jaybird and David .Smith, j u n i o r s ,
ning program will consist of the proeo-chairmen, Knluutl W a t e r m a n and
cession, presentation of ul lints, and
(I'ordon Tabner, sophomores;
prodancing.
grams, Warren Densinnre and Sophie
A liu.iiinceinelil s of dales for t r y Wnl/.ok, j u n i o r s , co-chaii men, Klizaouts
for Hie stunts will lie made
lielh ( l o o d i u g ami M a r y l.ani, seniors,
Inilav.
Muriel
(loldlierg,
Ms, and
.loan
H y r o n , '.'IP: p u b l i c i t y , l.aurila Sold,
'.'i7, c h a i r m a n , Itanioliu
Van Wie,
'.'IS,
(Irace
('ast iglioue,
Margaret
Horn, and .lune I'alaier, ' , ' ! ! i ; invitations, M i l d r e d
Nightingale,
MS,
c h a i r m a n , Charles M o r r i s and K-nherl
Hv vnle of the student assembly
Mnrgisnii,
seniors,
and
Victoria
ihis morning, one of live regal aspi
l i i l z i , '.'III.
rants iii'in i n;i led hv ballot in last
w eek 's assembly, will lake her place
in the line uf Stole college campus
Council Appoints
Stunt Directors
L a s t year a motion was passed
under the by-laws to the effect that
11
one ill every six assemblies shall
he c o n s t i t u t e d a business meeting of
the student association assembly and
lie used f o r the discussion of the
student a f f a i r s . "
J o h n , 1 . Deno, president of the
student assoeial ion, w i l l explain the
m o t i o n and a few of the m a j o r
p r i n c i p l e s of parliamentary practice
al I lie opening of the assembly.
For the lieiielil of those who have
not taken a course in this subject
Hie XKVVS presents a brief and concise statement of what a student
should know in order lo f u l l y under
stand the functioning)) of tlie student
assembly,
I. S e c u r i n g the lloor.
Rise and
address the chair.
The chairman
recognizes by calling aloud the name
ul I lie p r i s o n desiring lo speak.
'_'. Motions.
A f t e r a million is
seconded, no discussion call begin
u n t i l il is slated aloud by the chair.
No t w o unit i • J us can lie discussed at
a lime.
A main motion is one which introduces a subject In the assembly.
11 may be debated and amended.
A m a j o r i t y vole passes i l .
.'!. .Motion lu lay on table.
This
postpones
action
temporarily,
II
cannot be ipiulified, amended, or debated.
A motion may be taken oil'
the table by a m a j o r i t y vole.
•I. Ail mritilim.
This is consilientlion of a subject point by point
rather than as a whole.
a. A m e n d m e n t ,
II
changes I ho
w o r d i n g of a motion so thai the
assembly w i l l take action on it.
0. L i m i t
I ('milium
debate.
il
mi juijif
This
may
I, fillIIIIIll
be
-I)
Annual Campus Queen Election
To Occur in Today's Assembly
' News ' Begins
For Editorial
Classes
Cubs
The weekly cub classes for
those freshmen who are inter
esled in lln e d i t o r i a l staff uf
I he \ I. w s will begin uexl Heck.
Cilli-. al'e In attend one class n
week.
Three
sei I l u l l s
will
lie
cull
dueled even Keck, each super
Used by an Associate Mining
ing I'.'dilor. 'flic i lasses w i l l In
taught
mi M
lay l,\
Din id
S m i t h , mi Wednesday by Sophie
Wul/.uk, ami mi Thins,|a,\ b,v
\ \ ' ; i l I .'II
I lenslllole.
I lasses
u ill
In-
lirlil
in
Uoolll
I lo ul Draper H a l l , f i o u i twelve
mil il twelve Ihil'I.V live o 'clock.
I' n shineii
MI.I \
ul lend
I he
meet ings « In l her ul' not I hey
signed up nil A c t i v i t i e s
Day.
At the end ul' lie year, those
I'l'esliliicll tt lio ha \ e slum II ill
Iciest and ability through their
al leinlaiice ami M ork will lie p i n
MM 11 ('il lo posts as regular re
porters uf lhe Ni.w s,
Tin 1
cubs
will
learn
news
w i il ing ami various phases of
technical newspaper
work, including copy reading, galley read
ing and make up.
Hie class stiinls presented for her
ealei'lainineiil.
Miss K i l n Kane, '.'to ('a in pus queen,
is expected to he present to crown
llie llew ipieen.
ipleeiis,
Miss A l l n r d was president of tlie
The live candidates, all of whom
class of IH.'I7 last year, anil served
are members of the senior class, are
as v ice president
in her freshman
conleslauls I'm' uiie of the highest
and sophomore years. She is ;i meal
awards thai
llie student assembly
her ul' Myskania ami of Chi Sigma
beslows
Tln-y a r e : Alice A l l n r d ,
Theia s o r o r i t y .
In a I.a C i l i a , Klizaholh
Morrow,
Miss |,|| (Irun was .1 unn.t
From
Klsn S m i t h , and V i r g i n i a Stool,
i|l|een Inst year, and has been active
in elemental v and advanced d r a m a l i c
'I'll i - morning 's fav m i l e will be
lo llie lifleellth in a line of which
productions.
She is a member of
except I Ii i l l - have been members j I'hi Sigma Tliela sorority.
Miss Morrow is president of Hie
of Myskania, senior honorary society.
There hav e boon six blondes, si v ell l l i l ' l 's AI Mot io nssoi'ial ion ami a
In iiiiel les and inn l i l i a u mining the
member of I I . A , A . Honor Council.
past ipioells.
Of I hose In lie pre ! She is a member of Myskania, l'i
si iih-il
Ihis
morning,
three
are
(lamina M u , honorary social science
blondes and t wo are In unci les.
society, and Kappa Didta sorority.
Miss Smii Ii is a member of ( I . A . A .
llie i |IK i l l w ill I'eigll over I he ac
I iv il ies of I 'aiiipus da V oil (Icloboi'
honor council and of the lirsl cabinet
-•I.
The candidate receiving the
of the Young Women's ('hrisl inn
Assoeial ion.
She is also a member
highest number of votes Ihis morn
lag becomes ijlieell. She will bo al
of
Myskania
ami
Delta
Omega
sorority.
tended hv the two ul' her compel iters
wliu have llie next highest number,
Miss
N| u,<|
is
presidelll
of
the
Twu al leiolaals from each uf the
V.W.C.A., councilor al the A l u m n i
throe lower clashes iilukc up llie l o y a l
Kesideuco halls and associate editor
procession which is coiupleled by u
of the Slate College N K W H .
She is
I r a n i bearer.
Identities of all mem
a member o f Myskania.
hers nl' I he royal p a r l y are kept
A list of former ipieens includes
secret u n t i l the night of Campus day,
four members of Holla Oiuegu, four
al which l i m e the coroiiiilion cere
of F l a I ' h i , throe from I'si (laiuiua,
ninny is cunduclod.
A f l o r the coreone f r o m K a p p a Delta, and one f r o m
llioay, the ipieen and her court view
Old S i g m a T h o t n .
$2.00 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
British Publicist Will Be
Guest At State Next Week
Students Evaluate
Political Captpaign
W i t h the final round of the
national political campaign under way, the proselyting value
of
campaigning
will
be determined by Professor Risley's
I :,'ill o'clock H i s t o r y I I (dass.
This current events class voted
yesterday for presidential preferences, and on the eve of the
election will vote again.
The
result
w i l l determine
whether
political speeches, rallies, and
class discussion change a person 's polil leal viewpoints.
A chief indication of the interest in the campaign w i t h i n
Slate college has been indulgence
in
campaign
songs.
" W h e n We Fill Judge Weakley l Ivor ' ' and ' ' I hippy I 'ays
A re 1 l i r e Again ' ' are favorites,
liepllblicans seem lo have the
advantage in Hie singing, he
cause they have the host voices,
ur (hey are mil a"' 1 rant In gel
hack i n .
The placing of l.aadon posti en
in
I he
' XKVVM '
and
' Linn '
iiliii-es has mused a young riot,
in as lunch as members ul' each
ul'
these
publication
hoards
seem f a i r l y divided between tin'
major parlies.
Magazine Features
State's Program
Faculty Articles Disclose Newer
Trends In Teaching Field
W i t h llie e d i t i n g of the October
issue of A'I 'ill For/, Sluli1
Kiliirnlion magazine, students and I'ucully
members alike al. Slate college will
realize Hie importance ui I ho new
educational program which is being
sponsored here.
Articles by ton different members
ul 1 Stole college's I'ucully diseluse
Hie type uf progressive education
being
nl'fereil.
In the foreword to this issue,
' ' Film :il ing
Teachers
for
New
Vul'k 's Secondary S c h o o l s , " edited
by I'rofessut .lulin , \ l . Snyles, principal of M ilae High .school, and Dr.
W i l l i a m M. French, instructor
in
eille III lull. Hie tl'Ulll ul'
till'
old
mill l u , ' ' As is llie teacher, so is tlie
school,"
is considered a
modern
essential in present day leaching.
' • Through rev ision uf its offering in
e d u c a t i o n , " Stale college has for its
gual ' ' a lonelier vvilh the newer un
diTsl.'iiiiling.s, attitudes,
leohiiiipios,
and procedures. ' '
In Ins article, ' ' Hi I lieu I ing High
School
T.'.'o'ln is
in
New
Voi'k
S t a l e , ' ' I'r, A. K. Ili'ubai'her, pivsi
I,-nl
slab's thai l.v " l i b e r a l edll
cation is IIII>II n I a subject
mutter
content thai challenges II wide range
uf human interests and u luolliod uf
leaching thai ronleiil that promotes
tolerance, diM-rcdils superstition and
prejudice, ami inspires courage In
nccopl 11 ut Ii ill any f i n a l , ' '
The
general
i {'milnun
topic,
i/ oa /nii/i
"All
Fspel'i
.'I, niltlinn
I i
Freshman Class to Meet
The freshman CIIIHH will meet next
Tuesday noun in room -oil of 1'iiipor
Hall lu elect class ullicors iiuiuiualeil
two weeks ago. A l l uieinbers IMillli
lulled for mure I linn line ullico must
withdraw from all except one, according lo an .'iniiouiicoiueut today
by Flsu Smith and V i r g i n i a Stool,
freshman guardians from Myskaiiia,
senior honorary society,
College Students to Listen
To British Authority
On World Peace
TO ADDRESS ASSEMBLY
Open Forum to Be Conducted
On Thursday Afternoon
In the Lounge
M r . AV. A r n o l d Forster, B r i t i s h
publicist and a u t h o r i t y on i n t e r n a tional affairs w i l l meet w i t h Stale
college students and f a c u l t y next
week d u r i n g a three day visit, to
A l b a n y under the sponsorship of the
Now Vork oltieo of the I n s t i t u t e of
I n t e r n a t i o n a l Education.
Mr.
Forster, descendant of tho
famous A r n o l d f a m i l y o f E n g l a n d ,
is spending three days w i t h each of
the colleges of New Vork slate this
f a l l and winter.
His State college
appearances will include the conduct
of a student f o r u m Thursday afternoon, and addresses lo the student
assembly
Friday
morning and a
f a c u l t y tea on F r i d a y a f t e r n o o n ,
S l a l o college sliideats w i l l have
Iheir lirsl o p p o r t u n i t y to meet w i t h
Mr.
Forster at a forum in the
I
nge of Rii-li.-iiilsoii hall Thursday
afternoon from -I Mill to (}:00 o'clock.
The topic for discussion w i l l bo
"The
1'rice of
Peace—America's
Share."
The
Voting
Women's
Christian
association,
under
the
chairmanship of V i r g i n i a Sloel, '37,
presidelll, w i l l have charge of the
p r o g r a m , w i t h the Peace club, tho
International
Relations
dub,
and
campus religious groups cooperating.
On F r i d a y morning M r . Forster
w i l l address the student assembly on
Hie topic " T h e Present Armaments
Knee—Can It He Slopped in T i m e ? "
In order to provide a f u l l hour f o r
Mr. Forster, ami allow lime for regular
student
business,
the
12:35
o'clock period will mil begin u n t i l
I :0(l o'clock.
The I'ucully lea w i l l be F r i d a y
afternoon Prom I ;0t) to (i;00 o'clock
in the Ingle room of th,. A l u m n i
Kesideuco hall.
The topic for discussion will be " Fleiiieuts of a
Peaceful World O r d e r . "
.Mr. A r n o l d Forster comes Prom a
family
which has served F n g b i n d
ami m a n k i n d .
His father was the
lit.
lion.
I I . o . Arnold
Forster,
minister of war in the Hal f o u r cabinet, l i i i i . v n i i ,
| | i „ g , - t , „ | u m ,|,, w n g
M a l l hew Ai'iiohl, poet and essayist,
and
his
great
grandfather.
Dr.
Arnold of Kugby, educator,
(<"mi I in lint
mi / , „ , „ .|, column
2)
Sophomore Class Will
Entertain Class of '40
The sophomore class w i l l entertain the class of m-iii „ n F r i d a y ,
October " I in the gymnasium of
I'age hall.
Carolyn Mat I ice is general chair'"""•
'lolin Fdgo, soph
ore class
prosidenl, will speak lu Hie class uf
IIMU. Myskania will be present and
will read college traditions and interclass r i v a l r y rules lu Hie freshmen.
The
ooiuniittooN
assisting
Miss
Mattiee a r e : p u b l i c i t y , Marion Fir'"'Hi, ehtilrnmii, Margaret M a i t i s o a ,
M.vaderi Croiiuse; decorations, ,lunu
Hyron ami dune Puliuer, cu chairman, V i c t o r i a l i i l z i , l.oah Mclveul,
lh'tt,\
-Mien;
refreshments,
Hotty
l l a y f i i r d , c h a i r m a n , Helen
Lowry,
Kegina
Murphy,
Joyce
Maycoc'k,
Delia D o l a n ; oiilertaiuineat, W i l l i a m
TOITOIIS, ohiiiriuun, (lordou Tnhnor,
Kaymond Wallers, James Npoace;
faculty,
Hetty
Baker,
chairman,
D i i u l o n T y n a n , Kichard L o n s d a l e ;
and orchestra, Faye Forumn, chairman, Joseph Loose, Joseph Kovvland,
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 9, 1936
State College News
E s t a b l i s h e d b y t h e C l a n of 1918
TBe u n d e r g r a d u a t e Newspaper of N e w York
College for Teachers
William Walker Fete
Feature* Noveltie*
The Commentstater
State
Battle Front for Peace
P u b l i s h e d every F r i d a y of t h e college year b y t h e N E W S
B o a r d r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e S t u d e n t Association
Telephones:
Office, 5 0 3 7 3 ; Gtumaer, 2-0434; D e x t e r ,
2-4314; Seld, 2-9761; Oaylord, 2-4314
Entered at second class mailer in the Albany, N. Y., postoffice
T H E N E W S BOARD
HARBV
FRED
T.
GUMAER
Editor-in-Chief
B. DEXTER
Managing
Editor
W A R R E N 1. D E N S M O R E
Associate
Managing
Editor
DAVID B . S M I T H
SOPHIE WOLZOK
Associate
Associate
Managing
Managing
Editor
Editor
LAUHITA
CHARLES
SEU>
W.
MILDRED
E.
CHARLES
N.
GAYLORD
NIGHTINGALE
H E L E N CLYDE
PRINTED
Business
Advertising
Circulation
MORRIS
Sports
Women's
Sports
BY BOYD PRINTINQ CO., I N C . , ALBANY,
Manager
Manager
Manager
Editor
Editor
N.
Y.
Wc coinmentstate ourselves from ancient times r i g h t
up into t h e battle for peace. N e x t week's discussions
o n i n t e r n a t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s b r i n g t o m i n d a f e w of t h e
b i g p e a c e s t o r i e s of S t a t e ' s l a s t d o z e n y e a r s .
In 1925 t h e s t u d e n t association voted, after d e b a t e ,
t o go on record a s favoring t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s ' e n t r a n c e
i n t o t h e w o r l d c o u r t , 6 5 2 - 4 0 . T w o m e m b e r s of M y s kunia were named delegates t o a national intercollegiate
world court conference a t P r i n c e t o n u n i v e r s i t y .
I n D e c e m b e r , 1932, t h e N E W S f e a t u r e d a poll s t o r y o n
who would g o t o w a r a n d w h o wouldn't, " j u s t in case."
S a i d t h e p a p e r : " O n e - f o u r t h of t h e m e n of S t a t e college a n d e i g h t e e n w o m e n w o u l d v o l u n t e e r f o r a c t i v e
s e r v i c e if t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s s u d d e n l y b e c a m e e n g a g e d
in f o r e i g n w a r . "
T h e poll w a s c o n d u c t e d b y t h e Y.VV.C.A. i n c o n n e c t i o n
w i t h a l u r g e r s u r v e y of colleges i n N e w Y o r k s t a t e
to ascertain s t u d e n t sentiment on w a r . Reasons given
o n S t a t u b a l l o t s for a v e r s i o n t o t a k i n g u p a r m s in c a s e
of foreign w a r i n c l u d e d r e l i g i o u s c o n v i c t i o n , c o n s c i e n c e ,
a n d t h e r e a l i z a t i o n of t h e a w f u l w a s t e of w a r . P e o p l e
s t a t e d under w h a t conditions t h e y would a i d in intern a t i o n a l c o n f l i c t — o n l y if d r a f t e d , o n l y a s a n o n - c o m b a t a n t , o n l y if s i n c e r e a t t e m p t s u t a r b i t r a t i o n h a d
failed, a n d s o o n ,
t
The Library Committee's Report
The library committee of the college made
public last week a report which gave serious
question to the actual loyalty of State college
students to their school.
A large number of books have been disappearing from the shelves of the Hawley library, the
actual figure being so large that its publication
would reflect seriously on a college of future
teachers.
A drive for the return of "lifted" (it sounds
better than stolen) books was conducted last
spring. Pains were taken to make the point
that the return of books and not the penalizing
of offenders was the purpose of the campaign.
The small number of books returned voluntarily
is another indication of the seriousness of the
whole problem.
The cost of the missing books and the loss of
certain important volumes alone are enough of
a blow to thf> college. The larger question is
this—if one cannot be loyal to an institution
which is serving him, will he be loyal enough
to serve future generations in the teaching
profession?
Let's cooperate with the library. Or shall it
be said we have turned our Alma Mater into a
den of thieves?
The Captain's Garden Party
State college expresses its heartiest thanks to
William John Walker, citizen of Albany, who
opiiiied his home to seniors, graduate students,
and faculty at last Saturday's garden party.
Captain Walker, interested in Slate because
his mother was a member of the class of '71,
claims to be a son of State on his own merit,
having attended its practice school "until the
age of t e n . " In bis secondary education be
claims his school "eouldn't teach him anything."
We feel, however, from our acquaintance, that
the Captain has a groat deal to teach State
college, and we shall look forward to meeting
him many a lime again.
Every guest with whom we have come in contact felt the uniqueness of the spirit of the Captain's garden parly. Tlio spacious home and
garden, the German student caps, the informality of the group singing, and the host's personality will stand out as factors in a unique
and pleasant experience for those who attended.
And the fellowship spirit of the party carried
over into the dance; conducted after it in the
Commons.
The class of 1!),'!7 will remember the party
as the largest voluntary gathering of its members on record, The seniors appreciated the
opportunity of mooting the graduate students as
a group, Perhaps out of the party may come
a demand for social organization of the graduate
students, something which State has most often
been without,
Captain Walker has proved himself a loyal
alumnus of State college, by his genuine interest
in its students, if not by virtue of its college
degree,
#
#
»
#
t
B u t t h e poll s t o r y d o e s n ' t s t o p t h e r e . A local p a p e r
featured t h e s t o r y w i t h rod expletives, proceeded to
cull t h e f u t u r e t e a c h e r s c o m m u n i s t s , a n d u r g e d t h a t
. s o m e t h i n g be d o n e a b o u t i t . T h e y t o o k a p i c t u r e of
five l e a d e r s a m o n g m e n a t S t a t e a n d h e a d l i n e d i t t o
t h e effect tliut t h e s e five 100 p o r c e n t A m e r i c a n s would
fight. F o u r of t h e five e x p l a i n e d t o t h e i r f r i e n d s l a t e r
t h a t t h e y w e r e in t h e p h o t o b e c a u s e t h e y w a n t e d t h e i r
picture taken.
W h e n s c a r e j o u r n a l i s m h a d d o n e i t s d e e d , t h e college
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a d carefully to explain to t h e public
t h a t S t a t e s t u d e n t s w e r e i n t e r e s t e d in p e a c e , n o t
Moscow.
L u s t y e a r ' s p e a c e b o o m w a s m i l d e r . T h e V e t e r a n s of
F u t u r e W a r s a n d g r o u p s t h a t f o l l o w e d t h e i r lead
laughed their w a y t o w a r d peace.
T h e y e a r of o u r L o r d ItKlli .sees a c a m p a i g n a k i n t o
t h a t of 1925, in t h a t d i s c u s s i o n a n d c a r e f u l c o n s i d e r a t i o n a r e t h e o r d e r of t h e d a y . S t a t e college will be
h o n o r e d t o c o n s i d e r world p r o b l e m s w i t h A r n o l d F o r s t e r ,
a m a n of fine t r a d i t i o n in e d u c a t i o n , l i t e r a t u r e a n d
i n t e r n a t i o n a l affairs,
A n o t h e r p o i n t on p e a c e is a l s o t h e o r d e r of t h e d a y .
I t d e a l s w i t h p e a c e a t S t a t e college, a n d w e a r e n o t
being facetious.
W i t h t h e c o m i n g of r e g u l a r b u s i n e s s m e e t i n g s for t h e
s t u d e n t association, let's r e m e m b e r t h a t the association
is n o t a d e b a t i n g s o c i e t y b u t a place t o c o n s i d e r college
problems. L e t us n o t therefore introduce legislation or
e n t e r i n t o d e b a t e j u s t for t h e s a k e of a r g u m e n t , n o r
q u i b b l e o v e r t h e fine p o i n t s of p a r l i a m e n t a r y p r o c e d u r e .
W h e n d i s c u s s i o n is d o n e , l e t ' s v o t e , a n d w h e n b u s i n e s s
is d o n e , let's a d j o u r n .
Cover To Cover
S t a t e college s e n i o r s , g r a d u a t e
students and faculty
members
w e r e t h e g u e s t s of M r . W i l l i a m
J o h n Walker a n d his daughter,
M i s s J a n e t W a l k e r , in a g a r d e n
p a r t y a t t h e i r h o m o a t 4 2 3 .State
S t . Inst S a t u r d a y n i g h t ,
U p o n a r r i v i n g a t the door all
comers were given p a r t y h a t s to
a d d color to t h e festivities.
T h e p r o g r a m , c o n d u c t e d in
Mr. W a l k e r ' s spacious garden,
was opened with an address by
the
host
after
which
Eloise
S h e a r e r , ' 3 7 , led t h e g r o u p i n
songs.
R e f r e s h m e n t s of coffee
a n d d o u g h n u t s were s e r v e d .
A f t e r t h e p a r t y , m a n y of t h e
guests returned
t o t h e Comm o n s of H a w l e y hall w h e r e d a n c ing was conducted.
A s s i s t i n g t h e W a l k e r s with t h e
p a r t y a r r a n g e m e n t s were Miss
H e l e n H . M o r e l a n d , Dean of
Women, and John
Deno a n d
Eloise Shearer, seniors.
N o w t h a t i n f o r m a l hellenic s c r a m b l e s a r e h i s t o r y . . . y o u tell t h e
d i r t ; w e d o n ' t c a r e t o . . . H o w did
y o u like t h e g a r d e n p a r t y ? .
W e ' r e n o t a s e n i o r e i t h e r , b u t we
went in disguise—in dusguiso hat
. . . H o w times have changed . . .
I t ' s s h e a r e r n o n s e n s e t o insist t h a t
J a c k c a n be P a p a Deao for eber
. . . Y e t when the hog-knrling time
c a m e r o u n d , t h i s y e a r ' s p a r e n t took
tlio s o n g s t o a n e w low . , . N o t in
p i t c h , e i t h e r . . . T h e n we d a n c e d in
the commons . . . Ralph was singi n g a d i f f e r e n t l u l l a b y , a n d it w a s n ' t
r o c k o w b y e b a b y . . . As lie d r o w s e d ,
he m u r m u r e d , " D o n ' t rouse m« or
y o u ' l l r u t h t h e d a y v a n I horn in
on y o u " . . . E x c u s e t h e p u n s , b u t
morris to come . . . Charlie assumed
a v e r y s a g e e x p r e s s i o n a s lie listened
to t h e r u s s e l i n g of t h e g r e e n d r e s s
t h e g r a i l s t u d e n t wore . . . W e unders t a n d t h a t s h e w a s t a r d y for t h e
Monday
noon d a t e
because
coinm o n ( s ) a c t i v i t i e s a r e newt: t o her
. . . Does a n y o n e know Ivan Aufuliteli v T h e D i r e c t o r y hoard is worried . . . D i g week-end a h e a d . . .
in f a c t it s h o u l d b e a g r u d weekend . . . F i r s t vie p a r l i e s , t o n , K D H ,
Phi Delt, e e p s , College limine . . .
W e ' l l list t h e new c o m b i n a t i o n s next
t i m e . . . W e found t h e best lii
I'
l b " week . . . W h y do we d a n c e
with i i p p e r c l u s s g i r l s !
Uucause we
t h i n k t h e y ' r e s m o o t h . . . How do
you like o u r l i n e r . . . W c likes t h e i r
lines . . . Tlie X K W H lies n cut now
tu rival t h e j u n i o r g u i d e s . . . N a m e
it anil t h e y ' l l lei you have it . . ,
l > on q u a i l t h e y call t h e i r ' s (Ifimimi
b e c a u s e it 's t h e g u m m a k a p . . .
Ami finally, it 's d i b b l e t r o u b l e for
linger now.
T H E M A N OK S T A T E
State's Stage
Elementary Takes a Walk.
Advanced Premiere.
Free for All.
"Walk, Jenny, Walk "—thus the
fifty m e m b e r s of t h e . E l e m e n t a r y
Dramatics class begin t o display
talents toward acting. With vague
t h o u g h t s of " M e l o d r a m a — t o d a y a n d
y e s t e r d a y " in t h e i r m i n d s t h e y h a v e
s t a r t e d t o m i m i c w u l k s of v a r i o u s
c h a r a c t e r s , a n d l a t e r will c o n t i n u e
with more detailed pantomimes.
S e v e r a l m e m b e r s of t h e e l e m e n t a r y
group a r e t a k i n g lessons in m a k e - u p
from t h e A d v a n c e d c l a s s , n o w p r o m o t e d from s t r a i g h t t o c h a r a c t e r
make-ups.
T r y - o u t s for t h e o n e - a c t p l a y s a r o
well u n d e r w a y . T h e first t w o p l a y s
of t h e season', u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of
B e t t y Appeldoorn a n d Hester Price,
j u n i o r s , will be p r e s e n t e d on O c t o ber 20.
Miss A p p e l d o o r n ' s p l a y is a m y s tery thriller.
T h e cast
includes:
Irwin Stinger, T h o m a s Kelly, a n d
John Edwards, seniors; Paul Dittm a n , a n d H e r b e r t Drooz, j u n i o r s ; a n d
Kenneth Doran, '38.
Miss P r i c e will s t a g e a c o m e d y .
T h e c a s t will b e : G a r A r t h u r a n d
Janice Nicrman, juniors; Jack Nordell a n d R a y W a l t e r s , s o p h o m o r e s ;
a n d E l e a n o r Dibble a n d R o b e r t Cogger, f r e s h m e n .
L a s t y e a r t w o h u n d r e d a n d fifty
dollars was a d d e d to t h e D r a m a t i c s
mid A r t a s s o c i a t i o n b u d g e t to meet
the expenses of t h e s e p l a y s .
Since
the s t u d e n t t a x s u p p o r t s t h i s f u n d ,
all
persons
attending
the plays
w i t h o u t a s t u d e n t t a x t i c k e t will p a y
ten c e n t s a t t h e door of P a g e hall
auditorium.
T h e m e m b e r s of t h i s y e a r ' s A d vanced c l a s s a r e : A n n e R a n d a n d
T h o m a s Kelly, seniors; B e t t y Appeld o o r n , Lucille C l a r k e , M a r j o r i e C r i s t ,
B e t t y D a n i e l s , J a n e t Dibble, P a u l
D i t t i n a n , D o r o t h y Iliiner, C h a r l o t t e
Libiiiiin, .lean Lichoii.stcin, F l o r e n c e
Nelbach,
Janice
Nicrman,
Hester
Price,
Florence
Hingrose,
Ruth
S h u r i c k , S a l l y W h o Ian, a n d Florence
Zubres, juniors.
Miss P r i c e w a s
elected t o I lie oflice of m i s t r e s s of t h e
w a r d r o b e , a n d Mr. D i t t m a n is t r e a s u r e r of t h e c l a s s .
Menorah H a s Meeting
Menornli c o n d u c t e d i t s initial meeting T h u r s d a y , O c t o b e r first,
with
s e v e n t y live s t u d e n t s a t t e n d i n g . P l a n s
for t h e y e a r were f o r m u l a t e d , a n d a
p r o g r a m c o m m i t t e e of t h e following
people
was a p p o i n t e d ;
L i IIia n
S h a p i r o , '37, Hose I iorknwll.z, Herbert. Drnoz, Percy Furmuii, nail ArIcne Simon,
juniors,
a m i Vvelto
llyiiian, 'III.
by
John
Ounther,
Harpers
" Inside
Europe "
Brother*, N e w York,
i n s i d e " of t h e c o n A t r i p t h r o u g h K u r o p e on tli
f u s i n g i n f o r m a t i o n t h a t eonies o u t of i n e w s c e n s o r e d
c o n t i n e n t is t h e t r e a t J o h n ( i i i n t h e r g i v e s n s in liis
AI III! next m e e t i n g on O c t o b e r
n e w book.
" M u s s o l i n i is b u i l t like a s t e e l s p r i n g . S t a l i n is a
c h a n c e l l o r of t h e Inlcrcollock of s l e e p y g r a n i t e , a n d H i t l e r , a blot of e c t o leginlc Meaiirah, H e n r y l l u r w i l z , is
p l a s m " , S u c h r a r e figures of speech p e p p e r I lie spicy
'Xpecli I to s p e a k .
c o m p a r i s o n s of E u r o p e a n s t a t e s m e n .
As t o t h e i r
m a g n e t i s m , " a s s o c i a t e s w o r s h i p H i t l e r , fear .Mussolini,
a n d r e s p e c t S t a l i n ".
H i t l e r , " a m a n of p a s s i o n , of i n s t i n c t , not of
r e a s o n " , bases his a u t h o r i t y on t h e " L e a d e r P r i n c i p l e " ,
which d e m a n d s " o b e d i e n c e from t h e b o t t o m u p " . T h e
Si
thai
college
iinivel 11 v d i lineally every d a y
college anil
in an a t t e m p t
a u t h o r coins a fiii'iuidab . but. r e a l l y s i m p l e p h r a s e ,
s t u d e n t s who have
have bhern s h a d o w e d hi
lo
c o n s i d e r a l l a p p l i e a t ions a m i
" I h e p s y c h o p u l hology of d i c t a t o r s ", w h i c h includes
Hi,
Kpecli e of d e p r e s s i o n iua\
select I li ti.se nnisl d e s e r v i n g of a i d .
chlelly a h u m a n a n a l y s i s of t h e " p a u n c h y , C h a r l i e
Millie
the
lie
ir h i g h e r
oilucali
to
insomnia
anil
( 'linplin-iniislnched
m a n , given
T
h e N . V . A , ol'liee is now located in
National
Vinilli A d m i i i i s t r u l ion
e m o t i o n a l i s m ".
the I'eilera I g o v e r n m e n t this \ e a r
room 107, uppiisil e I he r e g i s t r a r ' s
A t hint, t h e world c a n find a l i n e p i c t u r e of t h e
distribute
In!
ofllco un Hie HrHl II n o r el'
abiinsl
siv million
Draper
n o t o r i o u s rtoichstiig lire anil i n f a m o u s " blood p u r g e
l.irs anion g t h e c o l l e g i a n s of the Is
hall.
of J u n e .'10 ".
states.
11
'I'
receive an allot
nt an iusll
T h e s o j o u r n in I t a l y r e s u l t s in c r i t i c i s m of M u s s o l i n i .
D e a n Helen I I . Morchiiiil is faculty
t l l l i i i l l 111 II-, I
nou prullt mailing ami
" H i s c a r e e r is t h a t of I he most f o r m i d a b l e c o m b i n a t i o n
d i r e e l o r of t h e movement al S t a l e
lax e x e m p t ,
Pile college ouch nmulh
of t u r n c o a t , r u l l i a n , a n d m a n of g e n i u s in m o d e r n h i s college a s s i s t e d by Mr, A d a m W a l k e r ,
receives I'unils' equal lii ill,- n u m b e r
lory".
W h a t t h e h i s t o r y b o o k s call h i s " m a r c h on
professor
of
KcoiiouiicN
a n d So
of lhu.se eligibl 1 m u l t i p l i e d hv Hficon
H o m e " l o o k place ill a t r a i n .
It is o n e of h i s t o r y ' s
c l o l u g y , a m i Miss K'dilh Owen \Vi
dollars.
T h e work dune must In,
p a r a d o x e s t h a t in ItJI'J in a s a r c a s t i c vein M u s s o l i n i
lace, a s s i s t u u t
p r o f e s s o r of
,a I i
p n i e l i e a l , IIS fill, anil
uncial.
It.
s h o u l d e x c l a i m , " I m a g i n e a n I t a l y in w h i c h t h i r t y - s i x
J o h n Demi, '.'17, is slinleill di
should lil the
I l b l l i h ami iuleiesl uf
million should all t h i n k t h e s a m e , a s t h o u g h t h e i r
T h e < I III 11 ll u|' jobs m a d e Ihi
Hie s t u d e n t ,
l i c g u l n r rlnsNI'noiil in
b r a i n s were m a d e in a n i d e n t i c a l mold a n d y o u would
is based mi I'J per ccnl of I In total
'Irnclinii ami
work provided for in
h a v e a m a d h o u s e , or r a t h e r a k i n g d o m of u t t e r bore
n u m b e r nf resilient s t u d e n t s i n n , l i e
I he college
budget
a r e excluded,
doiu or Imbeciles ".
in Hie i n s t i t u t i o n a s of O c t o b e r
A l e e e l l l lOllloliaeeilicnl „ | ' Deputy
ICuglunil's Kden, " t y p i c a l of t h e g e n t r y " , " D a n u b e
ll'.'M.
S t a l e college received allot
N . V . A . d i r e r l u r b'ii'lianl l l i u w a rii
H l u e s " ami t h e t r a g i c s t o r y id' Dolfuss, " M i l l i i n c l t o r m e n u for Hi'.' students.
The cum
vea led
Dial
+o,ii;,7,ii:io
would be
itiflt ", a m i I he l.upeseu cuiiicdy, a n a n a c h r o n i s m of t h e
millee
h a s received
I w u bundle I
spelll in i r e g u l a r iiuilorgniilimte ami
a g e of the, L o u i s ' , p r e s e r v e Ilia c u r r e n t a n e c d o t e s a n d
applications,
<inl\
(hose
slinleaU
gradual*
lienollU,
but
| tin | HUM
v i e w p o i n t * of c o n t e m p o r a r y h a p p e n i n g s .
T h i s is t h e
who r a n slum t h e iibnobile need I'm
would b
uppli'liumtcil with a fund
m a i n value of " I n s i d e K u r o p e ", but. m u c h of till) dethis u s s i s l u u c c to r e m a i n in scl I
»( ^L'IM.V, rur dlst rib a i ion to siu
t a i l e d m a t e r i a l a n d o b s c u r e foreign n a m e s will only
a r e ipialllleil to n ive positions
l' e l s iii Hie i'o d r o u g h t rldduii s t a t u s
c o n f u s e a n d i r r i t a t e t h e r e n d e r of I he f u t u r e .
The f a c u l t y c o m m i t t e e lias worked
" ' Hie soul It a m i m i d d l e west,
Federal Government Will Aid
162 State Students This Year
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 9, 1936
Canute's Corner
Football.
Football.
Football.
C. N.M.Once upon a time about fourteen
years ago, a State college football
team, the first gridiron squad in
the history of the institution, took
the field against the Union freshman
eleven.
Our forbears,
" making
their debut on the gridiron for the
first time in seventy years," were
defeated 16-6. Caton, State's fullback, scored those six points on an
eighty-five yard touchdown sprint.
"For the first time in seventy
years" can best be interpreted as
meaning that during that stretch of
time, State was officially credited
with not having a football team.
Before then, they hadn't thought of
it, anyway.
The 1022 team met with no outstanding success, a scoreless tie with
the Rochester School of Optometry
representing their liest
showing.
Hut they hud oodles of light. Trailblazers, they hoped the}' would be
called someday. Unfortunately football as a varsity sport was continued
for only two more yiurs.
Alan
power was conspicuously lacking,
with every tenth Statu student
lucky to be a man. In a couple of
years, with the woman-to-man ratio
reduced to 2-1, might it not be possible to take up where the teams of
.the Uarding-Coolidge regime left off,
and sort id' re-pioneer the grid
movement ?
Back to '22. In addition to the
initial defeat and the scoreless tie,
the State eleven dropped games to
RPI frosh, 39-0, and to St. Stephen's
by a large score. Inexperience paved
the way for most of the defeats.
The line was fairly strong, but the
team was almost without a pass
defense.
The second year of the short history of the sport here saw a more!
difllcult schedule than that of the
first year, but brought a little mure
success tu our hard-lighting, ill-supported warriors.
Whitewashed in
the
lirst
three games, by
St.
Lawrence. S i l l , by Worcester Tech,
,3!)-t), ami by Williams frosh, they
came back to bowl over the Destroyer Hrcck team, 12-0, and close
tin' season by losing to the lil'l
frosh, 7-0, in a well played game.
How sure of what was to come in
the way of an opponent must have
been the eleven of that season. To
quote from the October 26 issue of
the Xrus:
"Tomorrow State will
tackle one of the three following
teams at Ridgefield park: U.S.S.
Destroyer "Knox" eleven, Albany I
High School, or Troy Commerce
Academy."
The schedule for the lo.'.'l season I
included games with Manhattan col
lege, Spriliglield
college. Colgate |
fro-.li, lil'l fi'iudi. I'liiim frosh. ami j
W'ulre-ler Tech.
\ tie with the '
lil'l frosh was the best our lads
could do, ami thai ended football Ml
Male.
We can lane nothing Inn
admiral ion for t lie teams of I hose I
three vein-*, who struggled againM
bigger opponents, student non-support, ami inexperience.
Page t
Coach Hatfield Changes Basketball Schedule
Niagara To Play Fall Tennis Tournament Brings Hill And Dalers
Forty Competitors Into Lists
Await Contests
In Contest Here
Hartwick Added in Revision;
Squad to Meet R. P. I.
In First Game
Rocently released with corrections
for cancellations and additions, is
the State College basketball schedule
for the 1936-1937 season. Changes
in the schedule as originally planned
have removed all but one mid-week
game, that with Western Ontario,
and included a game with Hartwick
at Oneonta.
Seventeen contests are listed, eight
away and nine at home, commencing with R.P.I, at Troy on December a and closing witli Hartwick,
away, on March 13.
The two encounters with Niagara
will be the toughest of many tough
ones. Niagara represented the Central New Verk district in the Olympic
basketball tryouts and lost to a
strong Temple team by only two
points. This year the Roaring Cataracts look forward to an even more
successful season, with few players
lost by graduation, and plenty of
lanky replacements.
A game with R.P.I, is always
thrill-packed.
The noise from the
bleachers is tremendous even during
dull moments of the game.
The Buffalo State Teachers College court squad matches baskets
with State for the lirst time in recent
years. They have long claimed as
their very own the teachers college
and normal school championship of
the state. This year they will have
actual basis on which to claim the
championship or relinquish it.
The schedule is packed with other
strong opponents, a very very few
pushovers and two Canadian teams.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
• Inn.
Jan.
.Ian.
.Ian.
.Ian.
Feb.
Fell.
Fell,
Feb,
Feb.
Fell.
Fell.
Mar.
Mar.
"
|i
IS
H
!i
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The Schedule;
U.P.I.
Western Ontario
Brooklyn Poly.
St. Michaels
Norwich
Pratt
Niagara
Toronto
Niagara
Buffalo
lloburt
Hartwick
Alumni
H.P.I.
St. Michaels
Hani
Hartwick
Troy
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Home
Winsooki
Norwich
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Niagara
Buffalo
Geneva
Home
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Homo
Home
It.-i r«l
Oneonta
Fall Season
Stars.
Soccer.
Saddles.
Snap Shots.
H.F
The line weather is keeping the
hockey attendance up.
Sixty-one
Here i-i ill n 1 t-il at Hie last practice.
The sophomore ami junior classes
Periodical Features
have promising material in Dorothy
Articles by Faculty Marl,can, Belly Allen, Phyllis and
Marjoric Julisini, Irma
Anderson,
( f'tititilluril fniiii jiiiiir I, ruhimii li
Ktl.el Little, mid Thelma Miller.
menial P r o g r a m , ' ' is discussed by
The freshmen are si ill an unknown
several members of I In- education ile
parlnienl. I Jr. Hubert \V. I'Yederick quantity, ami practice leaching must
have downed llinsl of Hie seniors.
and Dr, French present an eviiliui
Betty Morrow ami Phyllis Tucker
lion nl' the dinner program and a
survey nl' I lie new courses including seem to be the last of the old guard.
llic Social Studied, Inlrmlllclion In
Once again I lie soccer schedule
I'.'ilucal ional Theory ami 1'rnetiec, bus been chllllgi'il. The new dales
ami Mcllhiils and I'niclice 'reaching. are Tuesday at I : I "i o'clock on the
' ' The 1 "II 1(4 in in in Ad inn, ' ' by Puge hall campus, and Thursday at
Dr, Arthur K. |lcil< and Miss .Mar
3 : l.'i, al llevorwyck park.
gniel lluyes, and ' ' T h e Spirit of
The riding group enjoyed I he lirst
Conducting the Course," by Dr
ride after season on Monday, although
Kli/.ulielh K, Munis and Dr. Karl iiue of the freshmen could have used
It. Suiitli, describe these Individual II little glue on her saddle,
phases. Thai leaching is essentially
li.A.A. is seeking material for the
a social process is prowd in ''lliihic current scrap bonk, If you have nny
Philosophy
I'udorlyiiig
Secondary snap shots of Freshman camp or
Teacher
Kdnciil i o n , " by Dr. .1,
Play day, lend the negatives lo
Allan Hicks ami Dr. dames II.
riiebua Miller, '.'IS, or June Palmer,
I'almcr, former education professor, MP, and win a medal.
Froth to Meet Milne
In Initial Court Tilt
The lid will be torn off the
basketball season Friday, November 20, when a team representing the class of '40. the
official freshman team for the
coming year, will tee off against
the Milne High school cage
team.
Richard Margison, '37,
is coach of the Milne high
squad, while Thomas Barrington, '37, MAA head, is the frosh
tutor.
Practice begins next week for
lads of the practice school, who
are in the capable managerial
hands of William llofnling. A
week later the freshman squad,
which will act as a sort of junior
varsity this year, commences
training. George Mallinson, '38,
an assistant basketball manager,
will serve as manager of the
yearlings.
Last year, the freshman five
nosed out the Milne baskettossers, 24-22. Out for revenge
and always dangerous, the high
school team should put up a
line scrap.
The power of the
neophytes, as ever, so early, is
but visionary. Anyway, more of
it to them.
Autumn coughs up thoughts of pret
tily falling leaves, brilliant harvest
moons and the fall tennis tournament. Every year, ambitious racquet
wielders sign up to meet opponent
after opponent and Anally, having
mopped the field, to run off with the
crown. Only one lucky fellow realizes his dream but all feel the thrill
of elay-court competition and the
matching of their skill and headwork against opponents of unknown
quantity.
Forty men have signed up for this
year's tourney. First round games
are already in play. The completion
of the schedule is in the hands of the
students and a maximum of cooperation is requested from every participant by Edward Hulihuii, '37, manager of intramural sports.
First round matchings: S. Berkinoff vs. V. Peultie; R. Clarke vs. D.
Wexler; Robert Margison vs. D.
Quant; II. Losee vs. K. Holmes; H,
.hiked vs. M. Edelstein; R. Waterman vs. C. Ettinger; W. Fremont vs.
K, Penney; L. Kawalsky vs. E. Bromley; R. Johnson vs. A. McNamara;
K. Sense vs. R. (Iloeckner; D. Dickson
vs. C. Matthews; H. Hurwitz vs. H.
Reissig; R. Lonsdale vs. W. Penney;
L. Striittner vs. E. O'Horu; W. Harpe
vs. M. Aiierbaeh; W. J. Zubon vs.
P. Sapolsky; J. Caramia vs. .).
Shearer; C. Cleaves vs. A. Casper;
L. Rick man vs. E. Tamassion.
French Club to Entertain
G.A.A. Plans Annual
Indian Ladder Hike
Elsa Smith Is General Chairman
In Charge of Fall Outing
r
'
The Girls' Athletic association will
sponsor ils annual Indian Ladder
hike mi Saturday, October 17, according to Llizabeth Morrow, '37,
president.
Lisa Smith,
'37, is
general chairman of the hike.
Assisting Miss Smith will be the
following committees: food, Irma
Anderson, '38, Llizabeth Allan, '39,
.lane Wilson and Frances Field,
freshmen; entertainment, Jean Edgcumbe, '38, Thelma Miller,
'38,
Kathleen Strevell,
'37, Charlotte
Peck, '38, Katheriue Bobbie, '38,
Christine Ades, '.'!!); buses, Helen
Lowry,
'.'111, Mary Trainor,
'40;
faculty, Helen Clyde, '37, Kllen Besl,
'•10; advertising, Katheriue Conklin,
'38, Phyllis Arnold, '311, Jeun Strong,
'.'111, Marjoric Hand, '1(1; clean-up,
Alice Bennett, '38, Lois (lame and
Alice ('niuiise, freshmen.
Featuring the singing of Miss
Gilda Bovo of Schenectady, the
French Club will hold its annual reception for freshmen Thursday night,
October lo, at 7:30 o'clock in the
Lounge of Richardson hall.
Large Squad Begins Practice;
Manager Sees Success
For Harriers
The State college cross-country
team has been pounding up and down
hills for almost two weeks now,
whipping itself into shape for this
most grueling of sports. The largest
and most ambitious squad in years is
out, with gobs of experience represented, Delhi, RPI, and Bard are
almost certain to match strides over
the long route with the tireless
Teachers—and equally as certain to
find the competition stiff.
Says Edward Reynolds, '38, manager of the hustling harriers and a
confirmed pessimist, of this fall's
squad:
'' Co-captain Fullagar is the only
man lost from last year's team.
Haynes is showing his heels to all
of us so far. We're looking for a
freshman sensation.
The team is
pretty cocky this year and looks forward to a very successful season.
Don't quote me on this, e t c . "
Youths practicing include lettermen Harold Haynes and Edward
Reynolds, juniors, and Anthony Wilczynski, '30; old timers Tom Meehan,
'37, Joseph Vidmar and Joseph
DeRusso, juniors and William Hopke,
James Johnson, Cecil Marino, and
Walter Russ, sophomores; and freshmen Frank Augustine, Louis Francello, Otto
Howe, Homer Loggett, Louis Rickman, and Steven
Szawlowski.
Freshman Men to Meet
Thomas Harrington, '37, conch of
freshman bnsketball, has called a
meeting ul' nil freshniun men in
room 20 in
'dinlelv after assembly
loday,
EAT AT JOHN'S LUNCH
Dinners 25(- and up
Delicious Sandwiches and Sundaes
7:30 A.M.—11:00 P.M.
Opp. the High School
RED'S BARBER SHOP
52 Robin Street
We Asked O n e Q u e s t i o n of 200 M e n a n d W o m e n
"Which Pen is Your Choice for Stf&
tuuit"&*£&?n
A n d 2 to I Selected P u r k e r ' s L a m i n a t e d Peurl*
•—The mclean Vacunwtio
tvith
Ever-Visible
Ink Supply
and
102% More Ink Capacity
than
Old Style —
CU.41UNTEED
Murium icitlly
Perfect
Ladies Haircutting A Specialty
Standard Prices
OPTICIAN*
FREDETTE'J
ASColnftbiait.ftfar'**^
At SfRVK'f
Yes, o t h e r things being equal,
hl\Ic-iuiinlcil people would choose (be
Parker Vacuum lie for buauly alunol
But other things, too, including perfarmuneo, make this revolutionary invention tin- national favorite bv a
slill lugger margin—by ') to -I.**
One important difference—its ink
supply is civr visible—tin; E N T I R E
length of (he barrel. Thus il shows
days ahead \\ I1KN IT'S R U N N I N G
LOW.
Another greut difference j« the patented Parker filler. There's no oilier
like it. Il requires no sliding piston
immersed in ink—ils working purls
are wealed i„ (be top WHERE I N K
CAN NEVEH TOUCH T H E M —
PKU never decompose them.
The Parker point is Scratch-proof
—•precious Platinum combined with
solid Gold.
Every student needs this miracle
writer (hut doesn't "let you down" hy
running dry in classes or exams.
Co mid sec this luminous, laminated Pearl Beauty at any good store
selling liens. The Parker Pen Co.,
Jaucsville, Wis.
z
Start the fkUj^
^iihthePen
er
GUARANTIED MIIHANIUUV rfRHCT
Junior, $5 jtfJhk Pantilt, $2.50,
CW Sue, HO t f f i j l $3.50 and $5
»«urolli«ii!wi,'.ilmiiuiiib«rwl»ctmtl'»rkertli»iiui/»Uipr.
**Nuu,...ui l-«u Cvutiu, l;.',.M.lu.g will Suu,.n,.i Uerp.
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 9, 1936
Hellenics
Lecturer Will Speak
On Foreign Situation
(Continued from page 1, column 5)
During the world war Mr. Forster
The Greeks are still recuperating served in the Admiralty and Foreign
from Intersorority Tea; but, all me! offices, and at the Versailles conference in 1919, was a member of the
I t was fun. We danced and danced Supreme Economic council.
and danced and then, for a change,—
Since the war his activities have
drank tea. Rusliing? Oh, yes, we included positions as secretary to
Lord Cecil in the disarmament camdid sonic of that, too.
Many alums came back to visit paign of 1927-28, and attendance at
and attend the tea. Anna Koren, the disarmament conference- at
•35, and Rose Koren, '32, stayed at Geneva, 1932. He has served as a
member of the advisory committee
A E Phi.
on
international affairs of England's
Pi Alpha Tau made welcome Mrs.
Howard Seld, '35, Helen Loth, '36, labor party.
Mr. Forster's published works inand Dora Levene, '36.
Gamma Kap seems to be " i n the clude n booklet on arbitration, " T h e
mood for love." Here goes the list Victory of Reason," 1925, and " T h e
of marriages—Margaret Service, '33, Disarmament Conference,'" 1931.
to Phillip Cox; Marie Redman, '33, He lectured in the United States beto John Meinhaucr; Joyce Hause, fore academic audiences in 1933.
'29, to Edward Hurst field; and
Proofs to Be Distributed
Nelta Miller, '31, to George Brown.
Quite a list! Gamma Kap is at
Proofs for the Pedagogue pictures,
present formulating plans for an taken during the past week, will be
alumnae reunion during the week of distributed sometime next week. All
October 12th.
people wishing to work on the PedaD 0 welcomed Marge Kalaidjian, gogue, who were unable to sign up
on Activities day, should leave their
'36, for the week-end.
Gamma Phi Sigma announces the names and class schedules in the
marriage of Rita Krenzer, '36, to mail ho.\ for either Rosemary Lafferty
Harold Hickman, ' 35, at Luzerne. or Thomas Breen, seniors. All stuThe Greeks still have a word for dents, including freshmen, are welcoine 1n trv out for the Pedagogue.
it,-—rushing!! !
H lac, Uccsrr a MVMS TOSMXO CO.
'Collegiate Digest'
Accompanies 'News'
Miss Lowerree Accepts
' News ' Presents Main
Parliamentary Rules
Position At Newburgh
The State College NEWS will
again feature the Collegiate Digest, the picture magazine,
regularly each week.
Featuring a new style of editorial presentation, Collegiate
Digest this year will bring to
our readers complete pictorial
news of events of interest and
importance to the nation's campuses, gathered for its editors
by more than three hundred
regular correspondents and photographers of the world's leading newspaper agencies.
The Collegiate Digest will present picture news of unusual
developments 111 education, science, extra-curricular activities,
sports, faculty, and student
projects.
Students of State College are
urged to send pictures of interesting campus events to Collegiate Digest, Box 472, Madison, Wisconsin. An added attraction, three dollars is paid for
each photo accepted for publication.
(Continued from page 1, eolumn 3)
done by a two-thirds vote.
7. Previous question. This is a
motion to stop debate and put the
question immediately before the
house. It can not be debated or
amended.
ft. Division.
When division is
called, a rising vote must lie taken.
In commenting upon the essentials
of parliamentary procedure, Deno
stated, "Every member of the student association should have a fair
working knowledge of the elementary
principles of Robert's Rules of
Order to facilitate business and
afford equal opportunity to all for
discussion."
In order to secure the NEWS,
with the Coltvgiati Digest included, students will he required
to present their student tax
tickets
beginning
this
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
The administration announced this
week the resignation of Miss Edna
M. Lowerree, secretary of the Appointment bureau. The announcement of her successor will be made
shortly.
Miss Lowerree has accepted a position at Newburgh Free Academy,
where she is teaching typewriting.
She has served as secretary of the
Appointment bureau since 1932.
Miss Lowerree was graduated
from State college in 1921. As an
undergraduate she served as business
manager
of
the
STATE
COLLEGE
NEWS. She will attend the twentieth
anniversary NEWS banquet tomorrow
night.
Dial 5-1913
Boulevard
Cafeteria
and Qri 11
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
week.
tAey have a more pleasing taste and aroma
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