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State College News
•Voir,. XV, No. 15
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS. ALBANY. N. Y„ FRIDAY, JANUARY 16,
$2.25 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues.
1931
TEAM HAS SECOND
CONTEST OF WEEK
GREEKS TO SEND
RUSH INVITATIONS
SAMUEL DRANSKY
WILL BE SPEAKER
Alumni to O p p o s e Five T o m o r r o w
Night at 8:15 in Annual Tilt;
Former Stars to Play
Official Rushing Period Will Begin
T h u r s d a y Night, J a n u a r y 29,
Miss Kautter Says
He
T h e Purple and Cold basketball
five will play its second contest of
the week t o m o r r o w l i g h t at 8:15
in the l'age halt gymnasium when
it encounters the alumni.
In its first game of the week,
the varsity clashed with the formidable Middlebury college quintet
last night.
T h e alumni team will be composed of the following former stars
of State basketball a g g r e g a t i o n s :
Anthony Cousins, Louis Klein, Bernard Auerbach, Joseph
Herncy
Francis Griffin, Howard Coff, Li
Verne Carr, Richard Whiston, am.
Leo Allan.
T h e s e men were chiefly respon
sible for putting State college t
the fore in intercollegiate basket
ball circles during the years tha'
they wore the I urple and Goli
colors.
Many of them are stil
active on the courts and are ir
excellent condition for the fray to
morrow night, Lou Klein is captain of an American Legion five in
Harrison, New York and also ol
the very fast Port Chester Jewisl
Center team, and is revealing t
the basketball fans of Westchestei
county the fine qualities which mack
him an outstanding player at State
Pushing invitations to frcihtneii
whom, sororities are considering for
membership will be mailed Tluirsd.r
night at 6 o'clock, according to Elizabeth Kautter, '31, president of the
intersorority council.
Freshmen must answer these invitations by return mail, Miss Kautter
said. As they will receive these at
the end of the first week of examiia
tions when nearly all freshmen tests
are over, they will be able to makt
plans for the following week accord
•ugly.
T h e other players are also ap
pearing on the court teams in tliei.
respective localities. Herncy, cap-1
tain of the 1929 quintet, and oni
of the best guards in the history j
of the college, will try to show that
he has not lost any of his defensive]
and
offensive
prowess,
on.in |
w'.io took scoring honors for three
successive seasons, and captained i
the 1928 five will be one of th
strongest men on the alumni. H e 1
has been playing on teams in the
vicinity of Saratoga and is sure
to display his usual excellent court
qualities.
(t u ii I in ii ril on fane -1, tolumn 3)
a. LB vEnrfE CARR.
Hamilton Acheson, '31,
To Teach In Academy
Hamilton Acheson is the first man
DRAMATICS CLASS
to obtain a teaching • position this
WILL GIVE PLAYS year, according to an announcement
made hy the placement
bureau.
ON FEBRUARY 10 Acheson
is teaching science in the
The advanced dramatics class will
present two plays in the Page hall
auditorium at 8:00 o'clock, Tuesday
night, February 10. Elizabeth Jackson, \\2, will direct a melodrama.
The plot deals with the theft of a
diamond necklace. Carolyn Kclley,
Ml, will take the part of an old lady,
Irving McConnell, '31, the thief.
Helen Cromie, '.33, the maid, Veronica
Crowley, '?I?I, companion to the old
lady, Kay Collins, '31, the police inspector.
Edith Hunt, '31, is chairman of sets
for the play. The other chairmen
are: properties, Anna Goldman, '32,
costumes, Jcai Gillespy, '31, makeup,
Florence Friedman, 'M, lights, Annabelle McConnell, '31, and advertising,
Dorothy Hranilow. '31.
Helen Mead, \U, will direct the
other play in lie given. It is a farce
dealing Willi the eternal triangle.
Niles llaight, a special student, will
he the husband. Ralph h'ci'i'i.rt, 3.'
will he the callow youth in love with
Until Edmunds, '31, the wife.
ALPHA PHI GAMMA
CHOOSES HUBBARD
AS NEW HONORARY
Albany Boys Academy.
He will
finish his work for his bachelor degree this semester and next semester
will work for his master's degree.
Last year Acheson was forced to
leave ( ollege on account of illness
and missed the first semester of work.
lie is a member of Kappa Delta
Kho and Kappa Phi Kappa fraternities.
Three Members To Aid
French Club For Year
Three members of the French department are to assist the French
Huh with its work for the remainder
of the year, according to Sylvia Rose,
'31, president. They are Dr. Marion
l'.. Smith, v, ho L in charge of programs; Miss Annette Dobbin has
charge of the bulletin hoard-,, and
Miss Arlene Preston is in charge of
the French paper.
I
T lie
its
1)11.
l-r en It 'club has a I r e a d i chos,
wl lich will a n u i ' in Fcbruar
xaniinalions thill, will I
t.. th
ig i.l the 1 rr. lib . hill III
1piti
I'nited States Commissioner
T. Hubbard lu- been pledged t.
Kap,
national honorary journalism 11 .item-
T„„„L~-„'
hy, Alfred i) fiat.-!., MI. patient,]
teachers Convention
&
.T^Ii^tSi^iCol/ege May Conduct
Z1
A fourth speaker has been added
to the number scheduled to address
junior luncheon which will take place
at the DeWitt Clinton hotel a t , o n e
o'clock Saturday afternoon, January
31, according to Helen Burgher,''32,
chairman of the luncheon. The fourth
speaker will he Samuel Dransky, '32,
who will present a prophesy of the
class events to occur in its senior
year.
The class history for freshman,
sophomore, and junior years will be
given by the following people respectively : Catherine Travcr, fre .lunan
president, George Rice, sophomore
president, and Curtis Rulenber, junior
president.
Dr. Donal V. Smith, instructor in
history, and Mrs. Smith; and i arlton
Moose, instructor in biology, and Mrs.
Moose will be the chaperoncs for the
luncheon, Miss Burgher announced.
The decorations will be yellow, the
junior class color, with yellow roses
on the table.
All those wdio wish to attend the
luncheon must sign up before Friday,
Miss Burgher announced.
Plans for junior prmn which will
be conducted at the Ten Fyck hotel,
Friday night. January 3(1, from 9 to
2 o'clock are not yet completed, according to Josephine Holt, chairman.
Information regarding financial obligations of any sorority will le supplied hy Miss Anna Burbank, assistant
registrar.
The rum invitations will contain
bids tn a formal din cr on Thursday
night. January 29, a tea, Friday, January 30, and a breakfast the next day.
Official rushing will not begin uili
'i o'clock Thursday, January 2''. how
ever, and mil a he done only in tin
sorority houses at the above functions, according to the rule, of tin
c luncil.
Bids will he sent out Sunday ini
mediately following the rush period
and replies made in per.mi to sorority
houses Tuesday, Fc m i r y 3. at 5:.'C
o'clock.
La v erne Carr, above, and
Louis Klein, members of the
class of 1929, who will return
to the scene of former court triumphs t o m o r r o w night w h i n
they
play
w'th
the
alumni
against the varsity quintet, ("arr
plays forward and Klein j u m p s
enter.
- -
i'
Will Give Class Prophecy
at Junior Luncheon -U
January 31
.,•
WOMEN'S SEXIET
TO PLAY ALUMNAE
TOMORROW NIGHT
The State college women will play
their first alumnae game of this year
as a preliminary to the men's alumni
game tomorrow nig t in t i e gymKatherine T r a v c r and Curt.ss ' nasiun. of Page hall. The preliminary
Rutcnber, former and present
same >s scheduled to start at 7:30
i
i. f the
..
• who
uclock. 1 his game is under the ausThe seventh annual contest an< I ' head;
junior class,
convention of the Columbia Scholaswill be among the speakers at 1 pices of the Girl's Athletic association.
the junior luncheon at the De
tic Press association, of which State
Witt Clinton hotel on Saturday j Miss Dorothea Deitz, former incollege is a member, will he con: structor in physical education at the
afternoon, J a n u a r y -il.
ducted on March 12, 13, and 14, at
| College, will referee the game. -The
Columbia university.
| alumnae who will play a r e : Emily
Colleges desiring to enter their publidding, '24,. Florence Craddock / ; '25,
lications for the contest must ch6ose
JUT l
-II T
' Dorothy Hoyt, '25, Georgianiia Maar,
articles from the issues of September
MeCnaniCSVUlS
leamyp,
Helen Tompkins, •'27; Margaret
to December inclusive. Classes of
Doughty, '28, Evelyn' McXi.kle,-- '29,
The freshmen quintet wi
publications into which contestants
r
court activities' after the "mid-year m^ u/ lJKi ^ , „ A ? j P A ? ^ , V - 3 - . . " * - - r 1 ^ . ' . ' ^
ie divided include: elementary | its
cxam
' ' '3D, Ethel Grundhofer, '.30,; last
it ijiMj /si's ' the
bonis, junior
junior high
schools, senior
senior i M |ianicsville when
scnoois,
mgn scnoois,
High school five "in >' e a r ' s president, and' Marie Ha'.vko,
ci;
high schools normal schools, teachers t|)( , v
hM
B y n l n a s i u t n „„ S a t l | r . . , MO
colleges, military schools, private , j a y . J a n u a r y 31 The visitors have!
1 he students who will comprise the
schools, and vocational and technical., s t r , „ | g o m f i t a | ) ( | w j | | j u m j s h ^
College squad will be: Margaret Cussscl , ,ols
lcr
: ,(l
' .
\,
, . f i r s t year men with keep opposition. .
"
Frances Virginia
Peck,
I he Ni-.ws will probably send at
T h ( , v c a m M ( , fivt, t r a v L .| t .,| ,„ 'froy seniors; Virginia Hawkins and Alice
Gil,li
least two delegates to the meeting, Saturday night when they met tie" . juniors; Mary Trela and
and possibly the entire hoard will at- ft . at .,, l h t . | | a | l l K n| . ,| R . |<L.ll!(SC.|at.r Katherine Van Valkenburg, sophotend. The hoard decided not to enter Pnlvtechnical Institute f r e s h m e n ""ores; and Doris Bell, Dorothy
the NEWS in this years contest.
:4()-J4.
Klose, Mary Moore, and Elizabeth
The visitors were handicapped hy j Kammerer, freshmen.
Ingraham Gets Snow Bath As
playing on a large and strange court
-,/ on fane I, column -I)
1934 Threatens Men Of 1933 and were not exhibiting their usual
.brand of ball, while the Institute team
Several men of the sophomore j seemed lo he in rare form.
Roger
Practice Teachert To Receive
class, marked for reprisal by the ' Bancroft and Thomas Garrett led the
freshmen, slunk warily through
Asunbly Seats, February 6
attack of the visiting team with 7 and
the halls this week in expectation .' : 4 points respectively.
All seniors who are now doing
of forcible seizure and consequent |
practice teaching in the Milut
punishment by the yearlings.
.
High school will be assigned to
Sophomores gave the first ofregular seals for the 11:10 asfense, according to the freshman
semblies on Friday mornings,
account, by seizing Jack Saunders,,
beginning February o, accord ufi
freshman president, in the Kappa I
Tin- women's varsity debate team
lu an announcement 0J4(I(J today
I lelta Kho house, and bathing him j will meet the repre eufatives of .Mid
by
President A. K. ISiiijj;u.li_«..-rr,
in ink and men uroc brume in spite
dlebury College in the auditorium of
.
All seniors w h o ' WMI-. iil>|""
Sam
,1 Ins vigorous opposition
.-.ami i j ,
,,.,], ,„, T h l ] | . , , j : n ,,,,.1,1, |.\.|
iiieuee their practici). te;/cj)jim
Iris, being Uie only freshman _ m | [ n n r v
19, the debate council ar
' nc,\| seuiester will be,, ex^u^etl ,
the house at present, was iinahh
lined today.
I ent'ref) from atttndance- ulj ilie
lo Miniinon any aid from his classDel,ok ol the debate, regarding
stiujt ut assenihles,
Dr.. '/trumates.
I lining the week, how
oil.ir I«, tune of spi.-. lies, and judges, j burner, concluded.
., J
ever, the freshmen organized and
have
not vet been arranged.
The
entered the gymnasium dining the
debate will he the lir-i lo lake place
T
n .on Innir dancing period and
between
Middlebury
college
and
threatened Charles In. loll. Ben
slate,
member.
'.'
the
count
il
said
janiiii Ingraham, and Arlton Bush,
NEWS WILL SEND
BOARD 10 ANNUAL
PRESS CONVENTION
1934 Quintet To Meee
....,.-.
Women's Debate Team
Will Meet Middlebury
I he\ left without banning the
sophomores
Later tlu-\ accosted
Ingral
in the corridors and in
spile ol his protest thai "a 'prof
might he ..lining along" look bun
oiitvde in the snow lo "look
around," as ihey put il. No report was given concerning the disposal of Ingraham after he got
there.
HARTEN OF GREGG
COMPANY TO TALk
AT CLUB MEETING
"Rushing" Lion To Make
larten. npiescutalive of
Appearance February 2 „' .l',^,, IPublishing
Company, will
I he Lion will inalo its appearance
announced today.
The I'M..' meeting oi ih. A - M I
1,-l.iii.m 2, ariordiiig lo Alfred
Mr. Iluhhanl was iiiianir,i.nisl> . mlt-il'l cat hers' t olleges and Xorinal I
|i,is,h,
'.il, ediloi iu-thief
11 will
voted a meniber bj the lot d i hapler, I schonl Iambics in:, v he n n.hu led in
i.intam arlitles, joke-, tarlooiis, ami
and in- name was then f..r\\,irded to, Male .ollcgc if an invitation which j
,,||
die
usual
fealures,
ientering
on
ass...
mi
inn,
according
to
Dr
Milton
,the national toinuiittee I. rcptance
by has been extended is accepted lis tin
final ap-1
tin- iheme .a soi-oritie. ami iinhing.
thai coniinillce
proval.
Word ofwas
h received today I.. Nelson, who is vice-president ol
Th,,,• U | | | be a sp.ii.I number on
from Sherrill F. Leonard, executive the assoination.
WELCOMES PLEDGE
"What sorority I'd like m\ girl to
The convention will he conducted
secretary.
Alpha Rho welcomes Sara Mill. I join, and why," b) Raymond Collins,
Mr. Hubbard will be initialed into in Buffalo this year on October 12
\U, into pledge inemhersbip.
Ml. Basel, annon.uetl
full member ship early nexi semester.' and 13
-|.e,d
"Shorlbaiul Methods" at the
first l.ii-.m-v- nu'etiug of the Cominerte t bib, which has been postpolled from Februarj 12 to February
I''. The club will elect a new vicepresident and reporter at the same
meeting and will make plans for its
.' mil card party in March.
The
j former vice-president, Beatrice E.
Heiiwig, 31, has left college.
STATE COLLEGE Nl£WS. FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1931
State College N e w s
Kaubiishvd in 1916 by the Clasi of 1918
•The Undergraduate Newspaper of New Vorfc
State College for Teachers
•••&',.:
,
:
THE NEWS
MIIXER.
590 Morris
GBOSGE P . R I C E
BOARD
NBTA
Street,
455
. — .
Telephone
Editor-in-Chief
6-0332-U
Managing
Editor
Elk Street
CATHERINE E . BRODEKICK . , . .Associate 'Managing
Editoi
3100 Sixth Avenue; Troy, Telephone Troy 6621-/
AUDBEY FLOWERS
Advertising
Manager
Page Hall, 131 South Lake Avenue, Telephone 6-6482
AMDBEW A . H S I T Z
Finance
Manager
201 North Lake Avenue, Telephone 6-5810
ALEXANDER SCHOOR
— Feature
Editor
184 Central Avenue, Telephone 3-7616
Samoa AMOCIATB EUITOKS; Genevieve Winslow, Lilly Nel.
aon, and Martha Nord.
DESK EDITOHS: Samuel S. Dransky,
'32, aud Alvina K. Lewi!-, '33. Jumoa ASSOCIATE LDITOBS:
Frances Keller, Uessie Levine, and Ruth lirezce.
RiroiTEits:
Vera Burnt, '32, Bernard Kerbel, Clara Allan, Abide Dtueeii,
Carolyn Kramers, Harriet Dunn, Elizabeth Gordon, Alice
KJoiup, Katherine Moore, Margaret Service, Hilda Smith, Laura
Styn, Edith Tepper, and Helen
Waltermire,
sophomores;
BuaiNU* STAFF:
Betty Kauttei, '31, Curtis Kutenber, 32.
Lloyd W. Jones, Jean Waikins, Mary Doherty, and Isabel
tutu,
aopkomores.
AssisfANT BUSINESS MASACEKS:
Frances
Maxar and Helen Rohel, juniors.
Child Development Clinic Makes Stndy
Of Babies To Forecast Future Actions
voting to learn to be a good citizen. True he may not
be able to understand the electoral system, but lie can
learn that it is wrong to lie, to cheat, and to steal.
Honesty is the foundation of the whole structure of govScientific study of very small
ernment. Throughout the elementary grades and high
their
future
school the curriculum should include the study of govern- babies to forecast
actions
by means of photographic
ment and the practical application of the principles.
records
is
t
h
e
latest
step
taken
by
These principles should be practiced with the proper
discipline for those who fail in carrying Oil the school the Clinic of Child Development,
Arnold
Cesell,
director,
declared.
government honestly.
Beginning at the age of two
Slowly but surely, all through school the oncoming
citizens will learn government—the fundamental prin- months, babies' are placed each
month
at stated intervals in a
ciples underlying good government, how government
works, their responsibility as citizens, and the evils of photographic room where they cannot
see
observers or the motion
•nrrupt government. Then and only then will citizens
picture cameras. Little red cubes,
be able to avert a disaster like the present one.
strings, balls, and bells a r e given
(From Highland Outlook)
them. Mr. Gescll reorts that t h e
studies a t Yale university show that
THE
HAUNTED BOOKSHOP
individual differences in capacity,
BOOKS: l:".
STORICAL
DRAMAS;
(For Sale in the Co-op)
The Maple's Bride and Other One Act Plays.
nette Scudder. Richard G. Badger Co.
143 pages. $2.00.
AntoiBoston.
The six short dramas presented in this collection present a delightful combination of literary and historical
values to the student. All of them are well suited for
production on the College stage and any one of them
could be utilized by the English teacher in a high school
The NEWS does not necessarily endorse sentiments expressed as part of a student program.
in contributions.
No communications will be printed unless the
The first play, which gives the volume its title, is
• Writers' names are left with the Editor-in-Chief of the NEWS.
Anonymity will be preserved if so desired. The NEWS does no! The Maple's Bride. It is a story of old Japan and its
plot centers around Ko-Hana, the beautiful courtesan,
guarantee to print any or all communications,
and her spirit husband of the maple tree who steals her
PaiWTKD av MILLS Ayr I'KESS, 394-396 Broadway—Dial 4-228;
away from the governor of the district. Thomas the
Albany, NTT,
J a ~ 1 6 , 19.31
Vol. XV, No. 13 Rhymer, based on the old English legendary poem, relates the story of Thomas, his return from the realm of
Ihe fairies after seven years, and his subsequent forced
PERT SLING MUD
return to it. Prince Pentaur is a story of the scene
T h e coming of winter and the subsequent free/in. between Pharaoh Ramses III and his son who has led
of the ground lias made even more apparent the di.s an unsuccessful revolution against him,
All of the plays are unusually imaginative and hold
'graceful condition of sections of the W a s h i n g t u
I one's interest throughout. The volume makes an at. avenue campus,
trartive and valuable addition to any student or teacher's
library.
T h e student body may now take the footprints i
'
Publialied every Friday in the college year by the Editorial
Hoard representing the Student Association. Subscriptions. S2.2.S
Delivered anywhere in the
per year, single copies, ten cents.
United Stales.
Entered as second class matter at poslotlice,
Albany, N. Y.
emotional characteristics, person
ality traits, and body types declare
themselves early,
These
differences, the investigators declare, are
comparable to those observed iatei
in life.
Members of the education de
pnrtiueut believe that these experi
ments a r e indicative of the new
trend t o w a r d studying children with
a view to determining early their
characteristics and tendencies. They
believe t h a t these early experiment*
will prove of great value in direct
ing t h e future activity of the child
both mentally and physically.
DR. X. G. NELSON
WILL DIRECT 1931
SUMMER SESSION
Dr. Milton G. Nelson, professor of
education, will direct the State college summer session for 1931. The
session will begin on June 29 this
year and will close on August 8, Dr.
Nelson said.
Plans are being made this year to
increase the scope of subject matter,
and special group courses in educational guidance will be among the
additions. Courses will be offered in
commerce, economics, education, English, French, government, history, and
mathematics.
Courses will be designed primarily
for graduate students and for normal
school graduates who are working for
degrees. Undergraduate students will
also be admitted to classes.
This year will be the second in
succession that will see Dr. Nelson
ircctor.
lt would seem that the
generation is nobly upholding the
dramatics reputation of the t.mip.n
Tuesday night the eletnenfiry •!'
matic class did some rather comnir '
able work, if we may say s., I
instance, we verily believe thai !' i
scream in Mildred (Jitick's big
j will haunt us for the rest of oar .; .
every time we pass a graveyi.ol
I a moonless night or read oi e • •
; from insane asy Inn is.
The -. i
i was not an isolated moment of i i Icnce in Miss Quick's perform,r;
1 however. She worked up to tin i
j nient of i limax most skillfully .
held the audience remarkably thi
out, whether she sp ike or wa- ,n
I and whether her speech un - ..i e n r
i importance or of little consccpi. • •
half the trespassers who have crossed the turf, sinci
/Tor Sale in the Co-op/
the freezing of the ground has made casts of them \The Haunted Bookshop.
Christopher Morley. Crossed
It is too late this year to plant new turf and imand Dtinlap. New York. 289 pages. $1.00.
. prove the condition of the campus, but it is not too
The author of Parnassus on Wheels has skillfully
,\ late to make a small appropriation to erect some j woven an interesting mystery of human interest with
kind of fence or barrier to protect the lawn from I one of the finest hook lists ever compiled between the
In ibis same play b dm d r . n
B Y A I . SCHOOR
. further defacement by lazy pedestrians who would insers of a fictional volume. The pages hold a double
did his best with a'rote well a-! i. - '
T h e yearlings will not swing into
. rather destroy the appearance of the campus than interest, for there is the story of Roger Mifflin and
; to bis particular ability. I le ' .-.
Ins heiress-apprentice Titania Chapman who falls in action again until the semester ex
walk around t h e block on the sidewalk.
j love with Aubrey (iilbert, peppy young advertising man animations have taken place. T h e ) gave a definite impression . - i t , .
'
Last year a fund of about $15,000 was spent to I figuring prominently in the story. An interesting post- will then go into actum against t h " imaginative, unsy nipathelii "Id I.I ;
: Hemic Kerbel was not
g r a d e a n d seed the Western avenue campus. Surely war plot to assassinate President Wilson on the way to Mechanicsville high school on tin ! the minister - a little stiff, u • •
the peace conference is foiled through the watchfulness
if this could be done, the small sum needed for the and heroism of the two young people. In addition, Mr. home g y m , the Saturday of tin I at ease.
l i e did not - u - ' . - •
:
older man, although the eili i
fence on W a s h i n g t o n avenue should not long In- Morley has included from time to time the title of second exam week.
i
p
imp
iiisiie.ss
was well done
I.
forthcoming.
If the administration cannot provide classic literature of many periods with interesting comIt will certainly be nice to once Traver did extremely well ,i
\ t h e money, t h e students should furnish it, either from ments about each made through the medium of the book- again meet the old grads w h o no j kindly Mrs. Bamberger, and M i
seller, Roger Mifflin.
It is a pleasure to meander
the student association treasury or by popular stib- through the smoke-laden passages of the book shop in doubt will b e present in large num- guerite Buchanan is to be eominen . 1
bers t o m o r r o w night to see the
, scription.
search of rare and interesting old hooks. It can be done Alumni g a m e . Friendships will be I strongly for her work. The aim
was admirably
suggc-si..
through the reading of this interesting tale of love and renewed a n d common experiences I phere
Couldn't you just feel the oppress;-,.,
literature.
COMMERCE CLUB LEADS
lived over again. W e heartily welheat?
(That's the result of g.,..d
como back t h e old g r a d s and antici.'• The list of worthwhile activities sponsored this
The setting showed abd
(For Sale in Ihe Co-op)
pate with great delight t o m o r r o w ' s directing.)
semester by the commerce club has set an example for Tom Sawyer.
ity and ingenuity on the part oi il
Mark Twain. Grosset and Dunlap. New event.
technical
staff.
W e were so relieved
.other departmental clubs to follow.
During the term
York. 291 pages. §75.
when we discovered that the railing
speakers of note in fields of commercial interest have
I n t r a - m u r a l sports will get under of the porch was strong enough i.
Everyone should occasionally turn to the old stories way immediately after mid years.
.' appeared under the club's auspices. Enjoyable social
support the weight of the people wb"
that held interest in childhood and for this purpose no
inter-class
tournament
is grasped it.
„ events have been promoted. Noteworthy among them liner story can be obtained than the adventures of Tom T h e
scheduled t o start the first Wed;
Marcia Gold did the best di.de. I
v was Clinton Reed, supervisor of commercial education in Sawyer.
Tom and I luck Finn
'in in playing many nesday after the exams and games
. ' N e w York state, Many of the programs were of in- pranks on the old fashioned villain schoolmaster and in will be played on Mondays and job our stage has bad in many ..
day.
She could speed up, or slowturn
receive
strenuous
applications
oi
the
ferule.
Tom
W e d n e s d a y s in the old g y m in
• terest to students who were not registered in the departdown, and be monosyllabic- in fait,
falls in love with the little daughter of the village judge Hawley hall.
ment.
,,
all the time she was on the stage sin
with all the fervor of adolescence, becomes the hero in
Many, departmental clubs have confined their activities a murder case and finally becomes wealthy through the
T h e p r e s e n t senior class annexed was cockney. She ejected a greal
i to an annual cake sale and one meeting each month to rediscovery of money buried by bandits.
tho inter-class championship last deal of charm and appeal into tin
ft
is
altogether
a
desirable
story
to
read
and
brings
. d i s c u s s profitless abstracts. Presidents of other clubs
year, after a play-off with t h e part of Violet. Rav Collins' act cut
back adventures and ventures of childhood in the in- s o p h o m o r e team, both having tied was not so dependable, but otherwise
will do well to emulate the work of the president of the
imitable way of Twain's that none can duplicate.
in victories a t the completion of the bis performance was most convincing
commerce c'ub in her successful efforts to have her club
A good team, this- the inter-play oi
regular schedulo of games.
promote better scholastic and social affairs.
reaction showed feeling for the role'
The varsity scrimmaged against (plus more influence of good direii
When it comes to the fair
i- iv,'. SCHOOLS AND FINANCE
the Polish A. C. five Monday night ing).
in the Page hall gym to polish off folk, we become quite ecstatic The
The state of North Carolina has a finance act which
charming
opening of the play is some
their
play
and
get
ready
for
the
two
\ states that 'all counties must protect their hank deposits
thing to remember.
Lack Moon-,
tests this week,
BY RAY COLLINS
'' with sound securities, but one county was exempted
you'll notice, is sustaining the lavor
from it by a bill passed by the Legislature. That action
The recent cold wave has been intensely felt by the
able
impression
given
by her wort
was described by Judge Junius (J. Adams "as the most students, especially the sorority girls who must brave
in an earlier play. She was so utierlj
stupid procedure ever carried On in any community in the cold nights in the dormitories, and as you probably!
natural, and seemed to be ciijoyien
ij the world, civilized, or uncivilived."
know, this requires more than bedclothes. It is not at j
herself so hugely, and withal ncglcil
Perhaps this community was civilized, but in a state all surprising to observe a co-ed donned in her fur coat, ]
;! of apathy. At any rate it received a rude awakening mittens and woolen stockings when she is about to retire. I An exhibition of etchings of l.evon ing none of the more delicate nuance:
of
the part, that it was sheer joy twhen the public funds melted in the recent crash. Real Such a procedure is not so impractical when we con- j West is now on display in the
watch her. Hetty Gordon, the oth. r
;' estate, which the county considered "sound security" sider that the dormitories are not heated, and ihe win- llarmanus Bleecker Library.
Mr.
sprite,
did her best work in the most
• decreased in value so much as to be almost worthless. dow glass, ot course, has long since been removed. Other i West lias etched and printed all the
sad moments of her character. Sin
; This would seem to prove that those who were en- sororities are also experiencing difficulties with their I work exhibited.
has
the
necessary spirit of wliunsi
• trusted with the care of these funds were unscrupulous heating systems which seem to balk when they are most
lie is a pupil of Joseph Pennell.
j in their judgment. It also appears that business interests needed. The girls have, been forced to give the furnaces List year Miss Eunice Perine, in- cality for such a part, but her fault,
! became of vast importance tu the government officials. their undivided attention in order to retain a comfortable! structor in line arts, became ac- we think, is sometimes to put IIIOH
[ As things turned out, business and government did temperature.
quainted with him while on a h i p feeling into Ihe role than it will --u' not mix successfully. Large sums of money were spent
to Europe and speaks highly of bis tain. One of her greater excellences
is in the matter of facial expression.
j for work which was unnecessary or which could have
In last week's issue two very important engagements ability as an etcher.
in which respect her reactions are
j been postponed. A few seemed to recognize the situawere officially announced; that of Miss Cornelia Van
quite exquisite.
tion, but the majority were indifferent until it was
IS E N G A G E D
Kleeck, '30, to Mr. (ieorge Hastings and that of MisAn almost bare stage was a slrik
too late to take action.
Jean Gillcspy, '31, to Horace Burton Myers, '31. The
Alpha Rho announces the engageWho is responsible for such condition? Why are latter has been anticipated by their many college friends ment of Dorothy L Ruteshauser, '33, ing feature of this play. The street
lamp was a most ingenious device, wr
politics corrupt? Has the United States failed in her for a long time, and it is sincerely hoped that nothing to William Ellrot, of Albany.
thought, and we have heard main
educational system? Have honor, truth, honesty, mor- will obstruct the completion and the materialization of
favorable continents about it hill HI
ality, and conscience been trampled to the ground? Have this most vital step. The sudden appearance of a fraterand yon about the campus.
parents and schools winked and helped children "to nity pin on the vest of Mr. Myers seemed to indicate
In the first play, Nile Clemens -1111
get by" when the situation called (or discipline? The that the romance had ended, hut subsequently upon
ply radiated the charm and grai 1011 ••
situation cited shows gross ignorance. T h e public was closely observing the baud of Miss Gilk-spy, it was quite
Today
lies-, appropriate to Mrs Swan
I lei
uninformed. Knowledge anil training are essential if a obvious that they had taken ihe most logical step.
II 10 A. M. Student assembly
a< ting is peculiarly adapted lo tie pari
person or group of persons ait intelligently ill any capa1
Auditorium, Page ball.
of a well bred woman
The oilier
city
It naturally follows that knowledge and trainThe present drive for Mihsc i iptions to the residence;
' iug for government should be a part of our educational
pis.pie remained definitely subordinate,
Tomorrow
hall fund has been enthusiastically met by the seniors,
6y»tem, It is not fair to the youth of the country to
Which was of course as il h - lid h.nc
8:15 P. M. Basketball
game
and it is believed that the pledge .aids will Soon lie
allow litem lo grow up and assume the mantle' of cit
been. The iiieii wc re CM client a - .1
returned with all the confidente and (Mod intentions of
Alumni
vs.
State
College
l/en bit) without a thorough knowledge of the prbvlple
unit, bill
none
was cult -.1 1 idi'ig.
potential teachers
In order to fulfill this pledge, u
G y m n a s i u m , Page hall.
• of g iviTimiciit and politics. Definite '•tudv sh'iuM bcirhi
Among Ihe daughli r-, Vi del I'm T H
position, ol course, must first he obtained; whether it l e
1
Monday
d d a re lh good 1,'t This p': e -w
in rollem-s and normal schools vi I •' »'••••
•• will 'en bine or "of another nature"
I I wever, Ihe <o e-ls
O' 1 -I m i b m .
i-vilc",
'
' i n '' '
9 '"» A M. Examinations beteach may be able to assume the re L p msibilitv f •• dire i
••em ' i be very optimistic and with lliL altitude Slice s
si ill e p e i a ' h „ , (>•<• ' i l '
jiig hildre i in ! -vet omental affairs
\ ' o child is too
i levilable.
r
THE STATESMAN
Library Display % West
Etchings During Week
Calendar
•11
-
•
!'•>! g r o u p
of I ' I I
' r
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1931
NEWS WILL EDIT
BOOK FOR STAFF
THK\
IOOK PART IN PLAYS TUESDAY NIGHT
FIFTEEN STUDENTS,
TAKE NEW COURSE
Lit:
Board I s Compiling "Stylebook"
Containing Information for
All N e w s Writing
Dr. Harold W. Hatting* Conducts
English 35 by Method Used
at Oxford College
Work on the compilation of a stylebook for use of the members of the
NEWS staff is progressing rapidly, the
NEH'S board announced today. The
present effort to compile such a book
is the first to be made by any NEWS
board. If possible, the work will be
rushed in order that the book may
be distributed for use tilts coming
semester.
The need for the handbook became
apparent last year when members of
the board began the work, but did nut
carry it very far. This year it was
found that the work of the associate
managing editor would be greatly
facilitated by such a bonk.
Work on collecting material fur the
bonk is under the direction of (jeorge
P. Rice, '32, managing editor o| the
Nr-ws.
The hook will contain about twenty
pages. Il will contain information re
garding the history of the N'I » s. tin
constituents nf a good story, i tniinion
errors made in writing stories, ;r
;i complete lay-out ol the usual met
,«|s M| the NEW ' in writing stories.
Special sections will he devoted to j
headline v\ riling and to the make ill
of the paper, k i t e sai I. The M, lion
mi headline writing will I e u i\l I'm j
instruction of the i ho - In healliui j
writing which will he conducted the !
se, ond semester.
Ml of the headline' |
ti.td in the \'i-.\v> at pre e;it. together
with their counts, will he cm
and printed.
The hook will he printed In, ll
Mills Art I'ress. publishers of tl
STATE (oi.i.r.t.h N'i w s, the hoard ai
Fifteen students have been taking
English 35, a new course instituted
in September. The course deals with
studies in literature, and is under thedirection of Dr. Harold W . Hastings,,
head of the English department.
The new subject is unique in that
it is an attempt to transfer the responsibility from the teacher to thestudent. Persons taking the course
do not attend class until late in the-,
semester. Their only connection with
the instructor comes through conferences, much as is now in progress atOxford college in England.
The students prepare a thesis onany of the masterpieces of literature
that interests them. Much research
work is involved, and the use of originality in point of view on the part
of the student is welcomed. There is.
no final examination in the course,
the mark gained being derived en-'
lirely from the quality of the research
thesis.
The course is the first attempt to
initiate at State college a system now
generally used throughout England
and on the continent.
T h e resultel
are being studied with interest, acrording to President A. R. Brubacher,
successful may lead to change
i the organization of other courses.
HEAD OF LIBRARY
SCHOOL REVIEWS
NEW SUPPLEMENT
News Desires To Purchase
Back Issues Of Publication
\ diet <-l)p of the files of theNi ws re\ cals copies of four issues
mi ssmg, The Ni:ws desires to obl.n 1 t o p i c i of these issues and will
pa • the selling price to students
V.I o will bring copies to the pubIn Itiolis' •oom and deliver them to
\ i tlrev
lowers, '.12, advertising
in; nager.
ssues desired a r e : October 3,
1!) and 3 1 ; and November 7.
H. BUCKLEY THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES
T h e above students formed part of the casts of the
[days of the elemental) dramatics class presented lues
the auditorium of Page hall under the direction of Mi
h'utterer, assistant professor of English.
Above, Hetty Gordon, '33, Nile Clemens, '32, and Mildred Quick,
'3.3; below, Marcia Gold and Bernard Kernel, sophomores.
T h e plays were: " T h e Song of Solomon," " P a n in Pimlico," and
"Crabbed Youth and Age." A capacity audience viewed the plays.
All work in connection with the business end of the productions
was in the hands of the m e m b e r s of the class.
Miss Martha I'ritchard, head ol
the library school, has written lor the j
net issue of the Alumni Oiiarterly, a ;
review of the supplement to the ( ata- |
log of Literature for Advisers oi |
Young Women and (iirls, which w a s ,
compiled by I lean Anna !•'.. Pierce.
This supplement was published in
December, 1930, and was issued by
the II. W. Wilson publishing company.
"Careful studies in a wide variety
of phases of the work are constantly
appearing from those engaged in it
or preparing to enter special instituA Reliable Place to Buy Reliable
tions for which further degrees are
and Cottons
required of the deans under appointment," said Miss Pritcbard in the re
Hswitt'i Silk Shop
view.
8 0 - 8 2 N. Pearl St.
"The annotations are a inose useful
feature, as the student of the subject
or the worker in the held can esti
mate to some degree his use of the
content of the hook or article noted,"
she continued. "Popular discussions
of such questions as eticpiette, status
of women, employment of women, and
H o m e S a v i n g s Bank Hldg
similar subjects are listed from main
.sources. These will he ireful to give
\i N . Pearl St.
to young people to read for them3-3632
HARMANUS
BLEECKFR
HALL
T h e picture the laughter-loving
public h a s been waiting fori
"REDUCING"
HEWETT'S
With
Silks, Woolen*
MARIE DRESSLER
and
POLLY MORAN
LELAND
A comedy of m o d e r n love
"OH, FOR A MAN"
With
JEANETTE MacDONALD
REGINALD DENNY
MARJORIE WHITE
and
WARREN HYMER
PALLADINO
Personality Bobs-Finger Waving - Permanent Waving
"The introduction of a considerable
body of child study material in thi' J
issue points to the modern interpret.'!- !
lion of adolescent and adult pro' Ictus
in the light of childhood beginnings" I
the review states. "A large amounl j
of material on vocations and a con
siderable list of readable biographic j
of persons successful in varied lines j
of life work .give constant assistance
to counsellors, for " \ \ hat arc you going to be?" is one of the questions |
ever present, and earnestly debated h\
the ambitious, eager young people who
come for help."
In conclusion \ ' i s s I'ritchard says
"Such a tool as this bibliography is
invaluable for all whose needs or in
terests call for perusal of its indexed
material. The careful collection of so
large a bulk of sources is of real help
to librarians, teachers, and students '
Mils Miller Calls Meeting
Of Editorial Staff Of Niwt
All
stall of
members
the
of
the
STATIC C o n iu-
editoria
Ni ws
as well as candidates (or positions
on that department are asked to
attend a meeting which will lake
plate on the first lloor id the
auditorium immediately after student as toil I, loda), N't Hi Miller,
31 alitor, ai noun, e l ' "lay
The Intel ,; will le hriei, -he
.:: .1
ALBANY BUSINESS
Strand
133 N . PearlSt.
4-MM
CO-OP
COLLEGE
83 NORTH PEARL STREET
SECRETARIAL AND ACCOUNTING
COURSES OF ADVANCED GRADE
SPECIALIZES ON CIVIL
SERVICE PREPARATION
START ANYJMONDAY
Clearance Sale
REGISTERED" BY THE~REGENTS
BOOKS — JEWELRY — PENNANTS
PICTURES AND SCRAP BOOKS
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
Studenti and Growpi m Suite Collett
will lie jsKvii special attention
90c each
3 for $2.50
Make your selection early and
keep happy during exams.
Mills Art Pre
")o
Kr.,n.lw:
4-2287
STATE CdLLECte»EWs; *FRIDAY, JANUARY 116, 1931
ORCHESTRA MAKES
fiRST APPEARANCE
WILDER LECTURES
AT ART INSTITUTE
Short News Notes
Newman club is conducting a dinner, February 14, in the cafeteria, according to Margaret Mulligan, '31,
president.
Elizabeth Moriarity, '31, is general
chairman. She will be assisted by
Frances Virginia Peck, '31, and Certrude Cora. '32. Newman club conducted a retreat last week-end under
the guidance of Father Collins.
State College Musical Unit Performs Fqr First Time
at Plays
Novelist Compares Literature and
Life in Address Thursday
Night
Literature is merely an idealization
of life, according to Thornton Wilder,
ill a lecture dealing with the subject
"Literature and Life" at the Albany
Historical and Arts Institute last
Thursday night,, Mr. Wilder is auAre Engaged
thor of the Pulitzer prize winning
Alpha chapter of Phi Delta sornovel; "The Bridge of San Luis key''
ority announces the engagement of
and "The Woman of Andros."
Dorothy F. Kline, '31, to Carl Holtz,
Othello,, he said, made one last
'31 of R. P. I. and Lynbrook, N. Y.
grand speech before his death. Ruth
Snyder attempted to do the same, ; tit
Announces Engagement
failed to .achieve the poetic philosophy
Beta Zeta sorority announces the
of Shakespeare's character. Thus, he
J. Bruce Fdoy, '33, who conconcluded, in real life a man is the
ducted the embryo orchestra in engagement of Ethei Loman, '31, to
Herford Smith, '29. Mr. Smith is
same as in literature, except that the
its lirst public program when it
literary character is more highly
provided music at the elemen- a member of Kappa Delta Rho fraidealized.
tary dramatics class plays Tues- ternity.
Leah
Dorgan,
'32,
heads
the
The lecture was attended by many
day night.
Visits Sorority
committee selecting the style of
State college students, and several
members of the faculty. It was the
Alice Benoit, '30, former president ring which will be worn next
Miss Peard To Report
of Eta Phi sorority, was a house year by the members of the third of a series which included Gilpresent junior class. She is a bert K. Chesterton, well-known EngTo Student Assembly guest last week-end.
member of Chi Sigma Theta lish essayist and novel author.
sorority.
Will Marry
Isabel Pcard, '32, will give a report today, of the convention of the Pi Alpha Tau sorority announces
Dr. Nelson Addresses
National Student Federation of the engagement of Gertrude Hoffman, MYSKANIA JUDGES
DR. SAYLES TOURS
'29, to Julius Cohen, of Albany, and
Assembly On Loyally
America to the student assembly. the marriage of Sallv Shapiro, 29, to
SAMPLES OF RING
WEST AND SOUTH Miss Pcard was a delegate to the Gerald Pliskin, of Syracuse.
"War is undesirable. Yet when
war
comes,
a man always puts himOF JUNIOR CLASSself whole-heartedly
TO COLLECT DATA convention in Atlanta, Ceorgia, durinto the servChild Is Born
ing the Christmas recess.
ice
of
his
country.
Two rings have been submitted to
Professor John M. Sayles, principal
Eta Phi announces the birth of Myskania for approval in regard to
This was the dominant thought
of the Milne High school, who is
a daughter to Mrs. William Mar- conformance to tradition, according to of the speech of Dr. Milton (i.
quel formerly Bertha Zajan, '27 I.call Dorgan. '32, chairman of the Nelson, professor of education, in
now on a tour of the western states Dr. Beik Goes To Iowa
Mrs. Marqucl was president of stuspeech delivered in assembly last
to observe teacher-training methods,
For Mothers Funeraldent association in her senior year junior ring committee. The two com- a^Friday
morning.
panies whose samples are being
started north this week for Seattle,
Dr. Arthur K. Beik, professor of
judged are Warren-Kahse and GleaWashington, to visit the public schools education, has been absent from ColConducts Sale Today
son-Wallace. Warren-Kahse company
there. He will spend all next week lege for the past week. He was atMenorah society will conduct ? supplied the present senior class with Registrar Makes Changes
in Washington, and will begin his re- tending the funeral of his mother ill food sale today in the lower corridor its rings.
In Examination Schedule
of Huested hall, according to Marion
Wapello, Iowa.
turn trip the following week-end.
Voting on the rings by the junini
The following changes have been
Weinberg, '31, who is in charge o
He left l.os Angeles, January 6 to Dr. Beik's classes were instructed the sale.
class will lc conducted if the samples made in the examination schedule,
visit the Teacher's college at Fresno, by Dr. F.arl B. South and Dr. Elizaaccording to an announcement
are approved by Myskania.
California, and then visited schools in beth H. Morris, assistant professors
made today by Miss Elizabeth
Merced. Dr. Sayles visited the na- of education.
TEAM
WILL
PLAY
VanDeiiburgh, registrar.
Dr. Beik will probably return totional park in Yosemite valley and
Women's Basketeers
The complete schedule was pubday.
then went to San Francisco.
AGAIN THIS WEEK
lished in the last issue of the STATE
Will Oppose Alumnae Co I.ECE NEWS.
January 26 and 27, Dr. Sayles will
visit the schools in Minneapolis, Min- Women's Chorus Gives
OPPOSING ALUMNI (I'mi/iiiim/ from pat chin 5)
Tuesday, January 20, 2 P. M.:
nesota, and will observe teacherEd. 8, Room 28.
Marion Gilbert and Beatrice Vai
(Continued from page 1, (ulumii 1)
training methods at the University ol
First
Public
Concert
Stecnburgh, seniors, will be tin Thursday, January 22, 2 1. M.:
Minnesota. He will then return home
Whiston and Allan, stars of last scorers, and Alvina Lewis and Kath'••in. 1A. Rooms 15(1, 250, 260;
The State college women's chorus
in time for the beginning of the secpresented the first concert of the sea- year's team, can be depended upon erine Moore, sophomores, will hi Eng. 3, Gym.
ond semester's work.
Monday, January 2l>. 2 I M.
timekeepers.
son last night in Chancellor's hall at to give a good account of themII. E., Room 22.
|
There will be another alumnae game
8:30 o'clock, under the direction oi selves.
Wednesday, January 28,') A. M.:
Dr. T. Frederick H. Candlyn, head
The alumni will be out to avengi sometime in March, according to Miss
Dr. Fttderick Speaks
French
5,
'Room
40;
2
P.
M.:|
Van
Steenburgh,
president
of
G.
A.
A.
of the music department.
the 33-28 setback last year and tlv
Music 4, Gym; Music 1, Gym.
week-end is planned for
To Roessleville Unit Steuart Wilson, tenor, and Dalic; contest tomorrow night will no \'nt regular
time, she said.
Frantz,
pianist,
were
the
assisting
doubt
prove more exciting and hard
Dr. Robert Frederick, principal of
the Milne Junior High school, ad- artists. Mr. Wilson is a graduate ol fought than the 1930 edition, with
A GIFT FROM
the alumni slight favorites to eke
dressed the members of the Parent- Cambridge university and has studied out
a
victory.
under
Jean
de
Reszke
and
others.
Teachers association at Roessleville
Coach Baker has subjected his
school last Wednesday night at the Dalies Frantz is a graduate of the
MEANS MORE
invitation of Richard Wurth, '30, University of Michigan and a pupil charges to intensive drills sine
of Guy Maier, who was one of tin their return from the holiday reprincipal.
artists in a two-piano recital under cess in order to get them in the
As a result, a child study program the auspices of State college several best possible shape for the games
may be introduced in the school.
Albany, N Y .
years ago. Mr. Frantz is also a dis- this week and lias succeeded ii 179 Broadway
instilling a lot of .spirit and aggres
tiguished athlete.
TO MAKE ADDRESS
PATRONIZE THE
sivencss in his players.
President A. R. Brubachcr will give
SORORITY ENTERTAINS
The varsity is out to atone for
the commencement address at the Delta Omega sorority entertained its last start when it lost out t'
State Teachers' College, Trenton, at a bridge party on Saturday after- the John Marshall Law team by
We Clean and Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Men's
N. J., on Friday, January 23 He noon from 2:30 until 5 o'clock.
•\ slktlit margin last month.
Wearing Apparel
will speak on "Footnotes on Fduca811A MADISON AVENUE
Phone 6-0273
tion."
• The' State college orchestra made
its debut Tuesday at the plays given
by the '''-Elementary Dramatics Class.
The program consisted of "Energy",
ail overture; "Organ Echoes", a
serenade; and two marches.
The orchestra is composed of seventeen1" members who practice every
WkHies'day flight, according to ' J.
Bruce Eilby, '33, conductor.
"Last year about one-half the members dropped out," Filby said. "The
attendance this year, however, has
greatly improved."
"Every instrumentalist in college is
urged to come to the practices," Filby
declared. There are none freshmen
in the orchestra.
"The orchestra may play in assembly next semester," Filby announced.
VAN HEUSEN CHARLES
The Van Heusen Charles Company
Ammratt drain'rs and Byrro
ALBANY HARDWARE & IRON CO.
39-43 Stat* St.
"Basket Ball Equipment"
OPEN NOON TILL YOU GET READY T O GO
Spatial Prieaa aa UaJfarmt aad Fall Train Out at* Prompt Sarvica
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4&N<? P E A I I L S T
UP c , ,„.«
FOR THAT JUNIOR PROM.
WESTLAND GOLF GARDEN
Man's Hair Cutting
Manicuring
Marcellng
Telephone 3-*MJ
Scalp I reatment
Shampooing
Facial*
PRIMROSE BEAUTY 8HOPPB
at Eddie's Barber Shop
Permanent wavl lg by latest method
Evening! by appolntmi ntxfyBlock Above the Boulevard XH Central Ave
Troy
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241 W. LAWRENCE ST. A T MADISON AVE.
Learn to play GOLF on the best and the most beautiful
18 hole indoor minature GOLF course in the state.
CHECKING FREE
Sch6HBCtad)f
We have just received a new
selection of Evening
Then too then
ilre
Coions,
EYEGLASSES
*o
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5 0 N
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ORTICIAN
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Girls and Misses
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Steefel Brothers, Inc.
3 » x r =
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