S t a t e College News STUDENT TAX MUST BE PAIDJEXT WEEK

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State College News
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
FIUIMV, NovRSfiiKit 5, 1920
Vol,. XI. No. 8.
STUDENT TAX MUST
BE PAIDJEXT WEEK
$9,400Collected by Wednesday;
Freshmen Class Leading
In Payment
EXPECT ONLY FEW DELAYS
Officers Not Paying Will Be
Automatically Removed,
Board Rules
Student tax must be paid by November 15. Such is the announcement
of the student finance board, which
conducted another regular meeting
again ibis week. Next Tuesday it
will meet again, and by a week from
Monday the lime for payment ol tax
will have expired.
After thai lime, methods of enforcing tax collection will be used. That
of refusing delinquents admission at
entertainments will be among those
put into cffccl immediately, the board
announced, Few eases of delay in lax
payment are looked for.
The finance board is preparing a
lisl of all students who participate in
studcnl activities. This will aid it in
automatically removing any who have
nol paid the lax by November IS from
these activities, Extremely few cases
will require tin's action, il is believed,
as llu lax collection is progressing
rapidly.
Kaeli association benefiting from the
lnidgel should have a definitely established door committee, the board be
lie\ es, whose duty il should be to see
[hal no one enters free without a
ticket. The eleven members of the
sindrui council and the membership ol
finance board will check the work of
these door committees.
(i.lhcri E. (ianong, '28, a member ol
(hi! board, announced in assembly
Friday thai no students without tickets
could gain free admittance al the entertainments, beginning with the Music
association concert last night.
Twice As Much News Printed By College News;
Advertising Volume Triples As Circulation Soars
An increase of eighteen per cent in circulation coupled with doubling of
its volume of news and tripling of its volume of advertising is the record of
the STATU GIU.EOE NEWS lluis far this year. The figures given are those for
the issues of this year to and including that of October 20, 1926, as compared
with those of last year to and including October 30,' 1925.
A year ago 1,100 copies were printed weekly of the NEWS. Now 1,300
copies are printed weekly.
This is an increr.se of e'ghteen per cent in circulation.
From the beginning of the last college year to and including October 30, 1925,
870 column incites of news reading mailer were printed. Froth the beginning
of the present colic e year to and including October 29, 1926, 1,870 column
inches of news reading matter were printed.
This is considerably more than twice as much news reading matter,
l'p to October 30 last year 1 ho NEWS carried 180 column inches of advertising. I'p to October 29 of this year il carried 530 column Inches of advertising.
This is nearly three times as much advertising.
I.asl year the student association voted the NEWS $2,500 to help pay its
expenses, This year it .nave $2,000, This is an increased cos! to the studcnl
body of sixteen per rent.
The figures therefore summarize as follows: eighteen per cent increase
in circulation; 100 per cent increase in volume of news; 200 per cent
increase in volume of advertising; sixteen per cent increase in cost to
student body.
WOLNER IS PRESIDENT; MAKE ONE LOAN FROM
FRESHMAN CLASS WILL FUND FOR STUDENT AID
REVOTE THIS MORNING "Only one loan has been made this
I .din's J. Wolncr was elected presi
denl of I he freshman class in the revole Friday.
< Mhcr officers are:
treasurer, Fred Crumb: men's athletic
manager, (icol'ge Taylor; song leader,
Mary Nelson; cheer leader, Frances
K'adding.
Rcvolcs will be taken this morning
for oilier offices,
Candidates are:
vice-president, Thomas Herney, Ivalhifine (iraham; secretary, Zora Cierow,
George Taylor and Cornelia Van
Klecck; reporter, Edith Lawrence,
Virginia Shiiltis and Richard VViston;
girls' athletic manager,
Elizabeth
Diamond, Marjorie llogan; member
of linn nee board, Louis W'olner, Ellsworth Kiriland, Katharine VVatkius,
I is J, W'olner, new president of
ihe freshman class is a graduate of
St, Patrick's (iraimnar school and of
Albany High school.
Last year lie was president of Ihe
Nine thousand four hundred dollars Philodoxia Literary society al the
if student lax has been paid up to high school and a member of both
Wednesday noon, an increase of .$1,600 the school and of the Philodoxia dein a week. Freshman class will soon hating learns.
reach the perfect mark, as 87 per COM1 II • participated in the inlersclioof the entire class have paid making la-iic speaking contest al Columbia
a total of 329 payments or $.1,019, university and in tile New York Times
Sophomore class is second in lead, hav- nation w ide oratorical contest.
ing attained an average of 7u per cent,
total amounting to $1,802 from 172
students. Seventy-live per eeiil of the
• ciror elasi has already paid, totalling
$2,112 from I'-'2 students, Juniors are
last, 71 per ci nl of ihe class having
Stale College Weill Republican in
paid, or $1,70(1 from 100 students.
ihe straw vole east i<n election day,
November 2. The returns were as
follows:
ve.'ir from Ihe student loan fund which
ihe liuauee committee
manages,"
Tirenee J, Deyo, secretary-treasurer
ol Ihe College announced yesterday.
Last year MO loans were made.
The other student loan funds nianig ''I by the alumni association are
ill being used, according to Miss Anna
E. Pierce, dean of women,
10 cents per copy, 88.00 per year
MAIER AND PATTISON
PLAY BEFORE LARGE
NUMBER LAST NIGHT
BULLETIN
The student finance board put
"tc:th" in its new tax enforcement
ruling3 last night when students
without tax tickets were refused
free admittance at the concert at
Chancellor's hall. .Warned by the
finance board's announcement that
the rules wen; to be enforced f ew
tr'ed to "civ.sh the gate." Those
who did, found the.'r attempts had
been anticipated.
Several hundred Colleee sludenls and
i large number of Albanians heard liny
Maier and Lee
Pallison,
widely
k n o w n pianists,
plav last night at
Chancellor's Hall.
Tlie p r o g r a in
was under auspices
of die Music association, of which
Willard Kclallick,
'17, is president,
T. Frederick II.
Candlyn,
college
musical
director,
arranged the concert.
Williir.l Reliilllck
The
musicians
presented an tin
Usually varied program thai found
lav ir with the audience. Debussy, ( h.ibricr, and Raff were played. Sainl-Saens'
"Scherzo, 87," and the selections from
Ill's "The Carnival of the Animals," were
much applauded.
k
FRATERNITY INITIATES HERODOTUS CLUB ASKS
OF MYSKANIA
FROSH NEXT SEMESTER CHARTER
Herodotus club, a newly organized
\ policy of deferring the Initiation
if freshman pledges until the second
euiestcr lias been adopted for tin's year
ly Gamma chapter of Kappa Delia Eho
fraternity, lis officers have made public.
•Veslunen will he pledged as hitherto
luring the first semester. They will
not he initialed, however, until the
ei'niid semester.
One of the chief reasons for tin's
change, fraternity officers said, is a deire to encourage scholarship among
freshman pledges.
honorary organization of history students, has presented a petition to Myskania for recognition,
The offices are: president, Ervvin
Baker, '27; vice-president, Arthur Layman, '27; treasurer, Helena IJbelle, '29;
and ccrelary, Meriam Baker, '28.
The club has already twelve members.
Problems of the history department,
methods and current events are to be
subjects for discussion,
The club has the approval of both
Dr. Adiin W. Risley and Mr. Clarence
llidley of the history department.
SMITH IS SWAMPED IN
News And Myskania Guardians of Freshman Class
COLLEGE STRAW VOTE
Correct False Report of Illegal Voting At '30 Election
MOVING-UP DAY TO BE
THIRD FRIDAY IN MAY
Mills
127
Smith
71
VVadsworih
89
48
Moving-lip Hay will be the third Wagner
40
Friday in May. This was the decision i Yisinian
1
made al a recent meeting of Myska- Maniere
1
n'a. Il will bring the "big day of I lie Parker
(Jul of I lie 198 votes east for flovyear" in about the middle of the month.
•rnor, Mills won by a majority of 56,
JUNIOR-FROSlTsTUNT
IN TODAY'S ASSEMBLY
The annual junior-freshmen stunt
will take place at ihe joint assembly
al 10:55 today,
"The stunt is a pirate dance and
- itk:!, I' act," said Marjorie Young,
'28, chairman of the junior committee.
Other members of the committee are
Helen K'lady, Dorothy Walls, Chrissie
t'nriis and Mary Judith l.angdon.
W'ilhelmina Scbcsta, '30, is chairman
,1" the freshman committee.
DIRECTORY TO CONTAIN
HOUSE GROUPS SECTION
Name, and addresses of secret societies and house groups will have a
cparatc department in the student directory ibis year, according to Abbic
i raw ford, '27, chairman.
The directory will he issued next week.
Oilier new features include a more durable cover.
Mills Art Press, printers of the NEWS,
is doing the printing.
I'o MEMUESS or THE STUDENT BODY:..
In view of the fact that much misunderstanding was caused by the article and editorial regarding freshman
class elections in last week's NEWS,
we as a pari of Myskania, which has
charge of all class elections, desire to
clarify and correct any vague or false
impressions, The voting was legal
except for the office of vice-president
in which ease names of all original
candidates appeared for re-election.
In all other offices except boy's athletic manager revote was necessary because no one received a majority.
(Signed) (ir.vnin.ws op THE FKESHM.VX CLASS
To THE STUDENT BODY :
The publication in last week's NEWS
of an incorrect news article with editorial comment regarding the freshman elections was not caused by
carelessness or haste. It was due
rather to a regrettable series of happenings. The NEWS, when il first received the report that all the freshman
elections were illegal, commenced an
investigation to determine the truth
of the report. From what it regarded
as unquestionable authority, it obtained confirmation of the story. It
has developed since that the NEWS
authority
bad been
misinformed.
After receiving tlie information the
NEWS discussed in some detail tlie ad-
visability of publishing it. Believing
thai story was I rue, ihe NEWS decided that its duty to the student body
was J o publish it, Especially was
ibis believed to he the case, since, bad
the story been correct, the entire
freshman class would necessarily have
been informed and the entire College
would in a few hours be filled with
conflicting, rumors, it was also decided that editorial comment was ad
visabl.'. After the NEWS had lluis
gained what il believed verification of
Ihe story and after il had thus decided upon (he advisability of publishing the material, the article was written by a reporter, Then it was examined and rewritten by an editor.
After tin's it went through the usual
editing of all copy. Il was carefully
copy-read.
Later, after it was in
type and before il was published, il
was re-read and proof-read.
As a
final precaution, (lie NEWS last Thursday afternoon, b.'fpi c page one wenl
to press, showed the story, with its
headlines, to another person qualified
to pass authoritatively on its accuracy. Through a misunderstanding it
also passed Ibis examination without
challenge. It appeared in last Friday's
paper.
(Signed)
EDWIN VAN IVI.EECK, '37,
Jitiitor-in-Cliicf,
GIRLS'BASKETBALL
WILL BEGIN MONDAY
Seniors And Sophomores Play
First Interclass Game
Of Season
PLAN DECEMBERGYM M E E T
Freshman - Sophomore Rivalry
To Include Swimming
Meet Games
Girls' interclass 'basketball games
will begin Monday. Ethel DuBois,
'27, is basketball sport captain, The
games ibis year will be played every
Monday and Wednesday at 5 o'clock.
The schedule follows:
November 8--Seniors vs. Sophomores
November 10—Juniors vs, Freshmen
November 15—Seniors vs. Juniors
November 17—Sophomores vs. Frcsh111 en
November
November
November
December
December
December
Dec.'inber
22—Juniors vs. Sophomores
2-1—Seniors vs. Freshmen
29 —Sophomore's vs. Seniors
I—Juniors vs. Freshmen
(1 Juniors vs, Sophomores
8—Freshmen vs. Seniors
13—Freshmen vs. Sophomores
December 15—Juniors vs. Seniors
The senior captain is Helen Tompkins, manager, Mary Neville,
Dorothy Lasher is captain of the
junior leain and Esther Luyslcr is
manager,
The sophomore captain is Agnes
McC'irly. Anne Moshcr is manager.
The freshmen captain and manager
have nol been elected.
The Interclass games between the
sophomores and freshmen will count
in interclass rivalry under the new
ruling.
Athletic events for girls, including a
swimming meet, volley-ball games,
hare and hound races and basketball
games, will be included ill the interclass rivalry contest tin's year. This
will be in addition to the regular gym
meet, the girls' athletic council has
announced.
The individual meet which has been
for sophomores and freshmen only,
will include uppcrciassmen this year.
This meet will be at the same lime as
the gym meet.
Those events will be scheduled before the meet December 13.
Volley ball practice will be every
Monday and Wednesday afternoon
from 3 to 5 o'clock in the gymnasium.
The schedule of games has not been
announced.
(<STATELY
STAGGERS"
PRIZE WINNING TITLE
"Stately Staggers" will be tlie name
of the new humor department of the
Quarterly. Julia Fay, '27, editor-inchief, has announced, Ruth Watts,
'29, contributed the winning title in
the Quarterly's contest.
Katherine
(iraham, '29, was given honorable mention. The magazine will appear about
November 15.
WILL STAGE TWO ONE
ACT PLAYS THURSDAY
Two one-act plays will be presented
Thursday night at 8:15 o'clock in thy
auditorium by the advanced dramatics
class. One, a fantasy, will be directed
by Mary Merchant, '27, The other,
a comedy will be directed by Eudora
Lampman, '27,
HARE AND HOUND RACE
WILL START TOMORROW
The hare and hound race scheduled
for last Saturday will start from the
College at two o'clock tomorrow afternoon, if enough girls sign up for it
011 the Girls Athletic association bulletin board, Dorothy Lasher, '28, biking captain, has announced.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 5, 1020
State College News
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
T h e Undergraduate Newspaper of New York
State College for T e a c l i c n
„
THE NEWS BOARD
~ " ~
EDWIN VAN KLEECK
Editor-in-Chief
Kappa Delta
Rlio
lloiisc, West 4 J M
HELEN ZIMMERMAN
Business Manager
868 M a d i s o n A v e n u e , W e s t
4048-R
VIRGINIA HIGGINS
Managing Editor
550 W a s h i n g t o n A v e n u e , W e s t
SARA BARKLEV.
2096-J
..Associate Managing Editor
59 So. Lake Avenue, West
TIIELMA TEMPLE
IC95-J
Subscription Manager
levying a large sum on each of many persons and collecting
from a few of them, but of laying an equal and moderate
burden on many and collecting from all.
Business judgment is altogether too rare in the administration of student organization finances, with the
notable exception of the conduct of the student budget,
which, it is worthy of remark, has faculty guidance. It
is open to question whether this argues an incapability
of the undergraduate mind in financial affairs or merely
indicates carelessness and slipshod methods. But
whichever is true, the fact remains that other classes
and other organizations can learn much from a study of
the senior financial methods.
I'sl Gamma H o u s e , W e s t 2732
SENIOR ASSOCIATR EDITORS
KATIIARINK B L I N I S , '27
J U L I A KAY, '27
T I I E L M A L. BREZEK, '27
f.oui.:E I). G U N N , '27
J U N I O R ASSOCIATE
EDITORS
ADELAIDE HOLLISTER, '28
LELA V A N S C I I A I C K , '28
MARY J U D I T H LANODON, '28
DOROTHY W A T T S , '28
THE NEED OF A Y. M. C. A.
REPORTERS
R U T H H . M C N U T T , '27
K E N T P E A S E , '27
MAROARET PROVOST, '27
ROSE DRANSKY, '29
MOI.I.IK K A U F M A N , '29
M A Y K I . I W E N , '29
IlERTUA ZAJAN, '27
Kl.ORENCB K O E N , '29
KATHLEEN DOUOIITY, '28
R U T H FLANAOAN, '28
MILDRED GABEL, '28
R U T H G. MOORE, '28
GERTRUDE URASLOW, '29
IIESSIE LAPEDES, '29
LORENA MARCUS, '29
ELIZABETH I'ULVER, '29
CAROLINE S C H L E I O H , '29
ROBERT J. S I I I L L I N O L A W ,
'29
VERA BELLE W E L L O T T , '29
ASSISTANT B U S I N E S S MANAGERS
E R W I N L. BAKER, '27
DOROTHY IIANDI.ON, '27
T H O M A S P. FALLON, '29
A N N E IIOLROYD, '28
FRANCIS E. G R I F F I N , '28
MILDRKD LANSI.EY, '29
KATIIEIUNK SAXTON, '28
R U T H KF.LI.EY, Assistant Subscription
Manager
DR. MARRY W. HASTINOS, Faculty Adviser
SARA BARK-LEY, Director of News W r i t i n g Class
WILLIAM
TIIELMA
M.
FRENCH,
DCSIC
Editor
[., BRE?.EE, President, News Chili; DOROTHY WATTS, VicePresident; MILDRED LANSLEY, Secretary-Treasurer
Published every Friday In the college year by the Editorial Board
Subscription, $3.00 per
representing the .Student Association.
year, single copies, ten cents. Delivered anywhere in the United
Slates. Entered as second class matter at postoflice, Albany, N. Y.
The News docs not necessarily endorse sentiments expressed in
contributions. No communications will lie printed unless the writers'
names a r e left with the Editor-in-Chief of the News. Anonymity
will be preserved if so desired.
PRINTED
BY M I L L S
A R T PRESS,
394-396
Broadway
Friday November 5, 1926
Vol. XI, No, 8
AN APOLOGY TO '30
The NEWS regrets deeply the tin fortunate publication last
week of an untrue story and editorial regarding the freshman election. This newspaper sincerely apologizes to the
freshman class and to the others concerned for its part in
the mistake. It is happy that it was wrong and that the
election was, with one minor exception, entirely an honest
one. The NEWS, as is told on page one today, published
the story in good faith, believing that it had the correct
facts and that their publication was its duty.
THE IGNORANCE OF THE EDUCATED
The ignorance of the educated has become a by-word.
The lack of sufficient intelligent interest by the potentially
intelligent in public questions has been an open point for
attack on modern education. The failure of the colleges
to produce students who can think slraightly on affairs away
from the campus has been pointed out again and again.
Now comes at College an opportunity for the student body
to get at least a start toward remedying some of these defects. Open student forums are to be begun for the discussion of questions important to College students and to
men and women generally. The College Y. W. C. A, has
furnished the organization for the forums, but the entire
College is invited to share the benefits. There are those
who think that it is impossible to move the American
undergraduate mind to a consideration of much that does
not effect it immediately and materially. Student editors
in many Colleges are saying this in their editorials, either
openly or between the lines. They have been hinting at it
for years. But they are painting only the dark side of
the picture. The fault is as often with those who try to
stimulate student interest as it is with the students themselves. Of course students arc interested in what interests
men and women generally. Of course they have in addition certain interests peculiar to themselves, Of course,
also, they want to know what others think about what interests them.
That is why a student forum can succeed if it is given
a chance. Give State College's student forum a chance.
Attend its meetings.
LOYALTY — PLUS BUSINESS METHODS
An example in loyalty is offered by the senior class
which has announced that in addition to its gift to the
College of a portrait of Dean Anna E. Pierce, it will
give a large window for the auditorium. The portrait
of Dean Pierce alone would have been a gift worthy of
any class. The addition of a stained glass window is
equally commendable. Besides both of these remembrances, the class hopes to be able to leave a small
sum for the Alumni Residence hall fund. But despite
Few projects brought before the student body id recent
years have had more to commend them than has that for
the formation of a Young Men's Christian association.
Here is a type of men's activity which the College has
noticeably lacked. Men may belong to Monorail, Newman,
Canterbury and similar units whose purpose is strictly religious and largely denominational. They cannot of course
join the Y. W. C. A. The Y. M. C. A., however, has a
purpose and a work that is as much social as it is religious.
It is not a denominational organization. It is not controlled
by any sect. Its purpose is three-fold, the development of
spirit, mind and body.
There are enough men in College to warrant a Y. M,
C. A. It would be a body in which all men students, regardless of church affiliation, might belong. It. is needed
here. Students alone should not be depended upon to get
it started. The administration should cooperate. The men
of the faculty should cooperate. Other religious groups
should cooperate. The opportunity should not be lost,
WHO BOSSES AMERICAN COLLEGES?
OTHER BOOKS WHICH YOU MAY LIKE
BY E. V. K
The American College and lis Rulers, By J. E. Kirkpalrick. $1.00. 309 pp. New York: New Republic.
it is Dr. Kirkpatrick's thesis that the human triangle of
interests found in every college, namely, the people who
pay the bills, the faculty and the students, has lacked
equivalent form long enough, lie would make of college
government an "academic democracy," This term be
(iefinies as "that type of school, very rare as yet, 111 which
first the patrons and supporters, second the teachers and
officers of administration, and finally, the pupils or students
arc so related to each oilier that they share mutually In
the conduct of till the major as well as the minor interests
and activities of the school."
Considering the controversial nature of the mi terial
which he treats, the author has written with unusual
restraint, Dr. Kirkpalrick has opinions and definite ones
about what he calls present "academic practices" and
"democratic stirrings" in the college world, Hut he is willing to concede other points of view. The book is recommended without reserve,
Elbert Hubbard of East Aurora. By Felix Shay, Illustrated. $3.50. 553 pp. New York: William II. Wise
and Co,
Here is a book which can be judged by its cover, and
its cover and every other detail of the book-maker's art
which has gone into it are the most delightful which 1926
has brought. It is truly a hook which would have charmed
Era Elbet'tus himself. Felix Shay who wrote it had his
material from original sources, for few men knew Hubbard
better. The hook is almost as much a story of the Roycrofters of East Aurora as it is of Hubbard, The cartoons,
colored borders, mottoes, etc., with which the publishers
have been lavish, are products of their art. Henry Ford
wrote a foreword,
COLLEGE BRIEFS
Horseback riding will be it new sport
at Slate College if enough students
sign to enier the class. Three more
signers are required, Luetic Norgood,
30, chairman, has announced.
Y. W. C. A, to Take in Members
Opportunity will again be given students to join Y. VV. C, A, the first
three days of next week, A member
will be at the table near the Y. VV.
C, A. bulletin board in the lower corridor from 11:00 until 3:00, Gcorgiana
Maar, '27, membership chairman, has
announced. Dues are $1,00,
Miss Winchell Speaks Twice
Miss Florence E, Winchell of the
home economics department addressed
the central western district meetings in
Rochester, Thursday, and the Women s
club in Albany Friday.
Dean Pierce Attends Meeting
Aliss Anna E, Fierce, dean of women, is attending a meeting of the
Women's Foundation club in New
York today.
Biology Club Will Have Pin
Biology club will meet next week
to discuss designs for n club pin.
The pin committee will recommend
a silver star fish with a letter "S" ill
the center, according to William M.
French, '29, chairman. The "S" will
denote
State
College.
Lane Elected to Finance Board
Ruth Lane, '28, has been elected a
member of the finance hoard by the junior class.
Pcd Seeks Alumni Subscribers
Circular letters have been sent to
recent alumni by the Pedagogue circulation stall, seeking subscriptions.
Undergraduate subscriptions may be
paid any day from 12 to I o'clock in
the rotunda.
Name Home Management Family
The home management family of the
home economics practice house from
November 1 to November 13, is Mary
Deck, '27, Bella llyman, '27, _ Edna
KnilTcn, '27, and Edna Wixom, '27.
News Club Elects Ruth Moore
Ruth Moore, '28, defeated Mildred
Gabel, '28, and Anne IIolroyd, '28, in
the election of vice-president of the
News club Tuesday.
Miss Futtcrer to Give Reading
Miss Agnes Futtcrer, director of college dramatics, now studying in New
York on sabbatical leave, will read
"Lady Windermere's Fan" m Cortland
Normal school tonight.
Alumni Visit College
We suggest til
Margaret Buckbee, 26, and Mrs. in the main locket
Mabel Holliday Parsons, 'IS, visited the >i:c gym period
home economics department recently,
plenty of cxereis
Catherine Miller, '26, visited the Col- icrimmage is held
Nimrod of the Sea. By William M. Davis. Illustrated.
lege on Monday. She is studying at the
$3.50. 405 pp. Boston: Latiriat,
If you would know the epic of the America whaleman New York school of social service in
COMP:
you will read this book. "Nimrod of the Sea" is a new New York.
My drowsy brai
edition of what was once a favorite of sea-story lovers.
My mind is fille
Its appearance in a reprint with illustrations just as they
The veils are dr;
were in the' first edition gives a sidelight not only into
But
comes to n
the development of whalefishing but into that of book
*
illustration. The story is written by a whaler captain and
Cold a n d gleami
tells actual experiences of the palmiest days of the industry, when hundreds of vessels tinder the American fiag
T
h
e
p
a
p
e
r
p
a
le
Chi Sigma Tbeta welcomes Genesearched the seas for oil. Adventure tales heap atop vieve White, '28, Catherine McGowan,
one another throughout. An historical resume of the '29, and Grace Chippendale, '29, into
The
inex.periem
growth and decline of the industry is given by John R. full membership.
w i t h t h e definilio
Spears.
c h i l d l i k e t r u s t , she
Chi Sigma Theta Entertains
" A c h a i r is a n a r
Adventure's Best Stories—1926. Edited by Arthur S.
Week-end
guests
at
Chi
Sigma
f o u r l e g s , seat, ;
Hoffman. 300 pp. New York: Doran.
house were Marjorie Sinnott, for one p e r s o n . "
Mr. Hoffman is much wrought up over what he believes Theta
'23,
Jean
Dardcss,
'25,
Mary
Morrisey,
E x p e r i e n c e d co-i
is a popular misconception of "action" stories. This col- '26, Margaret Carey of Gloversville,
—'1
lection of eighteen short stories is his attempt to prove
and
Mary
Fitzsimons
of
Utica.
A Kotin
that such stories arc not necessarily sensational and cheap,
"See
anything
j
"fit only for crude or youthful minds." Regretfully lie
admits that this is generally true. But we feel inclined to Delta Omega Has Shower
that
frosli.'"
acrree that some of the samples he presents here go part
Delia Omega seniors attended a shower
"Sure,
the
fros
of the way toward proving his point that sometimes the Saturday given for Marian Wright
action story "becomes the means to the highest possible Blakeslec, '26, by the Misses Blakeslee.
literary attainment."
SORORITY NEWS
STATIC COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER o, 192(1
SEVEN LETTER MEN
BACK WITH VARSITY
Outlook For Successful Team
Best In Several Seasons,
Says Coach
Meti's basketball practice continued
Tiicsday at 4 o'clock, when 35 men reported for the initial practice. Conch
Rutherford R, Baker said he is confident that with the material present he
will turn out a winning team this season, "With seven of last year's rcgtiu,.-. uncle, the outlook for the season
is belter than it has been for several
years,1' he declared.
Aiming the letter men who have rciiirncd are Captain Clarence Nephew,
2°, center on last year's leant; Anthony
uie/.ynski, '28, LaVerne Carr, '29, and
. raucis Griffin, '28, forwards; and ITow.MI Lioff, '28, Joseph llerney, '29, guards.
u,oi.ls Klein, '2'), guard on the freshman
in iast year, will play with the vary.
resides the members of last year's
..irsity team Coach Baker will have the
e linian team of last season to pick
rum.
nith the opening game more than a
in mill away State should he represented
by a well trained team for its initial
' ontest, according to Captain Nephew.
The freshman basketball team held its
first practice of the season last week,
hied Crumb, manager, announced that
practice will he every Tuesday and
Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock and
Fridays at 4 o'clock.
Seven games, live of which would be
homes games, are mi the tentative
schedule. Expenses of the team will be
between two hundred and three hundred
dollars, it is estimated.
Those wdio were present at the first
practice were. George Taylor, Thomas
Hcrncy, lames R. Garvin, Adolph
Sch .11, Louis W'olner, Michael Tepe
dino, P.. Thompson. Ward B. (Vile.
Isaac Kaplan, R. Pickleslein and R.
Whinston.
Four Girls Learn Home Management In Practice House;
Expenses Are Budgeted, Shopping Is Done Personally
WILL UNVEIL DEAN
PIERCE'S PORTRAIT
Four senior girls are learning housekeeping and home management nt the
home economics practice house at 151
Western avenue. They will live in the
louse for twelve days.
The expenses arc budgeted and the
•hopping is done personally by the girls.
Lessons receive practical application.
"We have a large fireplace, electric
sewing machine, overstuffed furniture,
and a firelcss cooker," said Doris Sinnot, '27, one of the girls living in the
house.
Seniors To Exhibit Class Gift
"1 believe," said Miss Flllingbam,
At Art Shop Before
supervisor of the house, "that soon every
Presentation
College girl will receive some home economics training, The class in ctilhcitics
BY LOUISE D. GUNN
at Vassaf is hut a step toward it."
The portrait of Dean Anna F.. Pierce
"Guests and visitors are welcome at will be completed by March, 1927, acthe II. E. house," said Myra Roach, '27, cording to Mr. David l.ithgow, the artist, This will make possible the unveiling on Moving-up Day. The portrait
COMMITTEE TO REPORT ALUMNI SUBSCRIPTION is the special gift of the present senior
ON DESIGN FOR WINDOW LIST DOUBLES IN YEARclass to the College, and will be hung
in the alumni residence hall when the
The senior window committee will
Twice as many alumni are m the sub* dormitory is completed.
•onfer with President A. R. l'rubacher caption list of the NEWS today as last
Before presentation the picture will
oon, and report on (he design to be year, according to Thclnm Temple, '27,
elected for the class' gift to llu: Col- subscription manager, Next spring a be on exhibition for three weeks in the
lege,
earripai rn will be started to secure a one window of Annesley's art shop, at 504
Mary Galviu, Eudora Lampman, and hundred per cent subscription lisi from Broadway.
be graduating class.
Hilda Sri IT comprise tile committee.
The portrait shows Miss Pierce sitting
in a chair, and leaning slightly forward.
ALUMNAE MARRY
j
SORORITY ENTERTAINS
Recent marriages of alumnae arc:
Tbeda Mosber and lact|uelyn Monroe She wears a tan dress with lace inserElizabeth D. Naglc,,'24 to R W. Bur- w m . recent visitors'al the Eta Phi tions, A pink scarf and cameo pin add
Conrli'K.v Ml) my Tl c.yiiloli
bank, 22 St. Lukes Place, Montcalm, ,l10llsc
a delicate touch of color.
Clarence Nephew, '28, captain of N. |.; Marian S. Wright, '26, to G. H
'
One can almost bear Miss Pierce say,
vars'ty basketball, whose chances for lllakcslee, 76 Winthrop Avenue, Albany,
Muriel Wenzcl Moat, '20, is spending
winning team are high.
"Well, what can I do for you?"
N. Y.
| iwo weeks in Albany,
CLUB PICTURES IN PED
TO BE IN GROUP FORM
Club pictures in the Pedagogue this
year will be group pictures, and not the
officers alone, according to Ruth McNlltt,
'27, photograph editor.
"All photographs of seniors and faculty for the Pedagogue will be taken at
Lorry's before November 15," she declared.
"Kach senior will hand in an informal
snapshot for the Red," said Miss McXutl.
Pictures of the secret societies, student
organizations and the dormitories will be
taken after November 15.
The class and the club pictures will
be taken al the < ollegc.
Faculty Spend Vacations Teaching, Studying, Resting;
Several Visit Canada, While Others Travel In Europe
Amedee Simonin, assistant profesDr. Milton G. Nelson, assistant prosor of French, taught at the summer fessor of education, studied at Cornell.
session here, and spent the remainder
of the summer with his family in the Mahar Studies Languages
"1 spent my vacation at home not far
country.
from Albany," said John A. Mahar,
professor of French. "Most of my
time was spent in studying and reading
Dr. Power Teaches at Cornell
Greek, Latin, Hebrew and French. This
Dr. Carleton E. Power, assistant pro- is my favorite pastime."
fessor of physics, taught physics at Cornell and took a pleasure trip to Roch- Spend:; Summer in Vermont
ester and to Lake George.
Miss Anne L. Gushing, supervisor
of practice teaching, spent the summer
at her home in Vermont.
Birchenough Rusticates
Professor Harry Birchenough, head of Mies Johnson Studies in Rome
the mathematics department, spent the
Miss Lydia A. Johnson, instructor
entire summer rusticating at Lake in Latin, traveled abroad and studied
in
Rome.
Hopatcong, N. J.
Vacations at Thousand Islands
Miss Huyck Visits Farm
Mrs.
Florence D. Frcar, instructor
Miss Lucy Huyck, assistant librarian, in home economics, took a course at
was in charge of the library here dur Columbia university for six weeks,
ing the summer session, then she spent then traveled through Canada. On
her return from Canada, Mrs. Frcar
four weeks on her farm at Deposit.
visited Thousand Island park.
Candlyn Tours England
T. Frederick H. Candlyn returned to Miss Betz Completes M. A. Work
his home in Cheshire county, England.
Miss Margaret Hetz, instructor in
He visited many famous cathedrals, chemistry, completed her work for a
among which were Chester, Manchester, master's degree at Columbia university
Liverpool, and St. Paul's cathedral, this summer.
London.
Studies at McGill
Works on Master's Degree
Miss Millicent Burhans, assistant inRalph A. Beaver, instructor in mathe- structor in French and supervisor of
matics, also attended Columbia for his practice teaching, attended summer
second summer there. He expects to school at McGill university and later
complete work for a master of arts de- visited in Philadelphia.
gree in two more summers.
Miss Wheeling Learns to Swim
Miss Keim Studies at Columbia
Miss Katberine P. Wheeling, instrucMiss Anna Randolph Keim, assistant tor of English and supervisor of pracprofessor of home economics, spent ten tice teaching, divided her vacation beweeks of the summer recess at Colum- tween summer school, Like Erie and
bia university taking a special course in her home at Sewickley, Pa. At Lake
psychology. She spent two weeks at Erie she learned to swim.
Lake Sunapec, N. H., and part of the
summer at her home in Fredricksburg.
Studies Wild Birds
Miss Elizabeth F\ Shaver, supervisor of practice leaching, spent two
Takes Camping Trip
Professor Jesse F. Stinard, professor months of the summer at Lake George.
of Spanish, left for a camping trip to
Montreal and along the coast of Maine Summers at Lake George
after college closed in the spring. He
Mrs.
Queene Human Faust, of the
camped at Ballston Lake for two weeks Oioiopy department, spent four weeks at
and at St. Lawrence for a week.
Valley Forge, ami in Philadelphia, In
Professor Stinard also visited the August she went to Canada to fish and
to study wild bird life.
Sesqui-Centcnnial at Philadelphia.
At Forty
Upon g r e a t g e n e r a t o r s
which send out current to
light the homes and carry
the burdens of millions, you
will find the G-Emonogram.
Upon industrial motors, on
electric railway trains—
wherever quality and unfailing performance are first
essentials—the G-E monogram will be found.
A series of G-E advertisements showing what electricity is doing in many
fields will be sent on request.
Ask for booklet GEK-1.
GENERAL
ELECTRIC
"At Forty" the housewife in some sections
of Europe wears a black bonnet to signify
the end of her youth. A quaint custom—you
say—but it usually signifies a fact. Heavy
tasks, indoors and out, have made her old—
at forty.
Of all the uses of electricity in America, the
most important are those which release the
woman from physical drudgery. Electricity
carries water, washes clothes, cleans carpets,
cooks the family's food—better and quicker
than could be done by hand.
A trip to town or an hour's rest in the afternoon pays a woman dividends in good health
"at forty years." And what is youth but that?
Men and women who have had the benefit
of college training and college life have
learned to place the proper value upon rest
and recreation. They appreciate the relief
afforded by electricity.
AL ELECTRIC
COMPANY
CHENECTADY
NEW
I O I K
STATE COLLEGE XKWH, "NOVtSMBKR 5, 1020
Take Advantage
COLLEGE MEN PLAN Few Students
Tax Includes Hospital
BRANCH OF Y. M. C. A.
of Infirmary Fund;
Care, Says Dr. Croasdale
past," Dr, Caroline Croasdale, instructor
in hygiene and college physician, said.
"Tilts fund is maintained for their
benefit by the students and I wish they
would use it," she said.
" I he two dollars which each one pays
in his student tax entitles all to care
amounting to $25 in any of the Albany
hospitals, preferably the Albany hospital.
"If the bill is larger than $25 it must
be met by the students tbenicslves, except in cases of diphetheria and scarlet
fever when a maximum of $75 is allowed because of the extra care and
quarantine expenses. I also use this
fund for X-ray and laboratory tests
where these arc needed.
"If it is only a bad cold, make use of
the privileges offered by the fund since
a few days' rest and special care will
make the recovery so much more prompt
and often prevent serious illness.
"The only requirement in using this
fund is that each student must get a slip
from me, stating the ualtire of (he illness, to be presented at the hospital to
get care," Dr. Croasdale said,
•
Would Form I n t e r c o l l e g i a t e
Council With State As
Charter Member
Organization of a V. M. ('. A. for
College men here may he started next
week, according to Robert T, Ross, '29,
"If enough young men respond," he
• said, "Doyle F. Parsons, student secre. tary of the slate student committee of
the Y. M. C. A. will speak at a meeting
to be held here next month."
"The Y, M. Ci A. unites young men
both socially atirl religiously," said Miss
Anna E. Pierce, clean of women.
A. Reginald Dixon, '27, said, "The
Y. M. Ci A. should be represented here.
Ofc,
It is the greatest organization i't the
world for providing men with clear,
Qpko'U
healthy minds and clean, healthy Indies
All men at Slate Cdlicp should I"' in— \
terested e.-otigh lo back this movement."
(JOttrlEHy Aliiany Kvonliw News
"I am in favor of a Y. M. ('. A. al
"Very few students have taken advanState. I think it would stimulate intertage of the infirmary fund during the
est anion;,' the ftieti especially if a hgitse
with a gymnasium were maintained. A
house would also serve as a men's
dormitory and help develop a closer lelOtto F. Huddle, principal of the Briarlowsbip amoir; the men," Ralph J.
cliff
Manor High school and a College
Stanley, '28, declared.
alumnus, lias been appointed pro-consul
Professor
Winchell
S
k
e
t
c
h
e
s
"I think a ' V for the men at State
for (he first province of Kappa Delta
Nursery Schools' Place
would be a goad plan," said William J.
Klin fraternity. Mr. Huddle is a memIn Education
Clarke, '27, especially if the members
ber of the local chapter, His territory
could finance a regular house with a
Behavior of children was discussed at will include the chapters at Middlebury
gymnasium with the aid of the national the first meeting of the child study
college, Colg'Uc university, Colby colorganization. A group bound together -.•roup, under (he auspices of the Amerilege, Cornell university and State Colcan
As.
'iatinll
of
I'liivei'Mly
Women,
by friendliness and good fellowship is
which met here Tuesday at .1 o'clock. lego. 'file appointment has been ancertain to he of value to all."
Professor Florence E, Winchell, bead nounced by Arthur M. Oilman of ScheThat the Y. M. C, A. is a worthy pro of the home economics department
nectady, national president of the fraject to develop a spirit of brotherhood iketelled bt'ielly the child study movcternity.
ine
i|
and
the
place
of
die
nursery
and that it could web be the nucleus of
schools in education, Dr, Caroline C.
a men's dormitory is the opinion of Croasdale spoke on the effect of pre
Francis E. Griffin, '28,
ichool trainiii!. on the individual as reThe Y. M. C. A. or, anized at State flected during the college years.
The study group i- open lo non-college
would have its central office at College
but would be cornice.ed with the Albany women Interested in the (raining of
young children, h mecls in Room lol
Miss Laura F, Thompson, manager of
Y. M. C. A. It is the intention of the he second and fourth Fridays of each
die cafeteria, was elected treasurer of
men in charge of this movement in form month at 3:00 P. M.
eastern district home economics assoan intercollegiate council, according to
ciation.
U P P E 3 C L A S S E S TO DEBATE
Mr. Ross.
Members of the senior and junior tleMiss Jessie l!. Lane, a Stale College
'mtirig learns will be chosen this week,
e-.-ording to Ruth ('oll)urn, chairman '.jraduatc, in charge of the service deI tin.' senior debating conuuillee. Kalll- partment al (be \diroiidack Power and
iirilic Saxton is chairman of (he junior Ligbi Corporation, was elected presiPoetry written by Dr. Harold \Y. •oiiimittee. The ipie.ition for debate has dent of the district.
Thompson, professor of English, and tot been chosen.
Miss Alice E, Clear, '24, instructor in
English, appear in recent issues of the
Several poems written by Miss Clear
when an undergraduate here, appear in
the Book of Student Verse published
last spring under the supervision of
464 Washington Ave.
Professor R. II. Kinland, of the English department.
I Doors Above High School
BEHAVIOR OF CHILD HUDDLE, '22, IS NAMED
PROCONSUL OF K. D. R.
IS GROUP'S SUBJECT
50 NEW BOOKS ARE
IN COLLEGE LIBRARY
Include Barries 'Mary Rose,"
Milne's "Second Plays"
And Others
"Quotable Anecdotes'-' by Knox, "Literary Lapses," by Leacock, "Count
Frouleuae," by Parkniau, and Milne's
''Second Plays" are recent additions to
the College library,
Other new books include: Athertoii,
The Conqueror; Barrie, Mary Rose;
lloissier, Cicero and His Friends; Cross.
Fundamentals in KngTsh; (.'urmc. College English Grammar; Dearborn, Introduction to Teaehiitii; DcKruif, Microbe Hunters; Delaud, Old Clieslcr
Tales; Ferrero, Characters and Events
of Roman History; Galsworthy, Loyal
ties; Gault and Howard, General Psychology) Grenfell, Adrift on an Ice-pan;
Gulick, Life of Ihe Ancient Greeks; Harris, Religion of Undergraduales; llealy,
Individual Delinquent; I lemon, Marin
Chapdclaine; Derrick, Manual of Injurious Insects; House, Intimate Paper ;
llbert, Parliament; Jameson it Lockwood, Freshman Girl; Lindgrcn, Modern
Speeches; Longman,
Frederick the
Great; Mace-Bogardus, History of the
U. S.; Melville, Moby Dick; Merivale,
General llislory of Rome; Merrilield,
Modern Religious Verse and Prose;
Morley, One Act Plays; Muir, Our National Parks; Myerson, Foundations of
Personality; Parkniau, Jesuits in North
America; Parkman, LaSalle and the Discovery of the Great West; Parkman,
Montcalm and Wolfe; Ravage, American in the Making; Roosevelt, Episodes
from the Winning of the West; Russell,
Proposed Roads lo Freedom; Shaw,
Story of a Pioneer; Slefanssoii, Hunters
of ihe Great North; Slrayer and others,
Problems in Educational Administration;
Thomson, Instinct, Intelligence and
Character; Tiekncr, Social and industrial History of England; Trcvclyan,
England Under Ihe Stuarts; Wright,
History of French Literature; Young,
Adventure-, in Alaska.
ELECT MISS THOMPSON
AND ALUMNA OFFICERS
POETRY BY FACULTY IS
PUBLISHED IN BOOKMAN
GIRLS WILL BE RANKED
IN SWIMMING CLASSES
To add interest lo the swimming
classes, a system of ranks and awards
may be instituted, Elizabeth Bender, '27.
swimming captain has announced.
"Girls in the advanced class are asked
not to come until 9:00, as it crowds the
pool and is unfair to those in the elementary class," she said.
The pool is open on Friday afternoons from 3:00 to 5:00 free, and on
Saturdays from ') :00 to 11:00, with a
charge of ten cents.
TWELVE JUNIOR GIRLS
SEEK BERTHS ON PED
Juniors who are trying out for the
Pedagogue are: Eleanor Smith, Clara
Hagey, Catharine Benson, Prances
Smith, Dorothy Smith, Ethel Van Embrugh, Sarah Law, Chrissie Curtis,
Ethel FfTron, Ruth Kellcy, Velma I.iebi.
Alice Fisher.
108 Working On News This Year;
Eighty-Nine Registered for B. A.
One hundred eight are working on
the NEWS this year, the largest staff
ever enrolled here.
The freshman class contributes
sixty-two cubs and the sophomores
come next with eighteen members.
The juniors and seniors have fifteen
and thirteen, respectively.
Of this number, eighty-nine are
registered for the B. A. degree;
seventeen for B. S. in Commerce, and
• t»yo for the B. S, in II. E.
ZIEGFELD'S FAMOUS
SHOW
"Kid Boots"
With Eddie Nelson, Pauline
Blair, Alan Allenwortli, jean
N'ewcombe and a Huge Cast
Augmented Orchestra
Ivory Tlutrs, Fri., and Sat.
Columbia Burlesque
COLLEGE SHOE
STORE
O v e r s W , Rubbers of All Kirds
Mens' Keds and Womer.s' Rub'rtrs
Sneaks F^r Gymrasium
WE GUARANTEE ALL OUR
REPAIRS AND GDODS
845 Madison Ave.
DRUGS and PHARMACEUTICALS
Telephone West 3 4 6 2 - 3 4 6 3
at 18 Steuben St.
Whether it's a Shingle Bob
A Swirl Bob or
A Peacock Bob
We Specialize in Hot Oil Scalp and
Hair Treatment
Two (2) Expert Marcellera Always in
Attendance
For Appointment, Call Main 7034
(Traftmtmuttn Jfimii S'lnijiur
215 LARK
STREET
Luncheon 12 M . t o 2 P. M.
Dinner 5 P. M. to 7 P. M,
CATERING
COTRELL & LEONARD
Albany, N. Y.
CAPS
$
GOWNS
HOODS
FOR ALL DEGREES
Phone West 40-J
W. $ . g>mttlj
MASQUERADE COSTUMER
Masks, Wigs, Beards, Etc.
Costumes Made to Order at Short Notice
122 Quail Street (opposite car barns)
Albany, N. Y.
S A V O C A & TRIM A R C K
PATRONIZE THE
Amertran Cleanavrs anil Dyers
and Spumoni
We Clean and Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Men's
Wearing Apparel
811 MADISON AVENUE
Phone West 273
809
J. W. WEYRICH
Home Made Ice Cream
FEAREY'S
is THE store
in which to buy
SHOES
& HOSIERY
JHottft U . <&ratu»s
LEONE
BARBER
Madison Avenue
44 No. Pearl
A lasting treat
and good for
teeth, appetite,
and digestion.
If you see ONE
You'll Know It's a
J. BARBAGALLO
Next Mon., Tues., and Wed.
Matinee Wednesday
•PEPPERMINT
FLAVOR
* * »
299 ONTARIO ST.
EXCLUSIVE PRINTING
Special attention to college students
Br<-ennan's
Stationery Store
C O L L E G E AND S C H O O L S U P P L I E S
336 CENTRAL AVE.
Phone West 2037
Parker's, Waterman's and Moore's Fountain Pens,
Eversharp Pencils, National Loose Leaf Books,
Brief Cases, Drawing Sets, Etc,
Eaton, Crane and Pike's Writing Paper and Correspondence Cards,
Diaries, Memory Books, Address Books, "Buzza" Framed
Mottoes, Greeting Cards for all Occasions,
Christmas Cards, Calendars
Cor, Washington and Lake Aves,
Opp. High School
STATK COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 5, 192(5
COMMERCE CLUB WILL
VISIT DELMAR TONIGHT
FOR HARVEST PARTY
S l a n t s and Hallowe'en g a m e s will
feature tlie C o m m e r c e club's party in
Deltnnr tonight, T h e bits will leave
College at eight o'clock. Refreslimcnls
Will be served after the dancing,
N e w m a n H a l l H a s Dance
Newman hall held a fall bouse dance
Friday evening. The chaneroncs were
Professor John M. Sayles, professor of
secondary education and Mrs, Sayles,
and Miss Alice Clear, instructor in
Kiifrlish.
C a n t e r b u r y H a s Hallowe'en P a r t y
Several members of Canterbury club
panic,paled with the young people of
St. Andrew's Episcopal church in a
Hallowe'en party and entertainment al
ibe parish bouse Friday evening.
O r r and Ripley R e a d P a p e r s
"How high Ibe sky is" was discussed
by Bessie Urr, '27, at the Mathematics
club meeting, Thursday, October 28. A
paper was also read by Helen Ripley,
'27. The club will bold its fall initiation
next week.
Classical Club I n i t i a t e s
Classical club initialed several new
m e m b e r s in the gymnasium W e d n e s day
night,
November
3,
Kuil
Lcrnmle, '27, was in charge of games,
and Dorothy Kabie, '28, played foi
dancing.
Refreshments were served.
C h e m i s t r y Club is Aetive
Compositions of coal and of a u l o m o
bile lacquers were explained by Gilbert (iauong, '28, and Mary Harris,
'27, at the Chemistry club meeting,
Friday.
Initiation of new members
will be discussed al I he nexi meeting.
Club Spells B a c k w a r d s
A ' b a c k w a r d s " parly was conducted
by faculty and students of ibe home
economics d e p a r t m e n t Tuesday even
big, A spelling match in which words
were spelled
backwards,
backward
walking and oilier
"backwardness"
featured.
P a g e Hall Celebrates Season
Vaudeville skits and stunts by fresh
men featured Page Hall's Hallowe'en
parly Friday evening.
Dorothy (iurlt,
'28, and iVfarjoric I.eek, '27, took pari
in the vaudeville. Dancing and games
were on ibe program.
Chairmen of ibe commlttes were K'uib
Murray, '20, decorations; Marian Woolcock, '29, entertainment; Dorothy Curlt,
'28, refreshments.
DR. WOODWARD FAVORS
Queen Endora Offers No Solution
To Blond Versus Brunette ProblemINDEPENDENT BOUGHT \
"Hs said a rose by any olbei'
name would smell as sweet,
And
so a little ibing
>•.: : v
like I be color of
one's hair makes
lid d i IT e r c u c e
where a perfectly
genuine Qtietfl is
Hui
t\ concerned,
Stale C o I I o g e ' s
i&,
1926
C a in p u s
§%:,.
Q u e e II
fooled
\
everybody
this
year. Those who
bad anticipated a
Kndora Cstntpmnri briuielte
queen
found
Kud o ra
f.anipman,
'27, not
dark-haired.
And those who bad awaited a
blonde-tressed
qlteeu found
her
hair far from light, Auburn hair
was tile answer, and the selection
by (fie student body of an auburn
haired queen, left the much-mootecl
supremacy of blondes versus brunettes still in doubt.
The now queen is a native of
Catskill.
Besides her regal duties
she holds the presidency of the
Intersorority council and of Kappa
Delta sorority. She has been active in oilier student affairs.
" D o y o u r own thinking," urged Roland B, Woodward of Rochester, a
regent of the University of the State
of N e w York in both assemblies Friday,;;
" O n e thought of your own, well
pursued, even though it is wrong, is
belter than the right thoughts of
others," he declared.
Dr. W o o d w a r d asked the students
'to bo above requiremenls." "A degree at besi," be said, "is merely au
expres ,ioii of progress, It is only an
incidei.'al and not the goal."
Y.W.C.A. RUMMAGE SALE
TO FINANCE DELEGATES
Y. W. C, A. will hold its first rummage
sale at 10 South Pearl street from 9 to 5
tomorrow, Proceeds of the sale will be
used to finance delegates lo Ibe stale
and national conventions. Plans for another sale in the spring will be discussed
at the next meeting.
EVERY TEACHER
Should Visit the Home of
£
Madison Ave, at Quail St.
Albany, N. Y.
At Your Service
Try Our Lunches
Delicious Snacks or a substantial meal
m a y be selected from our menu
Florist
W e a r e here t o serve you when you
are h u n g r y — w h e t h e r you wish to eat
at our tables or in your own rooms.
(ireenhouses and Nursery
O p e n 'till m i d n ' g h t every day—all day
Sunday,
744 Central Ave.
OPTOMETRIST
High Grade Delicatessen
and Lunch
811a M a d ' s o n Ave,, J u s t
Above Quail Street
Albany, N . Y .
OPTICIAN
ANNA K. BROWN
STATE STREET AT LARK
B o o t h s to a c c o m o d a l e 50 p e o p l e
This company extends an especially
cordial invitation to those engaged
in educational work. Our plant is
one of the most modern and complete in Ibe country—-a truly model
dairy of unique interest lo you personally as well as professionally.
Cor- Western Ave. & Lake
A L B A N Y , W. Y.
Boulevard Dairy Co., Inc.
231 Third St., Albany
Telephone West 1314
"The Sunlight Dairy"
CAFETERIA
EYEGLASSES
5 0 N . P e a r l St.
SCIENTIFIC BEAUTY PARLOR
VISIT THE COLLEGE PHARMACY
P H O N E ' W E S T 4135
Complete Beauty Service
lliiirdreMlnK, Marcelling. ShlnB'Intf, Dyeing, Manicuring Knclnls, Scnlp Treatment*, etc.
Skilled Operators Using Up to date methods will keep yon charmingly Attractive
CLOTHES ~
Raady-mada
And Cut to Order
ESTABLISHED ENGLISH UNIVERSITY
STYLES, TAILORED OVER YOUTHFUL
CHARTS SOLELY FOR DISTINGUISHED
SERVICE IN T H E U N I T E D STATES.
H a v e Y o u r H a i r Cut a t
MIKE'S
6 BARBERS - NO W A I T I N G
W-2455-J
M
TE NATIONAL BANK
X
(><) S T A T E S T R E E T
DIAMONDS
WATCHES
JEWELRY
i i
E€hfcvterJ§otxse
Suite and Overcoats
A L B A N Y , N. Y.
•40, »45, 'SO
lein Market
331 CENTRAL AVENUE
99 N O R T H P E A R L S T .
Opposite Strand Theatre
Choice. Meats,
and
Poultry
Special
]'fijcl<il)!rn
School
SUPERIOR DRY C L E A N E R S AND FANCY
851 Madison Ave.
P h o n e W e s t 5975
Attention
To
Organizations
DYERS
Albany, N . Y.
IN CLEANING
IN DYEING
IN PRESSING
SXJPEKIOR
H i g h Grade, Dry Cleaning, F a n c y Dyeing, in L a d i e s and Gents Apparels
of All Description is O u r Specialty
Satisfaction and P r o m p t n e s s is O u r Motto
9 N o r t h Lake A v e n u e
DANKER
Phone W. 144
"We Understand Eyes "
Dependability
Why go down town and pay
$1.00 for a marcel when you
can get it around the corner
for $.75 ?
Phone West 3479-W for au
appointment with the
Bernie's Drug Store
It's not necessary to be girlish or
athletic to get into a Girls' Athletic
association
frolic.
That's
what
two College men, disguised as
ghosts, discovered Saturday night.
Wrapped in sheets and masked
Ihey passed inspection at the door
and siayed through the meeting and
danced.
W h e n refreshment time
eaiue, the hunger urge proved too
s t r i n g and they unmasked to eat.
Albany, N. Y.
ZIGFIKLD SHOW C O M I N G
"Kid Hoots," called ibe greal m u s c a t
ihovv nl all lime, will be al ibe Capitol
heatre Monday. Tile day and Wedneslay. "Kid [loots," (he work of William
\nthrniy McGuire, On > Hnrbach, fosoph
McCarthy and Harry Tierney has been
lie must successful of all the Zicgfeld
irofliietions,
100
Years
V
^ ^ ^\ Masquerade
^ ^ ^ t
40 and 42 Maiden Lane
262 C e n t r a l A v e .
^
WE DELIVER THE GOCFDS
Superior Quality and B e t t e r Service
W o r k Called F o r and Delivered
BV SPECIAL APPOINTMENT =5
OUR STORE IS THE
(ftmttev l o u s e
OF A L B A N Y
KIMMEY'S
Kleen-Maid
Itlodel Coil
l4So.Pearlsi,AlLamj,lllj.J
BREAD
Holsum
The character of the suits and
overcoats tailored by Charter House
will earn your most sincere liking.
^|
Steefel Brothers
INC.
Clolhtt thai are Dhtinciiv* bul not Ex ptiuivt
:
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JOTAT13 COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 5, 1926
ALUMNI RETURN FOR
FALL HOUSE DANCES
Sororities Have
Hallowe'en
Parties Friday And
Saturday
Fifty people attended the Gamma
Kappa Phi.lionise dance Saturday evening. Among the alumni present were
Blanche Merry, '26, Anne Evans, '25,
and Marion Kline, '23.
The Pen-Rensselaer orchestra furiiishec! music.
Miss Jane. ,B, Agar, house mother,
Miss Ha/el Rowley, instructor in
physics, and Mr. and Mrs. David Avitt
of Schenectady were chaperones.
Delta Omega Entertains
Delta Omega held its dance Friday
evening, from eight to eleven-thirty
o'clock. William G. Kennedy, assistant
professor of chemistry, and Mrs. Kennedy chaperoned the dance. Fred Clement's orchestra furnished the music.
Shultes Plays For Kappa Delta
Kappa Delta's fall house dance was
Saturday night. Music was furnished
• by David Shultes' orchestra.
Alice Blair, '26, Jeanetta Wright,
'26, and Marjorie Potter, '22, were
alumni members present.
Chi Sigma Theta Dances
Chi Sigma Theta held its fall house
dance Friday evening.
HARRIS WINS COSTUME ALBANY ALUMNUSHAS
PRIZE AT G.A.A. FROLIC TAUGHT FOR 50 YEARS
Mary Harris, '27, won the prize for
McQuade was one of the
'atrirl
the funniest costume at the Girls' Ath- eight State College ilumni whose fifty
letic association gym frolic in the gymyears of service in
nasium Saturday evening!
teaching were commemorated
last
Miss Elizabeth Morris, professor of
week by the sixtyphilosophy, Miss Anna Randolph
Kcim, professor of home economics,
eighth convocation
of the University
Dr. Caroline Croasdalc, College phycisian, Miss Isabella Johnson, instrucof the State of
New York in Altor in physical education, and Dr.
bany.
Mr. McGertrude E. Douglas, instructor in
Quade is a membiology were the faculty members
ber of the "Fifty
present,
Year club," an orDorothy Taylor, '25, Florence Cradganization which is
Jock, '25, and Muriel Dagget, '24, also
to the entire teachattended.
ing profession of
Refreshments were served, followed
the state what the
by dancing and singing.
Half Century clulV
Patrick McQuntlc
is to State College
alumni.
He is principal of public
school 21, Albany.
A picked chorus of State College girls
Music club held its second monthly sang at the meeting Friday afternoon.
recital in the auditorium, Monday at Scores of college alumni, now in admini-I o'clock.
strative positions, returned to Albany
The program was: piano, Marion for the convocation. Many visited at
Zapli, '28; "Country Gardens," ar- the College.
ranged by Percy Grainger; "Lento"
by Cyril Scott.
Violin, Catherine'
Benson, '28, "Mazurka in G" by Mlinarski; "To a VVild Rose," by MacDonald. Voice, Grace Chippendale,
'29, "Homing," "A May Morning,"
Miss Chippendale was accompanied by
Dorothy Billingham, '29, Miss Zaph
and Miss Chippendale responded to
72 North Pearl St.
encores.
GRANGE STARS AT STRAND
Said to be throbbing with some of
the greatest football scenes ever put
on the screen, greater F. B, O.'s famous production of "One Minute to
Play," starring Red Grange, will be
shown at the Strand Theatre the week
of November 8. The. noted University
of Illinois "Galloping Ghost," probably the most wonderful player who
ever donned moleskins, gives . a remarkable exhibition of his versatility
and extraordinary broken-lield running
in the brilliant climax of the film, as
well as proving himself a splendid
actor, with a great screen versatility.
OUR PARK BRANCH
WELCOMES
the Accounts of State College
Students
NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
BANK and TRUST CO.
PARK BRANCH
209 Washington Avenue .
HERE'S YOUR CHANCE I
Working" y o u r w a y t h r o u g h
school is not so difficult , w h e n
selling Salem
Products.
A
c o m b i n a t i o n of t h r e e of the foll o w i n g a r t i c l e s : V e g e t a l Lilac,
Eau de Quinine H a i r Tonic,
Piay R u m , F l o r i d a W a t e r , each
a 75c i t e m ; M a g n e s i a D e n t a l
and Comfort Shaving Cream,
each a 50c item, a n y t h r e e for
$1.00. Your profit 35c on e v e r y
$1.00 sale. E a c h m a n uses a n d
buys them.
Send $1.00 for
s a m p l e c o m b i n a t i o n to s u i t
yourself.
M o n e y refunded if
n o t satisfied.
SALEM PRODUCTS, INC.
33 Union S q u a r e
New Vork City
FRANK H.
EVORY & CO.
General Printers
36 and 38 Beaver Street
91 Steps Eaat of Peat I Street
BALLGAH'S
Exclusive
Albany, N. Y.
W e are h a n d l i n g a d v e r t i s e d
m e r c h a n d i s e in a b i g v a r i e t y .
W h e n y o u a r c in this vicinity
the n e x t t i m e d r o p in this s h o p
t h a t e a t e r s to m e n only.
A
call will c o n v i n c e y o u of this
fact.
Specials
C r e w Neck S w e a t e r s $5.00
Broadcloth
I Oth Anniversary Sale
P r i c e s Greatly
Reduced
Si'k Dresses ~$15.0O-$79.5O
B o t t l e d Milk a n d
Jersey Sport Costumes—
Cream
$5.00-$29.50
Velvet
Cloth School D r e s s e s —
Special Attention Given
to Sorority Houses
$10.00-$29.50
Evening Dresses—
846 Madlion Ave
Cor. Ontario St.
$15.00-$59.50
THE QUAITY STORE
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S
READY-TO-WEAR
•->
CRAIG P. BALLAGH
Coals from $29.50-$l50.00
RELIABLE MEATS
and FRESH KILLED
POULTRY
-•
Slickers
Normanskill Farm Dairy
L.A.BOOKHIEM
4
Shirts—$1.50
S h e e p Lined C o a t s —
FASHION SHOP
West 1837
Haberdasher
849 Madison Ave.
SECOND RECITAL HELD
BY MUSIC CLUB MONDAY
FACULTY MEETS MONDAY
Psi Gamma Has Annual Dance
Important College business was disFsi Gamma sorority held its annual
fall house dance Friday evening. Dr. cussed at the faculty meeting Monday
Caroline Crbasdale, professor of hygiene, afternoon. '
and Miss Elizabeth Van Denburgh,
registrar, were chaperones.
Yorks Chaperone Eta Phi Dance
The Eta Phi house dance was Friday night. Professor George M. York,
head of the commtercc department,
and Mrs. York were chaperones.
F R A T E R N I T Y T O H A V E DANCE
Kappa Delta Rho fraternity will conduct its annual fall house, dance at its
home, 731 Madison avenue, November
12. A Reginald Dixon, '27, is general
chairman. Committees comprise; decorations and refreshments, Thomas 1',
Fallon, '29, and La Verne Carr, '29; invitations and chaperones, Gilbert E. Ganong, '28, and A. Reginald Dixon, '27;
orders and orchestra, Francis E, Griffin;
'28j and Joseph Hcrncy, '29. Professor
William G. Kennedy, of the chemistry
leparlnietit, and Mrs. Kennedy, and Dr.
Caroline Croasdalc, professor of hygiene,
will be chaperones.
The surprise sensation of the year!
By all means see it!
STRAND
ICE
CREAM
W h o l e s a l e P r i c e to P a r t i e s
WEEK OF NOV. 8
Willard W. Andrews, Pres.
P. Wfiyland Bailey, Secy,
ALBANY TEACHERS' AGENCY, Inc.
' • • • •
211 C e n t r a l A v e n u e
* * *
A l b a n y , N . Y.
who wish to teach and WHO AUK QUALtVXW TO DO'QUOD WORK.
Y. W. C. A
80-82 North Pearl Street Cor. Columbia St.
Telephone SMain
"S
dtulrablo
ALBANY. N. V.
Correspondence and Interview* Invited
HEWETT'S SILK SHOP
V
Burly registration
74 CHAPKL S T R E E T ,
1-5 Lodge Street
ROOMS
SWIMMING POOL
For Permanent and Transient Guests
Learn to Swim
~.„„~,r,^..
Learn Life Saving
CAFETERIA
Have a Pool Party
Home Cooked Food
SERVICE O F ANY K I N D
A Reliable Place T o Buy
Reliable Silks
And Woolens
Wo receive CHIIH for teachers from every male in the Union mid can ooftlllnl; bo of service to those
Agents For McCall Patterns
Also For
Elite Patterns
1109
BAKERS
A. HAGAM AN & GO.
877 to 885 Madison Ave., Albany, N. Y.
Branch Stores:
206 Lark St., Albany
20A Steuben St., Albany
173 Central Ave. Albany
1 South Allen St., Albany
294 Madison Ave., Alban
130 Quail St,, Albany
32 Fourth St., Troy
BUY BONNIE BREAD
JOHN W. EMERY, Inc.
'POPULAR PRICED SHOES
54 No. Pearl St.
Shoes and Hosjery
Albany, N. Y.
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
Students and Groups at the State College for
will be given special attention
*8
203 Central Avenue (near Robin)
TRY OUR TOASTED SANDWICHES
Teachers
Mills A r t Press
394-396 Broadway Main 2287
Printers of State College New3
PALLADINO
T h e hob with which H e r
Majesty of R u m a n i a e n h a n c e d
her beauty has been featured
at this e s t a b l i s h m e n t for the
past four m o n t h s .
[t is le bobb distingue
12 M a s t e r B a r b e r s
6 Beauty Culturists
P h o n e Main 6280
33 No. P e a r l St.
O'jp. Clinton S q u a r e
Be fair to your dollar. Spend it
with merchants who make a specialty
to college students.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Business Department
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