State College Nells 1\ +* OSWEGO NORMAL TO

advertisement
+*
1\
State College Nells
KEEP
COLLEGE CLEAN
VOL. X No. 15
CLEANUP:,
NEW Y O R K S T A T E COLLEGE F O R T E A C H E R S
WEEK, JAN. 15-22i
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$3.0Q-pef^r
ALBANY, N. Y., FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1926
Seats For Three One Act Plays To Be Given
OSWEGO NORMAL TO Sell Many
COMMENCE CAMPAIGN
At Historical And Art Society Tonight And Tomorrow
PLAY HERE TONIGHT
AGAINST UNTIDINESS
Varsity Losss To University Of
Vemont, And Trims
St. Michaels
Gertruds Swettman Has Charge
Of First Attack In War
With Dirt Today
C. C. N. Y. DEFEATED, 23 13
CHIEF CHAIRMAN
Oswego Normal will oppose
the
Purple and Gold tonight, The teams will
clash on the local court and State is
favored to run away with the junior
teachers. State had little trouble in conquering the Oswego hoys last season and
should do it just as handily this year.
The regular team will he on hand in
full force to add another victory.
The University of Vermont trimmed
State at Burlington before the recess,
39-13.
Price, elongated guard of the
Vennonters, ran wild, scoring ten field
goals in spite of the efforts of three
Stale players to stop him. The Burlington paper announced, " I'lie Green and
S. NILES HAIGHT
Gold won their first test of the season
For the first time in the history of
against the New York State College.
The game was not as lopsided as the he State College Dramatics and Art
score shows and the visitors were within association, the annual production of the
striking distance until the last minutes of three one-act plays by the elementary
play."
The Burlington Times stated, "Kite- Iramatics class, will be given two suczynski was the star of the visitors and cessive nights, Heretofore, the plays have
met with great favor with the fans who been presented one night only, hut this
called him Tony. That's easier to say." year, it was decided to attempt the double
State avenged the defeat at the hands
performance.
There is still another
of the University of Vermont by trouncing St. Michael's the following iii'.'bt at feature of this year's presentation, and
Wiuooski Park, 42-29. The local team that is the digression from the traditional
was outplayed in every point of the game "election of a play-house. The class
and only threatened State once in the has always chosen the Vinceutian Instisecond half, when St. Michael's rallied
only to have State run away completely tute on Madison avenue in which to act.
This year, however, the new ball of the
to an undisputed victory.
The varsity basketball team achieved Historical and Art Society offered devictory again Saturday night for the lightful possibilities to the enterprising
fourth time this season, when it defeated class, and was selected after due conthe Brooklyn branch of College of the
City of New York, 2?> to 13, in the gym- sideration. The hall has only half the
eating capacity of the Vinceutian Instinasium.
It was the visitors' first defeat this ute,
and this fact originated the idea
season, C. C, of N. Y. having taken the if giving the plays a two-night run.
measure of Jamaica Teachers, who vanquished State in its opening game, and
Everyone has been most kind in londof Brooklyn Polytechnic, which is booked ng assistance to boost the plays, and
as a Purple and Gold opponent next
mo-th
C. C. N. Y.
State won the game by straight basketfb
tp
ball with nothing but a few exceptional
fp
shots to enliven the contest. Like every Gobes. If
3
5
1
other outfit the varsity have met on Dwarkin, If
0
2
1
their home court this season, the New Seligman, c
1
3
1
Yorkers were outplayed on the floor. Greeuberg, lg
0
0
0
Only their inability to take advantage :of f-opp, lg
1
3
1
m a r y safe shots kept the Albany players Swanton, lg
0
0
0
from rolling up a high score.
0
0
Hunt, rg
0
State used two freshmen and three
sophomores in the game.
Totals
4
5
13
The summary:
S U M MARY
STATE
S o r e at half time—State, 14; C. C.
fb
fp
tp N. Y., 7. Referee—Humphries. TimeHornung, If
2
1
5 keeper—Slocum,
Fouls
committedCarr, rf
2
0
4 State, 10; C. C. N. Y., 10. Time of
H e m e y , rf
0
0
0 periods—Twenty minutes.
Nephew, c
3
1
7
Griffin, lg
0
0
0
Rensselaer high school scored a victory
Kershaw, lg
0
0
0 iver State College freshmen by a score
Kuczynski, rg
3
1
7
of 30 to 11 on the Rensselaer court,
10
Tola
3
23 Saturday night.
DeWITT C. ZEH
special acknowledgment is made to Mr.
Theodore llampcl, who has been right
hand man to the props committee, in obtaining the "unobtainable necessaries"
for the plays. Thanks are extended to
T. Frederick II. Candlyn, in whose
charge the music program is.
Mr.
Candlyn has arranged for violin solos
between the first two plays, and student
singing between the last two. Due to
the abnormal seat sale, it was decided to
dispense with the services of the college
orchestra, which usually functions at
such affairs, to make room lor the dramatic enthusiasts of Albany and for
College students.
Committees and assistants include:
house, Louise Gmin; advertising, Bertha
Zajan; stage set and lighting, Helen
Zimmerman; props, Sara Barkley; costumes, Mildred Graves
Stage manager
is Constance Baumann • prompter, Sara
Barkley; secretary-treasurer, Ruth McNtitt.
NAMED
Slate College has declared war on din
and its ally, waste paper.
Hostilities
begin today with a chapel program of
which Gertrude Swettmann is in charge
The first intensive drive against the
enemy will last one week, until Friday,
January 22. If this docs not result in
the utter defeat of untidiness, a year's
campaign will he begun, with other drive*
at intervals.
At the head of the forces for cleanli
ness are Lorcna Shaffer, '26, and her
assistant, Elizabeth Milminc, '26, who
bear the proud titles of Chief Charwomen. The other leaders (members o(
the clean-up committee) a r c :
1926Mildred toman, chairman; Alice Gooding, Mildred Melrose, Rachel Wcstfall
Herbert
Camnbell;
1927—Georgiann.i
Maar, chairman; Katbcrine Blenis, Hilda
Saar, Edwin Van Klecck, Helen Tompkins; 1928—Margaret Stoutenburg, chairman ; Leah Cohen. Dorothy Lasher,
Dorothy Watts, Richard Jensen; 1929—
Mary Hart, chairman; Ruth Watts,
Mildred Lansley. Caroline Schlcich, and
Robert ShilliiHaw.
The duty of the committee is not, a?
(he leaders' title mMit imply, to scruh,
floors or wash windows, They are to s;
influence student opinion that wasV
napers will not be scattered over th
floors, that people standing in the cor
ridors will not leave behind them tin
print of the sole of one •dioc when brae
ing themselves against the wall. etc. fi
movement for the cleaning out of locker
will also be started
On January 22, the last day of Clean
up Week, a tour of Inspection will bi
made by Dr. Abram R. Rrubacher, Dea-'
William IT. Metzler, and Miss Anna E
Pierce, to judge the results of the d r i v e
President Rrubacher has suggested that
the committee hold office for the re-'
of the year, and institute another Clean
up Week if it proves necessary.
WILL PUBLISH JUNIOR
EDITION JANUARY 29
The junior issue of the State College
News will be published January 29, two
weeks from today.
The issue, which
appears annually in Junior Week, will be
printed on the Friday before- Prom this
year, instead of on the day of Prom, as
formerly. This will make it available to
the larger number of students who have
finished their examinations by the end of
the second week and have gone home.
As it is customary, the 'issue will
feature the news of the junior class, particularly Prom and the junior luncheon.
The regular editorial staff of the News
will turn over its work for the week to
the juniors.
The juniors who will edit the paper
arc:
Julia Fay, Sara Barkley, Katharine
Blenis, Louise Gunn, Edwin Van Klecck,
'' lielma Brezee, Bertha Zajan, and Ruth
McNutt.
G. A. A. H O L D S F R O L I C
Friday evening, G. A. A. entertaine
the faculty at a post-Christmas frohV
T h e Christmas spirits emerged fron>
about the fireplace and danced awa>
their real feeling, beautifully interpreted
by Ruth McNutt and Bertha Zaian. T h e
children came in, too, Ruth Empie, a
little girl, and Georgianna Maar, a little
boy, and recited
Christmas poems.
Christmas carols were sung by a crowd
of choristers, Anne Hojroyd, Dorothy
Rowland, Ruth Empie, Ethel Chippendale, Florence Gillct, Hilda Saar, Kathleen Doughty, and Mildred Loman. The
guests were further entertained by group
games directed by Mildred Wilson anil
Leah Cohen. Music for dancing wa i
furnished by Dorothy Rabiebii the pi""
and Carolyn Josslyn on ' the v i l l i '
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JAYUA.BY 15, uwrt
Page Two
EflTAIUSHEO IY THE CLASS OF 1918
COLLEGIATE AMERICA
BACKS WORLD COURTTHE
Collegiate America is behind the enNo. IS trance of the United States into the permanent court of international justice, S.
Published weekly during the college Miles Haight, president of the senior
year by the Student Body of the New class, declared Friday, addressing the
York State College for Teachers at junior-freshman assembly. Haight reported as the college's delegate to the
Albany, New York.
1
recent national collegiate world .court
The subscription rate is three dollars conference
at Priiicctoii uniper year. Advertising rates may be had versity, A conducted
similar report was made by
on application to the business manager.
William J. Dclchauty, the other delegate,
lo the sophomore-senior assembly.
Editor-in-Chief
'I he great majority of the representaHARRY S. GODFREY, '26
tives of 250 American college were in
Managing Editor
favor of the court, but nevertheless they
EDWIN VAN KLEECK, '27
were won by the personality of Clarence
Harrow, the noted criminal lawyer who
Business Manager
was one of the principal speakers against
HELEN E. ELLIOTT, '26
the tribunal, Haight said, "While the
Subscription Manager
other speakers appeared dressed in 'soup
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
and fish' and with sparkling bosoms,
Harrow mounted the platform with a
Copy Reader
.aiit ol old tweed, his tie hanging loose
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
and
his hair all over his face.
Assistant Business Managers
Later, students are to vote on the
MYRA HARTMAN, '27
question of the college's entrance into
HELEN ZIMMERMAN, '27
the national student federation which has
Assistant Subscription Manager
been formed at the conference by college
THELMA TEMPLE, '27
and university men and women.
Assistant Copy Reader
JULIA FAY, '27
DEAN PIERCE VISITS N. Y.
Associate Editors
Dean Anna E. Pierce spent Christmas
Sara Barkley, '27
Louise Gunn, '27 vacation in New York
Most of her
Katharine Blenis,
Anna KorT '26 time was spent at the headquarters of
Joyce Persons, '26
the Women's Foundation for Health, of
which she is a member of the board of
Reporters
Leah Cohen
ElizabethMacMullen directors, and of the executive committee,
also chairman of the endowment
Thelma Brezee Lela Van Schaick
committee. Tamblyn and Brown, who
Virginia Higgins Kathcrine Saxton
helped the alumni organization in their
Adelaide Hollister Dorothy Watts
Residence Hall campaign, are cooperatElnah Krieg
Bertha Zajan
ing with the Foundation to secure an
endowment. The Women's Foundation
for Health stands for maintained or
YOUR DUTY - DO IT!
positive health for women. It is a naOur College has declared war on dirt! tional organization, the aim of which is
The intensive campaign begins today and a health examination for every woman
continues for a week when, on January and girl in America. This includes not
22, the student committee will make a only a physical examination, but also the
tdur of inspection. Whether they find study of the individual's occupation, her
the halls and classrooms tidy or untidy nervous reaction to it, and either relationdepends upon you. If each student makes ships affecting her health. The organization is connected with many educahimself a part of the campaign and tional institutions. At present it is
remembers that he must be careful not carrying on a cooperative movement
to throw paper on the floors but in the with the National Association of Deans
baskets intended for the purpose, if each of Women, for a survey of health servstudent refrains from writing on the ice in about 1200 schools, all over the
walls and from scratching the paint off United States. Another phase of Dean
them, there is no doubt but that the end Pierce's work was in connection with
the health committee of the association,
of the campaign will find our halls as of wh ch she is chairman.
clean as they should be. And what will
happen then? It depends upon you!
CALENDAR
Will you go back to the old habits of
Today
tearing paper and letting it fall on the
4 :00 P. M. Chemistry Club—Room
floors? Will you continue to make 160.
P. M. Basketball—Oswego
futurist pictures on the walls because
you have a pencil handy and nothing to Normal—Gym.
8:15 P. M Dramatics Clasi Plays
write on? This untidiness is due, not
Art Auditorium.
to a lack of pride in our College, but —Historical and
Tomorrow
rather to thoughtlessness. Permanent
P. M.
Basketball—Froshcleanliness depends upon you. What arc Union Frosh—Gym.
you going to do about it?
8:15 P. M. Dramatics Class Plays
—Historical and Art Auditorium.
Tuesday January 19
3 :00 P. M. Y. W. Meeting—Room
JOSEPH HENRY INITIATES
B.
. Nine new members were initiated into
4:00 P. M. Political Science Club
Joseph Henry Society Tuesday evening, —Room 101.
December 15. The itiitiates entertained
7:00 P. M Advanced Dramatics
with three skits, utilizing Harold Lloyd's
antics in "The Freshman," the profession Play—Auditorium.
Wednesday January 20
of teaching, and radio humor. Original
5:30-9:00 P. M. French Club
jokes were featured. Members added
were A. Hollister, M. Baker, R, Holmes, Banquet.
Thursday, January 21
M. Youngs, H. Elliot, C. Benson, I).
4:00 P. M, Menorah MeetingSmith, E. Travis, A. Arning, Constance
Room B.
Baumann headed the committee in charge,
4:00 P. M. Spanish Club—Room
aided by E, Krieg, H. Campbell and P.
li.
Mattice. Sandwiches, coffee, and cake
Friday, January 22
were refreshments, A program over the
P. M Basketball—Gym.
laboratory radio ended the evening.
Vol. X,
Jan. IS, 1926
CHRISTMAS IN CUBA
NEWS' SIGNED ARTICLE BY A FACUL TY MEMBER IS CONTRIBUTED THIS WEEK
BY
MISS ALICE TAYLOR HILL
Christmas in Albany probably consisted of Christmas trees and holly, zero
temperature, sleigh-rides and Santa Clans. The holidays in Cuba were characterized
by warm summer skies, August temperature, plenty of roast pig and guinea hen,
and the Nativity scene In every toy shop window.
It was difficult to believe that our friends at home were shivering while wc
were walking along the Malecou in the warm sunshine, clad In our thinnest summer
garb.
Those who celebrate Christmas in true Cuban fashion, attended the Christmas
Eve performance at the Tcatro Marti, where a very colorful Spanish Zaraiela was
playing all holiday week, Leaving the theatre at twelve or a little after, we took
a taxi to the Cathedral, to attend the Midnight Mass, where special music and the
altar decorated with natural Mowers were the principal features. The rest of the
night, or rather, early morning, was spent by the Orthodox in consuming all the
dainties that accompanied the roast pig banquet. The rest of Christmas day was
slept away in order to enable us to be in trim for the festivities of the evening,
when the cafes were filled with the holiday revelers.
The Christmas llowcr or poiusettia blossomed luxuriantly in everybody's garden, and Christmas roses were in abundance. Children posted letters to the Wise
Men in little booths on the sidewalk, erected for the purpose. Toy balloons Moated
n the sultry air of the gaily illuminated streets. Instead of drinking hot chocolate,
we enjoyed the cooling tropical drinks such as piiia fria and tamarindo. If it was
one's first visit to Havana, there were the trips to Morro Castle and Cabana Fortress, the Hershey sugar mill, the Jai-Alai games, the Corona cigar factory, and,
if one's vacation was long enough, the long train ride to Matanzas and the descent
into the Bellamar Caves, warranted to supply any number of thrills, especially
when the lights go out at a depth of 280 feet.
On those who love the sea, the view of the beautiful blue Gulf of Mexico,
with the surf breaking over the sea wall of Havana harbor, made a lasting impression, and the voyage, three days in each direction, afforded all the delights of
much needed rest and recreation, even though Cape Hatteras had an unpleasant
tendency to rob one of his appetite.
All those interested, should sign up early for the Ward Line 1926 Christmas
cruise to Cuba. The writer offers to chaperon the party.
•H
1926 WINS MOST G. A. A.
BOOK ENDS
i\ Weekly Review of Current Klclion by the
AWARDS IN GYM MEET Editor
of the Quarterly.
The G. A. A, gym meet was held Wednesday evening, December 16. Highest
class awards went to the seniors with
thirty-one points. The juniors were
second with thirty and one-third points,
the sophomores next with twenty-eight
and two-fifths points, and the freshmen
last with twenty-five and three-fifths
points. Only sophomores and freshmen were eligible for the individual
awards. First prize, the silver loving
cup, went to Evelyn Graves, '29,
who had a total of thirty-five and threequarter points. Second and third awards,
"lass numerals, were given to Dorothy
Lasher, '28, and Gertrude Hall, '29, who
had thirty-five and a quarter and thirtytwo and three quarter pints, respectively. Sylvia Ferber, '2'J, received
honorable mention with thirty and threequarter points.
The first influence of the Outing Club
on G. A. A.'s activities was shown by
'he sleigh ride Tuesday night. From
ive to seven, a jolly State crowd followed jingling hells about the city and,
returning to college had supper in the
cafe. The entire frolic, including eats,
was free of cost, which means, furnished
by G. A. A.
MISS PERINE ATTENDS
CORNELL CONFERENCE
Miss Eunice A. Perine attended a
joint meeting of the College Art Association of America and the Art and
Archaeology Association at Cornell university in Ithaca, New York, December
29, 30, 31. Delegates of college teachers
were present from all over the country,
Dr. Ferraud, president of Cornell, made
the address of greeting at the opening
banquet and Dean Lainge of Chicago
university gave the principal address.
WOMEN
By Booth Tark.'ngton
"If only someone could understand
me!" is a familiar quotation, overmuch
parodied and burlesqued these days,
when the discussion concerns women.
One cannot deny, of course, that the
narody has its point. Everyone has
heard this unhappy pla'nf of women
in love and out of love, women married
and not yet married, women overworked and bored for lack of something useful to do, women, in fact,
who have time to think about them'•clves—and what woman can not find
t'rnc for so absorbing an occupation?
That lonely woman needs someone to
understand her is the reason for the
rise and progress of psycho-analysis,
ft is the reason, also, that physicians
are so seldom poor; for sympathetic
understanding of one's inner self is
lcar even when expensive.
Booth Tarkington comes gallantly
'o the rescue of misunderstood feminin'ty, boldly throwing the gauntlet
'o psycho-analysis, new thought, and
'.he present smug generation'of family
'octors. I do not know in what school
Tarkington studied women, but the
proof that he has learned his lesson is
in the reading of "Women." I, for
one hope he has locked the laboratory
door behind him and closed his textbooks, I ha' e a nervous feeling that
he understands women far too well.
We ought to be allowed to keep a few
illusions about ourselves.
It isn't fair! Some clever woman
novelist ought to stop thinking about
her charming self long enough to
write a book entirely about men, just
by way of polite retort. For the men
in Tarkington's 'Women" are quite
too absolutely perfect, and long-suffering, and meek, and noble. It isn't
fair!
Olga G. Hampel.
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STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 15, 1920
COLLEGE NEWS
AT A GLANCE
The Music, Association is bringing the
Fbnzaly Quartet here February 16, at
Chancellor's Ifeil.
There vvill be no Music Club program
in lainu'.ry, but tlie chili is planning a
very interesting one for next month.
Also, a concert will be given in February
by the chorus and Ihc mixed chorus.
KOHN BROS.
" A Good Place to Buy"
SHOES
125 Central Ave. at Lexington
Open Evenings
YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION
5 Lodge Street
swimming Pool
Cafeteria
Gymnasium
Rooms
Clubs ^
Classes
For all women and girls.
V";
Pago Three
State iSpllege
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner" J fW 5— I =30
Announcement has been made of the
engagement of Gladys W. Sncll, '26, to
Dudley VV. Lansing of .Schenectady.
At the regular meeting of the Frencn
Club, it was do 'iclccl to postpone the
French play which had been scheduled
for January 20, to be given in connection
with a meeting of the Alliance Francaise
in the auditorium. The play will be
postponed indefinitely.
The subscription canvass among students and faculty for the Book of Verse
was very successful, Over five hundred
subscriptions were received in the two
weeks. Work is progressing on the book,
which will be delivered before the end
of the College year.
Gamma Kappa Phi expresses deep regret and extends sincere sympathy to
Elizabeth Frederick, '28, upon the recent
death of her father, William .1. Frederick.
Where motorized power Is virtually unknown, men toil yet nccomplish little. The United States has over one-quarter elect thai
horsepower installed per capita. Japan, lending country of the
Orient, hen but,04 horsepower. Electric shovel and storage battery
locomotive are shown at a completely electrified open-pit coalmine,
at Colstrip, Montana.
Miss Ethel Dullois, '27, attended the
meeting of the Purpose Commission of
the National Y. VV, C, A„ which was
held in New York last week-end.
Kappa Delta welcomes Marian Smith
into pledge membership.
Kappa Delta welcomes Edna Wolfe,
'28, and Helen Jewell, '27, into full
membership.
Work without Toil
More copies of the November issue of
the College Quarterly are still obtainable I
in the News office. Olga A. Hampel
editor-in-chief, has announced.
Ten or twelve hours a day toils the coolie. If he
carries all he can, he moves one ton one mile in
one day. For that he receives twenty cents.
G-E Motorized Power—
an ideal combination of
electric motor and control properly fitted to the
individual task—-is at
work the world-over,
relieving workers more
and more for better and
more profitable pursuits.
Dr. Caroline t'roasdale will speak on
"Examinationitis" at Y. VV, meeting,
Tuesday, at three o'clock, in Room B.
On Friday, January 8, Miss Ann Nee'y.
nl'ii ial representative of the American
Association of University Women, inspe ted State College,
Miss Ncely
vi iled practice teaching classes and the
resident halls.
'I lie purpose of the visit was the consideration of the recognition of State
(, i liege as a member of the association.
A new series of G-E advertisements showing
what electricity is doing
in many fields will be
sent on request.
Ask for Booklet GEK-1.
Newman house girls held an impromptu sleigh ride last Sunday afternoon.
Formation of the Kosciusko Club by
Poli;h students and students of Polnh
descent was announced today by a group
headed by Anthony Kuczyuski, '28.
The ptirpri'c will be to aid Polish students in "cttiir; acquainted with the College, with each other and with student
activities. Election of officers will take
place at the next meeting.
Girls varsity practice has started under
the leadership of Elizabeth Milmine,
captain, and Gorgmnna Maar, manager.
Three games will be played, two .with the
alumnae and one with Russell Sage.
Seniors, juniors, sophomores, out to
practice Moiuky and Wednesday, 3 to 6.
Watch the bulletin board!
Cheap labor! Yet compared with our American
worker, receiving at least twenty-five times as much
for an eight-hour day, the coolie is expensive labor.
In America we move one ton one mile for less than
one cent. The coolie, working by hand, accomplishes
little; while the American, with electricity's aid,
accomplishes much.
Plenty of electricity and cheap electricity —these
are two great advantages which America enjoys
ever the rest of the world. While our present generating capacity is 20,600,000 kilowatts, new developments call for 3,000,000 kilowatts more per year.
To college men and women— potential leaders—will
fall the duty of finding more and still more work
for electricity, with less and still less toil for our
workers. For the task is but begun!
GENERAL ELECTRIC
^BNERAl
ELECTRIC
COMPANY
SCHENECTADY
YORK
S T A T E C O L L E G E N E W S , J A N U A R Y 16, 1920
Page Four
JUNIOR GIRLS WIN
NEWMAN HOLDS T H R E E
DAY RELIGIOUS R I T E
The annual three-day Retreat of Newman Club took place the week-end of
January 8, at the Academy of the Holy
Names. Rev. Joseph A. Dunney gave
the conference. He spoke of the Magi
who sought the Christ Child with
promptness, diligence and perseverance.
He urged the members of the club to
follow the example of the Wise Men
of the East, and to give to Christ the
gifts of love, loyalty, and a true heart
which are symbolized by the gold, frankincense, and myrrh of the kings.
Girls' interclass basketball wound up
its season Monday, December 14, when
the juniors won the tournament, defeating the seniors, 31 to 22. This com
plcted the schedule, each class having
met every other class in six contests.
The juniors won five games, the seniors
four, and the sophomores three.
The line-up of the senior-junior game
follows; seniors, Shaffer, F.; Smith, F.;
Tuell, F.; Koen, F;; Raynor, G.; Lccming, G.; Wright, G.; Milminc, G.
Juniors, ,'Swcttmann, F.; DtiBois, F.;
Tompkins, F.; Maar, G.; Empic, G;
The Retreat closed with Mass at the
Florio, G.
Academy, Sunday morning, which was
followed by the second Quarterly Breakfast. Marion O'Connor, '26, president,
C0TRELL& LEONARD
introduced Father Dunney, who spoke
on the influence of the club members as
Albany, N. Y.
a student group and later as teachers.
Mrs. Mary E. McMaick represented the
Caps—Gowns—Hoods
alumnae. Mary Rhcin, '26, sang two
vocal solos accompanied by Agatha Flint,
FOR ALL DEGREES
'27. The breakfast committee included:
Gertrude Lynch, vice-president; Mary
Dardess, Marjorie Secger, Ruth Lockhard and Helen Tompkins.
FRESHMEN TO SKATE
TOMORROW AFTERNOON
The class of '29 lias planned a skating
carnival on the Wcstlahcl Hills skating
rink for tomorrow afternoon,
The rink lias been prepared for use
l>y the Wcstland Hills Improvement
Association, and is located on Homestead avenue, near Washington.
David Stnnrl, president, expects a
large crowd at the rink tomorrow for the
second party of the class of '29.
Get A Hair Bob At The
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
82 ROBIN S T R E E T
ITlodel College Skop
311 Central Ave.
Phone W-37»I-M
More f o r y o u r m o n e y
and the best Peppermint
Chewing Sweet for any money
STETSON SHOES
O P E N EVENINGS
(Drtental and (DatrJental
J. W. WEYRICH
Hestaurant
44 S T A T E S T R E E T
BARBER
Dancing Every Evening
11:3* P. M.
I A. M
umu
Special attention to college students
West Lawrence
The Gateway Press Shoe Repairing Shop
Your Printer
QUALITY PRINTERS
At your elbow—West 2037
336 Central Ave.
Fits hand *»
pocket and purse
Authentically
Collegiate in Style
"Clothes that are Distinctive
But not Expensive"
71 State St.
Silk . Woolen - Cotton
Hemstitching and Trimming
299 ONTARIO STREET
NEW HANDY PACK
CLOTHES OF QUALITY
E. A. Beaumont Co.
ECONOMY
DRESS GOODS STORE
MHGLEYS
l4SaPearlSlAlLuuj.ll.lJ. J
SHOE SHINE
MATTEO LAVENIA
Cor. Welt Lawrence & Western A ve
OUR P A R K B R A N C H
WELCOMES
the Accounts of State College
Students
NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
BANK and TRUST CO.
PARK BRANCH
200 Washington Ave.
Look (or Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack
g| on your Dealer'* Counter 07 fc
SMART CLOTHES
for
YOUNG MEN and MISSES
CLOTHING, HATS,
SHOES, HABERDASHERY
Steefel Brothers
Inc.
Cheerful Service Shop
STATE STATE
JOS. A. WALSH, Prop.
At Luries
Luggage
WOMEN'S PURE THREAD
UMBRELLAS
5* T o College Students
STOCKINGS IN ALL
"Albany's Gift Store"
WANTED COLORS
Gordon's Luggage Shop
Have you seen the new fancy
silk gloves, and the slipper
back hosiery, all shades.
$1.29
80-82 So. Pearl St.
SILK, FULL FASHIONED
Hosiery for
LINGEIUE—GKNTB
107 Central
Ave.
H. E. STAHLER'S RESTAURANT
GUSTAVE
FURNISHINGS
LOREY
Photographer
7 doors below
Lexington Ave.
130 State St.
Albany, N. Y
360 Broadway
Saratoga Springs
Photographer of Pedagogue, 1925
DEALEKS IN AND SHIPPERS OF
Candies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
Phone West 6448
"Ideal Service"
Care
Wm. McEwan Coal Co.
"THE BEST IS NONE TO GOOD"
307 CENTRAL cOVE. Albany N. Y.
People Who
HUDSON COAL COMPANY'S
L A C K A W A N N A COAL
'Ideal Food"
IDEAL RESTAURANT
George P. Hamp, Prop.
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
PHONE CONNECTION
Regular Dinner 40c
SPECIAL CHICKEN DINNER
11 a. m. to 3 p . m .
SUNDAYS 60c
ALBANY, N. Y.
Supper 40c
5 p. m, to 8 p m
MILLS ART PRESS
394-396 BROADWAY
Printers of
State
College
ALBANY, N. Y.
News
Main 2287
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