State College Ne%s CITY WILL AID STATE Attendance Record

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o
State College Ne%s
N E W YORK S T A T E C O L L E G E FOR T E A C H E R S
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
ALBANY, N. Y. MARCH 20, 1925
VOL. IX No. 21
$3.00 pef year
Attendance Record Social Life As
CITY WILL
SOPHS LOSE
At
State
Improves
Seen
By
Student
AID STATE
TO FRQSH
Help Promised In
Dormitory Drive
" T h e attendance record last term is
a noted improvement over the record
of past years," Dr Brubacher told
the student body in chapel last Friday, "Students, however, sometimes
fu order thai: Albany may have a | think there is no penalty for tmexciised
Absences without proper
chance to help in the Residence IIall absences.
Campaign, the city is going to have excuse go through the year and make
a campaign organization of its own. inevitable the result which follows al
It will he asked to contribute $15(1,000 tint end of the year—the loss of
of the $-100,000 being sought in the credit hours c o u n t i n g toward g r a d u Dr. Brubacher also spoke of
effort.
It is fell thai Albany will be ation."
willing to take part in the work be- I wo events scheduled for State College
cause of I be prestige that accrues in the near future, One, the round table
from bavin- the Slate College here, I conference which will call together
anil because it is estimated that the : teachers, principals, and superiiitencollege brings $1,0(10,000 annually to dents of twenty counties; tin' other,
! the presence of Mrs. Knapp, Secretary
the city.
| of Stale, who will -peak on "Political
'I he committees that are being
Activity in Relation to the H o m e . "
formed, and thai will have activeT h e freshman banner, guarded by
shares in (he campaign during the
intensive period from May 15 to J u n e seventeen freshman fellows, was displayed
on the platform as an a n n o u n c e 8, are as follows: Publicity Commit- I
tee, Lynn J o h n Arnold, Jr., c h a i r m a n ; | ment to lln' sophomore class that the
School Cooperation Committee, I Jr. haiiner light was on.
The
following
amendment
was
C. Edward Jones, chairman; Church
Cooperation Committee, Dr. Roelif voled on and passed by the student
Resolved that the student
H , B r o o k s ; Public Offices Committee, body:
Dr, Frank I'. Craves; Public Utilities b o d y by-laws he amended to r e a d :
" N o student clubs will be allowed
Committee, David II. Fleming; Mercantile Committee, Alfred J. Spor- to exist longer than one year from
borg; Citizens Committee, Elbert V. the date of its organization, which
Mulleneaux; Manufacturers Commit- date of organization shall be recorded
tee, Charles M. Stern, and W o m e n ' s with Myskania, without official recogCommittee, Mrs, Edmund N. Iluyck. nition by the president of the college
The Church Cooperation C o m m i t t e e and by Myskania.
Officers of unrecognized clubs will
and the Public Offices Committee are
already under way, and held meetings not be credited with points under the
point
system.
last Monday. T h e first of these plans
to enlist the aid of the churches of
the town not only to have a n n o u n c e m e n t s of the campaign and a p p c u s
made from each church, but also to
have financial solicitation in each
T h e Public Offices C o m m i t church
tee will canvas., the workers of the
city, state, and Federal Governments,
From March 20 to 28, conferences
will be held in the seven divisions of
alumni.
Division 1 is Albany and
vicinity; Division 2, Eastern New York
from
Greene County to C a n a d a ;
Division 3, Eastern New York, from
Greene County south, including Long
Isiaud; Division 4, Southwestern New
York along the Pennsylvania line;
Division 5, Northern New York from
Syracuse to the St. Lawrence River;
Division 6, United States outside of
New York S t a t e ; and Division 7,
foreign countries.
T h e r e seems to he a general complaint that there is not enough social
life al Stale.
W h a t is meant by
' s o c i a l life"—parlies, dances, g a m e s ?
Taken for granted that by social life
is m e a n t such, there is a general complaint, that throughout the colleges of
America, there is loo much social life.
T h e public declares that the m o d e r n
girl and boy go lo college lo play, to
enjoy that " s o c i a l life." Did not the
president of Hamilton College declare
that to be the opinion of the public?
In comparison with other colleges, our
mcinl life is less dazzling, O u r social
life consists of a few, large " g e t t o g e t h e r s " ; they are high notes in
ur college year—the Get Wise Party,
the J u n i o r - F r e s h m a n Parly fur the
freshmen, and other notable events
for the upper classmen.
W h o can
complain of the Dramatics
Class
plays, our Inspiring lectures, and concerts, and our g a m e s ?
Perhaps we
do n o t have a social life I hat is frequency itself, hut one which is on a
h i g h e r scale, as is our scholarship.
W e arc nol grinds, however, and
neither have we come to college io
d a n c e . W h a t m e a n s can be suggested
lo make our college life ideal in a
social way?
T h e person who complains of the spirit as dull, is dull
himself, for never has any social event
fellowship,
been
lacking in good
friendliness, and cheer. Social life at
S t a t e does not have lo be e x t r e m e ; il
is at its best now, when il neither
distracts the scholarly mind, nor disipates the frivolous one.
R O U N D T A B L E C O N F E R E N C E S , M a r c h 21, 1925, 10:00 A. M
DepartR o o m s ments
Topics
Leaders
And. Administration: ( I ) T h e Problem of Supervision
Dr. Avery W. Skinner
(2l A Proposed Scheme for Rating Dr. H o w a r d G. Burclge
R e g e n t s Papers
250
uiglish
Ill
Modern
Languages:
201 H i s t o r y :
100 Commerce:
'01 M a t h e matics:
STATE'S T H I R T Y - F I F T H A N N I 110
'
^SARY M A R C H 13
150
The
. ly-lifth anniversary of the
couvei.-iion
of the Stale
Normal 251
School into the State Normal College
was passed last Friday at State Col- 200
lege. O n March 13, 1890, the state
res • i l l ado pted a resolution author- 161
the trustees of the scl 100I to ore a state normal colli
Dr. Brubacher staled that no spe211
cial observances would
Hi
main date in the institution's history
is its founding under a legislative act
M;
idopte
1844.
;ie Norma
School began functioning in Dccem1844.
Latin:
Physics:
Chemistry:
Biology:
My
Uns< ved
Proh
Teacher 0" English
Prof. I-I, W. Haslim.
Eastern
Section
Modern
Language Association
E m p h a s i s and Viewpoint in Teaching Modern History
Prof.
R, W. Cr<
Union College
Prof. A. W . Rislev
A c c o u n t i n g for S e c o n d a r y
Courses
School
Current
Problems
reaching
Algebra and Geometry
Methods and Objectives in Latin
Symposium on D e m o n s t r a t i o n s a m I
E x p e r i m e n t s Helpful to S t u d e n t
Use of New Tests and T h e o r i e s
P r o b l e m s from Field and L a b o r a -
. A. Wilkes, Education
Department
Prof. H. Birchenough
Prof.
W . Richardson
Prof. C. 1 Hale
Prof. B. S. Brouson
Prof. C. A. Woodard
Home
EcoUp-to-date Clothing
Design
Junior
High
J u n i o r High School Problems
School
Luncheon Conference in the Coll'
c:
Rural Education, Speakers: Sena
Mrs
To be
'.velvn
Teachers College,
Columbia
Charles E. Finch,
Rochester
Cafeteria at 12:30
Ernest E. Cole, A s s e m h h
Banner Rush, Seen
By A Sophomore
Official action lo lorbid
banner
lights at college social functions in
the future and to substitute some other
time for th" battles is anticipated, as
a result of the melee at the soiree
Friday night when seventeen
freshmen raided the dance and slide the
banner from six sophomores after a
light in the middle of a crowd of college girls and guests which brought
out police reserves from the fifth precinct.
College authorities, including President Brubacher and Dean Pierce both
of whom were al the dance, are reported opposed to a repetition of the
row and next year il will he forbidden,
it is believed.
More than I wo hundred persons in
(•veiling clothes looked on as the freshmen " r u s h e d " north windows of the
college gymnasium and piled in on
the s o p h o m o r e s whom they o u t n u m bered three to one anil after a light
that lasted ten minutes, tore the big
green banner from the ceiling where
I he s o p h o m o r e s hail placed it ten minutes before.
Angered at the failure of their plan
to intercept the banner as it was being
brought to the dance, the yearlings
threw caution lo the winds and soon
after the sophomores had nailed it to
the ceiling essayed the successful "gate
crash."
In the midst of the melee of figures
in evening and work clothes police
rushed
into the gymnasium
and
winched the light progress, interfering
mly when they thought extreme violence was impending. During the row
fuses controlling the hall's lights were
removed a n d the room was t h r o w n into darkness, under cover of which the
invaders carried the banner to a winI ;w and later in full light escaped withi. O n e sophomore man pursued five
of the freshmen and tried to wrest the
banner from them.
According
to
spectators,
some
.reshmen invaders did not discriminate between police and sophomores
and one of the hoys nearly succeeded
in w r e n c h i n g a night stick from a patrolman's hand.
Police patrolled the
building for Ihe remainder of the
dance. T h e orcll stra, which was playing when the sortie was made, continued for some time.
T h e attack had been anticipated,
but the students of the smaller class
had been unable to muster enough
men to ward it off. The banner was
b r o u g h t into the building in a musician's case and lay concealed in it for
an hour before it w.is put up.
T h e rush was the culmination of a
series of outbreaks Friday between the
two micl'.-rcl.'i :ses. At noon following
the d e m o n s t r a t i o n in Asseml>\y, a vioIcul
tool place hetween
;ug factious in the m e n '
locker room and about the same time
indents mistook sorority banners for
Mi
Hill Clli
them.
rage Two
#taft QtiiU?ip Jfaroa
D
19
pii
ha!
m(
I'm
Tc
tin:
(Hi
tim
Coj
Ro
2 t
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 20,. 1925
ON THE BYRNE BILL
SOPHISTICATION
O n e kind of person fascinates m e :
the person whose simplicity and seemVol. I X
March 20, 1925
N o . 21
ing naivete parodo.xcs, in. this day of
sophistication, extraordinary knowlPublished weekly during the college
edge and wisdom. H a v i n g , then, conyear by the Student Body of the New
sciously recognized in that philosophy
York State College for Teachers at
a goal of attainment, I have naturally
Albany, New York.
wondered how college affects it. _
E v e r y w h e r e the common criticism
The subscription rate is three dollars
of the college graduate is " he knows
per year, Advertising rates may be had
Miss Mabellc Townsencl of Hi-. -.
too
much."
We pass it by lightly,
on application to the business manager.
ster, New York,, spent the week-: r
telling
ourselves
individually
that
a
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
proper perspective of the u n a t t a i n a b l e at the Alpha Delta Oinicron hm-.,
in the hands of the editors before Monvastness of knowledge has given us as the guest of her sister, \f ; ,rj
day of the week of publication.)
a proper humility. W h a t we fail to Townsend, '27.
Editor-in-Chief
see is our propensity to measure ourEleanor Gamby, '22, visited coil,
KATHLEEN E. F U R M A N , '25
selves not with the immensity of the
Managing Editor
universe, but with the smallncss of Tuesday, March 10.
HARRY S. GODFREY, '26
our associates; and, finding our own
Kappa Delta Rhp is thinking sen
Business Manager
abilities tip the balance, to puff up otisly of turning the fraternity ln.u>
R U T H BARTON, '25
ourselves with pride.
T h a t is my into a hospital. During the last > >
greatest criticism; we fail to main- weeks
Subscription Manager
William
Clarke, '27, LyL
tain an intellectual equilibrium by a Roberts, '25, Francis Griffin, '28, am
GWENDOLYN JONES, '25
high standard of comparison.
J o h n Gainor, '26, have composed ih
Assistant Business Managers
T h e r e is in this regard a n o t h e r frat's quota at the Albany Hospiial
Lois MOORE, '25
fault found the world over, the fault while Gilbert G a n o n g , '28, and Kah>!
E L I S E BOWER, '25
of " a little knowledge.''
T h e criti- HarHs, '27, recuperated at their hoi
Assistant Subscription Manager
Chi Sigma T h e t a
welcomes
cism is not applicable lo freshmen and
H E L E N BARCLAY, '26
sophomores alone that religion is— pledge m e m b e r s Catherine O ' l . c u
Associate Editors
'26,
and
Gertrude
Lynch,
'26.
not vehemently denied as so great a
FLORENCE PLATNKR, '25
subject deserves to be by those who
Alpha Delia Oinicron entertaii • .
T h e stale alreay has seen the need oppose it—hut gently scorned. T h e y
H E L E N ELLIOTT, '26
and
Mrs.
VVoodard
of expansion, for it has granted $75,- have made some such important dis- Professor
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
000 for work on the foundations for covery as the improbability of J o n a h ' s dinner on W e d n e s d a y evening, Main
MARGARET B E N J A M I N •26
the new buildings.
Last year a hill aquatic feat, and, with that for basis, 11.
Reporters
Miss Eleanor Gellrich oi I'mi
to get the money for the buildings contemptuously brand religion as a
SARA BARKLEY, '27
propel" failed because, it since has been kind of illusionary fool's paradise, nec- keepsie, was the week-end gne-.i
JULIA F A Y , '27
stated, "the state could nol afford the essarily including in it such poor, her sister, Louise Gellrich, '27, ai tin
KATHRYN ISLENIS, '27
money."
This year that bill is up credulous souls as Dante, Erasmus, and Alpha Delia Oinicron house.
A N N A ICOFF, '26
lor passage again in revised form. If Milton. They read the " Everlasting
Managing editor of a Sunday in •
EDWIN V A N KLEECK, '27
the slate still is unable to afford the N a y and Yea," as sonorous pieces of p a p e r with a circulation running in
LOUISE G U N N , '27
money the college must continue its well
live
figures is the record of Jen.
written literature which
the
work under influences which President world has done well to preserve. It K. Walker, '25.
Annoiiiiecineni .-.
A. K. Drubacher has described as is not applicable to only freshmen and made this week by the publisherON KEEPING WELL
petrifying'
and
'deadening.'
the
Sunday
Telegram
that Mr. Wall i
Last week there came to the ears
lophomorca that "loose conduct" is
S t u d e n t s at the University of South considered clever, a sign of worldly will succeed the retiring nianae.in
(if Doctor Cronsdalc a r u m o r to the
Dakota are asking whether it is more wisdom; that ignoring shabbily dressed ,'ditor this week.
T h e posi i- in
effect that an epidemic had broken worthwhile to he crazy than to be
most important editorial position on ',.
out in college. T h e r u m o r did not learned, since they discovered that people is a mark of gentility; that paper.
specify what form the epidemic took, South Dakota has spent more for the "Missouri" incredulity sets one apart
T h e final result of Senior Class h i
hut concerned itself with a more pleas- care of its insane anil feeble-minded from fools, incompetent.-;, and ignor- elections has been announced
iainotises; that a little unsavory slander
ant subject—the length of I he vaca- in the last forty years than for the
Prophet.
Mary
Dris. . 11
removes the relator from a m o n g the follows:
tion which woukl he forthcoming. Dr. maintenance of its two major insti- pious goody-goodies to tin; ranks of Poet, Ruth Moore; Historian, Ed ill
Parents "those
Cronsdalc immediately thwarted all tutions of higher learning.
who know." Anyone,
after lliggins; Testator, Kathleen luiriii.ni
plans for a vacation, by the following and teachers of New York state might merely a glance at his neighbors, can Councillor, Mary Bull.
Mathematicians from .Albany. Si <•
statement: " T h e r e is an epidemic of ask if trees and horses are more add to the list.
ncctady, and T r o y were in Alb.tm
mild influenza about college.
T h a t worthwhile than public school chilI do not intend lo set forth a moral,
dren,
for
this
state
spends
more
on
last Friday to hear Professor Sil.
is no cause for alarm. It does mean
lint outthe forestry college and the veterinary or phrase an exhortation,
man of D a r t m o u t h lecture on "In
we all need more fresh air.
March
medical college than it does for Slate side (he leaching profession there may
Professor Si 1 \ < : •
represents (lie peak of long winter College and the ten state normal be a place m (he world for sophisti- gent Series."
has made a special study of fiver:.''..:
cated people.
days spent indoors, and with our schools combined,
series. H e is a friend of Docloi :
overcrowded condition, we are bound
M. [?. !!., '26.
T h e state intends to appropriate
Porte who is responsible for hito suffer to some extent from faulty the money sometime.
It is sound
pearanee here, Harvard being tin
ventilation. The best way of avoiding economy to do so now when the need j
other college at present at which
influenzal colds is to spend every is very great. T h e land for the build- I
scheduled to lecture.
foundation
possible minute in the open air.
ft iugs is purchased, the
A m o n g the casualties reported ; •
,7
money
is
assured.
T
h
e
r
e
should
be
is not advisable to spend much time
riday night is a much battered
in the locker rooms or in other parts no delay this year in voting the rest
by President Rrubacher.
W i n n i!
of the building where m a n y people of the funds."
lights went out, some girl found I
On Friday evening, March 27, a a means of giving " b r o a d " vent I"
'
are congregated in a small space.
STATE
E X T E N D S S Y M P A T H Y unique opportunity will be afforded wrath. Since she is modest wi v.
T h e first spring sunshine is here
to State to attend live big acts of hold her name, hut she is a soph
Funeral services for Mr
Let us wrap up well and go into the
Vnna T. superior vaudeville in combination
All but the new seal stationers
open. -If necessary let us take our Futtercr, m o t h e r of Miss Agnes E. with a one-act play. This program
books with us. If it is too cold to Futtcrer, director of dramatics, who is presented by G. A. A.' for the bene- be sold at bargain prices nexl 1v.
Lay
in a supply for the remain.
died
early
Saturday
morning,
were
sit still in the open and study, let us
fit of the Dormitory Fund.
this year and next summer.
become peripatetics and walk while conducted Monday m o r n i n g at the
T h e offering comprises jazz, sorcery,
h o m e 444 Clinton Avenue, Albany, fantasy, and drama. The latest colGreat
bargains in H o m e Fcom
we study."
and at St. Patrick's R o m a n Catholic legian song hits will he rendered by books also next week. Nothine
r
Church.
Mrs. Futterer had IK en ill a trained band of ukelele performers, one dollar! Values up to tinlars,
so
no
H
o
m
e
Economics
girl
STUDENT COMMENT
lor many years. Her husband, who j T h e very newest Stale College jokes
died several years ago, was a teacher will he related bv Gertrude
afford to neglect this opportunii
T h e r e is a general opinion around
Olds,
T h e rental list of books is o "
I Madeline Hold i; .
the college that the student comment of music in the Albany schools.
m charge of a pro- ally growing. As excellent pre '
The
reading
of
"The
Great
Divide,"
|
^
r
a
m
of
modern
page of our weekly paper is s o m e t h i n g
song ami dance,
irranged for Sat urday, was postponed j A c r o b a t s are an essential part of a readi
is suggested Don
to be labeled as " d r y " and "Hot worth
indefinitely by th
field Fisher's beautiful translan
Dramatics and 'vaudeville perfo rmance, and G. A. A.
reading."
ff this is true; if our Art Association. <
Pap:
\i
ccrest
sympathy
j
will
be
if Christ.
exception. Bertha 7., a
weekly comment section docs not disis extended by the student hod y and and D o r o t h y Hoyt will feat
, » of th e rental hooks may he I
cuss school problems which are vitally I he
lire
as
in!
acuity of State Colic
week
for
1
lo Miss dividual tnnibl
wenty-hve cents
i m p o r t a n t to college students, every
'Utterer in her recent bereav
D ryads, a witch, and a fairy
college person should bear his share
will
cast their
iver the audience in | I heater-goer,
of the criticism. T h e student comLlewellyn Gill, I
a delightful fai '.asy, directed by Ruth ! Qninn. and Dorothy' llovi
N o hook
ut'll h
ment' page is yours to do with it as
Me.Vult.
Will give you the fti
you wish. Contributions are willingly
diaractern in (he plav
tud
Th
if (In
accepted, not only from members of
knowledge
Unifc
-lied by E. M; nnn Scbrader. play,
T h a t the '25 " P e d "
the News staff but from any one who
ha
)f th
arrangement*
startlin
twist
wishes io contribute.
capture general admission will he tweii
ic imagination of the m
cents
ir reserved
T h e following plea for adoption of
the B y r n e bill was published recently
in Albany, over the signature of E d mund H . Crane, president of the student association and chairman of the
student legislative committee, s u p p o r t ing the bill:
" T h e Byrne bill, now before the
legislature to a p p r o p r i a t e $250,000 for
c o m m e n c i n g work on the three building addition to State College for
Teachers, is one which should receive
the s u p p o r t of every legislator. T h e
fact that the college must expand immediately or continue in its present
starvation condition has been proved
by figures and opinions beyond question of doubt.
T h e college is fifty
per cent overcrowded, resorting in
s o m e cases to antiquated methods of
leaching because of lack of m o n e y for
more faculty m e m b e r s and space for
them to hold their classes; in other
words, compelled to teach by methods,
known to be pedagogical ly unsound,
y o u n g men and women who, in turn,
will fill the teaching positions in high
schools everywhere in the state,
Vaudeville Will Be
Staged by G. A. A.
March 27
SE
307
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 20, 1925
?
SUCCESS ASSURED
Albany will be able to raise its $150,000 share of the Residence Hall fund,
according to the belief of Charles Gibson, vice chairman of the campaign
committee. Mr. Gibson sailed for
Europe Saturday, but will return to
Albany before the campaign ends.
"I am certain," said Mr. Gibson,
"that Albany will see its duty in this
matter, and work and give for the
erection of the Residence Hall. It has
been a source oi continual regret to
Albanians that the girls who are to
be the teachers of the children of the
coming generation in New York state
should be subjected to the tribulations
that await so many of them when they
come here to attend college.
As I look over the calendar it
seems to me there will be a continuous campaign in Albany from now
till mid-June. But of all the objects
none is more deserving than State
College.
"] am told the Residence Hall will
be both beautiful and useful, that it
will be provided with every modern
convenience of light, air, and comfort,
All of these things should be at the
disposal of these young women who
come here as. guests of the state and
of the city.
With Albany giving $150,000 or
more, and the alumni adding $150,000
more to the $100,000 already raised for
the $400,000 Residence Hall Building
Fund, it should not be very long before
wc can point with pride to another
achievement in the Capitol District."
The church cooperation committee
has been organized and conducted its
first meeting Monday in the form of a
dinner in the Fort Orange Club. The
Rev. Dr. Roelif H. Brooks is chairman. Assisting him are the Rev.
Dr. William Herman Hopkins, the
Rev. H. G. Hagaman, the Rev, Richard E. Locke, the Rev. C. E, Frontz,
the Rev. Charles S. Hager, Rabbi Marius Ransom, the Very Rev. Charles
C. VV. Carver and the Rev. David Lee
Jamison.
The purpose of the committee is to
obtain the active support and cooperation of all Albany churches and religious societies.
Methods of procedure will be
discussed and it is expected the
committee will choose a Sunday
during the intensive period of the campaign from May 15 to June 8, when
the campaign may be announced in
churches.
By unanimous agreement the board
of directors of the Albany Chamber of
Commerce, at its most recent meeting,
approved the coming campaign.
The resolution said:
Whereas, the New York State College for Teachers has made an excellent record as one of the leading institutions uf the east, and
Whereas, its alumni, over a period
of years have been most influential in
those movements tending to the
growth and upbuilding of our various
communities, and
Whereas, the college is both a_ cultural and business asset in providing
free tuition and expending approximately $1,000,000 yearly in Albany, and
Whereas, the alumni are now engaged
in raisine i $400,000 Residence Hall
Building Fund to construct a students'
dormitory, so urgently needed properly' to house girl students under
favorable social and moral conditions.
Be it therefore resolved, that the
Albany Chamber of Commerce heartily
endorse and commend this movement
to the public as a worthy object and
express to the Residence Hall buildiing funds its desire and willingness
to cooperate in every possible way to
make the movement a signal success.
^ " ^ - ^ v , , . , : : ; . , ; . -
,"•
College Cullings
p O O T B A L L will be dropped as a
sport at State next fall. The Athletic Council has not acted on the
question but the opinion of the college's leading athletes is that continuance of inlcr-scholastic football in
September will be unwise. The need
all along has been not for better men,
but for more men so that two teams
each with a string of substitutes can
lie maintained. Without scrubs with
whom to practice excellence is practically impossible.
In basketball
where the squad is much smaller this
is not so necessary. A longer court
schedule and the beginning of basketball practice a month before the usual
date will be possible if football is
abandoned.
Basketball is the most popular
sport here and has always
proved the most successful,
From the financial viewpoint it
is less expensive than football.
Dormitory life in Whittier Hall,
home of live hundred girl students of
Columbia University is interestingly
described by Miss Winifred Ctllbcrtson, an alumna of Geneseo State Normal School in the school's newspaper.
Her article says:
"Getting acquainted with 500 girls
who live in one dormitory is facilitated
by the seating arrangements in each
of the ten dining rooms in Whittier
Hall.
One gets acquainted with the members of one's own class by being seated
first of all with seven others at table.
After a brief period of acquaintanceship, congenial groups organize "home
tables" of eight. Each two weeks,
however, a change is affected by lot.
In this fashion each student spends
two weeks at the "home table" and
two weeks at other tables where she
makes new contacts.
Whittier Hall is intended for women students of the University under
24 years of age, although apparently
some older students and some doing
graduate work also gain admission.
Comparatively few restrictions are
placed on the social life of the students. They are required to sign a
register when leaving and returning
to the dormitory and for week-end
absence must fill out a slip and inform
the assistant welfare director. They
may not be out in the evening later
than 9:30 without asking permission
or letting tneir destination be known.
Specal arrangements have to be made
for cominvr in late.
No definite rules respecting absence
from or tardiness in arriving at classes
seem to be in force, as it is expected
that all students will voluntarily attend on account of their interest in
the work which they are doingStudents living in Whittier Hall pay
$462 yearly for a single room, board,
and a certain amount of laundry. The
tuition amounts to about $250 a year.
In addition to these fixed expenses
there is a tax of one dollar a semester
for the support of student activities.
These include an informal dance
everv Friday afternoon, open to all on
payment of a small fee, usually ten
cents, and various club activities.
Each major subject has its own club
so that students are brought together
on the basis of their common interests. The clubs meet weekly for suppers and dances, and sometimes present programs in the Horace Mann
auditorium."
Page Three
Jul, Il'achler, who coached
Stale College's basketball in the
1916-17 season and who now
has the same position at Harvard has brought his team out
7i ith eleven wins in thirteen
names this year. The year he
was here Slate trimmed A'. /'. /.
and St. John's and held Colgate
to a low score.
Education by hypnotism is a far-off
possibility and not to be thought of
seriously in the opinion of Dr. George
A. S. Painter, professor of psychology
and philosophy. Discussing the reported discovery of a method to hypnotize students into winning Phi Beta
Kappa keys for excellence in scholarship, Dr, Painter expressed doubt as
to the practicability of the process,
The discovery is attributed to a
graduate student in the psychology
department of Harvard University, of
which Dr. Painter is an alumnus,
"I do not take much stock in the
strange stories of this kind which appear periodically," Professor Painter
•aid. "Ilynotism is so subtle a phenomena that we cannot say just what
is possible but the idea of Inpiring
greater scholastic zeal by use of it
seems improbable."
CTATE COLLEGE is a million dollar
asset for Albany yearly, according
to estimates of the Albany Chamber of
Commerce. The group figures the college spends this much money in the city
each year. One million dollars is a
sizeable item, even in Albany's balances.
Between a quarter and a fifth of it is
itate money that goes to the support of
the college. The rest comes out of the
students' pocket. One thousand students
here nine months plus eight hundred
summer session students here six weeks
spend $750,000, the figures would indicate. All this should make interesting
reading to advertisers in college publications. The college has been here
eighty years, The first year it spent
le s than $50,000. The cost has been
I'oing up ever since. Since 1917 the
liidcit budget has gone from $4,000 to
$11,000, If someone could estimate the
gold which has been collected from all
vcr the state and circulated in Albany
broiigh the papa-student-slorekeeper
route, the aggregate would be tremendous.
Next year the cost of operation ivill go up $30,000. Add to
that the probable proportionate
increase in student spendbigs,
$75,000 for foundations for
three new buildings, $250,000
more for the first third of the
work on them, $400,000 more
for a dormitory, and the total
will be nearly two million
dollars.
VARSITY TO PLAY R. P. I.
A change in the varsity baseball
schedule substituting a regular game
with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
for the practice contest originally announced has been made by Harry Rude,
manager. The game will be played May
30 at Troy.
4.——The Rush As Seen
By'4 IffesShman
At approximately/, H):LX,oif Llhe
evening oi Friday tlfe thictexyitn of
March, thirteen male menibcfsyof vjjic
class of '28 wrested a green* and vymjtc
banner from the masculine portion fjft
the sophomore class which was prcs*r v
cut, three policemen, and two janitors! '^'//t
After all other business of chapel
//•'
was over, on the "hoodoo" day, '28
F*%
Haunted its s h i n i n g b a n n e r of y e l l o w
and white in the faces of '27, and
dared them to "try and get it." The
men of '28 then followed up a trail
which they thought might lead to
the highly-coveted sophomore banner,
but found, when on their way to Schenectady, that it was only a sorority
banner that they had found." They
returned it in due time. Later, with
a little persuasion not wholly lingual,
'28 devested '27 of its coats for a matter of a mere couple of hours; at the
end of that time the garments were
returned, having been replaced in the
interim by overcoats and the like.
The next event of the day deserves
a new paragraph.
"Gangway!" '28 was "rushing" the
gym! Not more than thirteen seconds had elapsed before thirteen of
the men of '28 had shot through a
window of the gym, down the stairs,
and onto the floor,
Immediately,
policemen's clubs began to land none
too softly on the apparently undesired
freshmen, to which fact many of them
can bear witness. A hammer flashed
threateningly in mid-air; '27 tried to
stand its ground; janitors endeavored
to throw out some of the freshmen;
but most of the defense was of little
avail. In this corner, one sturdy
freshman all but pulled a night stick
from the hands of one of the reserves
from the Filth precinct, Here, a group
of freshmen tried to raise a ladder in
order to tear down the prize. There,
another one leaped from four to live
feet straight into the air toward the
banner, and barely missed it. Meanwhile. '28, '27, policemen, and janitors formed the best melee that Slate
College has seen in years, with the
women of the sophomore class, their
partners, and others as witnesses of
the fracas. Finally, three freshmen
pushed an iron and leather gym
"horse," with lightning speed, to a
position directly under the banner.
Immediately the sophs tried to push
it back from where it came, but—a
summer breeze against Gibraltar!
Now one daring freshman took a flying leap over the backs of the nearest sophs, paused during a split second on the "horse," leaped again
toward the banner,, and crashed to
the floor with the quarry in his hand!
Then followed blackness in the entire gym while another freshman
threw the switch that plunged the
place into darkness.
During the "lost" feeling which ensued, '28 dragged the prize to a window at the south side of the building
and, after making a few attempts to
pass one end of it up to one of their
members at the top of the exercising
bars, succeeded. During the struggle
around the window, several more
blows were indicted on the freshmen's
arms and heads by the clubs of the
•policemen, who were supposed to interfere "only to break up the handto-hand fighting."
MILLS ART PRESS
394-396 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
Printers of State College
News
PRINTING
Special Attention Given
Society Work
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 20, 1925
7age Four
Y. W. TO MEET TUESDAY
Miss Craclclock's talk upon the
Traveler's Aid last Tuesday was of
particular interest to Y. VV. in that
It stressed the social service aspect
of the work. Many services rendered,
although they seem small, mean a
lufrcat deal to those who receive them,
she said. It is doubtful just what
Miss Craddock calls a small service,
for most of her stories of assistance
involved what woidd generally be
termed hard work.
Next Tuesday, Y, VV. will hear the
Rev, Mr. Marry Swan, director of
young peoples' work, and of religious
education of the Fourth Presbyterian
Church,
H. E. TO ENTERTAIN
Following the assembly on March
20 when Mrs, Knapp speaks to the
student body, she will be entertained
in the Home Economics Department
for luncheon. I Jr. and Mrs. Brubacher, Dean ami Mrs. Metzler, and
the staff of the Home Economics Department will have luncheon in (he
family dining room, The meal will
lie prepared and served by the students
in the Meal Planning and Table
Service course.
At the Home Economics meeting
lo be held on March 21, Mrs. Evelyn
Smith Tobey from Teachers College,
Columbia University, will give a
demonstration in millinery. She has
given as her subject, "New Hats, How
to Make and Wear Them." Seniors
and juniors of the department have
been invited to see tiiis demonstration
together with (he visiting teachers
from this neighborhood,
pmicron Nti is taking the responsibility of looking after details regarding the preparation of the room and
reception of guests.
SPANISH CARNIVAL
At the meeting of Spanish Club,
Wednesday, March 11, plans were discussed and committees appointed for
the Spanish Carnival, which will be
held May 8. The committees are:
Advertising, Edna Fit/.patrick, chairman, Sady Grecnwalcl, Elrna Bird,
Mildred Hubert, Sara Barklcy; Dinner, Kathleen Malone, chairman, Clara
Deltte, Louise Denison; Decorations
and costumes, Muriel Wcnzel, chairman, Sady Greenwaid, Anne Stclcliuget-, Margarclta Emytll, Evelyn Dawson; Flowers and Balloons, Ruth McNutt, chairman, Esther Milnes, Helen
Barber; Entertainment, Mary O'Hnrc,
chairman, Mildred Whitcgiver, Helen
Cornell, Blanche/ Merry, Sadie Nailinoff, Mary Leary.
COMMERCE CLUB
There will be an important regular
business meeting of the Chamber of
Commerce Club at 4:00 o'clock Wednesday, March 25. The entertainment
committee promises a treat, Come
and add one per cent to the attendance,
STUDENTS WILL AID
Students were asked Friday by Dr.
(Irubaeher, to aid in entertaining the
faculties of high schools in nineteen
counties in and near the Capitol Dis'Hcl who will be in .Albany tomorrow
for the first annual round table confirence under Slate College auspices,
There are students from all the counties sending representatives enrolled
at the college.
CALENDAR
Friday, March 20
7:'30-10:.1() I'. M,
Mathematics
Club Initiation—Gym,
Tuesday, March 24
3:00 P. M, Y. W. C, A,—Auditorium.
4:00 P, M, Political Science Club.
4:00 I'. M, Home Economics Club
--Room 160.
Wednesday, March 25
4:00 P, M, Chamber of Commerce
Club,
4:00 P. M, Spanish Club—Room
103,
Thursday, March 26
Canterbury Club.
THIRD QUARTERLY COMMUNION
The committee fbr the third Quarterly Communion of Newman Club
includes Eleanor Fitzgerald, chairman;
Joanne Grady, Helen Zimmerman,
Helen Barber, Ethel Curley, and
Mary O'llare, The date for the Communion announced as set for Sunday,
March 29, has been changed. Definite
arrangements regarding the dale
scheduled and the program for the
morning, will be completed next week
and anonneed on Friday, March 27,
At that time, opportunity will be given
for Newman Club members lo sign up
on the bulletin board.
/A Sweet Breath \±
at alt times f
NEWS PINS SELECTED
The design for the new pins for
the ensuing News Board officers has
already been selected, The cutting of
the pin will be practically the same
as that of this year, but the letters
will be so arranged as to read State
College News. The former pins have
the N above the C, thus bringing about
the reading, State Normal College, a
mistake galling to those who object
to giving the impression that they are
spending four years in a normal
school,
Shoe Repairing
We Use Best Oak Leather
Good Year Rubber Heels
and O'Sullivan Rubber Heels
250 Central Ave.
2 <loorn from Luke Ave
C. P. LOWRY
Watchmaker and Jeweler
171 Central cAmehue
cAlbuny, SH.. Y.
Phone
Wist
3756-J
Try Me Out
ECONOMY STORE 215 CENTRAL AV.
Dress Goods Trimmings
Hemstitching and Pleating
OPEN EVENINGS
KIMBALL'S
Compliments
of
RESTAURANT
Always carry Wrigley't
lo freshen the mouth
and sweeten the breath.
Soothe* nerves, refreshes
throat and aids digestion.
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS 40and50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
206 Washington Ave.
Telephone
4 doors above Lark St.
West 3464
\ • after eVery mealj^
ATTENTION
467 Broadway
MADE
IN
SHEARER
Albany
DAIRYLAND
F L A V O R E D IN
COLLEGEJBftRBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
Drop in b e t w e e n Classes
FAIRYLAND
iifofllgr 3re Otmtm (So.
BEST IS N01STE TO GOOD''
Candies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
307 CENTAL
JIVE. Albany, &C Y.
SHOE SHINE
MA1TEO LAVENIA
Cor. West Lawrence & Western Ave.
SPORTING
"Phone West 6448
GOODS
Open Evenings
ALBANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC,
West 1616
145 Central Avenue
82 ROBIN STREET
N e w Silks
WOOLENS & COTTONS
State College
Cafeteria
For Quality Merchandise and Courteous Treatment Visit
Luncheon or dinner 11:15—1:30
H. E. STAHLER'S RESTAURANT
"THE
West Lawrence
Shoe Repairing Shop
Radio Supplies
SENIORS AND FACULTY WRITE M E - I HAVE A MESSAGE
FOR YOU
H O W A R D A.
WRKLEY5
College Candy Shop
Compliments of
r Kresges B-IOc
Store
Hewett's Silk Shop
16-17 NORTH PEARL
LAST "BUT ZKPT LEAS!
The Gateway Press
QUALITY WINTERS
Chapman &tattteft
AT YOUR. ELBOW—WEST 2037.
336 Central Avenue
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