State College News Vol. VIII No. 6 $3.00 per year

advertisement
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State College News
NEW Y O R K S T A T E COLLEGE F O R T E A C H E R S
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
Vol. VIII
ALBANY, N. Y., NOVEMBER 2, 1923
No. 6
OMICRON NU ELECTS TWO
NEW MEMBERS
Beta Chapter of 0micron Nu, tne
National Honor Society in Home Economics, held its first mooting; Tuesday evening', October 23, at the home
of Miss Steel on New Scotland Avenue.
At this meeting' Hole nForbeo
and Marion Helmer were elected to
membership. There! are now three
active members since Marginet Cleveland was elected lust spring. There
are also four faculty members, Miss
Pillingham, Miss Flemming, Mrs.
Frcar, and Miss Steel.
SPECIALS ORGANIZE
The special students and former
teachers, at a meeting' held last week
in the cafeteria, elected: President,
Mr. French; Secretary, Miss Quig'Ioy;
Chairman of Entertainment Committee, Miss Minnie B. Pitcher. A program of speeches and songs was given
at the meeting and various persons
replied to the que3tion, ''Why I
should he President?" Dean P i e c e
in an Informal address warned the
group against over-study and cautioned the into develop the social side
of college life, She also bade them
welcome. The club will meet the
first Wednesday of each month and
more officers will bo elected as occasion requires.
FIVE COLLEGE JOURNALISTS
With five students on the editorial
and reportorial stall's of the leading
State College contributes no little
newspapers in Albany and Troy,
amount to the day's news and tlio
production of so-called metropolitan
newspapers.
Edward Vines of the senior class
"covers" State College for the Albany
Evening News, and Miss Olga Hampel of the sophomore class is the
Albany Journal's reporter at college.
Coming to those more directly connected with the actual news departments of the papers, one finds Miss
Mary Bull of the junior class the assistant society editor of the Knickerbocker Press, Jerome Walker of the
junior class the assistant editor of
the Sunday Telegram, and Edwin
Van Kloek of the freshman class, the
Waterford correspondent of the Troy
Times.
TO THE FACULTY
You will be interviewed on an average of once a day by some member of the News Board. You will
probably be asked to give the same
information to several reporters and
"cubs." We ask tiiat you patiently
co-operate with us in doing this, for
only in this way can we train the
large number of "tryouts" in accuracy, perseverance and soeed in writing.
The Editors.
"The Wonder Hat" which
was scheduled for November 1
has been postponed until November 6' because of the Shakespeare play, "King Lear," which
was scheduled for the samo
night.
CHEER FOR THE TEAM!
STATE PROVES METAL
TASTE OF VICTORY
STIMULATES FIGHTERS
Snge Score* First Touchdown
Bring on the next victim!
Keyed up to a high pitch of enthusiasm as a result of their thorough,
ly convincing victory over the De.
stroyer Brock eleven, State's hardfighting grid warriors anxiously await
the start of the impending struggle
with the Union Cubs this afternoon
at Ridgefbld park.
The Garnet yearlings will enter inu
contest a decided favorite by virtue
of their spotless record so far this
season ovjr formidable teams. It will
bo termed the "Battle of Brains," for
neither of the teams lias the advantage in weight.
Experts may disagree, but last Saturday's long hoped for victory was
the sensation of a day of extraordinarily interesting football in the east
—as far as State college is concerned.
It was the making of the team.
The huskey gobs battered away at
State's almost impregnable line, but
the sense of victory was too strong.
Even uncanny forward passing failed
to net anything more than a slight
gain now and then only to find the
Capitol Hill boys ready to carry the
ball back.
To "Red" Sage, the diminuitive
pilot and backfield flash, goes the
honor of scoring the first touchdown
I'or a State College football team
since the first game of last season.
Running the ends, plunging through
the line and skirting the tackles, Sage
was almost unstoppable in the first
period when he made a sensational
tfash down the field with the ball
snugged tightly in his arms.
The other notable epoch in State's
football history, which has finally
been inscribed with victory, came in
the third quarter, when the sorreltopped Gilchrist dashed through the
opposing line, intercepted a perfectly
directed forward pass, and gallopped
across the goal line i'or another sixpoints.
There is no doubt that State would
have piled up a more formidable appearing si'ore if it had not kept to
the old-fashioned defensive style of
Cornellian football. The men played
a brilliant, almost mechanically perfect game, They moved as though
the master hand of Fritz Wegner,
their crafty coach, were hovering
over each man on the team.
Composed of husky seamen, the
Breck team was no "set up." At
times their loose and faulty playing
was costly to them, but on the whoie
State won a cleancut victory. The
lineup:
State
Bader
Hayes
Bentley
Smith
Beaver
Roberts
Donnelly
Sage
Caton
Crane
Gilchrist
Pos.
L.E,
L.T.
L.G.
C.
R.G.
R.T.
R.E,
Q.B.
L.H.B.
R.H.B.
F.B.
Tuesday, November 6 is merely
Tuesday unless you are twentyone years old. If you are it is
Election day. Remember to
vote as your conscience dictates.
$3.00 per year
CAMPUS DAY PROGRAM
Amalgamated Highbrow Circus
Football Substitute
TEA THAT WAS DIFFERENT
It is expected that a tea be a pleasant occasion but .not all of them
meet our hopes in such a truly festive way as did the 1023 Intersoro
rity.
The rotunda hung with banners, its
glints of silver and of yellow chrysanthemums, dissipated any cloud of
homesickness. The atmosphere from
the most dignified presiding faculty
members to the girls in the green
room intent on obscure culinary rites,
was one of genuine good fellowship.
Through tho effective agency of
the ushers, who were designated by
their sorority colors, the guests were
welcomed by the sorority presidents:
Eleanor Gifl'en of Intersorority and
of Gamma Kappa Phi, Emily Bidding
of Delta Omega, Mary Wright of Eta
Phi. Ruth Ellis of Psi Gamma, Marion
Miller of Kappa Delta, Mary Mahr of
Chi Sigma Theta, and Lillian Ershler
of Alpha Epsilon Phi. Then after tea
was served one answered tho music,
and danced and chatted.
D.I. HASTINGS PROMISES A
TREAT TO ALL ENGLISH
STUDENTS
Dr. Hastings has something in store
for us. He is going to give to us
illustrations of good theme writing
and poor theme writing. Knowing
the clever and interesting articles
written by Dr. Hastings that were
published in our "Quarterly", wo are
expecting something quite above tho
ordinary.
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Assembly opened last Friday with
the singing of our Alma Mater, followed by a short talk by Coacli Wegner.
Following cheers and songs a representative from tho University of the
State of New York gave a talk on
how to vote without going home.
After more singing assembly closed
with the reading of the notices and
cheering.
Tho Quarterly Board wishes
to remind the students that all
articles for the Quarterly must
bo signed with full name and
numerals. Articles must not bo
signed with initials or assumed
names.
:30:<I0:20-
-Marshalls assemble classes and
take attendance (3)
-Junior-Senior Soccer Game (5)
-Soph-Frosh Cleanup Contest
(S)
-Obstacle
(2) ( I )
Race for girls (3)
-Obstacle Race for boys (3)
(2) (1)
:40- -Tii roe Legged Raci
girls
(3) (2) (1)
:50- -Three Legged Raci
boys
(3) (2) ( I )
:<)()- -Sommersault Race for girls
(3) (2) (1)
:10- -Sommersault Race I'or boys
(8) (2) (1)
: 1 5 - -Bazaar Race for boys (3) (2)
:30-
:20:30:30-
0)
-Running backward Race, for
girls (8) (2) (1)
-Soph-Frosh Combat (C)
-Circus in Gym
1. Audience assembles
2. Clowns perform during assembly
3. Costume parade of performers
4. Announcement of queen
and her entrance
5. Senior Class stunt. Acrobatic—Hick
Stuff—Clowns.
(i. Junior Class stunt. Bareback riding—Animal stunts.
7. Sophomore Class stunt.
Wild West Show.
8. Freshman Class stunt. Fat
lady — Thin man — Snake
Charmer — Strong Man —
Jazz Band—Sword Swallowor—Wrestling
!). Announcement of winning
class and presentation of
prize by queen.
10. Announcement of winner
in '2(i-'27 contest.
11,?
?
?
V
?
PENALTY LIST
The list of tradition breakers includes for this week:
Name
Violation
Helen Rex
No button
Dorothy Rex
No button
Louise Gersch
No button
Evelyn Deck
No bution
TEN NEWS CUBS NAMED
Stella Rodgers
No button
The following students have been Dorothy Young
No button
accepted as "cubs" to try out for Elizabeth Young
No button
places on the "News" Board: Sara John Lalor
No hat
Barclay, '27, Katherme Blen's, '27, Mr. Gilchrist
No hat
Louise Gunn, '27, Ralph Harris, '27, Mr. Pease
No hat
Anna Koff, '2(i, Elnah Kreiz, '26, Mr. Baker
No hat
Ruth Moore, '27, Bettv Trowbridge, Clifford Palmer
No hat
Sailors
Albertine Tucker, '27, and Edwin Davis Schultes
No hat
Wisneski i '27,
E. Van Kleek
Wearing Insignia
Davis Van Kleek, '7.
Score by Periods:
Helen Rex
other than S.C.T.
Ash
State
(i 0 (i 0—12 Miss Delaney
No button
Nuir;
Sailors
0 0 0 0 — 0 Helen Deans
No button
Fielding- j
Substitutes: Sailors—Murphy for Elizabeth Trowbridge
No button
Flynn
Sans,
Hyland
for
Bateman,
Klioen
for
|
Miss
Berry
No button
Bateman!
Cutting Campus
Sans Galerick; State—Davis for Smitn. lAileen Alderson
Referee,
Humphries;
Umpire,
Russell;
j1 Priscilla Jones
Cutting Campus
Breen
Harvey Fenner
Cutting campus
Servanack Head Linesman. Cassavant.
Cutting campus
Galerick CHEER FOR THE TEAM! i Edwin Juckett
STATE
Page Two
fctafe ffluUwj? Jfettra
Vol. VIII
Nov. 2, 1923
No. (i
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates may
be had on application to the business
manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the editors before
Monday of the week of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
Dorothy V. Bennit, '24
Managing Editor
Mildred Kuhn. '24
Buiinen Manager
Dorothy Jones, '24
Subscription Manager
Ruth Ellis, '24
Assistant Business Managers
Hildcgnrde Liebich, '24
Lois Moro, '25
Associate Editors
Kathleen Furman, '26
Florence Platnor, '25
Margaret Demarost, '25
Reporters
Helen Elliott, '26
Margaret Benjamin, '26
Joyce Persons, '26
Harry Godfrey, '26
Jerome Walker, '25
THE PENALTY LIST
The penalty list published in last
week's News was one composed of
freshmen who, because of thoughtlessness or misunderstanding of college traditions, violated them. It was
no more than the college expected,
indeed, the list was surprisingly sho t.
Freshmen must learn by their mistakes. Well and good. That is the
way with beginners.
The penalty list published this week
is not entirely composed of freshmen.
There are senior names on the list
as well as sophomore and Junior ones,
What to do?
Are the upperclassmen going to
protest indignantly at thus be'ng hold
up for criticism? Undoubtedly, but
on what basis? That they forgot?
Are the freshmen going to look upon
tradition breaking as a serious offense
to the college? No. How could they
be expected to?
The probable result? The upperclassmen will be indignant and think
themselves unjustly wronged. The.v
will try to protest and explain thenactions. The freshmen, no longer beginners, will show less and less regard
for college law and order. Myskania
will have to spend all of its time for
the remainder of the year in fostering
harmony and respect for the traditions of the college.
If you are satisfied with the probable result, you take delight in seeing
ideals shattered, in seeing disorder
and disrespect the controlling college
spirit. If you are not satisfied, if
you are concerned and eager to have
college traditions, not clasii rutes, but
college traditions respected and
obeyed, there will be no more penalty
lists.
These rules are ours, self-imposed,
for the purpose of adding to our collegiate life things which we feel are
a vital part of every live college. Especially should upperclassmen and
sophomores adhere strictly to all rules
applying to them and by their attitude aid the enforcement of rules
COLLEGE
NEWS,
NOV.
2,
1923
applying to freshmen; they should
frown upon all attempts at violation,
not wink at them. Why? Because
they made these laws, and the right
to make laws presupposes the willingness to be governed, by those laws.
There is a natural law that makes
us appreciate more fully whatever we
have rendered homage and service to
or given up privileges for. The rules
which apply to the wearers of buttons
and caps, and to the segregation at
games, are only such rules as custom",
at all times has laid upon freshmen.
You will look back upon this "year
of tribulation" with greater delight if
you submit to these rules. Freshmen,
honor the upperclassmen. You are
no longer State's guests; you arc the
younger members of her family. By
honoring the rank of upperclassmen
through the means provided in our
traditions, besides fulfilling a natural
law of courtesy, you are laying up
for yourselves a sto.re of respect. The
more respected you make the rank
of senior, the greater distinction will
be yours when you have reached that
rank. The subtle influence of giving
up privileges and of rendering honor
where it is due, cannot ho defined,
but we all must feel its presence.
It would seem that we should feel
instinctively all the reasons for living
up to our splendid traditions, and that
none should bo t.mpt;;d to break
them except such as can feel no loyalty to anything But the almighty " I , "
Then why do we have tradition-violators in any class, (for they do violate
when they wink at breaking of rules.)
Is it in defiance of Myskania and its
deputy, the Hoard of Censors?
Nothing, is so far from the purpose
and desire of these bodies as to seom
to invite lawlessness. Myskania must
enforce rules with dignity and firmness, for when you select a Myskania,
you entrust to its care the guidance
and protection of college customs and
traditions. It is the last thought of
Myskania to be arbitrary and overexacting, but firm it will aim to be,
provided you will stand behind its
attempts for State. It is not a challenge for traditions-violators; it exists
only to make State's traditions something for State's prestige. It can
fulfill its purpose only with your
earnest co-operation; through your
willingness to live up to rules, and
your unwillingness to let anyone dishonor the rules.
Myskania.
CALENDAR
Friday, November 2
Political Science Club—4:10 P.M.-—
Room 201.
Saturday, November 3
Campus Day
Tuesday, November 6
Y. W. C. A,—3:00 P.M.—Auditorium
French Club—4 :00 P.M
Room 100
Joseph Henry Society—7:30 P.M.—Room 150
Advanced Dramatics Class Play—
8:15—Auditorium.
Wednesday, November 7
vtnKutwuttttttuutttutuutttttmuttnttis
There are two kinds of stupidity Newman—4:00 P.M.—Room 211.
in State College. One is not knowing how to answer a professor's quesNEW CLUB ORGANIZED
tion, and the other is spoiling a proThe women students residing on
fessor's pot "catch as eaten can"
Long Island held a meeting October
query.
IS for the purpose of organizing into
* * »
a club. Dean Pierce acted lis temIf Caesar came back ho might be- porary chairman. It was decided thai
gin his new book, "All Germany is this should be an informal organizadivided into three parts." Perhaps, tion, therefore, the only officers
our own Professor Richardson, or elected were a chairman, Louiso Goldmaybe, Hoy Collins, will produce this smith, '26, and a reporter, Ruth
work now that they have been given Munch, '25. It is to be called the
the hint. It ought to bring a couple "Sunrise Trail" Club, and mooting*
of wagon loads of marks on the mar- will bo held about once a month."
ket.
* >n #
It's a good tiling, and we can be
happy for it, that we don't have to
pay our student tax in German marks.
It might require the able assistance
NEWS DEALER
of the husky Coleman to carry the
Cigars, Candy and Stationery
required amount to room 203.
Developing & Printing Camera Films
"Big Dirigible to Fly at Athletic
Electric Supplies
Field Dedication" says a newspaper
headline referring to the Now Jersey j D i ,
% ? P S s n d a y 205 CENTRAL AVE.
College for Women. A squadron of i
submarines will fly over State College j
when the proposed addition becomes!
more than a proposition,
,
*
+
* .
Compliments of
It's a good thing no Albany city i
officials were in the audience recently j
when "Salesman Billio" Hoinemann j
cracked wise about Washington park'!
being the college campus annex. Dr,
Brubacher would be liable to got a
rent bill on behalf of the state.
PROFESSOR KIRTLAND JUSTIFIES CURRICULUM
The argument for required courses
in college is that they develop the
thinking powers of the students. Each
professor in his respective department
argues that his course can accomplish this to the best advantage. The
professor of mathematics declares
that mathematics is the one subject
which will make students think; the
coach, that athlet'cs will bring this
about; the scientist, that science is
the one subject which brings' into
play every part of our mental makeup. If we really stop and think, we
must admit that not one subject in
itself can supply the richness of material which is to be gained from numerous courses taken together.
(Continued on page 4)
To have unity and coherence in the
home, Dr. Hastings advises the freshmen to practice harmony. An example given was to have "the salad
harmonize with the wall paper."
John J. Conkey
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
* * *
A State College diploma may be an
entree to exclusive educational circles
but it's only a scrap of sheepskin to
an Albany registry board. Nowadays you have to demonstrate your
literacy to mark a ballot.
C. P. LOWRY
UP-TOWN JEWELER
171 CENTRAL AVENUE
Below Robin Street
* * *
* * *
Outside: "Got any good timber for
the team?"
Inside: "Yes—from the neck up!"
GOOD YEAR SHOE
REPAING
BEST OAK SOLE LEATHER
HIGH GRADE RUBBER HEELS
Always Good Work
250 CENTRAL AVE.
* * *
With women now getting mixed up
in politics and some holding office it
is interesting to note the. advantage
of! being a teacher. Governor Al
Smith is going to be a "prof" at
Columbia this fall and winter. This
just goes to show that we must all
prepare ourselves for no matter what
happens in this life.
*
*
Cotrell & Leonard
Albany, N. Y.
Caps---Gowns---Hoods
FOR ALL DEGREES
>H
Girls who carry a whiskey flask
must carry their oowder and rouge
along, too, according to Dr. Charles
F. Pabst of Brooklyn, who declared
POLI SI CHANGES
that bootleg whiskey is depriving
American girls of their good complexMEETING DATE
The time of meeting of the Politi- ions. Without throwing bouquets at
anybody
it is certainly evident that
cal Science Club has been changed
to Friday, 4:10, the first and third Mate College girls don't carry flasks.
week of the month.
* * *
Cheer leader Heinemann: "Let's have
CHEER FOR THE TEAM! a locomotive with three coaches on
the end!" (And right after that railroad song, too.)
PHONE MAIN 2660
Marinello Shop
Alice F. Buckley
111 State Street
ALBANY, N. Y.
STATE
COLLEGE
NEWS,
NOV
1928
Page Three
BROADCAST
T h e a n n u a l l u n c h e o n of t h e K a p p a
D e l t a A l u n i n a o Association of t h e
Capital District w a s hold a t t h e T o n
Eyck S a t u r d a y , O c t o b e r 2 7 a t o n e
o'clock.
Following t h e luncheon
t h e r e w a s a b u s i n e s s mooting' of t h e
Kappa
Delta A s s o c i a t i o n .
Louise
P e r s o n s , ' 2 2 , is p r e s i d e n t of t h e association.
Kappa D e l t a also had its a n n u a l
fall h o u s e d a n c e S a t u r d a y evening',
October 27. T h e chaporonos for the
dance included:
Miss P i e r c e , Miss
Cobb a n d M r s . Stitson.
Marion Burnnp, ' 2 1 , and Frances
Stilson, ' 2 1 , s p e n t t h e w e e k - e n d a t
t h e house.
In a d d i t i o n t o t h e list published
last w e e k , K a p p a D e l t a Itho a n nounces
the
following'
m e n as
pledgees:
Charles Badur, '25, Herbert Bcntly, "i'\, W i l l i a m Cunistock, ' 2 7 , Rob e r t H a y n e s , ' 2 5 , Harold F r e n c h , '2<J,
Milton N e l s o n , ' 2 4 .
WILLIAM KONRAD ROENTGEN
1845-1923
Born in Lennop, Prussia. Educated a t Zurich. Awarded tho
Huniford Medal of tho Royal
Society in 1896 jointly with
Philip Lonard for discovery of
X-rays. W o n the Nobel Prize
in physics in 1901.
On
Saturday
evening,
October
t h i r t e e n t h , G a m m a K a p p a Phi house
was t h e scene of a most e n j o y a b l e
fall lioii.su d a n c e . T h e r e w e r e t w e n ty-five c o u p l e s in a t t e n d a n c e . S e v e r a l
alumnae
faces w e r e in e v i d e n c e
among the merry-makers. T h e house
was p r e t t i l y d e c o r a t e d with g r e e n a n d
gold s t r e a m e r s . D a n c i n g w a s enjoyed
from e i g h t - t h i r t y t o e l e v e n - t h i r t y .
G a m m a K a p p a Phi e n t e r t a i n e d Miss
S u s a n Collier, '2;i, a n d Miss M a r y
Tracey, ' 2 5 , over the week-end.
G a m m a K a p p a Phi received in formal initiation Miss C a t h e r i n e B i r m ingham, '26.
Week-end guests a t Gamma Kappa
Phi H o u s e i n c l u d e d Mi's. O s l r a n d e r ,
who visited h e r d a u g h t e r G r a c e , ' 2 4 ,
Dean Motzlor h a s been elected a
m e m b e r of t h e executive c o m m i t t e e
of t h e A l b a n y c o u n t y c h a p t e r of t h e
A m e r i c a n Red Cross,
The General Electric
Company manufactures
e v e r y t h i n g electric—
from fans to powerful
locomotives, from tiny
lamps to mighty power
plants. Its products are
used around the world.
E d n a Laytpn has been a p p o i n t e d
t e m p o r a r y c h e e r l e a d e r of t h e sophom o r e class.
M a r y F l a n n i g a n h a s been elected
song leader.
G. A . A . J O I N S
COUNCIL
"I did not thinkI investigated"
One day in 1895, Roentgen noticed that a
cardboard coated with fluorescent material
glowed while a nearby Pluecker tube was
in action. "What did you think?" an
English scientist asked him. "I did not
think; I investigated," was the reply.
Roentgen covered the tube with black
paper. Still the cardboard glowed. He took
photographs through a pine door and discovered on them a white band corresponding to the lead beading on the door. His
investigation led to the discovery of X-rays.
Roentgen's rays have proved an inestimable boon to humanity. In the hands of
doctor and surgeon they are saving life
and reducing suffering. In the hands of
the scientist they are yielding new knowledge—even of the arrangement and
structure of atoms. The Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company
have contributed greatly to these ends by
developing more powerful and efficacious
X-ray tubes.
Inter-collegiate rivalry and
publicity advantages
O u r G.A.A. h a s t a k e n a n o t h e r progressive s t e p in its successful c a r e e r by j o i n i n g t h e A t h l e t i c Council
s t e p is d e c i d e d l y t o S t a t e ' s a d v a n t a g e ,
f o r w e c a n n o w k e e p in touch with
all college a c t i v i t i e s .
T h e Council
publishes a m a g a z i n e on w o m e n ' s athletics in which S t a t e will h a v e a splendid o p p o r t u n i t y f o r publicity a n d f o r
s h o w i n g u p its p e p .
GENERAL ELECTRIC
Special Rates to Students
Ideal Service
S e a Food.
!«•«•!
Food
IDEAL RESTAURANT
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop.
Regular Dinner 40c—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Supper 4 0 c - 5 p. m. to 8 p.m
Special Chicken Dinner Sundays, 60c, 12 M. to 8 P. M.
Phone West 4472
208 WASHINGTON AVENUE
ALBANY, N. Y.
6 DOORS ABOVE LARK STREET
CHEER FOR THE TEAM!
CHESTER ARRIVES
Shall Chester Gump go to State
I College?
This was a question of
j great importance to the Gump family
! in the Gym last Friday.
After a
! lengthy discussion, it was finally de! cided by "Spark Plug," who rode o(f
I with Chester to State College.
During the business meeting it was
decided that points should be g'.ven
for bicycling.
Dorothy Dietz, '25,
was elected cheer leader.
There were interclass basketball
games and also a contest between the
B.A. and B.S. students. Babe Ruth
would have been put to shame had
he seen the freshman baseball games.
Dancing occupied the rest of the evening with cider and doughnuts forrefreshments.
SCOUT CONVENTION
A scout convention is to be held
in Albany High, School' on Friday
evening, November 2, which delegates
from within a radius of one hundred
miles will attend. Everybody who is
interested in scouting and scout work
is invited to come. The adm'ss'on
charged will be ip the form of a gift
of vegetables to be given to the Old
Ladies' Home. An interesting program, consisting of addresses, games,
and songs is planned. The convention will close on Saturday with a
sight-seeing trip through Albany, a
visit to the Old Ladies' Home, and a
luncheon at Washington Tea Room at
two o'clock.
College students who
are interested in scouting are especially urged to attend the convention.
STATE
Page Four
CURRICULUM JUSTIFIED
(Continued from paj?o 2)
Professor Kirtlund suys that he balieves that it is a mistake to think
that any one course in part'cular can
supply mental training better than
another. He believes that the amount
of mental training gained from explicit subjects is gained not so much
from the subject itself, as from (he
training which it gives. To say definitely that a child who detests mathematics will of a certa.'nty gather
more from that subject than from
any other is an erroneous supposit'oi,
but the variety of courses offered in
the list of required subjects of most
colleges makes it almost cait.in that
there will be some subjects umong
them which will fill the requirement.
CANTERBURY CLUB
The Canterbury Club of State College held its second meeting of the
year at St. Andrew's Church, Main
Avenue, Thursday evening, October
26. Many students attended, including a good representation of freshmen. The invitation to join Canterbury Club is extended to students of
Albany Medical School, Pharmacy
School, and Law School. Meet'ngs
are to be held at State College every
second Thursday afternoon, following
Dean Pierce's lecture to the young
women of the freshmen class, and
every fourth Thursday evening at
St. Andrew's Church at seven-thirty
o'clock.
An address by The Reverend Mr,
Pinley followed the opening service
which was led by Miss Marjory Bayless, president of the club. After a
short business session, there was>
dancing. Refreshments, consisting of
good "home-made" doughnuts and cider were served.
COLLEGE
NEWS,
THE CAFETERIA TELLS
STATE SECRETS
NOV
192 3
Albany Hardware & Iron Co.
Partiality Shown to Football Men
HEADQUARTERS FOR
"Give the men bigger portions than
COMPLETE SPORT EQUIPMENT
the girls," is what Miss Thompson, of
the "cafeteria told members of her 39-43 State Street
Albany, N. Y.
class In lunch room management.
"They are always hungrier and they
need more to eat," she said. "It's
no easy job to feed three hundred
hungry people every noon, but we
can always tell what they are going Whipped Cream or Marshmallow Served Here
to eat most of. The favorite dish?
Oh, potatoes, by all means, potatoes!
YOUR CHOICE
They eat them by the barrel, and
with gallons of gravy. That is, the
TRY
A
TEDDY
BEAR OR JUNIOR SPECIAL
students do, The faculty don't seem
HOME MADE CANDIES A SPECIALTY
to eat as much, Maybe its because
they are brain workers. The women CANDY, SODA, STATIONERY and SCHOOL SUPPLIES—HAIR NETS
of the faculty cut less than the men,
BOX CANDY FROM 39 CENTS A POUND UP
usually a eun of tea, some salad and
298 CENTRAL AVENUE
PHONE WEST 3959
dessert. Generally the men get a
regular luncheon." "Don't you think
that some students eat more than they
should?" the News reporter asked,
G. W i l e y & B r o .
watching a fat girl dodge the cocoa
Dealers in All Kinds of
and reach for pickle sandwiches. "I
The Parker's Here
don't believe so," replied Miss ThompFresh and Salt Meat
son, "You know the football men
\ \ T OULD you d a r e
and Poultry
say they don't got enough to eat, and
• • to pass another
I have told my girls to be sure to
3 4 8 State Street, Corner Lark
en from hand to
give them larger portions. I want
Telephones 544 and 543
everybody to get all they want and
and?
not to go away hungry, I like to
We'll see that you get
IF YOU
see the students eat and they certainthe point fitted to
ly like eating. Vegetable and tomavour hand.
C
O
O
PERATE
to soups are always popular, and of
WITH THE
the desserts pic runs 'way ahead—
when they can get it. Everybody
eats a tremendous amount of Ice
cream."
eSTABUSHEO-IBB?
KETCHUM AND SNYDER
K
"CO-OP"
Here is what Miss Thompson says
State students should do to co-operate
with the cafeteria management: speak
louder so that) the girls can tell
whether it is potatoes or tomatoes
that you want; keep in line and be
orderly, and, by all means, come back
for more if you don't get enough the j
SPANISH CLUB
j
At a meeting of the Spanish Club first time.
Friday, October 2fi.. Miss Martinez
gave a very interesting talk on her i DEAN PIERCE ENTERTAINS j
trip to Porto Rico last year. She ! Dean Pierce entertained three of I
gave a very vivid account of her voy- her classmates at State College on I
age and, aided by pictures, she Thursday, October 25, After show- !
painted very realistic scenes of Porto ing them through what they called I
Rican life, The Spanish atmosphere "the nqw building,." Dean Pierce
of the meeting was further brought lunched with them at Syddum Hall, j
about by the playing of Spanish Dean Pierce recalled that her class I
songs.
had one social function during the
It is evident by the accounts which whole college course.
The three classmates, Mrs. Jessie
Miss Martinez has brought back to
the Spanish students that Hie thor- Campbell Dorn, '89, of Cooperstown,
oughly enjoyed her v.'sit to the Span- N. Y., Mrs. Ida Babcock Cameron,
'84, of Albany, and Mrs. Lcvonne
ish-speaking country.
Cushman Gibson, '88 of Bayshore,
MENORA TEA
N. Y., were all contributors to the
The first Menora tea was held Sun- Residence Hall Fund,
day afternoon at three o'clock in the
college rotunda.
Miss Pierce and
MUSIC CLUB
Miss Loeb were the honored guests
The program of the first meeting
of the occasion. A delightful pro- of Music Association featured a regram made the Tea most enjoyable. cital from Liszt, Nieman, Beethoven,
Esther Gordon gave several selections and Grieg by Miss Mary Rein, a pupil
on the piano, including "Paderewski's of Mr. Grestung of Schenectady and
Minuet," and "Rachmoninoff's Pre- a performer for radio concerts. Then,
lude"; Ethel Persk played the violin, after a spirited discussion of various
and Florence Greenblath sand. The composers, the club adjourned until
Tea broke up at half past five, a November 8.
pleasurable afternoon having been
spent.
CHEER FOR THE TEAM!
ALBANY PRINT SHOP, Inc.
394-396 BROADWAY
ALBANY, N. Y.
Special Attention Given Work
for Student Societies
P R I N T E R S
OF
T H E
PURE WHIPPED CREAM SERVED ON SPECIALS
NO EXTRA CHARGE
All prices of box chocolates fresh from the factory
at 39 cents pound box and up
Phone W 869 J
2«W CENTRAL AVENUK
S T A T E
WRKLEYS
After
Every
Meal
C O L L E G E
N E W S
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
General Printers
Take it home to
the kids.
36-38 Beaver Slreel
ALBANY, N. Y.
91 Steps East of Pearl Street
Have a packet in
your pocket for an
ever-ready treat.
A delioious confection and an aid to
the tooth, appetite,
digestion.
Yum Yum Bakery
FRENCH
PASTRIES
CAKES LIKE MOTHER M A K E S
2 3 5 Central Ave.
State College
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner 12:00—1:00
OSHER'S SHOE REPAIR
SHOP
STAHLER'S
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery
and Ice Cream Parlor
We will supply ail your
College Needs
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28 Central Ave. Albany, N. Y.
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Call and Delivery Service
Quality
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336 Central Avenue
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