State College Mews V I VI. No. 5

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VI
State College Mews
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OK
VOL.
VI. No. 5
SORORITIES ENTERTAIN
ENTERING STUDENTS
The annual [ntersorority Tea will
be given by Ibc sororities in tbe
College rotunda on Saturday, October 22, from 3 to S o'clock, All
faculty members, freshmen and
entering students are cordially invited to attend,
The sororities in charge arc as
follows:
Arrangements, Kapmi Delta,
Refreshments, Psi Gamma,
Decorations, Chi Sigma Thela.
Invitations, Alpha Epsilon Fill.
Ushers, Gamma Kappa Phi,
Music, Delta Omega.
' ».
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ALBANY, N. Y., OCTOBER 17,
STARTLING GROWTH
OF ORCHESTRA
Wanted.—Two 'cellists, two banjoists. Apply State College Orchestra. Castella I lees, president;
Eleanor Abranis, secretary..
Qualifications.—(I) An instrument
in your possession. (2) Ability to
appear for practice Tuesday evenings between 7:15 and 9 o'clock.
Home Address.—380 Western avenue, Telephone West 3470-W.
You have read the advertisement
—be the first to answer it.
The qualifications are easy to
meet but are, however, very important. You will notice that we don't
want the 'cellist without the instrument—we have no money with
which to buy you one. You will
also notice that for fear of scaring
some one away we did notsay anything about ability to play it. However, we judge that yon will be able
to read the notes and pick out the
parts at the required orchestra
practice,
The drilling of each
group of instruments over the difficult passages is especially valuable, so that if you do not know
your part at first you will have mastered it with Mr. Candlyn's thorough attention to each of the parts.
Opportunity is given each member
to practice his part at home,
11 is a necessity, moreover, that
you be able to attend rehearsals
regularly, whether or not you arc
obtaining credit in the course. The
efficiency of the orchestra as a
whole depends largely upon this
fact.
After hearing these simple qualifications, can't you consider yourself eligible? We hope that you
won't think of regular attendance as
a weekly bore to you, for it is the
source of thorough pleasure to the
members in the orchestra at present. The enthusiasm shown by the
unanimous desire of the orchestra
to take tbe music home should be
very encouraging to you.
The present registration in the
orchestra is twenty-five, a considerable increase since last year. The
increase in the noise we can make is
proportional to the increase in our
numbers.
We can boast of the following
instruments as appearing in our
orchestra for the first lime: Trombone, played by Hayes, '25; the
cornet, played by Miter, '25; the
banjo-mandolin, played by Florence
Dorsey, '23, and the banjo, played
by Mayes. The flute, which hasreappearcd, is played by Crane, ''25.
It is quite difficult, and, moreover, impossible for Hayes to play
two instruments at the same time.
Continued on page 4
1918
1921
CONVOCATION TO
HAVE INTERESTING
SPEAKERS
College Students Invited
Addresses by Slate officials,
headed by Governor Miller and by
educational
dignitaries of
the
United States, will mark the liftyscventh convocation of the Regents
of the University of the State of
New York, October 20 and 21, in
Chancellors' Hall in the State Education Building, Besides the addresses, honorary . degrees will be
conferred upon Dr. John H. Finlcy,
former State Commissioner of Education, and other noted men who
have made their pasts in the University. This function will be performed at the closing exercises
Friday night.
The assembly will convene at
STATE COLLEGE
8:15 Thursday evening, with the
lion. Chester S. Lloyd, LL.D.,
CALENDAR
Chancellor of the University of the
State of New York, presiding. The
MONDAY, OCTOBER 17
Rev, John Kelman, D.D., LL.D,, of
8 p. m.
the University of Aberdeen, New
Canterbury Club Meeting at St.
York City, will deliver tbe invocation address, which will be followed
Andrew's Parish House.
by the Chancellor's annual address
and the presentation of Dr. Frank
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18
Pierpont Graves, LL.D., new State
3 p. m.
Commissioner of Education, as
president of the University,
Y. W. C. A. Meeting—Auditorium.
The principal address on Thursday will be made by Dr. Nicholas
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19
.Murray Butler, president of Colum4 p. m,
bia University, New York City,
who has just returned to the United
Political Science Club Meeting—
States from a visit to Europe where
Room 111
he delivered the address at the laying of the corner-stone of the new
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21
college at l.ouvain, Belgium. Undoubtedly Dr. Butler will give a
4:15 p. m.
talk which will be of great interest
Music Club Meeting—Room B.
to college students.
8 p. m.
Thursday morning will be deGym Frolic in Gymnasium.
voted to a reception in the rotunda
of the State Education Building,
tendered by the Board of Regents
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22
to guests and delegates. Dr. Bru3-5 p. m.
bacher, of State College, will repreIntersorority Tea in the Rotunda.
sent this institution at the convocation.
The Friday morning session of
the convocation will be presided
over by the Hon. Adclbcrt Moot,
LL.D., Vice-chancellor of the University. The feature of this session
will
be addresses by noted eduFACULTY N E W S
cators as follows: "What Education Means >to America," Lotus D.
Dr. A. R. Brubacher was among a
Coffman, Ph.D., president of the
number of prominent educators who
University of Minnesota; a disspoke at a conference of teachers of
cussion led by Frederick C. Ferry,
Schenectady county, held last MonLL.D., president of Hamilton Colday and Tuesday at Excelsior High
lege, and Albert Leonard, Ph.D.,
School, Stop 4, Schenectady-Albany
superintendent of schools in New
road.
Rochelle; "Principles Determining
the Content of the High School
Dr. G. A, Painter has resumed his
COLGATE CONCERT
Course," Alexander Inglis, Ph.D.,
duties at College after his recent
Graduate School of Education,
illness,
Prof. Gillett left on Friday, OcThe Colgate Musical Clubs will Harvard University; another distober 14, to speak at the New York give a concert in the Auditorium cussion led by John H. Dcnbirgh,
State School of Agriculture, Mor- Thanksgiving eve, November 23. Ph.D., principal of Packer Collerisville, on "Time and Labor De- The Colgate clubs will entertain in giate Institute; Brooklyn, and Shervices in the Home."
conjunction with the State College man L, Howe, B.A., president of
Prof. Gillett held open house at Musical Clubs. This advance no- the Association of Academic Princi151 Western avenue on Wednesday tice is given so that you may plan pals at Carthage.
afternoon from 3 to 5 p. m, A large your trip home accordingly.
Speakers for the Friday afternoon
number of guests enjoyed the hospiThe concert will he given under meeting will include Louis Martality of the Home Management the auspices of Kappa Delta Rho shall, LL.D., New York City, who
House. Prof. Gillett will he at Fraternity, A _ more detailed an- Will speak on "The Desirability of
home every Wednesday at the same nouncement will be made later. State Appropriations for Education
time and the faculty, students and Remember the date—Wednesday, as an Investment;" Mark Graves,
their friends are invited.
November 23.
Continued on page 3
$3.00 PER YEAR
G. A. A. TO HAVE
SNAPPY FROLIC
The first gym frolic of the year
is going to be in the College gym
on Friday evening, October 21.
The gym frolics arc given by the
Girls' Athletic Association, and this
is the first opportunity of the year
for all the G. A. A. girls to "get together." Let everyone who enjoys a hilarious time come dressed
in bloomers and middle, Pull out
your old sneakers, or buy new ones,
and give them an initiation before
wearing them to gym class. Show
your spirit and wear your class
colors.
There will be new stunts, and a
refreshment committee has been
appointed. So you will be sure of
eats (perhaps lollypops). All ye
people who are searching for the
fountain of eternal youth come to
this frolic. You will feel as youthful as a child of twelve when the
lights are snapped out and you are
unceremoniously forced to leave a
long time before you are ready.
T O T H E PACIFIC IN
80 DAYS
By Dr. Gertrude E. Douglas
To complete the western picture,
some cowboys sprang up from nowhere and gave us a line exhibition
of horsemanship. VVe appreciated
Ibis the more later, when we missed
the round-up at Cody by a single
day, owing to car trouble.
The Yellowstone trail led us
through some wierdly beautiful
country in Wyoming, over prairie
roads, mere trails in many cases,
through rugged red and yellow
•cliffs, almost bare of vegetation
and with very few traces of human
habitation. We wondered indeed
where the childrein lived who attended the line rural schools which
we passed frequently — and still
more who paid the taxes to keep
them going. For many miles we
followed the old Oregon trail and
our respect for the pioneers increased as we penetrated farther
and farther into the desert and
realized the hardships which they
must have endured.- We entered
the park from the east, through
Cody and the Shoshone canyon,
and, let me advise you, if you are
contemplating a trip to the park
some day, to go this way by all
means. As far as scenery goes,
the rugged canyon of the Shoshone
river can boast of more beauty than'
the park itself. Can you imagine
our delight upon camping for the
first time in a real primeval forest
with pine needles, a mossy creek,
wild flowers resembling those we
find_ at home, with the sun setting
behind a huge crag of deep red
rock?
I am appalled at the idea of telling
you anything about the Yellowstone! .1 can simply say that the
hook descriptions are not overdone,
and that the photographers can
never do it justice. You must go
and sec it for yourself! I smile
now as I recall my first impressions, culled from geography books.
I thought it a great barren waste
of colored _ limestone, with hot
Continued on page 4
mmam
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 17, 1921
doing, just
as she
might
walk
through a park, unchanged and unState coutgt Rtitfs ' changing.
When she was a fresh-
Vol. VI
\
October 17
No. 5
Published weekly, during the college year, by the Student Body of
the New York State College for
.Teachers, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
.
[Articles,, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the Editors before Thursday of the week of publication.]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D. Persons, '22
Managing Editor,
Hope D, Persons,'22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22 .
Subscription Manager, ,
Ethel Huyck, '22
Assistant Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, '23
Associate Editors,
Robert MacFarlane, '23
Eira Williams, '23
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
Dorothy Bcnnit.( '24
Doris Butler, 23
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
A PLEA
FOR
THE
FUTURE
The interest of the world will
shortly be centered upon the conference on the limitation of armaments at Washington.
That the young people of this
country realize the magnitude of its
importance to them and to future
generations is evidenced by their
attitude at the present time. One
of the farthest reaching religious
organizations, embracing the youth
of several nations, has taken for its
slogan "A Warless World by 1923."'
A few weeks ago President
Hibben of Princeton University,
in his matriculation sermon, suggested that an association of students in the nation's universities be
formed to assist the Washington
conference to end the international
race for .supremacy in armaments.
As a result 1,200 students of Penn
State College have unanimously resolved to challenge the students of
Europe to join the undergraduate
bodies of America in such a concerted effort that there will be no
doubt that the men of the future
desire permanent peace.
They further propose that every
college in the land send delegations
on December 3 to the Disarmament
Conference to present their pleas in
the name of the nation's young
manhood to "end wars."
When one considers that war
eats at the foundation of the future,
that it claims the young men as its
victims, such resolutions and movements have particular significance.
THE LIFE OF ABBIE A.
Abbie Augusta is a junior; yet
no one is really aware of the fact.
The reason for such a calamity is
this: Abbie came to college with
one desire, "to go through" college,
and that is precisely what she is
ED SAYS:
HALLOWEEN NOVELTIES
QREETINO CARDS
Gee, Louie,
JSaflhiugtmt (gift tyop
I may have been a wreck when I
man she was afraid to go anywhere
came
here, but 1 sure am reckless,
2 4 4 W A S H I N G T O N AVE,
for fear of spilling ice cream on her
second best, or being obliged to get now. Yep, they want me to be on
ALBANY, N. Y.
acquainted with someone.
She the football team, now. I told you
P H O N E WEST 1 3 3 8 W
never went to a class meeting, that I'd get there some day'. And OPEN E V E N I N G S
never used the front door, never 'tain't because they's only eleven
men
in
Collidge,
neither.
They's
spoke to an upper classman and
never, never did anything for any- twelve, counting a lame guy. Leave
one but herself. And all this time it to me, Louie, eh? They can't Home Cooking Restaurant
the other Co-Eds were having the keep a good man down, can they?
Mn. I. A. Altheiier
time of their lives, making friends, Here's one they can't—by jiminees,
Say, Louie, did I tell you what
teasing the sophomores and getting
Fotmtr cook at Slat* Collmtm Cafttiria
. "billets cloux."* Sophomore year happened to me last week? I was
Abbie Augusta kept right on "going goin up the stairs right in back of a
• 289 CENTRAL AVENUE
through" college, with only a few swell pair of Janes. All of a sudpeople, such as registrars and pro- den, one of them dropped her
fessors, knowing she existed. As a hankachif, 1 don't suppose you'd a
junior, even the professors regard known what to do in a case like
her as a mere name on a class card. .that, would you, Louie? T didn't
We Bake the Beat
To climax her college career she think so. But I didn't buy Pumperwill be listed in the Fed. under the nickel's "What to do in Parlor or
Piazza
and
at
Parades"
for
nothing.
title "a senior," Could any college
OUR BREAD A SPECIALTY
biography be more pathetic than No siree, bob. f just leaned over
nachal like and got it for her.
this? No, never!
63 North Like Ave,
Albany, N. Y.
You'd orter heard the compliNow dear Abbie A's ,in the bud
or flower, because there arc a lot ment she paid me.
"Gee, he looks as if he had a T H E CONSTITUTION OF
of you right here now. Wake up!
Start in making friends, no matter strong back," she says aloud to her
T H E STUDENT ASSOfriend,
Then she said sitmpin more
what class you are in; do someCIATION OF T H E NEW
thing for someone if it be only under her breath that .1 couldn't
YORK STATE COLLEGE
currying books, telling time or.lis- quite ketch. Ails 1 could hear was
FOR TEACHERS
tening sympathetically to a tale of sumpin about "mind." lint she was
woe.
He a sport—give and take! tellin her girl friend that she
thought
I
must
have
a
strong
mind,
Don't just "go through," but dive
ARTICLE I.
into college life. 'Make a big too, eh Louie? It kinda makes a
splash, because here is the place to fellah feel good to hear some one
Name.
besides himself talk about how
be seen and heard!
Tins Association shall be called
slick he is once in a, while, eh
'24.
the
State
College
Student AssociLouie? You bet!
Then, "You saved my life," she ation,
ARTICLE II.
I says kinda thoughtful like.
Purpose.
I knew she was goin to say that.
Leave
it
to
me,
Louie.
1
can
tell
The purpose of this Association
A QUESTION
what theyre thinkin', can't f, Louie? shall be the management of all matYou bet. So's I was ready for her. ters of student interest not acade"Give me a nickel, Hints all its mic in nature, and for these purWhen twenty-two was a freshman class, June 'exams began June worth," I says meanin thats all her poses recognizes the following
life
was worth, Louie. Pretty good, boards, committees and associsecond; by the end of the first week
the freshman's year was over, and aint/it? I'll say so. Besides you ations:
know
how devilish f am, Louie.
Finance Board
by the end of the next, upper classAthletic Council
men were free. The large number I'm just so full of the devil that I
Quarterly Board
of girls who had planned to go to can't keep it in all the time, can I
News Board
the Silver Bay Conference were able Louie. You're right, I can't. I just
Dramatic and Art Association
to go. State College sent a dele- got to let it out once in a while.
And, would you believe me,
Freshman Handbook
gation of about thirty, enough to
Myskania
compare favorably in numbers with here's what she slings back at me.
G. A. A.
the groups sent from Mount "Where was you when that was
Holyoke, Vassar, Wells and other pulled off first?" she says, sarcastic
like. "I know where you was. You
colleges of the vicinity.
ARTICLE III.
In the year 1919-1920 it was de- wasn't," she says. "That stuff may
Membership.
cided to give us two weeks' vaca- be new in Cohocs," she says, "but
All regularly enrolled students of
tion at Easter, and to prolong sec- it was passe in the Mayflower." the New York State College shall
ond semester one week in June. Can you beat that.
be members of this Association.
Well, sir, you could a knocked
Students favored the longer Easter
vacation enough not to object 'to me out with an clastic crow bar, I
ARTICLE IV.
the later close of the semester. was so goldarned riled up. But
Finances.
Although a large number of girls you gotta admit, that when it comes
All the expenses of the Associhad planned to go to Silver Bay, to handin it back as fast as you get
ation
and
all
authorized indebtedthe delegation was reduced to two. it, I'm like the handle on a teapot,
Examinations conflicted with folic Louie—I'm .there, eh? You bet. ness, shall be met by a per capita
conference. Consequently we heard Not always there and never in it, tax, levied annually. The finances
shall be administered by the
much less about Silver Bay last either.
year, and received less from the
"Your folks don't keep a pig any Student Board of Finance.
delegates' contact with students of more since you came to Collidge,
do they?" I says just as sarcastic
other colleges.
ARTICLE V.
Last year the Easter vacation as her.
Legislative Department.
seemingly snapped back to a oneAnd I'll be gosh hanged if she
Section 1. The legislative power
week period automatically, and as duki't laff right out in my face
shall be vested in the assembly of
June approached inquiries- brought Yes sircc. Thats what she did.
the Association.
out the fact that the time of closing
She kept on a Iaffin so that I
2. Officers. The officers
in June was not to snap back a commenced to get hct up around of Section
the Association shall be:
week. Y. W. girls who were able the ears. And she would stare at
(a)
President.
The President of
to go to Silver Bay at all, did so my collar which I just had sharp- the Senior Class shall
be president
only after arranging for special ened—or 1 mean cleaned—at the of
the Student Association cxexams. The delegation numbered laundry.
officio.
ten. The girls who attended the
All to oiicc she says, "Look out,"
(b) Vice-president. The Presiconference very naturally observed she says, "or you'll set that celluthat we were among the very last loid collar o yourn on fire if you dent of .the Junior Class shall be
vice-president
of the Association
colleges in time of closing. Most don't stop blushin" she says.
ex-officio.
colleges were closed at least a week
I declare, Louie, these wimmen'll
(c)
Secretary.
The Secretary
before State. Perhaps it is a matter be the death o' me yet, Aw Shucks,
which only those who'intend going when they're handin' it to me theyre shall be chosen from members in
regular
standing
of
the incoming
to Silver Bay need consider, but the layin' offa somebody else, what do
Sophomore Class.
objection to the lengthening of the you say, eh? Aint that right.
(d) Treasurer.. The Treasurer
college year seems to become more
The Prof that teaches me my shall be the treasurer of the Student
general as time goes on.
same old sore is the one that taught
Board.
May we hear the opinions of the French to say "They shall not Finance
Section 3. Duties of Officers,
others who may or may not have pass.
Am bavin' an awful time
(a)
It
shall be the duty of the
a different point of view?
with the course.
President:
*22.
Hopin' you're the same, EDDTE
Continued on page 4
Guier's Bakery
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 17, 1921
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(V
V
It
Grace Torrenec, '21, spent the
week-end at 186 Western avenue
' She_ is teaching at Westport, N. Y
ICatherine Stratton is spending
several clays at her home,
Frances Lawrence, '21, was th
guest of Elinor Buell, '23, Saturday
and Sunday.
Psi Gamma welcomes the following into full membership: Emma
Deutl, '22; May Wood, '23; Eliza
both Stroup, '24.
CJccilc Couklin, '20, spent the
week-end at the Psi Gamma house.
Elizabeth Naglc, '24, attended the
Princeton-Colgate game al. Princeton, Saturday.
On Wednesday, October 12, Miss
Sarver, supervisor of home economics in Schenectady, visited the
home economics department and
the college cafeteria with a'class in
lunch room service from the High
School. The students were accompanied by their mothers. They
studied the management of the
cafeteria, and were interested in
selecting a nutritious lunch at a
fixed price.
Gamma Kappa Phi enjoyed an informal house party on Saturday
evening.
Katharine Collier, who is leaching at ('obleskill, spent the weekend at riC'I' house.
Ethel Cummings, '23, was called
home on account of the illness of
her mother.
I'10l> congratulates Mr. and Mrs.
Carl Archer on the birth of a son.
Airs. Archer was Monica Cardiff,
'19.
Gamma chapter, KAP, welcomes
the following men as pledge members:
lohn Hayes, '24; Harry
Rude, '25; Herbert llornung, '25;
Edwin Jucketl, '25; Floyd Handon,
'25: Edmund Crane, '25; Harvey
Fcnncr, '25; Charles Cole, '25;
Andrew Smith, '25.
Gamma congratulates Martin J.
Barry, ex-'21, on his election as
president of the senior class at Albany Law School.
Ralph Baker, '21, was in town for
the week-end. "Bake" sure does
look good. Same old laugh and
everything.
Camma held its annual fall dance
Friday night. It was a most enjoyable function.
Helen Leary spent the week-end
of October S with Margaret Crane
at Tuxedo Park, N. Y.
Kappa Delta announces the marriage of Gertrude Blair, '19, to
Madison Kaynor of East Hampton,
N. Y. The marriage took place in
July at Clinton, N. Y. Mr. Raynor
is a graduate of the University of
Syracuse.
Frances Stilson spent the weekend of October 8 at a Student
Volunteer Conference in Rochester.
Miss Edith Casey, '13, of Hudson,
was at college Friday, October 7,
She is the head of the Columbia
County State Aid Charities. She is
also secretary of the Child Welfare
Board of Columbia County.
Coldie nioom, '20, is teaching at
Kinderhook, N.' Y.
Ruth Grccnblath, '21, visited
Alpha Epsilon Phi last week.
Anne Reeback, '22, 'had as her
guest last Sunday, Evelyn Nelke,
'23, Adelphi College, Delta chapter,
Alpha Epsilon Phi.
Mr. and Mrs. George Meyers
spent a day at college last week.
Mr. Meyers is a member of the
class of '86, and it was his first visit
here in thirty years. Tie is connected with the customs house in
New York,
GROWTH OF ORCHESTRA
Continued from page 1
We can't speak for him, but here's
a hint—if he's a good friend of
yours perhaps he will give you the
use of his banjo for the year,
Nellie Parkhurst, '21, spent last
There is a mandolin which has been
week-end in Albany,
donated to the College orchestra by
Eta Phi welcomes Aileen Wala member of the Class of '20 which
lace, '24, as a house girl.
aiiy
volunteer may use. If you
Florence Stanbro, '21, and Florwish to take these opportunities,
ence Van Ness, '20, spent the weekplease
notify our officers or some
end at the Eta Phi house.
Margaret .Meyer, '22, spent the other member of the orchestra.
week-end with Helen Van Aken,
Although the orchestra is in'22, at her home in Amsterdam.
creasingly large, there is still room
Miss Helen Kelso was a dinner
for you on the Chapel platform,
guest al the Eta Phi house recently. where we practice. We are sure
Louise Perry, cx-'21, visited colthat Mr. Merrit, '25, "Chair-Comlege Wednesday.'
liiittec" will not object to "carting
up" a dozen more chairs from the
gymnasium if you decide to come.
present orchestra members
ORGANIZATIONS are:The Violins,
Castella I Ices, '22,
Grace Aronowitz, '23, Beatrice Cris11 eld-, '24, Mr. Merrit, '25, Elisa
Music Club..
Rigonard, '22, Mr. Iloruimg, '25;
The Music Club will meet Friday, mandolins, Eleanor Abrams, '24,
October 21, in room B at. 4:15. Mabel White, '22, Ruth Ellis, '24,
There will be a program and very Marion Van Biircn, '23, Augusta
important business will be taken
Conley, '23, Aileen Wallace, '24,
up, Will every member for the fol- Ethel Cummings, '23, Lela Cackclowing year please be present?
ner, '22, Alida Currcy, '22, Dorothy
Hoyt, '25, Ruth Kiddick, '25;
French Club.
guitars, Eunice Rice, '22, Gladys
French Club at its first meeting Lodge, '22, Dorothy Ben nit, '24;
elected Elisa Rigonard, president; banjo-mandolin, Florence Dorsey,
Ruth I leminover, vice-president; '23; flute, Mr. Crane, '25; trombone,
Elizabeth Rcnncr, secretary and Mr, Hayes, '24; cornet, Mr, Miter,
25 j piano, Dorothy Dangremond,
treasurer; and Dorothy Licnuit, reporter.
This year the club is going "over
And next week we will add You
the top" in furnishing good times, to our list.
good eats, and lively meetings for
Time of rehearsals, 7:15-9.
its members, who are to include all
Place, Auditorium.
those (male and female) who have
Day, Tuesday.
had two years of high school or
Come, boost music.
one year of college French, who now
have an abundance of pep and
loyalty and a financial status of 25
cents a semester to be given as
dues. All new members will be
CONVOCATION
initiated, in order that they may apContinued from page 1
preciate to a greater extent the advantages of tlte club. Prospects, research director of the State Hoard
please sign up on the bulletin board of Estimate and Control, and Frank
D. Iloynton, Ph.D., superintendent
Wednesday, October 19.
of schools at Ithaca, who will conduct a discussion; the Hon. Ernest
Press Club.
W. Bulterlield, LL.D., CommisThe original aims and work of
the Press Club1 were outlined by sioner of Education of the State of
Dr. Hastings at a meeting last New Hampshire, who will speak on
Wednesday. He was the chief pro- "The Problem for the Rural
moter of the Press Club when or- School"; George M. Wiley, LL.D.,
ganized live or six years ago. Its Assistant Commissioner for Elepurposes then were to bring to- mentary Education o'f the State of
gether people interested in writing, New York, and William E. Pierce,
and to act as a publicity bureau for district superintendent .of schools,
the college. He gave suggestions Eric county, who will also conduct
for the carrying out of these aims. • a discussion.
In the evening starting at 8:15
Miss Murray read a list of prominent newspaper men whom she o'clock several addresses by noted
hopes to bring before the Press American and foreign educators
will be given, the first -two by the
Club as speakers.
Hon. James Byrne, LL.D., and
The next meeting will be held on
Countess Irene di Robilant, assoWednesday, October 26.
ciation manager, Italy American
Political Science Club.
Society, New York City, will be
A regular meeting of the Political based on "Dante." The underlying
Science Club 'will be held Wednes- causes—economic, social, political
day, October 19, at 4 o'clock, in and educational—responsible for
room 111. Professor Risley will the present conditions in Russia
speak on "What Men Lived Of." will be outlined by the lion. Baron
Meetings are held every other Scrgius A. ivorff, of Washington,
Wednesday. All are cordially in- D. C, who is a member of .the Russian Legation.
vited to attend.
Following Baron Korff's talk, the
honorary degrees will be conferred
and the recipients will deliver
short addresses which will be sucCONSTITUTION TO BE
ceeded by the benediction led by
Rev. John J. Wynne, S. J., of
CONSIDERED the
New York City, which will mark
the closing of the convocation.
Student Assembly on Friday, OcAttendance by students of State
tober 21, is to be devoted to the at as many of the sessions of the
consideration of the constitution meeting as possible is urged by Dr.
which has been posted on the bul- Brnbachcr, but in no case should
letin and which is printed in the a student "cut" in order to go, lie
"News" this week.
said. Particular invitation has been
The students are requested to extended college students, and Dr.
come prepared to finish voting in Brubacher expects a large delegathis one Assembly.
tion from State at the affair,
Pagf Three
JTAHLBR'J
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MUSIC
299 Central Avenue
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Albany, N. Y.
Cotrell & Leonard
472-478 Broadway
Albany. N. Y.
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Furs
Frocks
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Tailored Hats
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Cor. Western nnd No. Lake Avci.
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EYRES
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TheflavorLasts!
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 17, 1921
ciation. The proposed amendment
shall have been posted at least a
week before being voted upon.
BY-LAWS.
Section 1. Elections. All elecMUSCLE BUILDERS
tions shall be by secret ballot and
by a majority vote under the supervision of the Executive Board,
The muiclei of the ieet like thoie of
Section 2. College Song Leader.
the handi need proper exercise to
The College Song Leader shall be
develop and strengthen them.
elected from candidates submitted
Socket Fit Shoes are flexible, allowing
by the Sophomore, junior and
absolute freedom to the foot.
Senior Classes, each class submitting tvyo.
Section 3. College Cheer Leader.
McAulitf & Gallahger
The College Cheer Leader shall be
elected
from three candidates
22-24 Steabtn St.
Albany, N. Y.
recommended by the Athletic
Council,
Section 4. Secretary of the AsCONSTITUTION
sociation. The Secretary shall be
Continued from page 2
elected from three candidates sub1, To preside over regular weekly mitted by the Sophomore Class.
meetings of the Association in asSection 5. All changes in the
sembly and to call special meetings constitutions of all boards, drawing
at his discretion,
funds from the student treasury,
2. To appoint all committees and and all elections to these boards
their chairmen not otherwise pro- shall be by flic approval of the Executive Board.
vided for,
3, To appoint a temporary secreSection 6, The financial powers
tary in the absence of a regular of all boards, drawing funds from
secretary.
the student treasury, shall be
4. To serve as an ex-officio mem- limited as foflows:
ber of any committee of the Asso(a) No board shall spend in one
ciation,
year more than the amount appro(b) It shall be the duty of the priated to it by the Association at
Vice-president tp assume the duties the beginning of that year.
of the President in the absence or
(h) No board shall contract debts
at the request of the President
the sum total of which exceeds the
(c) ft shall be the duty of the amount of its appropriation for the
Secretary to keep all minutes of the previous year,
Association in assembly and to
Section 7. Any action taken by
attend to all correspondence.
the Association may be brought
(d) It shall be the duty of the back by the Executive Board to the
Treasurer to take charge of the assembly for reconsideration, if
finances of the Association in the the assembly, by a majority vote,
manner defined by the Constitution refuses to reconsider, the action
taken in the first instance shall be
of the Finance* Board.
Section 4. The election of offi- final.
cers shall take place the first FriSection 8. Restriction of Offices.
day in May of each year.
No member of the Association shall
Section 5, Duties and powers of hold more than one of the following
the Association.
offices during one college year:
(a) The Association shall legisPresidents of Classes, Editor-inlate on all matters of student inter- chief of the College Magazine, Ediest. If the question arises as to tor-in-chief of the College Newswhether any matter is within the paper, Editor-in-chief of the Senior
jurisdiction of the Association it Year Book.
shall be referred for decision to the
Faculty Council.
(b) The Association shall elect
the following:
1. College song leader.
2. College cheer leader.,
TO THE PACIFIC
3. Members to Myskania in acContinued from page 1
cordance with the Constitution of
springs,
curious mud volcanoes and
Myskania.
4. Representatives to the Finance wonderful geysers. These there
were,.but
the greater part of it is
Board in accordance with the Conprimeval pine forest, covering the
stitution of the Finance Board.
slopes of the Great Divide. In it
5. Secretary of the Association.
Section 6. The work of the As- is an exquisite lake in a setting of
sociation shall be transacted by snow-capped mountains and the
committees elected by the Presi- Grand Canyon, tinted in all varieties of buff, orange and red, into
dent, except as otherwise provided
whose depths drops a stream of
for.
clear aquamarine. It has also Mt.
Washburn, upon whose sides arc
ARTICLE VI.
the gayest llower gardens I have
Executive Department,
ever seen. Only a few spots were
Section 1. Executive Board. The barren, and here are the deservedly
President, Vice-president, Secretary famous green and blue hot pools
and Treasurer shall constitute an and geysers.
Executive Board.
The rainbow effects on the borSection 2. The duties of the Ex- ders of these were extremely interecutive Board shall be:
esting to the botanists of the party,
(a) To carry out the provisions because they are due to red pigof the assembly according to this mented algae, living plants, which
constitution.
have acquired the characteristic of
(b) To act as a court of appeal. enduring temperatures just under
the boiling point. We were fortunate in seeing the Giant, the largARTICLE VII.
est
of the geysers, erupt, as he only
Ratification.
pours forth his mighty stream ol
This constitution shall be ratified boiling water every 14 days. Even
by a majority vote of the student
he with his tremendous volume,
body.
however, could not be compared in
sheer beauty to Old Faithful whose
ARTICLE VIII.
graceful stream rises 150 feet into
Amendments.
the air every 60 or 70 minutes, true
to
his name.
This constitution may be amended
by a two-thirds vote of the Asso(To be continued.)
SOCKET FIT SHOES
ALBANY ART UNION
'Distinctive 'Photography
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rates to Students
48 No. Pearl Street
THIS
Phone Main 991
SPACE
BELONGS
TO
HELMES BROS., INC.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
BUSINESS PURPOSES
LESTER H. HELMES, PRES.
COME TO
College Co*op
FOR
Books, Supplies, College Stationery
and College Banners
f—4SfiM*~-±
Steefel Bros.
FOUNTAIN PEN INK
We can supply you with
Waterman Ink and Onoto Ink-two of,the best
for fountain pen use.
Girls Shop
"We PEN CORNER,
Quality and Moderate Prices
ESTABLISHED- IBB7
CORNER-HUDSON AVESHO SO.PEARL.
JOHN T. D. BLACKBURN
Danker
We Grow
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40 and 42 Maiden Lane
THE
HAMILTON
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Principal Office and Dock*
129 Water Street
PRINTING
Tel. 998 Main
CO.
PRODUCERS OF T H E BETTER CLASS OF
BOOKLETS, C A T A L O G S , P U B L I C A T I O N S
D I R E C T BY M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G
AND
PltlNTURm OP THE BTATU COLLMat NMWB
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
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