Teaching Real Science: Practical strategies for creating a rigorous and relevant TEKS-

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Teaching Real Science:
Practical strategies
for creating
a rigorous and relevant TEKSbased science curriculum
CAST 2007
Austin, Texas
November 15–17
David Castro, science team lead
Barbara Taylor, senior science program coordinator
1
About the Dana Center
 Established during the early 1990s in the College of
Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin to
support equity in mathematics and science education.
 Coordinated the development of the mathematics and
science Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills.
 Worked long-term with over 200 school districts to
support systemic change.
 Became a Texas STEM Center in 2006.
 Provides ongoing research as well as support materials
and professional development for teachers and leaders.
2
Session Objectives
Learn four protocols that help teachers work
together to . . .
 analyze the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
(TEKS) for examples of rigor and relevance.
 translate the TEKS into clear student criteria.
 understand the role of the TEKS as part of a
coherent K–16 program.
 create practical definitions of rigor and relevance that
can be used to guide instruction.
3
A Working Definition of Rigor
and Relevance
• A rigorous educational program requires
students to demonstrate their skills and
knowledge in multiple ways and in multiple
contexts.
• A relevant curriculum clearly connects skills,
knowledge, and classroom experiences to
students’ daily lives, future coursework, and
careers.
4
What do the TEKS have to
do with rigor and
relevance?
5
Please find the 6th-Grade TEKS Matrix (page 2)
and the TEKS Matrix Reflection Form (page 7)
6
7
What kinds of things would students be
learning and doing
if they were exposed to a rigorous and
relevant lesson based on science
TEKS 6.11 A, B, and C?
8
Transparent Traits:
A practical example of
rigor and relevance
9
10
11
12
13
Transparent Traits:
Reflection Questions
Does the activity:
• reflect the intent of science TEKS 6.11 A, B, and
C?
• effectively build student understanding of
genetics?
• represent a rigorous and relevant lesson?
Be prepared to support your answers with specific
examples.
14
How can teachers
collaborate to create a
common understanding of
the TEKS?
15
Please find the 8th-Grade TEKS Matrix (page 4)
and the Curricula Collaboration Form (page 6)
16
Each group will use the Curricula
Collaboration Form to generate
student performance criteria for
science TEKS 8.11 A, B, or C.
Be prepared to share your results.
17
The Curricula Collaboration Form
18
19
20
Square Dancing:
A practical example of
rigor and relevance
21
22
23
24
Square Dancing:
Reflection Questions
Does the activity:
• reflect the intent of science TEKS 8.11 A, B, and
C?
• effectively build student understanding of
genetics?
• represent a rigorous and relevant lesson?
Be prepared to support your answers with specific
examples.
25
How can teachers
collaborate to create
vertically aligned lessons?
26
Please find the 7th-Grade TEKS Matrix (page 3)
and the PTM Process Guide (pages 8 and 9)
27
Professional Teaching Model
(PTM) Overview
28
PTM Process Guide
29
PTM: Study the TEKS
30
PTM: Determine the Criteria
31
PTM: Plan the Common Lesson
32
Transparent Traits, part 2:
A practical example of
rigor and relevance
33
34
35
36
37
Transparent Traits, Part 2:
Reflection Questions
Does the activity:
• reflect the intent of science TEKS 7.10 A, B,
and C?
• effectively build student understanding of
genetics?
• represent a rigorous and relevant lesson?
Be prepared to support your answers with specific
examples.
38
How can teachers
collaborate to create a
Guaranteed and Viable
Curriculum?
39
Why is curriculum so
important?
40
Educators need curriculum so
that they can purposefully and
methodically build student
knowledge and skills within a
K–16 context.
41
An effective curriculum must be
both Guaranteed and Viable
Educators must
• be confident about what students learned the previous
year.
• leave next year’s TEKS to next year’s teacher.
• have a common vision of what students should know
and be able to do.
• be able to teach the curriculum in the time available.
Powerful lessons alone are NOT enough.
42
Building a TEKS Tower
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
K
43
Building a TEKS Tower
(K–2)
44
Building a TEKS Tower
(3–4)
45
Dominant Fly:
A practical example of
rigor and relevance
46
47
48
49
50
Dominant Fly:
Reflection Questions
Does the activity:
• reflect the intent of Biology TEKS 6. A, B, C, D,
E, and F?
• effectively build student understanding of
genetics?
• represent a rigorous and relevant lesson?
Be prepared to support your answers with specific
examples.
51
An Operational Definition of
rigor and relevance
As a group, use today’s experiences to
create practical definitions of rigor and
relevance to share with your colleagues
when you return to your school. Focus on
what students will be able to do in a rigorous
educational program. Be prepared to share!
52
Session Objectives
Learn four protocols that help teachers work
together to . . .
 analyze the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
(TEKS) for examples of rigor and relevance.
 translate the TEKS into clear student criteria.
 understand the role of the TEKS as part of a
coherent K–16 program.
 create practical definitions of rigor and relevance that
can be used to guide instruction.
53
How did we do?
On an index card, please write:
 Something you learned
 An idea that you felt was powerful
 A concern or suggestion
54
Contact information
David Castro
Barbara Taylor
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.sciencetekstoolkit.org
www.utdanacenter.org
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