T Oregon State University 300

advertisement
300
OregonCollege
State University
of Health
and Human Sciences
T
he College of Health and
Dedicated to
Human Sciences advances
improving the lives,
knowledge, policies, and
health, and
practices to enhance the lives,
environment of
health, and environments of individuals,
individuals,
families, and communities in Oregon and
families, and
beyond. We achieve this mission through
communities.
exemplary undergraduate and graduate
education, creative scholarship, and
effective Extension programs and
outreach initiatives.
We offer the Pacific Northwest's most
comprehensive array of undergraduate
and graduate professional education in
five areas:
• Design and Human Environment
• Human Development and Family
Sciences
• Nutrition and Exercise Sciences
• Public Health
Our graduates are employed in a wide
variety of research, education, service,
management, and leadership positions in
business, government, industry, education, and agencies related to health,
nutrition, housing, apparel and interior
design, education, community development, and family relationships.
The college’s scholarly and creative
work improves the lives of individuals,
families, and communities. Reflecting the
strength and diversity of our faculty and
disciplines, this work ranges from
laboratory-based investigations of
nutrition and physiology, to artistic and
other creative works in dance and design.
Our outreach initiatives and programs
serve individuals, families, professionals,
and communities across the campus,
Oregon, the nation, and the world. This
outreach program includes the Extension
Family and Community Development
(EFCD) program, active continuing
education initiatives ranging from credit
and noncredit courses to full degrees, and
service programs that serve OSU students,
faculty, and staff, as well as individuals and
families across Oregon and the nation.
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Advanced degrees include the Master of
Public Health (MPH), the Master of
Science (MS), Master of Arts (MA), and
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The MS and
PhD degree is offered in all departments
of the college and the MA in the Department of Design and Human Environment.
All departments also participate in the
Master of Arts Interdisciplinary Studies
(MAIS) graduate degree program.
ADVISING
The Office of Academic Advising and
Student Support is a primary source of
information for all College of Health and
Human Sciences undergraduate students.
Students receive accurate, thorough, and
timely information regarding their degree
requirements, academic progress, job
opportunities, and campus activities.
Professional advisors oversee the undergraduate students within the college.
Faculty members also serve a vital role to
undergraduates by providing professional
and career advice. Faculty members often
involve students in research and professional activities that create opportunities
for leadership, personal growth, and
discovery.
INTERNSHIPS AND PRACTICUMS
To help prepare College of Health and
Human Sciences graduates for careers, all
students participate in an intensive
internship and/or practicum program as
part of their academic course work. These
opportunities provide students with
invaluable work experience in their field
of study and often lead to postgraduate
employment. Faculty members help place
students in the workforce and work with
on-site mentors to create a meaningful
internship experience.
INTERNATIONAL DEGREE
Undergraduates with majors in the
College of Health and Human Sciences
also may earn a second degree in International Studies. See the International
Education section of this catalog for more
information.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The College of Health and Human
Sciences offers a variety of scholarships to
deserving students. Many are reserved for
students in designated majors or for firstyear students. A list of scholarships and
application forms are available from the
college’s website at http://www.hhs.
oregonstate.edu/. Additional scholarship
information is also available at the OSU
Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships.
TEACHER EDUCATION
Students who plan to pursue careers as
public school teachers in physical
education, grades K through 12, must
complete the professional teacher
education program. Students should
follow this process:
1. Select an academic major in the area of
exercise and sport science in which the
student wishes to teach.
2. Complete the baccalaureate degree.
Students are strongly advised to take
the supporting education courses,
TCE 411, TCE 416, TCE 418, TCE 419,
as undergraduates in preparation for
the Professional Teacher Education
program.
3. In consultation with an academic
advisor, physical education students
will select two field experiences in the
public school classroom setting (one at
the elementary level and one at the
secondary level).
4. Apply for admission to the professional
education program.
Dean’s Office
123 Women’s Bldg.
Oregon State
University
Corvallis, OR 973316802
541-737-3220
Student
Advising
116 Milam Hall
Oregon State
University
Corvallis, OR 973315109
541-737-8900
1-888-219-4513
E-mail:
[email protected]
oregonstate.edu
Website: http://
www.hhs.
oregonstate.edu
ADMINISTRATION
Tammy Bray
Dean
737-3256
[email protected]
oregonstate.edu
Jeffrey
McCubbin
Associate Dean
737-5921
[email protected]
oregonstate.edu
Liz Gray
Assistant Dean
737-0985
[email protected]
oregonstate.edu
Kim
McAlexander
Head Advisor
737-8900
[email protected]
oregonstate.edu
College of Health and Human Sciences
Requirements for admission to the
professional education program
include:
1. Demonstration of basic skills in
reading, writing and mathematics by
passing the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST).
2. Holding a baccalaureate degree.
3. Admission as a regular graduate
student.
4. Favorable recommendations from
immediate supervisors regarding
ability to work with school-aged
children/youth.
5. Recommendations and statement of
“good character.”
6. Subject matter competence as specified
by the appropriate department.
An academic major in exercise and sport
science is recommended for students
who want to be elementary classroom
teachers. Consult an advisor in the
College of Health and Human Sciences
for further information.
USE OF FACILITIES
Student registration fees entitle every
student to the use of locker rooms and
shower facilities. A towel and free
laundry, and basket and lock in the
locker room also are provided to
encourage students to maintain an
active and healthy lifestyle.
PROFESSIONAL TEACHER
EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Courses for the Professional Teacher
Education programs in the area of
physical education are taught primarily
in the College of Health and Human
Sciences.
The graduate Professional Teacher
Education program includes graduate
courses and extensive practical experience in the public schools at levels
K through 12. A cohort of students
enters the program during summer term
and completes certification and master's
degree requirements the following June.
The Physical Education program
offers students the opportunity to
participate in continuous on-site
supervised internships in elementary,
middle and high school settings. In
association with the nationally recognized graduate program in Movement
Studies for the Disabled, students will
work with special needs children and
youth in physical education environments. Activities in the Instructional
Analysis Laboratory offer students the
opportunity to improve their teaching
behavior through analysis.
A strong public school partnership
including collaboration with area public
school teachers is an essential feature of
both programs. Master teachers are
selected from the schools and invited to
participate in this joint effort to prepare
outstanding teachers.
Admission requirements for the
program are listed under the Teacher
Education section.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To graduate with a BS degree in any of
the health and human science majors, a
student must complete 180 credits, of
which 60 are upper division, and fulfill
the following requirements:
University Baccalaureate Core (48)
Approved speech course (3)
Department requirements (listed below
for each major)
First-Year Program
First-year students usually take 45 credits
in their first three terms, selected from
the following in consultation with their
advisor:
Baccalaureate Core
Skills:
301
Market Analysis and Research
Merchandising Management
Minors
Cultural/Historic Aspects of the
Near Environment
Merchandising Management
Graduate Majors
Design and Human Environment
(MA, MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
(MA, MS)
Cultural/Historic Aspects of the Near
Environment
Design in the Near Environment
Human Behavior and the Near
Environment
Merchandising Management
Textiles
Graduate Areas of Concentration
(PhD)
Cultural/Historic Aspects of the Near
Environment
Design in the Near Environment
Human Behavior and the Near
Environment
WR 121. *English Composition (3)
MTH 105. *Intro to Contemporary
Mathematics (3)
or higher mathematics course (3)
HHS 231. *Lifetime Fitness for Health (2)
Graduate Minor
Perspectives:
Design and Human Environment
HDFS 201. *Contemporary Families in
the U.S. (3)
Literature and the Arts (3)
Physical or biological science (min. 12)
Social Processes and Institutions (3)
Western Culture (3)
Other courses from major or
baccalaureate core (11)
DESIGN AND HUMAN
ENVIRONMENT
Leslie Davis Burns, Chair
224 Milam Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-5101
541-737-3796
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/dhe/
FACULTY
Professors Burns, Francis
Associate Professors Caughey, Chen,
Mullet, E. Pedersen, Read, Steggell
Assistant Professors Kim, Mahmood
Instructors Burnett, Cluver, Egan,
Laughlin, M. Pedersen
Undergraduate Majors
Apparel Design (BS)
Interior Design (BS)
Housing Studies (BS)
Merchandising Management (BS)
Options
Historic and Cultural Studies
The Department of Design and Human
Environment offers undergraduate
instruction in the areas of apparel
design, interior design, housing studies
and merchandising management.
Advanced courses prepare students for
positions in retailing of apparel and
textile products, design and
development of sewn products for
manufacturers and retailers, housing
design and policy, design of commercial
and residential environments, and for
graduate work leading to research and
college teaching. The Design and
Human Environment majors are
endorsed by the National Kitchen and
Bath Association; graduates may apply
to sit for the Certified Kitchen Designer
and/or Certified Bath Designer
examinations.
GRADUATE STUDIES
The department offers the MS, MA, and
PhD degrees. Areas of emphasis for the
MS and MA degrees include cultural/
historic aspects of the near environment,
human behavior and the near environment, design in the near environment,
merchandising management and
textiles. Areas of emphasis for the PhD
degree include cultural/historic aspects
of the near environment, design in the
near environment, and human behavior
and the near environment.
302
Oregon State University
PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
To be considered for admission to the
Apparel Design, Interior Design, and
Housing Studies professional majors, a
student must complete 45 credits with a
minimum cumulative GPA of 2.4. The
list of designated courses is available in
the Office of Academic Advising and
Student Services in Milam 116.
APPAREL DESIGN (BS, HBS)
Baccalaureate Core (48)
HDFS 201. *Contemporary Families in
the U.S. (3)
Required Professional Core (63)
BA 390. Marketing (4)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (WR III)
(3)
or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (WR III) (3)
or COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (WR III) (3)
DHE 245. Applications of Design
Theory (5)
DHE 255. Textiles (5)
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (DPD) (4)
DHE 277. Fashion Trend Analysis (3)
DHE 326. Sewn Product Development (5)
DHE 366. Cross Cultural Aspects of the
Near Environment (4)
DHE 370. ^Textile and Apparel Market
Analysis (4)
DHE 453. Product Quality Assurance (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
or DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 475. Global Production and Trade
in Textiles and Apparel (4)
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(SPI) (4)
ECON 202. *Intro to Macroeconomics
(SPI) (4)
MTH 111. *College Algebra (M–SK) (4)
Apparel Design (63–66)
ART 115. Foundations: 2-D (4)
ART 131. Foundations: Drawing I (4)
DHE 182. Computer Assisted Design
and Drafting (3)
DHE 227. Apparel Construction (3)
DHE 321. Technical Drawing,
Illustration and Fashion Design (4)
DHE 327. Flat Pattern Design (4)
DHE 427. Draping (4)
DHE 428. Apparel Production Processes
(4)
DHE 429. Advanced Apparel Design (4)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 400. Field Experience Orientation
and Development (1) (Take twice for
2 credits)
and DHE 410. Field Experience (Sect. 3,
Apparel Design) (12)
OR
+Select 14 credits from other
300/400-level DHE courses
and/or listed ART and BA courses
(minimum of 7 credits from DHE)
Select two courses from the following: (6–8)
ART 101. *Intro to the Visual Arts (LA)
(4)
ART 117. Foundations: 3-D (4)
ART 120. Foundations: Digital Imaging
(3)
ART 204. *Intro to Art History-Western
(LA or WC) (3)
ART 215. Design III/Color (4)
ART 234. Drawing II/Figure (3)
ART 263. Digital Photography (3)
ART 367. *History of Design (STS) (3)
Select two courses from the following: (8)
BA 347. International Business (4)
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and
Team Performance (4)
BA 492. Consumer Behavior (4)
DHE 470. Retail Merchandising (4)
Electives (0–18)
Total=180
* Course fulfills baccalaureate core
requirement
+Courses cannot be counted twice to fulfill
requirements of the major
HOUSING STUDIES (BS, HBS)
Baccalaureate Core (48)
(Professional requirements include
12–15 baccalaureate core credits.)
HDFS 201. *Contemporary Families in
the U.S. (3)
Required Housing Studies
Professional Core (93–99)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
or COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (SK) (3)
DHE 180. Introduction to Single Family
Housing (3)
DHE 182. Computer Assisted Design
and Drafting (3)
DHE 187. Intro to Design
Communication (3)
DHE 245. Applications of Design
Theory (5)
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (DPD) (4)
DHE 283. Building Construction and
Materials (3)
DHE 287. Studio I: Design
Communication (4)
DHE 288. Environmental Building
Systems (3)
DHE 289. Studio II: Residential Space
Planning (4)
DHE 331. Contemporary Issues in
Housing (3)
DHE 387. Studio III: Advanced Design
Communication (4)
DHE 389. Studio IV: Kitchen and Bath
Design (4)
DHE 400. Field Experience Orientation
and Development (1,1)
and DHE 410. Field Experience
(Sect. 4, Housing Studies) (6,9,12)
or select 6 upper-division credits that
align with your career goals;
departmental approval required.
DHE 432. Studio V: Advanced Housing
Studio (4)
DHE 434. Housing for the Aging
Population (3)
DHE 435. Housing Policy (3)
DHE 436. Real Estate Finance and
Management (5)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 464. Contemporary History of
Interiors and Housing (3)
DHE 481. ^Professional Practice in
Housing and Interior Design (3)
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(SPI) (4)
MTH 111. *College Algebra (SK) (4)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
WSE 470. *Forests, Wood, and
Civilization (3)
or H 495. Design for Environment,
Safety and Health (3)
Electives (20–34)
Total=180
INTERIOR DESIGN (BS, HBS)
Baccalaureate Core (48)
(Professional Requirements include
21 baccalaureate core credits.)
HDFS 201. *Contemporary Families in
the U.S. (3)
Required Interior Design
Professional Core (121)
ART 115. Foundations: 2-D (4)
ART 117. Foundations: 3-D (4)
ART 131. Foundations: Drawing I (4)
ART 204. *Intro to Art History-Western
(LA) (3)
ART 205. *Intro to Art History-Western
(WC) (3)
ART 206. *Intro to Art History-Western
(WC or LA) (3)
ART 215. Design III/Color (4)
BA 230. Business Law I (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
or COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (SK) (3)
DHE 180. Introduction to Single Family
Housing (3)
DHE 182. Computer Assisted Design
and Drafting (3)
DHE 187. Intro to Design
Communication (3)
DHE 245. Applications of Design
Theory (5)
DHE 255. Textiles (5)
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (DPD) (4)
DHE 283. Building Construction and
Materials (3)
DHE 287. Studio I: Design
Communications (4)
DHE 288. Environmental Building
Systems (3)
DHE 289. Studio II: Residential Space
Planning (4)
DHE 352. Textiles for Interiors (3)
College of Health and Human Sciences
DHE 387. Studio III: Advanced Design
Communication (4)
DHE 389. Studio IV: Kitchen and Bath
Design (4)
DHE 443. Studio VI: Commercial Design
(4)
DHE 445. Studio VII: Advanced
Commercial Design (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 464. Contemporary History of
Interiors and Housing (3)
DHE 481. ^Professional Practice in
Housing and Interior Design (3)
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(SPI) (4)
MTH 111. *College Algebra (4)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
Select a minimum of 12 credits from the
following:
ART 367. *History of Design (STS) (3)
DHE 331. Contemporary Issues in
Housing (3)
DHE 366. Cross Cultural Aspects of the
Near Environment (4)
DHE 410. Field Experience (Sect. 2,
Interior Design) (6,9,12)
and (required if interning) DHE 400.
Field Experience Orientation and
Development (1,1)
DHE 434. Housing for the Aging
Population (3)
DHE 435. Housing Policy (3)
DHE 436. Real Estate Finance and
Management (5)
DHE 466. Research in the Cross Cultural
Aspects of the Near Environment (3)
DHE 490. Study Tour (1–6)
HORT 280. Intro to Landscape Design
(3)
Electives (0–11)
Total=180
MERCHANDISING MANAGEMENT
(BS, HBS)
Baccalaureate Core (48)
HDFS 201. *Contemporary Families in
the U.S. (3)
Required Professional Core (59)
BA 390. Marketing (4)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (WR III)
(3)
or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (WR III) (3)
or COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (WR III) (3)
DHE 240. Survey of Design in the Near
Environment (3)
DHE 255. Textiles (5)
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (DPD) (4)
DHE 277. Fashion Trend Analysis (3)
DHE 326. Sewn Product Development (5)
DHE 366. Cross Cultural Aspects of the
Near Environment (4)
DHE 370. ^Textile and Apparel Market
Analysis (4)
DHE 453. Product Quality Assurance (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
or DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 475. Global Production and Trade
in Textiles and Apparel (4)
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(SPI) (4)
ECON 202. *Intro to Macroeconomics
(SPI) (4)
MTH 111. *College Algebra (M–SK) (4)
In addition to completing the baccalaureate core and required professional core
described above, merchandising
management students must complete
one of the following options:
• Historic and Cultural Studies Option
• Market Analysis and Research Option
• Merchandising Management Option
(with one of two areas of emphasis)
Footnotes:
* Baccalaureate core course
CD=Cultural Diversity
DPD=Difference, Power, and Discrimination
LA=Literature and the Arts
SPI=Social Processes and Institutions
STS=Science, Technology, and Society
WC=Western Culture
^ Writing Intensive Course (WIC)
HISTORIC AND CULTURAL
STUDIES OPTION
ANTH 210. *Comparative Cultures (CD)
(3)
AG 111. Computer Applications in
Agriculture (3)
or CS 101. Computers: Applications
and Implications (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
or DHE 462. History of the Near
Environment II (4)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 466. Research in the Cross-Cultural
Aspects of the Near Environment (3)
DHE 470. Retail Merchandising (4)
Select one course from the following:
(WR II)
PHL 121. *Reasoning and Writing (3)
WR 201. *Writing for Media (3)
WR 214. *Writing in Business (3)
WR 222. *English Composition (3)
WR 323. *English Composition (3)
WR 327. *Technical Writing (3)
WR 330. *Understanding Grammar (3)
Select one course from the following:
ART 204 or ART 205 or ART 206. *Intro
to Art History-Western (LA or WC)
(3,3,3)
ENG 210 or ENG 211 or ENG 212 or
ENG 213. *Literatures of the World
(3,3,3,3)
ENG 215. *Classical Mythology (3)
ENG 221. *African American Literature (3)
ENG 260. *Literature of American
Minorities (3)
RUS 232. *Russian Culture (3)
Select a minimum of 9 credits from the
following:
HST 101 or HST 102 or HST 103.
*History of Western Civilization (WC)
(3,3,3)
303
HST 428 or HST 429 or HST 430.
History of Western Thought (3,3,3)
Select one course from the following:
ANTH 312. *Peoples of the WorldEurope (CD) (3)
ANTH 313. *Peoples of the World-Latin
America (CD) (3)
ANTH 314. *Peoples of the WorldMiddle East (CD) (3)
ANTH 315. *Peoples of the WorldAfrica (CD) (3)
ANTH 316. *Peoples of the WorldSouth and Southeast Asia (CD) (3)
ANTH 317. *Peoples of the WorldPacific (CD)(3)
ANTH 318. *Peoples of the WorldChina (CD) (3)
ANTH 319. *Peoples of the WorldJapan and Korea (CD) (3)
Select a minimum of 9 credits from the
following:
ANTH 493. Statistical Applications in
Anthropology (1–3)
ANTH 496. Visual Anthropology (1–3)
DHE 406. Projects (1–16)
or DHE 400. Field Experience Orientation and Development (1,1)
and DHE 410. Field Experience (Sect.
5, Historic/Cultural Studies) (6,9,12)
DHE 464. Contemporary History of
Interiors and Housing (3)
DHE 577. Fashion Theory (3)
Electives (20–22)
Total=180
MARKET ANALYSIS AND
RESEARCH OPTION
AG 111. Computer Applications in
Agriculture (3)
or CS 101. Computers: Applications
and Implications (4)
BA 215. Money and Investment
Management: Manager, Lender,
Investor Viewpoint (4)
DHE 401. Research and Scholarship
(1–16)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 470. Retail Merchandising (4)
DHE 472. Merchandise Planning and
Control (4)
DHE 473. Assortment Analysis and
Management (4)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(SPI) (3,3)
SOC 204. *Introduction to Sociology
(SPI)(3)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
ST 211. Introduction to Hypothesis
Testing (1)
ST 352. Introduction to Statistical
Methods (4)
Select a minimum of 9 credits from the
following:
BA 396. Fundamentals of Marketing
Research (4)
BA 492. Consumer Behavior (4)
DHE 406. Projects (1–16)
or DHE 410. Field Experience (6–12)
DHE 577. Fashion Theory (3)
PSY 360. Social Psychology (3)
SOC 300. The Sociological Perspective (3)
SOC 360. *Population Trends and
Policy (3)
304
Oregon State University
SOC 415. Understanding Social
Research (3)
SOC 416. ^Conducting Social Research
(3)
Electives (12–14)
Total=180
MERCHANDISING
MANAGEMENT OPTION
AG 111. Computer Applications in
Agriculture (3)
or CS 101. Computers: Applications
and Implications (4)
BA 215. Money and Investment
Management: Manager, Lender,
Investor Viewpoint (4)
DHE 470. Retail Merchandising (4)
DHE 472. Merchandising Planning and
Control (4)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
Select one course from the following:
PHL 205. *Ethics (WC) (4)
or PHL 280. *Ethics of Diversity (DPD)
(4)
Select one course from the following:
(WR II)
PHL 121. *Reasoning and Writing (3)
WR 214. *Writing in Business (3)
WR 222. *English Composition (3)
WR 323. *English Composition (3)
WR 327. *Technical Writing (3)
WR 330. *Understanding Grammar
(WR II) (3)
Select one course from the following:
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(SPI) (3,3)
SOC 204. *Intro to Sociology (SPI) (3)
Select three courses from the following:
(9–12)
BA 347. International Business (4)
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and
Team Performance (4)
BA 396. Fundamentals of Marketing
Research (4)
BA 452. Leadership and Team Building
(4)
BA 453. Human Resources Management (4)
BA 492. Consumer Behavior (4)
BA 493. Advertising Management (4)
BA 495. Retail Management (4)
PSY 360. Social Psychology (3)
SOC 360. *Population Trends and
Policy (DPD) (3)
Areas of emphasis within the
Merchandising Management Option—
Complete one of the following two:
1. Apparel/Sewn Products Emphasis
(21–22)
Select two courses from the following:
+DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
+DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 473. Assortment Analysis and
Management (4)
DHE 400. Field Experience Orientation
and Development (1,1)
and DHE 410. Field Experience (Sect.
1, Merchandising Management) (12)
or select 14 credits from other 300/400level ANTH, ART, BA, COMM, DHE,
PSY, or SOC courses.
+ Courses cannot be counted twice to
fulfill requirements of the major.
2. Interior Textiles/Furnishings Emphasis
(26–28)
DHE 180. Introduction to Single Family
Housing (3)
DHE 182. Computer Assisted Design
and Drafting (3)
DHE 352. Textiles for Interiors (3)
DHE 464. Contemporary History of
Interiors and Housing (3)
DHE 400. Field Experience Orientation
and Development (1,1)
and DHE 410. Field Experience (Sect. 1,
Merchandising Management) (12)
or select 14 credits from other
300/400-level ANTH, ART, BA, COMM,
DHE, PSY, or SOC courses.
Total=180
CULTURAL/HISTORICAL ASPECTS
OF NEAR ENVIRONMENT MINOR
The Cultural/Historic Aspects of the
Near Environment minor emphasizes
the cultural and historical aspects of the
near environment, specifically apparel,
interiors, textiles, and the built
environment.
All courses must be taken on a graded
(A–F) basis.
ANTH 210. *Comparative Cultures (3)
DHE 240. Intro to Aesthetics (3)
DHE 366. Cross Cultural Aspects of the
Near Environment (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near
Environment I (4)
DHE 462. *History of the Near
Environment II (STS) (4)
Core courses (18)
Select one course from the following (3)
HST 101, HST 102, or HST 103.
*History of Western Civilization
(3,3,3)
HST 428, HST 429, or HST 430. History
of Western Thought (3,3,3)
Select three courses from the following
(two must be upper division) (9–10)
DHE 250. Fundamentals of Textiles (4)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 464. Contemporary History of
Interiors and Housing (3)
DHE 466. Research in the CrossCultural Aspects of the Near Environment (3)
DHE 577. Fashion Theory (3)
Total=30–31
MERCHANDISING
MANAGEMENT MINOR
The Merchandising Management minor
emphasizes the merchandising of textile
products such as apparel, outdoor gear,
and home furnishings. BA 215 or
equivalent, BA 390, and ECON 201,
ECON 202 are prerequisites for upperdivision courses in the minor.
All courses must be taken on a graded
(A–F) basis.
DHE 250. Fundamentals of Textiles (4)
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (DPD) (4)
DHE 277. Fashion Trend Analysis (3)
DHE 326. Sewn Product Development
(5)
DHE 370. ^Textile and Apparel Market
Analysis (4)
DHE 470. Retail Merchandising (4)
Core courses (24)
Select a minimum of 7 credits from the
following:
DHE 366. Cross Cultural Aspects of the
Near Environment (4)
DHE 461. History of the Near Environment (4)
DHE 462. *History of the Near Environment II (STS) (4)
DHE 463. History of Contemporary
Fashion (4)
DHE 472. Merchandise Planning and
Control (4)
DHE 473. Assortment Analysis and
Management (4)
DHE 475. Global Production and Trade
in Textiles and Apparel (4)
Total=30–31
DESIGN AND HUMAN
ENVIRONMENT (MA, MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Human behavior in the near
environment, cultural/historic aspects
of the near environment, design in
the near environment, merchandising
management, and textiles
The Department of Design and Human
Environment offers graduate work
leading toward Master of Science,
Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Design and Human
Environment.
The MS, MA and PhD degree
programs in DHE are approved by
Western Interstate Commission for
Higher Education (WICHE) as Western
Regional Graduate Programs (WRGP).
Students from Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana,
Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota,
South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and
Wyoming may attend at resident
tuition rates.
Areas of concentration for MS and
MA degrees include human behavior in
the near environment, cultural and
historic aspects of the near environment,
design in the near environment, merchandising management and textiles.
Areas of concentration for the PhD
degree include human behavior in the
near environment, design in the near
environment, and cultural and historic
aspects of the near environment.
Graduate programs in DHE prepare
students for college and university
teaching, research and creative scholarship; careers in design, product development, product quality assurance or
merchandising; historic/cultural
research, collection management, and
College of Health and Human Sciences
preservation of textile and architectural
artifacts; and public policy.
Research is a central component of
the DHE graduate program. Students
have an opportunity to work on
research and creative activity projects
with internationally recognized faculty
members who have published in the
areas of historic costume, human
behavior and the near environment,
apparel, design, interior design, fashion
theory, consumer behavior, and housing.
Students who apply for admission to
the program must submit GRE scores, a
one-page statement of professional
goals including a time schedule for
completion of the degree as well as the
program and area of concentration they
wish to pursue, and three letters of
reference. Students may begin graduate
study any term. Completion of the
degree in summers only is not possible
because of course offerings.
For further information, contact
DHE Graduate Program Coordinator,
Department of Design and Human
Environment, Oregon State University,
Corvallis, OR 97331-5101.
DESIGN AND HUMAN
ENVIRONMENT GRADUATE
MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
COURSES
DHE 180. INTRODUCTION TO SINGLE FAMILY
HOUSING (3). Critical examination of single family
housing. Considers space planning fundamentals.
Introduces construction principles and methods.
Develops a working knowledge of methods used
to communicate architectural ideas.
DHE 182. COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN AND
DRAFTING (3). Instruction in computer assisted
design and drafting techniques.
DHE 187. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN
COMMUNICATION (3). Survey of fundamentals of
design communication. Introduction to terminology
and nomenclature of construction documents.
DHE 199. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16).
DHE 227. APPAREL CONSTRUCTION (3).
Construction techniques and processes used to
produce apparel. Analysis of apparel construction
related to equipment, cost, quality, end use and
customer needs.
DHE 240. INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS (3).
Examines the basic issues and the major theories
of aesthetics, the elements and principles of
design, as related to the fields of apparel,
interiors, housing, and merchandising.
DHE 250. FUNDAMENTALS OF TEXTILES (4).
Properties, characteristics, selection, and use of
textile fibers, yarns, and fabrics; fabrication and
finishing processes. OTHER PREREQS: Not open
to apparel design, interior design, or
merchandising management majors.
DHE 255. TEXTILES (5). Properties, identification,
selection, use and care of textile fibers and
fabrics. Analysis of fiber, yarn, fabric
construction, color and finish in textiles. Lec/lab.
DHE 270. *APPEARANCE, POWER AND SOCIETY
(4). Survey of the cultural, sociological,
psychological, economic, and aesthetic influences
on appearance and power. (Bacc Core Course)
305
DHE 277. FASHION TREND ANALYSIS (3). The
fashion trend forecasting process within the soft
goods industry; use of information sources and
trend analysis in developing and promoting a
fashion product.
DHE 366. CROSS CULTURAL ASPECTS OF THE
NEAR ENVIRONMENT (4). Sociocultural study of
the function and design of clothing, housing,
interiors, and textiles. Cultural diversity; impact of
cross-cultural contact; ethnicity.
DHE 280. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION METHODS
(4). Basic construction concepts, code
constraints, materials, and methods of
construction for building projects. Utilizes
individual research, discussion, sketching, hand
drafting, and other hand-generated visual
communication techniques. Lec/lab.
DHE 370. ^TEXTILE AND APPAREL MARKET
ANALYSIS (4). Organization, operation, and
merchandising activities of the domestic textile
and apparel industries. Analysis of the marketing
process and the product/service mix of textile and
apparel manufacturers. (Writing Intensive Course)
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 277* or AIHM 277
OTHER PREREQS: BA 390 is recommended.
DHE 281. MULTIPLE FAMILY HOUSE PLANNING
(3). Multiple family house planning in compliance
with land development and building codes and the
Americans with Disabilities Act. Utilizes CAD.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 280
DHE 282. ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS
(3). Lighting, heating, ventilating, air conditioning,
and acoustical systems in residential and
commercial buildings. Includes sustainable
building principles. ENFORCED PREREQS:
DHE 280
DHE 283. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND
MATERIALS (3). Introduction to the manufacture,
characteristics and use of construction materials
used in contract and residential construction,
including environmentally friendly materials.
OTHER PREREQS: Enrollment restricted to
students who have been admitted into the
DHE Interior Design Professional Program or the
DHE Housing Studies Professional Program.
DHE 287. STUDIO I: DESIGN COMMUNICATION
(4). Fundamentals of design communication
including drafting, lettering, illustrative sketching,
perspective, and orthographic projections. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 187.
DHE 288. ENVIRONMENTAL BUILDING SYSTEMS
(3). Lighting, heating, ventilating, air conditioning,
and acoustical systems in residential and
commercial buildings. Includes sustainable building
principles. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 280
DHE 289. STUDIO II: RESIDENTIAL SPACE
PLANNING (4). Utilization of space planning
principles in the design of residences. Includes
rendering, perspective drawing, graphic
communication techniques, and model building.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 281 and DHE 282
OTHER PREREQS: Enrollment is restricted to
Interior Design and Housing Studies students
admitted to the Professional Programs.
DHE 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16).
DHE 321.TECHNICAL DRAWING, ILLUSTRATION
AND FASHION DESIGN (4). Techniques in
technical drawing and fashion illustration; use of
computer-aided design applications in the design
of apparel. ENFORCED PREREQS: (DHE 240 or
AIHM 240) and (DHE 277 or AIHM 277)
DHE 326. SEWN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (5).
Materials, assembly process, quality factors, and
costs in the development of sewn textile
products; consideration of consumer product
expectations and intended end-use. Lec/lab.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 250* or DHE 255*
DHE 327. FLAT PATTERN DESIGN (4). Pattern
design using the flat pattern method; manual and
computerized pattern drafting, development and
construction of design prototypes. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 227 OTHER PREREQS: DHE 182
is recommended.
DHE 331. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN HOUSING
(3). Introduction to housing as a product,
environment, service and process. Emphasizes
housing issues that have impact upon the wellbeing of individuals, families and communities.
DHE 352. TEXTILES FOR INTERIORS (3). Types,
qualities, and maintenance of functional and
decorative fabrics for homes and public buildings.
Use of specifications, standards, and legislation.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 255
DHE 385. STUDIO I: RESIDENTIAL SPACE
PLANNING (4). Utilization of space planning
principles in the design of residences. Includes
rendering, perspective drawing, graphic
communication techniques, and model building.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 281 and DHE 282
OTHER PREREQS: Enrollment is restricted to
Interior Design and Housing Studies students
admitted to the Professional Programs.
DHE 387. STUDIO III: ADVANCED DESIGN
COMMUNICATION (4). Development of illustrative
sketching, perspective drawing, concept model
construction, and presentation materials. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 289.
DHE 389. STUDIO IV: KITCHEN AND BATH
DESIGN (4). Kitchen and bath planning in
compliance with building codes and industry
standards, with emphasis on resource
conservation, safety, and special needs. This
course utilizes both CAD and hand drafting.
OTHER PREREQS: DHE 387.
DHE 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16).
DHE 400. FIELD EXPERIENCE ORIENTATION
AND DEVELOPMENT (1). Exploration of career
choices, goals, and field experience opportunities;
preparation in planning, obtaining, and completing
an internship. Graded P/N. Section 1:
Merchandising Management. Section 2: Interior
Design. Section 3: Apparel Design. Section 4:
Housing Studies. Section 5: Historic and Cultural
Studies. Section 6: Market Analysis and
Research. May be repeated for a maximum of
3 credits.
DHE 401. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 402. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16). OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
DHE 403. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 406. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 407. SEMINAR (1-16).
DHE 408. WORKSHOP (1-16).
DHE 409. PRACTICUM (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 410. FIELD EXPERIENCE (6-12). Integration
and application of academic preparation in an onthe-job work situation with supervision by
personnel at the participating site and university
faculty. Application must be made prior to
participation. Section 1: Merchandising
Management (12), ENFORCED PREREQ: DHE 370
and DHE 400 and BA 215. Section 2: Interior
Design (6,9,12), ENFORCED PREREQ: DHE 385
and DHE 400. Section 3: Apparel Design (12),
ENFORCED PREREQ: DHE 321 and DHE 400.
Section 4: Housing Studies (6,9,12), ENFORCED
PREREQ: DHE 385 and DHE 400. Section 5:
Historic/Cultural Studies (6,9,12), ENFORCED
PREREQ: (DHE 400 and DHE 461) or DHE 462 or
DHE 463 or DHE 464. Section 6: Market Analysis
(6,9,12), ENFORCED PREREQ: (DHE 370 and
306
Oregon State University
DHE 400 and BA 215). ENFORCED PREREQS:
DHE 400 OTHER PREREQS: Junior standing and
departmental approval.
DHE 427. DRAPING (4). Garment design based on
manipulation of fabric on a body form; emphasis
on the interrelationships between fabric, garment
design, and the human form. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 327
DHE 428. APPAREL PRODUCTION PROCESSES
(4). Production pattern-making, pattern grading,
marker making, garment specifications, and cost
analysis. Apparel assembly processes; analysis
of equipment capabilities and production
processes. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 326 and
DHE 327 and DHE 370
DHE 429. ADVANCED APPAREL DESIGN (4).
Design processes and research methods used to
develop apparel designs. Students will identify
design problems and implement appropriate
methods to develop apparel products. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 321* and DHE 327* and
DHE 427* and DHE 428*
DHE 432. STUDIO V: ADVANCED HOUSING
STUDIO (4). Problem-solving and design
processes to meet or satisfy actual client needs;
projects may range from remodeling to new
construction design. Professional portfolio
preparation. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 385.
DHE 434. HOUSING THE AGING POPULATION
(3). Shelter alternatives and services that address
the housing needs of the aging population.
Emphasis on the continuum of care and housing
options.
DHE 435. HOUSING POLICY (3). Analysis of
local, state, and federal housing and community
development policies and programs that address
the housing issues and needs of individuals,
families, and communities.
DHE 436. REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND
MANAGEMENT (5). Examines principles and
practices used in the purchase, sale and
management of real estate. Considers
perspectives of consumers, investors, managers,
and lenders.
DHE 442. STUDIO II: RESIDENTIAL DESIGN (4).
Design of interiors, space planning, and
specifying interior finishes, materials, and
furniture for use by able-bodied and physically
challenged clients. Utilizes computer-aided design.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 385 OTHER
PREREQS: Enrollment is restricted to Interior
Design Studies students admitted to the
Professional Program.
DHE 443. STUDIO III: COMMERCIAL DESIGN (4).
Commercial design, space planning and
specifications for facilities such as retail,
hospitality, healthcare, public institutions and
offices. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 442
DHE 445. STUDIO VII: ADVANCED COMMERCIAL
DESIGN (4). Interior design project development
with emphasis on design of healthcare and
hospitality environments. Application of knowledge
of space planning, building codes, and
specifications to projects. Studio work includes
concept sketches, schematic drawings, contract
documents, sample boards, and models. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 443.
DHE 453. PRODUCT QUALITY ASSURANCE (4).
Analysis and evaluation of textile materials and
final products in relation to end use. Performance
properties and serviceability testing, product
specifications and industrial standards.
ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 255
DHE 461. HISTORY OF THE NEAR
ENVIRONMENT I (4). History of clothing, furniture,
interiors, textiles, and housing and building styles;
primarily Euro-American, from the ancient world to
the Renaissance. The influence of social and
cultural factors upon design of the near
environment. Need not be taken in sequence.
DHE 462. *HISTORY OF THE NEAR
ENVIRONMENT II (4). History of clothing,
furniture, interiors, textiles, and housing and
building styles; primarily Euro-American, from the
Renaissance to 1899. The influence of social and
cultural factors upon design of the near
environment. Need not be taken in sequence.
(Bacc Core Course)
DHE 507. SEMINAR (1-16).
DHE 463. HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY
FASHION (4). Historic analysis of fashion change
in men’s and women’s apparel from 1890 to the
present. The influence of social and cultural
factors upon Euro-American fashion. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 461 or DHE 462 is recommended.
DHE 527. DRAPING (4). Garment design based on
manipulation of fabric on a body form; emphasis
on the interrelationships between fabric, garment
design, and the human form.
DHE 464. CONTEMPORARY HISTORY OF
INTERIORS AND HOUSING (3). History of housing
and interior design from the mid-19th century until
the present. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 461 or
DHE 462
DHE 466. RESEARCH IN THE CROSS CULTURAL
ASPECTS OF NEAR ENVIRONMENT (3).
Examines the research methods used to study
the cultural aspects of the near environment.
Case studies concerning cultural variation in the
design and use of fabric, clothing and adornment,
housing. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 366
DHE 470. RETAIL MERCHANDISING (4).
Organization, operation, and competitive
strategies of soft goods retailers. Planning,
procurement, pricing, and promotion of
merchandise assortments and inventory
management. ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 370* or
BA 390*
DHE 472. MERCHANDISE PLANNING AND
CONTROL (4). Quantitative analysis of inventory
planning, pricing, and control for the profitable
management of soft goods; analysis of
management problems using quantitative data and
merchandising principles. ENFORCED PREREQS:
DHE 470 and (BA 215 or BA 215H)
DHE 473. ASSORTMENT ANALYSIS AND
MANAGEMENT (4). Analysis of merchandise
management processes. Use of technology,
computerized databases, and simulations for
assortment planning and management decisionmaking in manufacturing or retailing. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 472
DHE 475. GLOBAL PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN
TEXTILES AND APPAREL (4). Trade theory and
the effects of trade policy, cultural values, and
economics on the global production, distribution,
and consumption of textile products. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 370 OTHER PREREQS: DHE
366, ECON 201, ECON 202 are recommended.
DHE 481. ^PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN
HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN (3). Ethical,
business, and legal aspects of the design
profession. Development of written documents,
schedules, specifications, and other materials
typical of the profession. (Writing Intensive
Course) ENFORCED PREREQS: DHE 385
DHE 490. STUDY TOUR (1-6). Planned study tour
with specific professional focus. OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval and advanced
registration and deposit. Course prerequisites as
appropriate to topic.
DHE 499. SPECIAL TOPICS IN DESIGN AND
HUMAN ENVIRONMENT (1-16).
DHE 501. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 502. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16). OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
DHE 503. THESIS (1-16).
DHE 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 506. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 508. WORKSHOP (1-16).
DHE 509. PRACTICUM (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 510. INTERNSHIP (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 528. APPAREL PRODUCTION PROCESSES
(4). Production pattern-making, pattern grading,
marker making, garment specifications, and cost
analysis. Apparel assembly processes; analysis of
equipment capabilities and production processes.
DHE 529. ADVANCED APPAREL DESIGN (4).
Design processes and research methods used to
develop apparel designs. Students will identify
design problems and implement appropriate
methods to develop apparel products.
DHE 532. ADVANCED HOUSING DESIGN STUDIO
(3). Problem-solving and design processes to
meet or satisfy actual client needs; projects may
range from remodeling to new construction design.
Professional portfolio preparation.
DHE 534. HOUSING THE AGING POPULATION (3).
Shelter alternatives and services that address the
housing needs of the aging population. Emphasis
on the continuum of care and housing options.
DHE 535. HOUSING POLICY (3). Analysis of
local, state, and federal housing and community
development policies and programs that address
the housing issues and needs of individuals,
families, and communities.
DHE 536. REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND
MANAGEMENT (5). Examines principles and
practices used in the purchase, sale and
management of real estate. Considers
perspectives of consumers, investors, managers,
and lenders.
DHE 543. STUDIO III: COMMERCIAL DESIGN (4).
Commercial design, space planning and
specifications for facilities such as retail,
hospitality, healthcare, public institutions and
offices. Includes preparation of a professional
portfolio.
DHE 545. STUDIO VII: ADVANCED COMMERCIAL
DESIGN (4). Interior design project development
with emphasis on design of healthcare and
hospitality environments. Application of knowledge
of space planning, building codes, and
specifications to projects. Studio work includes
concept sketches, schematic drawings, contract
documents, sample boards, and models. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 443.
DHE 553. PRODUCT QUALITY ASSURANCE (4).
Analysis and evaluation of textile materials and
final products in relation to end use. Performance
properties and serviceability testing, product
specifications and industrial standards. OTHER
PREREQS: DHE 255.
DHE 561. HISTORY OF THE NEAR
ENVIRONMENT I (4). History of clothing, furniture,
interiors, textiles, and housing and building styles;
primarily Euro-American, from the ancient world to
the Renaissance. The influence of social and
cultural factors upon design of the near
environment. Need not be taken in sequence.
DHE 562. HISTORY OF THE NEAR
ENVIRONMENT II (4). History of clothing,
furniture, interiors, textiles, and housing and
building styles; primarily Euro-American, from the
Renaissance to 1899. The influence of social and
cultural factors upon design of the near
environment. Need not be taken in sequence.
DHE 563. HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY
FASHION (4). Historic analysis of fashion change
in men’s and women’s apparel from 1890 to the
present. The influence of social and cultural
factors upon Euro-American fashion.
College of Health and Human Sciences
DHE 564. CONTEMPORARY HISTORY OF
INTERIORS AND HOUSING (3). History of housing
and interior design from the mid-19th century until
the present.
DHE 602. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16). OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
DHE 605. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 570. RETAIL MERCHANDISING (4).
Organization, operation, and competitive
strategies of soft goods retailers. Planning,
procurement, pricing, and promotion of
merchandise assortments and inventory
management.
DHE 608. WORKSHOP (1-16).
DHE 573. ASSORTMENT ANALYSIS AND
MANAGEMENT (4). Analysis of merchandise
management processes. Use of technology,
computerized databases, and simulations for
assortment planning and management decisionmaking in manufacturing or retailing. ENFORCED
PREREQS: DHE 572
DHE 575. GLOBAL PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN
TEXTILES AND APPAREL (4). Trade theory and
the effects of trade policy, cultural values, and
economics on the global production, distribution,
and consumption of textile products.
DHE 577. FASHION THEORY (4). Examination of
historical, sociological, psychological, marketing,
and economic concepts, theories, and research
that contribute to current understanding of the
fashion process.
DHE 581. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN
HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN (3). Ethical,
business, and legal aspects of the design
profession. Development of written documents,
schedules, specifications, and other materials
typical of the profession. OTHER PREREQS:
DHE 385.
DHE 582. AESTHETIC AND PERCEPTUAL
THEORIES OF THE NEAR ENVIRONMENT (2).
Aesthetic aspects from the philosophical and
theoretical bases formulated in art, art history, and
psychology as applied to the near environment.
DHE 585. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE NEAR
ENVIRONMENT (3). Application of concepts and
theories from cultural anthropology, sociology,
psychology, and social psychology to the study of
clothing and interiors. The significance of the near
environment in the dynamics of social interaction.
DHE 587. TRENDS AND ISSUES IN
MERCHANDISING (3). Theoretical approach to the
study of merchandising policies and practices.
Management issues related to strategic planning,
competitive positioning, and operational problems
of textile and apparel businesses. May be
repeated two times for a total of 6 credits.
DHE 588. THEORIES IN HOUSING (3). Basic and
applied theories developed and used in the field of
housing are analyzed, using a conceptual
framework that includes contributions from root
disciplines related to housing.
DHE 590. STUDY TOUR (1-6). Planned study tour
with specific professional focus. Graded P/N.
OTHER PREREQS: Prior written approval of
department head and advanced registration and
deposit. Course prerequisites as appropriate to topic.
DHE 599. SPECIAL TOPICS IN DESIGN AND
HUMAN ENVIRONMENT (1-16).
DHE 601. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
ADJUNCT FACULTY
Jennifer Conner-Smith
DHE 603. THESIS (1-16).
DHE 566. RESEARCH IN THE CROSS CULTURAL
ASPECTS OF THE NEAR ENVIRONMENT (3).
Examines the research methods used to study
the cultural aspects of the near environment.
Case studies concerning cultural variation in the
design and use of fabric, clothing and adornment,
housing.
DHE 572. MERCHANDISE PLANNING AND
CONTROL (4). Quantitative analysis of inventory
planning, pricing, and control for the profitable
management of soft goods; analysis of
management problems using quantitative data and
merchandising principles. ENFORCED PREREQS:
DHE 570* OTHER PREREQS: BA 215.
307
DHE 606. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 607. SEMINAR (1-16).
DHE 609. PRACTICUM (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
DHE 610. INTERNSHIP/WORK EXPERIENCE
(1-16). OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
DHE 665. HISTORIC/CULTURAL THEORIES &
METHODS OF THE NEAR ENVIRONMENT (3).
Critical analysis of historical and cultural
paradigms, theories, and research methods.
DHE 677.THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS IN
FASHION AESTHETICS AND HOUSING (3). An indepth study of current literature focusing on the
synthesis and integration of fashion, aesthetics,
and housing theories. Content varies with each
offering.
DHE 685. ADVANCED TOPICS IN HUMAN
BEHAVIOR AND THE NEAR ENVIRONMENT (3).
Critical evaluation of the current literature on
human behavior as it relates to aspects of the
near environment (clothing, interiors, housing).
Latest theoretical developments and research
methods. Content varies with each offering.
OTHER PREREQS: DHE 585 or equivalent.
DHE 687.THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR
MERCHANDISING RESEARCH (3). Critical
analysis of merchandising research; application of
current theoretical developments and
methodologies to the study of selected topics
within merchandising management.
DHE 690. THEORY DEVELOPMENT (3). Critical
analysis of scientific explanation, research,
theory, and paradigms. Focus on theory
development, particularly within the area of the
near environment.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
AND FAMILY SCIENCES
Carolyn Aldwin, Chair
324 Milam Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-5102
541-737-2024
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/hdfs/
FACULTY
Professors Acock, Aldwin, Berry,
Braverman, Driscoll, Hofer, Hooker,
Lusk, Settersten, Walker
Associate Professors Bowman, Gray,
Levenson, McClelland, Moran, Piccinin,
Rosenkoetter, Vuchinich
Assistant Professors Coehlo (Cascades
Campus), MacTavish, Richards
Senior Instructor Greaves, Sorte
Instructors Badiee, Brey (Cascades
Campus), Burgy, Chase, Cohnstaedt,
Crawford, Daeschel, Lawson, Magee,
Malito, McKenna, Meyers, Volkers
Undergraduate Major
Human Development and Family
Sciences (BS)
Options
Early Childhood Development and
Education
Family and Consumer Sciences
Gerontology
Human Services
Undergraduate Certificate
Program
Gerontology Certificate
Graduate Major
Human Development and Family
Studies (MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Early Childhood Education
Family Studies
Human Development
Graduate Minors
Gerontology
Graduate Area of Concentration
Gerontology
Human Development and Family
Studies
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Early Childhood Education
Family Studies
Human Development
The mission of the Department of
Human Development and Family
Sciences is to discover, apply, and
transmit knowledge that contributes to
the optimal growth, development, and
well-being of individuals and families
across the life course. In the discovery of
knowledge and preparation of professionals, department programs recognize
the critical importance of ecological
approaches, culture and gender,
diversity, and global perspectives.
Department activities are guided by
social responsibility, compassion, and
high ethical standards.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate programs leading to the
MS and PhD degrees also are offered.
Graduate degrees in human development and family studies emphasize life
span human development, adult
development and aging, child and
adolescent development, family studies,
or early childhood education. Emphasis
is on preparation for professional
careers in research, teaching, and human
services. Human development, early
childhood education, family studies,
and gerontology can be used as minor
areas in the MAIS.
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Oregon State University
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
SCIENCES EDUCATION
Students desiring a license to teach
family and consumer sciences (grades 5
through 12) should contact the College
of Education via http://
catalog.oregonstate.edu/
CollegeOverview.aspx?code=03.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND
FAMILY SCIENCES (BS, HBS)
The heart of helping professions, the
HDFS major provides undergraduate
students with the background to work
in public or private agencies and
programs that serve individuals and
families across the lifespan. The BS in
Human Development and Family
Sciences can be pursued through one of
four options listed below:
1. Early Childhood Development and
Education option
2. Family and Consumer Sciences option
3. Gerontology option
4. Human Services option
See each option in the HDFS overview
for detailed information.
Note: Most students choose one option;
however, it is possible to choose more
than one. Students should meet with an
advisor in the HHS Student Services
Office in Milam Hall 116 for additional
information.
Credits Needed to Graduate:
180 credits, 60 of which must be upperdivision. Credits are to include baccalaureate core courses, HDFS core
courses, classes required for each option,
and electives.
Baccalaureate Core (48)
48 credits required of all students;
courses may include BCC courses in the
HDFS core and options as indicated by
an asterisk.
HDFS Core Courses (51–52)
Required of all HDFS students:
COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (3)
HDFS 240. *Human Sexuality (3)
HDFS 311. Infant and Child
Development (4)
HDFS 313. Adolescent Development (4)
HDFS 314. Adult Development & Aging (4)
HDFS 341. Family Studies (4)
HDFS 360. Critical Thinking in Human
Development and Family Sciences (4)
HDFS 361. Applied Research Methods (4)
HDFS 461. ^Program Development and
Proposal Writing (3)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
PSY 202. *General Psychology (3)
SOC 204. *Introduction to Sociology (3)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
and ST 209. Principles of Hypothesis
Testing (1)
OR H 220. Intro to Epidemiology and
Health Data Analysis (3)
WR 327. *Technical Writing (3)
EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT AND
EDUCATION OPTION
The Early Childhood Development and
Education option prepares students to
work directly with children from birth
to age 8 and their families. This option
is a good foundation for work in
preschool and Head Start classrooms,
early intervention, parent education
and support, or as a foundation for
graduate work in HDFS, psychology,
sociology, or education. With additional course work, students can pursue
teacher licensure through the OSU
College of Education or through other
institutions.
Early Childhood Development
and Education Curriculum (39)
HDFS 233. Professional Foundations in
Early Childhood (3)
HDFS 330. Fostering Learning in Early
Childhood Development (4)
HDFS 331. Directed Experience in Early
Childhood (3)
HDFS 430. Supervised Experience in
Early Childhood Development (12)
HDFS 431. Family, School, and
Community Collaboration (3)
HDFS 432. Children and Youth with
Special Needs (3)
MTH 211, MTH 212. *Foundations of
Elementary Mathematics (4,4)
TCE 309. Field Practicum (K–3) (3)
FAMILY AND CONSUMER
SCIENCES OPTION
The Family and Consumer Sciences
option provides a broad knowledge
base including human development,
family environments and resources, and
nutrition. This option is excellent
preparation for careers in consumer or
Extension education, as well as middle
school and high school teaching in
family and consumer science. Students
who are interested in teaching licensure
pursue additional study in the OSU
College of Education, or other
institutions.
DHE 270. *Appearance, Power and
Society (4)
DHE 331. Contemporary Issues in
Housing (3)
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics (4)
or ECON 202. *Intro to
Macroeconomics (4)
HDFS 330. Fostering Learning in Early
Childhood Development (3)
HDFS 331. Directed Experience in Early
Childhood (3)
NFM 235. Science of Foods (5)
MTH 211 and MTH 212. Foundations
of Elementary Mathematics (4,4)
TCE 410. Internship/Work Experience (6)
or HDFS 410. Advanced Internship (6)
TCE 411. Educational Psychology,
Learning and Development (3)
Choose 6 credits from the following:
HDFS 431. Family, School, and
Community Collaboration (3)
HDFS 432. Children
Special Needs (3)
HDFS 462. Skills for
Professionals (4)
NFM 312. *Issues in
Health (3)
NFM 325. Nutrition
Cycle (3)
and Youth with
Human Services
Nutrition and
Through the Life
GERONTOLOGY OPTION
The Gerontology option prepares
students for careers related to adult
development and aging. Gerontology is
a rapidly growing field because of the
enormous increase in the number of
older people throughout the world.
Students in this option are prepared for
entry-level positions as senior caseworkers and advocates, volunteer coordinators, activities directors, and other roles
in long-term care facilities and community agencies serving the older population. Students who choose this option
are eligible to earn an Undergraduate
Certificate in Gerontology, a widely
recognized credential in the field.
Gerontology Option
Curriculum (37)
Also satisfies requirements for the
undergraduate Certificate in
Gerontology.
HDFS 209. Introductory Internship (3)
HDFS 261. Human Service Professions (3)
HDFS 410. Advanced Internship (aging
focus) (9)
HDFS 462. Skills for Human Service
Professionals (4)
Choose 6 credits from two different
departments:
DHE 434. Housing the Aging
Population (3)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
NFM 429. Nutrition and Aging (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
SOC 432. Sociology of Aging (3)
Choose 12 credits not already taken from
this approved list of gerontology courses:
DHE 434. Housing the Aging Population (3)
ECON 495. Health Economics (4)
EXSS 414. Fitness and Aging: Developmental and Programming Perspective (3)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 432. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 436. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
H 455. Risk Factors Over the Lifespan (3)
H 458. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (3)
H 465. *Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 467. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 468. Financing and Administration
of Long-Term Care (3)
H 476. ^Planning Health Programs (4)
HDFS 465. Topics in Human Development and Family Science (aging
focus) (3)
NFM 420. Medical Nutrition Therapy (4)
College of Health and Human Sciences
NFM 429. Nutrition and Aging (3)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PHL 455. Death and Dying (3)
SOC 432. Sociology of Aging (3)
Other courses as approved by the
Program in Gerontology.
HUMAN SERVICES OPTION
The Human Services option is ideal for
entry-level work in public or private
human services. Positions include youth
worker, caseworker, information and
referral specialist, family advocate,
volunteer coordinator, and others. This
option prepares students to attend
graduate school in HDFS, counseling,
marriage and family therapy, social
work, or other professions. This
curriculum allows maximum flexibility
for students to tailor their elective
courses to populations or ages of
particular interest. At least two internship experiences in human services
programs are required for degree
completion.
Human Services
Option Curriculum (28)
HDFS 209. Introductory Internship (3)
(may be repeated for a maximum of 6 cr)
HDFS 261. Human Service Professions (3)
HDFS 410. Advanced Internship (9)
HDFS 431. Family/School/Community
Collaboration (3)
HDFS 462. Skills for Human Service
Professionals (4)
Choose at least 6 credits from the
following:
HDFS 432. Children and Youth with
Special Needs (3)
HDFS 444. Family Violence and Neglect
(3)
HDFS 447. *Families and Poverty (4)
HDFS 465. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences (3) (May be
repeated for credit)
EARLY CHILDHOOD
DEVELOPMENT AND
EDUCATION MINOR
For Non-HDFS Majors
at OSU-Cascades Campus.
Required Course Work
HDFS 330. Fostering Learning in Early
Childhood Development (4) At OSUCascades
HDFS 331. Directed Experience in Early
Childhood (3) At OSU-Cascades
HDFS 341. Family Studies (4) At OSUCascades
HDFS 431. Family, School, and
Community Collaboration (3) At OSUCascades
PSY 201. Mind and Brain (3) Provided by
COCC
PSY 202. Mind and Society (3) Provided
by COCC
PSY 235. Human Development (3)
Provided by COCC
Plus 6 credit of upper-division electives
with HDFS prefix:
HDFS 360. Critical Thinking in Human
Development and Family Sciences (4)
HDFS 361. Applied Research Methods (4)
HDFS 405. Reading and Conference (3)
HDFS 406. Projects (3)
HDFS 408. Workshop (3)
HDFS 410. Field Experience (3)
HDFS 430. Supervised Experience in
Early Childhood Development (3)
HDFS 432. Children and Youth with
Special Needs (3)
HDFS 433. Child Behavioral Support in
Group Settings (3)
HDFS 461. ^Programs Development and
Proposal Writing (3)
HDFS 462. Skills for Human Services
Professionals (4)
HDFS 465. Topics in Human
Development and Family Sciences (3)
Total=27, including 18 credits of
upper-division credits in HDFS
^ Writing Intensive Course, WIC
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
AND FAMILY STUDIES (MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Early childhood education, family
studies, human development
The Department of Human Development and Family Sciences offers course
work and programs of study in the area
of human development and family
studies. The Gerontology Program is
also administered by the College of
Health and Human Sciences. The PhD
program in human development and
family studies has been approved by the
Western Interstate Commission for
Higher Education (WICHE) as a
regional graduate program. Students
from Alaska, Arizona, Colorado,
Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New
Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota,
Utah, Washington, and Wyoming may
attend at resident tuition rates. Areas of
study and degrees granted are described
below.
Human development and family
studies offers graduate work leading to
Master of Science and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees. Graduate programs
take a multidisciplinary approach,
preparing students for college and
university teaching and research, as well
as development, administration, and
evaluation of programs serving individuals and families across the lifespan.
Graduate programs are offered in
four areas. Human development offers a
life-span perspective from which
students may specialize in prenatal and
early childhood development, middle
childhood and adolescence, or adult
development and aging. Family studies
presents basic knowledge about families
with specific focus in relationship
development, family stress and crisis,
family policy, family structure, and
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intergenerational family relationships.
Early childhood education integrates
child development theory with educational programming to facilitate the
development of young children.
Gerontology, the study of aging, is
offered as a minor area.
Research is a very important focus of
the graduate program in human
development and family studies. The
HDFS faculty includes nationally
recognized scholars who are widely
published in areas such as families and
aging; families and stress; family
communication and conflict; child,
adolescent, and adult development;
intergenerational family relationships;
family structure; gender; teacher
training, as well as methodology.
For more information, contact the
Graduate Program in Human Development and Family Studies, College of
Health and Human Sciences, 322 Milam
Hall, OSU, Corvallis, OR 97331-5102.
GERONTOLOGY
GRADUATE MINOR
For more details, contact the program
director, Karen Hooker.
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND
FAMILY STUDIES GRADUATE
MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE
Karen Hooker, Director
Program on Gerontology
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-5102
541-737-4992
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/gerontology/
index.html
Undergraduate Certificate
Program
Gerontology
Graduate Programs
Gerontology Minor
Area of Concentration
Gerontology
The Program on Gerontology offers an
interdisciplinary approach to the study
of aging. Because aging involves
physiological, sociological and psychological processes, gerontology education
and research is relevant to many
disciplines. Career opportunities in
gerontology are extremely diverse and
include positions in community services,
health sciences, nutrition and dietetics,
housing, health and physical education,
pharmacy, counseling, health care
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Oregon State University
administration, business, public policy,
and many other arenas.
Recognizing the diversity of relevant
disciplines and career opportunities, the
OSU Program on Gerontology offers
course work in gerontology through
11 departments. The program is
administered through the Department
of Human Development and Family
Sciences.
To be considered a gerontology
course, at least 50 percent of the course
content must address gerontologyrelated issues.
Gerontology courses include:
AHE 578. Adult Development and
Learning (3)
DHE 435/DHE 535. Housing Policy (3)
ECON 495/ECON 595. Health
Economics (4)
ECON 595. Health Economics (4)
EXSS 414. Physical Activity and Aging
(3)
H 422/H 522. Control of Chronic
Disease (3)
H 423/H 523. Health Aspects of Aging
(3)
H 432/H 532. Economic Issues in Health
and Medical Care (3)
H 436/H 536. Health Services
Administration and Management (3)
H 458/H 558. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
(3)
H 465/H 565. Public Health and
Women: Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 467/H 567. Long-Term Care
Alternatives (3)
H 468/H 568. Financing and
Administration of Long-Term Care (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal
Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
HDFS 314. Adult Development and
Aging (4)
HDFS 465/HDFS 565. Topics in Human
Development and Family Sciences (3)
HDFS 587. Social Gerontology (3)
HDFS 617. Advanced Topics in Adult
Development and Aging (3)
NFM 420/NFM 520. Medical Nutrition
Therapy (4)
NFM 429/NFM 529. Nutrition and
Aging (3)
PHL 444/PHL 544. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PHL 455H/PHL 555. Death and Dying (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (3)
SOC 432/SOC 532. Sociology of Aging (3)
Note: Other courses are approved
annually by the Gerontology Program.
In addition to gerontology courses,
seminars, field study (310/410/510/610),
research (401/501/601), and projects
(406/506/606) in gerontology are
offered through the Department of
Human Development and Family
Sciences (HDFS). Field study, research,
and projects in gerontology may also be
available through other departments.
Students register for field study,
research, or projects credit in the
department that best meets their needs
for supervision given the nature of the
experience.
GRADUATE STUDY
IN GERONTOLOGY
OSU offers over 20 graduate-level
gerontology courses plus field study and
research opportunities. There are four
ways to pursue significant graduate
work in gerontology at OSU:
1. Adult development and aging may
be selected as an area of concentration for both master’s and
doctoral degrees in Human
Development and Family Studies.
Students choosing this concentration
will select adult development and
aging course work and research in
their major as well as choose an
integrated minor in gerontology.
2. Gerontology is an integrated
minor (i.e., courses chosen from a
variety of departments) available
to graduate students in any major
field. The minor requires 18–36
credits, including HDFS 587, Social
Gerontology. The balance of the
course work is selected from graduate
gerontology courses, field study, and/
or research.
3. Gerontology is an area of study in
the Master’s of Interdisciplinary
Studies (MAIS) program. MAIS
students are required to take a
minimum of 15 credits in gerontology, including HDFS 587, Social
Gerontology. The balance of courses
is selected from graduate gerontology
courses, field study, and/or research.
4. A Master’s of Public Health (MPH)
with a concentration in gerontology
is offered jointly by the Department
of Public Health and the Program on
Gerontology.
CERTIFICATE CURRICULUM
Students earning a baccalaureate degree
in any major at OSU may earn a
Certificate in Gerontology. Certificate’s
increase students’ employability in the
many professional areas related to
aging. Certification in gerontology is a
nationally recognized way of identifying professionals’ academic study in
aging.
The Certificate in Gerontology
requires 27 credits and includes a
required core through which students
study aging as an interactive process of
physical, social, and psychological
forces.
Gerontology Core (9 credits)
HDFS 314. Adult Development and
Aging (4)
Any two of the following selected from
two different departments (6):
DHE 434/DHE 534. Housing the Aging
Population (3)
H 422/H 522. Control of Chronic
Disease (3)
H 423/H 523. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
NFM 429/NFM 529. Nutrition and Aging
(3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
SOC 432/SOC 532. Sociology of Aging (3)
Field Study or Field Projects in
Gerontology (3–6)
May be completed
in any department:
310. Internship/Work Experience
401. Research and Scholarship
406. Special Problems/Special Projects
and/or 410. Internship/Work
Experience
Approved Gerontology Electives (12–15)
Additional Requirements
1. A grade of “C” or better in all gerontology courses. Overall GPA of 2.5.
2. Formal application to the program;
forms available from the program
office, 321 Milam Hall.
3. Certificate requirements fulfilled
within five years following graduation. Students who have not completed certificate requirements upon
receipt of the degree may continue as
special, postbaccalaureate, or
graduate students.
COURSES
FCSE 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-3).
FCSE 406. PROJECTS (1-3).
FCSE 407. SEMINAR (1-3). Student teaching.
FCSE 501. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
FCSE 503. THESIS (1-16).
FCSE 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-3).
FCSE 506. PROJECTS (1-3).
FCSE 507. SEMINAR (1-3).
FCSE 508. WORKSHOP (1-3).
FCSE 509. PRACTICUM (1-3).
FCSE 510. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP: FAMILY
AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION (1-15).
A full-time field experience in which the intern
integrates academic study with classroom
teaching experience to learn specific
competencies relating to functioning well in the
context of the classroom and the school, and
demonstrates this competency through the
assessment of work by supervisors and by
evidence collected and presented in work
samples. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to MAT
Program.
FCSE 512. FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
AND EDUCATION REFORM (3). Examination of the
rationale for an integrative, family-focused
framework for family and consumer sciences
education consistent with current educational
reform initiatives.
FCSE 514. CURRICULUM DESIGNS IN FAMILY
AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION (3).
Analysis of curriculum approaches to family and
consumer sciences education. Principles of
curriculum development and strategies for
implementing curricular changes.
FCSE 540. SELECTED TOPICS IN FAMILY AND
CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION (1-3). Current
literature and research in a specific topic of
concern to family and consumer sciences
education. May be taken for a maximum of 9 credits.
FCSE 557. ISSUES AND TRENDS IN
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3).
Emphasizes trends related to all content areas in
professional-technical education as well as those
unique to program areas.
College of Health and Human Sciences
HDFS 201. *CONTEMPORARY FAMILIES IN THE
U.S. (3). An introduction to families with
application to personal life. Focuses on diversity
in family structure, social class, race, gender,
work and other social institutions. (Bacc Core
Course)
HDFS 209. INTRODUCTORY INTERNSHIP (3).
Supervised field work in a professional setting
serving individuals and families. May be repeated
for credit. Graded P/N.
HDFS 381. PERSONAL AND FAMILY FINANCE (3).
Understanding financial planning, income taxes,
loans, credit and housing costs. Protection
through insurance: property, liability, automobile,
health, disability and life. Increasing income
through investments: time deposits, government
securities, stocks and bonds, mutual funds, and
real estate. Planning for retirement and estate
transfer. OTHER PREREQS: Sophomore standing.
HDFS 401. RESEARCH (1-6).
HDFS 233. PROFESSIONAL FOUNDATIONS IN
EARLY CHILDHOOD (3). Developmentally
appropriate practice, philosophy, ethics, service
models, family support, assessment practices.
OTHER PREREQS: HDFS 211.
HDFS 402. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16).
HDFS 240. *HUMAN SEXUALITY (3). Physiological,
psychological, social, and historical influences on
sexuality; emphasis on developmental and
relationship aspects. (Bacc Core Course)
HDFS 406. PROJECTS (1-6).
HDFS 261. HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONS (3).
Development of professional skills and strategies
to enhance effectiveness when working with
individuals and families with focus on foundations
of the services professions, on awareness of own
values, strengths, limitations, information
management, and human service intervention skills.
HDFS 410. ADVANCED INTERNSHIP (3-15).
Supervised work experience with professionallevel responsibilities. Supplementary conferences,
readings and reports. Supervised by agency/firm
and instructor. Focus on human services
intervention skills, interpersonal skills with clients,
co-workers, and supervisors, and awareness of
human services values, ethics, and attitudes.
Internships integrate academic and practical
experience. Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS:
Junior or senior standing. Restricted to students
in HDFS options, OSU Gerontology Program.
HDFS 311. INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT
(4). Research and theory on development from
infancy through middle childhood. Discussion of
biological, familial, and sociocultural influences.
Development of skills in observing children’s
behavior.
HDFS 313. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (4).
Advanced theories and research on physical,
social and psychological development during
adolescence; emphasizes influences of family,
peers, schools and community. OTHER
PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS, SOC or PSY.
HDFS 314. ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
(4). Advanced theories and research related to
developmental changes and stability in early,
middle, and late adulthood. Gender issues,
personality, cognition, and adaptation. ENFORCED
PREREQS: HDFS 311 and sophomore standing.
HDFS 330. FOSTERING LEARNING IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (4). Development of
skills in applying theoretical approaches to
observing, recording, and interpreting the behavior
of young children in order to design interactions
that support learning in group settings.
ENFORCED PREREQS: HDFS 211 OTHER
PREREQS: HDFS 233.
HDFS 331. DIRECTED EXPERIENCE IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD (3). Placement in early childhood
program to focus on guidance techniques,
classroom management, and implementation of
curricula, based on developmental observation,
research, and theory. Supplementary weekly
seminar, readings, and reports. OTHER
PREREQS: HDFS 233 and departmental approval
required.
HDFS 341. FAMILY STUDIES (4). Study of family
forms, family formation, and family change over
the human life course in sociohistorical,
economic, political, and cultural context.
HDFS 360. CRITICAL THINKING IN HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES (3).
Relations among opinion, assumptions, theory,
and fact. Examines ways to use and present data,
conduct ethical research with human subjects,
and draw scientific conclusions. OTHER
PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS, ST 201 or MTH 211
and MTH 212.
HDFS 361. APPLIED RESEARCH METHODS (4).
Basic research methods as they are applied in
human development and family studies. This
course includes a lab. ENFORCED PREREQS:
ST 201 and (ST 202 or ST 209 or H 220)
ENFORCED PREREQS: (HDFS 360 and ST 201) or
HDFS 360 and MTH 211 and MTH 212
HDFS 403. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
HDFS 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-6).
HDFS 407. SEMINAR (1-16).
HDFS 408. WORKSHOP (1-16).
HDFS 430. SUPERVISED EXPERIENCE IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (9-12). Participation
in a research-based model early childhood
program focused on student teaching, program
development and evaluation, parent education and
administration. ENFORCED PREREQS: HDFS 331
HDFS 431. FAMILY, SCHOOL, AND COMMUNITY
COLLABORATION (3). Focus on family, school,
community environments and interactions for
children from infancy to adolescence. Resources
and skills for enhancing child development across
these settings are emphasized. OTHER
PREREQS: HDFS 211 or HDFS 313.
assessment. (Writing Intensive Course)
ENFORCED PREREQS: HDFS 360
HDFS 462. SKILLS FOR HUMAN SERVICES
PROFESSIONALS (4). Explores assessment,
case management, and advocacy; helping skills;
self-care and ethical conduct; organizational
dynamics; application through case studies and
interactive learning. ENFORCED PREREQS:
HDFS 261 OTHER PREREQS: Senior standing,
Human Services option specialization.
HDFS 465.TOPICS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
AND FAMILY SCIENCES (3). Topics and issues in
human development and family sciences.
Examples: children and the law; gender and
families; parenting; aging; relationship
development across the lifespan. May be repeated
for credit. OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS,
SOC or PSY.
HDFS 465H.TOPICS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
AND FAMILY SCIENCES (3). Topics and issues in
human development and family sciences.
Examples: children and the law; gender and
families; parenting; aging; relationship
development across the lifespan. May be repeated
for credit. OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS,
SOC or PSY; Honors College approval required.
HDFS 471. *THE WORLD CONSUMER (3). A
multidisciplinary survey of consumer problems and
issues emphasizing factors that influence global
consumption values, patterns and trends.
Students are challenged to examine their own
consumer economic behavior and are encouraged
to use course information pragmatically. Satisfies
baccalaureate core requirements in contemporary
global issues. (Bacc Core Course) OTHER
PREREQS: Completion of all perspectives
requirements in baccalaureate core.
HDFS 501. RESEARCH (1-6).
HDFS 502. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-6).
HDFS 503. THESIS (1-16).
HDFS 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-6).
HDFS 506. SPECIAL PROBLEMS/SPECIAL
PROJECTS (1-6).
HDFS 432. CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH SPECIAL
NEEDS (3). Developmental, educational, and
family issues related to children and youth with
disabilities and giftedness. OTHER PREREQS:
6 credits of HDFS, SOC or PSY.
HDFS 507. SEMINAR (1-16).
HDFS 433. CHILD BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT IN
GROUP SETTINGS (3). Strategies for fostering
social and emotional development. Special
attention to positive behavioral support and
intervention with challenging behaviors.
ENFORCED PREREQS: HDFS 211 and HDFS 233
and HDFS 331 OTHER PREREQS: HDFS 261.
HDFS 510. INTERNSHIP (3-15).
HDFS 440. FAMILIES AND WORK (3). Examination
of the bidirectional influences of work and family
relationships, paid and unpaid work and varieties
of work experiences including those associated
with social class. How work differentially affects
(and is affected by) diverse family structures.
OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS, SOC or PSY.
HDFS 444. CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT (3).
Examination of the causes and consequences of
child abuse and neglect. Emphasis is on
protection and risk factors. OTHER PREREQS:
6 credits of HDFS, SOC or PSY.
HDFS 447. *FAMILIES AND POVERTY (4).
Examines families in poverty focusing on causes
and consequences of family poverty, including
global economic factors, migration patterns,
discrimination, and policies and programs for
families. Community service required. (Bacc Core
Course)
HDFS 461. ^PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND
PROPOSAL WRITING (3). Principles of program
development and evaluation applied to the
development of a proposal for a human services
program; analysis of needs and resources,
identification of empirically-based strategies, and
311
HDFS 508. WORKSHOP (1-16).
HDFS 509. PRACTICUM (1-16).
HDFS 511.THEORIES OF HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT (3). Critical examination of
significant theories of human development.
Emphasizes evolution of theories and impact on
current human development research.
HDFS 518. ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
(4). Study of theories, concepts, and issues
related to biological, cognitive, social, and
emotional development throughout adulthood.
Covers life transitions, stress related growth,
optimal aging, wisdom, and developmental
methods. OTHER PREREQS: 15 quarter credits of
behavioral and social sciences.
HDFS 523.TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
EDUCATION (3). Examination of a particular area
of study in early childhood education and
development. Topics may include philosophy and
models; children with special needs; parenting and
parent education; curriculum development; literacy
development; adult-child relations; administration
of programs; guidance. May be repeated for credit.
HDFS 530. RESEARCH IN HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES I (4).
An overview of research design, measurement,
sampling and evaluation research. Introduces
computer applications for data collection and
analysis. OTHER PREREQS: Undergraduate
statistics and 12 credits of social science
courses.
312
Oregon State University
HDFS 531. RESEARCH IN HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES II (4).
Philosophy and methods of behavioral research
including experimental design and advanced
evaluation research techniques. ENFORCED
PREREQS: HDFS 530
HDFS 616. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHILDADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (3). Advanced
critical study of theory and research related to
specific topics of social, emotional, and cognitive
development during infancy, childhood and/or
adolescence. May be repeated for credit.
Corvallis; Smith; Rick Stanley, MD,
Albany; Elizabeth Waldron, MD,
Corvallis; Victoria Warren-Mears, PhD,
Portland
HDFS 532. RESEARCH IN HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SCIENCES III (4).
An in-depth study of research methods related to
human development and family studies. Covers
multivariate procedures, path analysis, causal
modeling, and related techniques. ENFORCED
PREREQS: HDFS 531
HDFS 617. ADVANCED TOPICS IN ADULT
DEVELOPMENT AND AGING (3). Advanced
critical study of theory and research related to
specific topics of social and emotional
development and stability in adulthood, including
later life.
Undergraduate Majors
HDFS 533. FAMILY POLICY AND PROGRAM
DEVELOPMENT (3). Principles, processes, and
practices in the creation of family policies and
subsequent programs which address well-being
across the lifespan. Offered alternate years.
HDFS 534. FAMILY POLICY AND PROGRAM
EVALUATION (3). Models of evaluation and
application of research methods of family policies
and programs. Offered alternate years. OTHER
PREREQS: HDFS 531 or introduction to research/
statistics; HDFS 533 recommended.
HDFS 540. FAMILIES AND WORK (3). Examination
of the bidirectional influences of work and family
relationships, paid and unpaid work and varieties
of work experiences including those associated
with social class. How work differentially affects
(and is affected by) diverse family structures.
OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS, SOC or
PSY.
HDFS 544. CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT (3).
Examination of the causes and consequences of
child abuse and neglect. Emphasis is on
protection and risk factors. OTHER PREREQS:
6 credits of HDFS, SOC or PSY.
HDFS 546. THEORIES OF FAMILY STUDIES (3).
An overview of the major theoretical perspectives
used in the study of families. Issues of theory
construction and evaluation are also covered.
Course goal is to enable the student to apply
conceptual frameworks to a particular area of
interest.
HDFS 547. FAMILIES AND POVERTY (3).
Examines families in poverty focusing on causes
and consequences of family poverty, including
global economic factors, migration patterns,
discrimination, and policies and programs for
families.
HDFS 548. ADVANCED FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
(3). Study of contemporary American families from
a developmental perspective. Covers marriage,
parent-child relations, and family transitions
across the lifespan. Attention is given to the
diversity of family structures and processes.
HDFS 565.TOPICS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
AND FAMILY SCIENCES (3). Topics and issues in
human development and family sciences.
Examples: children and the law; gender and
families; parenting; aging; relationship
development across the lifespan. May be repeated
for credit. OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits of HDFS,
SOC or PSY.
HDFS 587. SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY (3).
Advanced theories and research related to social
development and change in middle and late
adulthood. Gender, social roles, personenvironment congruence, period and cohort
influences are emphasized.
HDFS 601. RESEARCH (1-6).
HDFS 602. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-6).
HDFS 630. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN FAMILY
AND INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT (3). Advanced
quantitative techniques in human development
and family studies. Includes longitudinal designs,
structural equation modes. Content varies with
each offering. May be repeated for credit.
ENFORCED PREREQS: HDFS 532
HDFS 635. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(3). An overview of qualitative methods in social
science research. Covers issues of sampling,
development of the problem, measurement,
analysis, and interpretation. Issues of validity and
reliability are also addressed.
HDFS 648. ADVANCED TOPICS IN FAMILY
STUDIES (3). An in-depth study of a particular
area within family studies. Content varies with
each offering. May be repeated for credit.
HDFS 808. EARLY CHILDHOOD LEADERSHIP
DIRECTIONS I (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Application to Early Childhood Leadership
Directions.
NUTRITION AND
EXERCISE SCIENCES
HDFS 606. SPECIAL PROJECTS (1-6).
HDFS 607. SEMINAR (1-16).
HDFS 608. WORKSHOP (1-16).
HDFS 610. INTERNSHIP (3-15).
Options
Applied Exercise and Sport Science
Athletic Training
Exercise Science
Physical Education Teacher Education
Pre-therapy and Allied Health
Nutrition and Food Management
(BS)
Options
Dietetics
Nutrition Science
Restaurant/Foodservice Management
Undergraduate Minors
Athletic Administration
Exercise Physiology
Foodservice Management
Nutrition
Sports Injury Care
(Please check with the Office of Academic Advising and Student Support in
116 Milam Hall for minor requirements.)
Graduate Majors
Anthony Wilcox, Chair
101 Milam Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331
541-737-2643
E-mail: [email protected]
Websites: http://www.hhs.oregonstate.
edu/nes/index.html
For Student Advising Inquiries: Call
Student Services, 541-737-8900
FACULTY
Professors Bray, Cardinal, Hayes, Jump,
Manore, McCubbin, Raab, Snow, Traber,
Turner, van der Mars
Associate Professors Case, Cerklewski,
Cluskey, Cusimano, Ebbeck, Gregg,
Harter, Hoffman, Smiley, Soleau,
Widrick, Wilcox, Yun
Assistant Professors Hannigan-Downs,
Ho, Iwaniec, Pavol, Riersgard
Research Assistant Professor Lotinun
Senior Instructors Dark, Hoisington,
Maddalozzo
Instructors Andreoni, Asbell, Bonham,
Carr, Chatfield, Gunter, Hyde, Minot,
Polizzi, Schwab, Swanger
Senior Faculty Research Assistant Hardin
Faculty Research Assistants Stark
HDFS 603. DISSERTATION (1-16).
HDFS 605. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-6).
Exercise and Sport Science (BS)
COURTESY FACULTY
Bob Burkhart, RPT, Corvallis; John M.
Dunn, EdD, Carbondale, IL; Dorothy
Hagan, PhD, Portland; Richard E.
Lague, RPT, Corvallis; LaJean Lawson,
PhD, Portland; Thomas L. Marker, MD,
Exercise and Sport Science
(MS, PhD)
Movement Studies in Disability
(MS)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Biomechanics
Exercise Physiology
Movement Studies in Disability
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sports Medicine
Sport Pedagogy
Nutrition and Food Management
(MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Applied Nutrition and Dietetics
Bionutrition
Food Service Management
Graduate Minors
Exercise and Sports Science
Movement Studies in Disability
Nutrition and Food Management
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Nutrition and physical activity make
essential and complementary contributions to optimal health, disease prevention, and human performance. These
two academic disciplines have been
brought together in the department of
Nutrition and Exercise Sciences.
Nationally recognized programs in the
department prepare students for careers
as athletic trainers, dietitians, medical
and health science professionals,
College of Health and Human Sciences
teachers in physical education, nutritionists, researchers, personal trainers,
and fitness and nutrition professionals.
Students may choose from the following undergraduate degree programs, all
of which support advancement to
graduate school.
ATHLETIC TRAINING
This option provides the academic and
practical experience necessary to prepare
for certification as an athletic trainer to
aid in the prevention, treatment, and
rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The
Athletic Training program is accredited
by the Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
Graduates work as athletic trainers for
professional, college and high school
athletic teams, in clinics or hospitals, or
enter graduate programs for the allied
health professions.
DIETETICS
Dietitians provide guidance to the
public regarding nutrition and diet. The
Dietetics degree option at OSU is
accredited by the American Dietetic
Association and prepares students to
become Registered Dietitians (RD). This
option provides the course work and
preparation to enter a supervised
dietetic internship, pass the Registered
Dietitian exam, and become a leader in
the profession. Graduates from OSU's
program consistently exceed the
national average for placement into
accredited dietetic internships and for
passing the RD exam the first time.
EXERCISE SCIENCE
This option has a strong focus in
exercise physiology and exercise
programming. Graduates of the Exercise
Science option provide leadership for
organizing, directing, and managing
physical fitness programs in business
and industrial settings, health clubs, and
hospital-based fitness/wellness cardiac
rehabilitation programs. This program is
excellent preparation for graduate
school.
NUTRITION SCIENCE
The Nutrition Science degree option is
designed for students who want to
focus in the sciences and the scientific
basis for nutrition. Students may pursue
careers in medicine, academia and/or
health-related research. Professionals
trained in nutrition science have many
career options due to population
growth and aging, the focus on
prevention of chronic diseases, and a
growing emphasis on health, nutrition,
and wellness.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHER EDUCATION
Students seeking careers in teaching
physical education would select this
option. If you want to teach in an
elementary and/or secondary school
setting, this program provides the
academic major and prerequisites needed
for application into the fifth-year,
master’s-level teacher education program
that leads to teaching licensure.
PRE-THERAPY
AND ALLIED HEALTH
Students who choose this option
prepare for admission into medical
school or a professional training
program in the allied health professions.
Graduates become physical therapists,
occupational therapists, physicians,
physician assistants, or nurses.
RESTAURANT AND FOOD
SERVICE MANAGEMENT
The Restaurant and Food Service
Management degree option prepares
graduates for professional management
positions in the vast area of food
service. As one of the largest and fastest
growing industries in the nation, food
service management offers opportunities
in restaurant management, catering,
schools and universities, and business
and industry.
APPLIED EXERCISE
AND SPORT SCIENCE
This option allows students to individualize their program of study to prepare
for a variety of professional goals such
as medical school, graduate and
professional programs, adult fitness,
sport business, athletics, youth programs, and leadership of non-school
sports programs for people of all ages.
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
(BA, HBA)
See International Education for
information on the International
Studies Degree.
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY COURSES
The Physical Activity Course (PAC)
Program is an elective, academic-credit
program designed to provide OSU
students with the opportunity to learn
and engage in a wide variety of physical
activities, with the goal of promoting
health and lifelong participation in
physical activity. Students may take any
number of PAC credits, but only 11
credits may be counted toward graduation. Courses may be repeated for credit
and a grade. There is a PAC fee for each
class, and some courses have additional
fees. All fees are listed in the online
Schedule of Classes. Student accounts are
billed upon registration. Refunds of the
PAC fee are automatic upon dropping
313
or withdrawing from the course and
follow university policies as listed in the
Schedule of Classes. Some additional fees
are refunded through the PAC Office
(Langton 123). Social dance classes are
listed with a men's and a women's
section in order help balance the
number of students in the traditional
lead and follow roles within the same
class.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate programs within the department lead to MS and PhD degrees in
Exercise and Sport Science or Nutrition
and Food Management. Graduate
programs may have concentrations in
biomechanics, exercise physiology,
movement studies in disability, sport
and exercise psychology, sports medicine, sport pedagogy, bionutrition,
applied nutrition and dietetics, or food
service management.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
Preparation
Entering first-year and undergraduate
transfer students should prepare to enter
the College of Health and Human
Sciences with a strong foundation in the
sciences, balanced with good writing
and critical thinking skills. Students
transferring from other institutions are
best prepared for the college curriculum
if they have taken chemistry or biology
or both.
Admission
Any student who has met the admission
requirements of Oregon State University
may be admitted to a nutrition and
exercise sciences program of study. To
transfer from another OSU college or
school, the student must have the
approval of the head advisor of the
College of Health and Human Sciences.
Retention
Students are expected to make satisfactory
progress toward a degree. Satisfactory
progress includes, but is not limited to:
1. Maintaining a minimum Nutrition
and Exercise Sciences option program
GPA of 2.25.
2. Maintaining a minimum GPA of 2.50
in all EXSS and NFM-prefixed courses.
EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (BS, HBS)
The basic exercise and sport science
curriculum meets university requirements for the bachelor's degree and
provides general education needed for
professional preparation. In addition to
the general education and professional
courses listed in the core program,
undergraduate major students complete
an option selected from athletic
training, exercise science, physical
education teacher education, pre-
314
Oregon State University
therapy and allied health, or applied
exercise and sport science.
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
Skills
Fitness (3)
Mathematics (3)
Writing I (3)
Writing II (3)
Writing III/Speech (3)
Writing Intensive Course
Perspectives
Biological science (lab) (4)
Physical science (lab) (4)
Plus an additional 4 credits from
another biological or physical science
lab
Cultural diversity (3)
Literature and the arts (3)
Social processes and institutions (3)
Western culture (3)
Difference, power and discrimination (3)
Synthesis
Contemporary global issues (3)
Science, technology, and society (3)
APPLIED EXERCISE
AND SPORT SCIENCE OPTION
The Applied Exercise and Sport Science
option allows students to develop an
academic experience designed to meet
very specific career goals that are not
met by one of the other four options.
Curriculum requirements for the
four-year program are listed below.
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
14 of the 48 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Applied Exercise and
Sport Science option.
Core (32)
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4).
EXSS 323. Biomechanics of Sport and
Exercise (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 371. Measurements in Exercise and
Sport Science (4)
EXSS 411. Movement Skill Learning and
Control (4)
EXSS 444. Adapted Physical Activity (4)
The courses taken in Applied Option
sections A, B, and Supporting Courses
should be integrated into a coherent
program based on the goals of the
student and planned and agreed upon
by the student and the student’s
academic advisor. The program of study
must be approved by the department
chair.
APPLIED OPTION
Section A. (12–18)
EXSS 307. Seminar (Sect. 2, Pre-Internship)
(1)
EXSS 333. EXSS Practicum (2)
EXSS 410. Internship (9–15)
Section B. (17–18)
EXSS 131. Introduction to Exercise and
Sport Science (1)a
EXSS 271. Principles of Computing in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)a
Select one Writing Intensive Course (WIC)
from the following:
EXSS 381. ^Analysis of Critical Issues in
EXSS (3)
EXSS 415. ^Motor Control and
Movement Dysfunction (3)
EXSS 450. ^Orthopedic Physical
Assessment (4)
Additional EXSS course work (9)
Supporting Courses (27–28)
Science and Social
Science Courses (39–40)
CH 121, CH 122. General Chemistry (5,5)
and CH 123. *General Chemistry (5)
or CH 130. General Chemistry of
Living Systems (4)
OR:
CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201. *General Physics (5)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Total=175
Courses listed in Core, Applied Option,
Supporting Courses, and Science and
Social Science must be taken in the
normal grading basis, A/F, except for
EXSS 131, which is graded P/N.
Footnotes:
a
Recommended courses; if not taken
the student must take other EXSS
courses to satisfy the total credits
requirement.
• Additional electives to complete a
total of 180 credits required for the
Bachelor's degree.
• 26 credits within the major can be
used as baccalaureate core.
Careful advising is recommended to
assure that the classes chosen will meet
both the science/social science and bacc
core requirements.
ATHLETIC TRAINING OPTION
Students completing the Athletic
Training option are eligible to sit the
National Athletic Trainer’s Association
Board of Certification (NATABOC)
examination. With NATABOC certification, the graduate is qualified for
employment as a certified athletic
trainer (ATC) in a variety of work
settings. These venues include sports
medicine clinics, hospitals, high schools,
colleges and universities, professional
sports teams, and corporate/industrial
settings.
The Athletic Training option is a
rigorous academic and clinical program
designed to prepare graduates to enter a
variety of employment settings and to
render medical care to a wide spectrum
of individuals engaged in physical
activity. The program of study involves
specialized academic course work and
three years of supervised clinical
experience. The technical standards set
forth by the OSU Athletic Training
option establish the essential qualities
considered necessary for students
admitted to this program to achieve the
knowledge, skills, and competencies of
an entry-level certified athletic trainer, as
well as meet the expectations of the
program’s accrediting agency.
The Athletic Training option employs
a competitive admission process, in that
all students interested in applying for
the Athletic Training option must
complete prerequisite courses and a
directed clinical observation experience
prior to gaining formal admission.
Typically, the admission process occurs
at the end of a student’s freshman year.
A competitive admission process is used
because there are historically more
applicants than can be accommodated
in the clinical settings. Consult with the
athletic training education program
director or a College of Health and
Human Sciences advisor for program
guidelines and application instructions.
Curriculum requirements for the
four-year program are listed below.
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
14 of the 48 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Athletic Training option.
Core Curriculum (32)
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4).
EXSS 323. Biomechanics of Sport and
Exercise (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 371. Measurement in Exercise and
Sport Science (4)
EXSS 411. Movement Skill Learning and
Control (4)
EXSS 444. Adapted Physical Activity (4)
Athletic Training
Option Courses (46–54)
EXSS 131. Introduction to Exercise and
Sport Science (1)
EXSS 158. Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries (3)
EXSS 159. Directed Observation in
Athletic Training (1)
College of Health and Human Sciences
EXSS 257. Athletic Training Practicum:
Lower Extremity Injury Assessment (2)
EXSS 258. Athletic Training Practicum:
Protective Taping, Wrapping and
Bracing (2)
EXSS 259. Athletic Training Practicum:
Upper Extremity Injury Assessment (2)
EXSS 265. Emergency Management of
Sports Trauma (3)
EXSS 271. Principles of Computing in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
(Recommended)
EXSS 357. Athletic Training Practicum:
Principles of Rehabilitation (2)
EXSS 358. Athletic Training Practicum:
Spine Assessment (2)
EXSS 359. Athletic Training Practicum:
General Medical Conditions (2)
EXSS 380. Therapeutic Modalities (4)
EXSS 385. Therapeutic Exercise (4)
EXSS 394. Professional Activities:
Resistance Training Program Design (2)
EXSS 425. Biomechanics of
Musculoskeletal Injury (offered
alternate years) (3)
EXSS 450. ^Orthopedic Physical
Assessment (4)
EXSS 452. Athletic Training Program
Management (3)
EXSS 457. Athletic Training Practicum:
Joint Mobilization/PNF (2)
EXSS 458. Athletic Training Practicum:
Core Stability (2)
EXSS 459. Athletic Training Practicum:
Manual Therapy (2)
Supporting Courses (8)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
PHAR 210. Terminology of the Health
Sciences (2)
Science and Social
Science Courses (39–40)
Complete a total of 14–15 credits of
chemistry:
CH 121, CH 122. General Chemistry (5,5)
and CH 123. *General Chemistry (5)
or CH 130. General Chemistry of
Living Systems (4)
OR
CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201. *General Physics (5)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Electives
Additional electives to complete a total
of 180 credits required for the Bachelor's
degree.
EXERCISE SCIENCE OPTION
This option prepares graduates to
provide leadership for organizing,
directing, and managing physical fitness
programs in business and industrial
settings, health clubs, and hospitalbased fitness/wellness cardiac rehabilitation programs. The program is excellent
preparation for graduate school.
Curriculum requirements for the
four-year program are listed below:
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
14 of the 48 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Exercise Science option.
Core Curriculum (32)
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4)
EXSS 323. Biomechanics of Sport and
Exercise (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 371. Measurement in Exercise and
Sport Science (3)
EXSS 411. Movement Skill Learning and
Control (4)
EXSS 444. Adapted Physical Activity (4)
Exercise Science Option Courses (29–40)
EXSS 131. Intro to Exercise and Sport
Science (1)
EXSS 265. Emergency Management of
Sports Trauma (3)
EXSS 271. Principles of Computing in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
(Recommended)
EXSS 307. Seminar (Sect. 2, PreInternship) (1)
EXSS 333. Exercise and Sport Science
Practicum (2)
EXSS 381. ^Analysis of Critical Issues in
EXSS (3)
EXSS 394. Professional Activities:
Resistance Training Program Design (2)
EXSS 410. Internship (9–15)
EXSS 414. Fitness and Aging:
Developmental and Programming
Perspective (3)
EXSS 434. Applied Muscle Physiology (3)
EXSS 436. Cardiovascular Dynamics (3)
EXSS 474. Exercise Physiology Lab
Methods (2)
Select a minimum of 9 credits to build a
supporting area for career direction.
Courses can be taken from the list below or
other courses can be taken with advisor
approval:
CH 331, CH 332. Organic Chemistry (4,4)
CH 337. Organic Chemistry Lab (4)
HDFS 360. Critical Thinking in Human
Development and Family Sciences (4)
HDFS 361. Applied Research Methods (4)
EXSS 334. Exercise and Sport Science
Practicum (2)
or EXSS 335. Exercise and Sport
Science Practicum (2)
EXSS 340. Organization of Sports
Programs (3)
EXSS 395. Professional Activities: Group
Fitness (2)
Supporting Courses (12)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
or COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (3)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
315
PHAR 210. Terminology of the Health
Sciences (2)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
Science and Social Sciences (23)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
CH 122. *General Chemistry (5)
CH 123. *General Chemistry (5)
or CH 130. General Chemistry of
Living Systems (4)
OR: CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201. *General Physics (5)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Electives
Additional electives to complete a total
of 180 credits required for the Bachelor's
degree.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION
For students who seek careers teaching
physical education at the elementary
and/or secondary school setting, this
option provides the academic major
and prerequisites needed for application
into the fifth-year master’s level teacher
education program.
Curriculum requirements for the
four-year program are listed below:
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
14 of the 48 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Physical Education
Teacher Education option.
Core Curriculum (32)
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4)
EXSS 323. Biomechanics of Sport and
Exercise (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 371. Measurement in Exercise and
Sport Science (4)
EXSS 411. Movement Skill Learning and
Control (4)
EXSS 444. Adapted Physical Activity (4)
Physical Education Teacher
Education Option Courses (45–49)
EXSS 131. Intro to Exercise and Sport
Science (1)
EXSS 158. Care and Prevention of
Athletic Injuries (3)
EXSS 194. Professional Activities: Basic
Rhythms (1)
EXSS 271. Principles of Computing in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
(Recommended)
EXSS 313. Lifespan Motor Development
(4)
316
Oregon State University
EXSS 353, EXSS 354, EXSS 355. Physical
Education Teacher Education
Practicum (2,2,2)
EXSS 360. Sport Skill Analysis (take 3
times for 6 credits) (2)
EXSS 381. ^Analysis of Critical Issues in
EXSS (3)
EXSS 394. Professional Activities:
Resistance Training Program Design (2)
EXSS 395. Professional Activities: Group
Fitness (2)
EXSS 396. Professional Activities:
Aquatics (2)
or EXSS 236. Water Safety Instruction
(3)
EXSS 420. Physical Activity for Children
(3)
EXSS 421. Physical Activity for
Adolescents (3)
PAC courses approved by advisor (8)
PAC courses in different activities required
to reflect content taught in public schools
and other physical activity settings,
including fitness games and sports, outdoor
leisure pursuits and aquatics.
Supporting Courses (13)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
TCE 216. Purpose, Structure, and
Function of Education in a
Democracy (3)
TCE 219. Multicultural Issues in
Educational Settings (2)
TCE 253. Learning Across the Lifespan (3)
TCE 418. Civil Rights in Education (2)
Science and Social Science
Courses (21–35)
Complete a total of 14–15 credits of
chemistry:
CH 121, CH 122. General Chemistry (5,5)
and CH 123. *General Chemistry (5)
or CH 130. General Chemistry of
Living Systems (4)
OR:
CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201. *General Physics (5)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Electives
Additional electives to complete a total
of 180 credits required for the Bachelor's
degree.
PRE-THERAPY AND
ALLIED HEALTH OPTION
This program is designed for the student
interested in pursuing admission into
medical school or a professional
program in the allied health professions,
such as physical or occupational
therapist, nurse, or physician assistant.
The Pre-Therapy and Allied Health
option requires the completion of one
of four professional tracks:
1. Nursing
2. Occupational Therapy
3. Physical Therapy
4. Physician Assistant and Medicine
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
14 of the 48 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Pre-therapy and Allied
Health option.
Core Curriculum (32)
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4)
EXSS 323. Biomechanics of Sport and
Exercise (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 371. Measurement in Exercise and
Sport Science (4)
EXSS 411. Movement Skill Learning and
Control (4)
EXSS 444. Adapted Physical Activity (4)
Pre-Therapy and
Allied Health Option (20–24)
EXSS 132. Intro to the Allied Health
Professions (1)
EXSS 271. Principles of Computing in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
(Recommended)
EXSS 313. Lifespan Motor Development
(4)
EXSS 343. Allied Health Practicum (2)
EXSS 380. Therapeutic Modalities (4)
EXSS 385. Therapeutic Exercise (4)
EXSS 414. Fitness and Aging:
Developmental and Programming
Perspective (3)
EXSS 415. ^Motor Control and
Movement Dysfunction (3)
Supporting Courses (5)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
PHAR 210. Terminology of the Health
Sciences (2)
All courses above must be taken in the
normal grading basis, A–F.
Additionally, the Pre-Therapy and
Allied Health option requires
completion of one of the following
four professional tracks:
1. Professional Track: Nursing
Science and Social
Science Courses (77)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
CH 122. *General Chemistry (5)
CH 130. General Chemistry of Living
Systems (4)
COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 312. *AIDS and STDs in Modern
Society (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
PH 201. *General Physics (5)
PHL 205. *Ethics (4)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(3,3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (3)
SOC 204. *Introduction to Sociology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342, Z 343. Human Anatomy
and Physiology Lab (2,2,2)
Total=77
Total Credits Required for this
Option 162–165.
Additional elective credits to
complete a total of 180 credits is
required for a degree.
Strongly
Suggested Electives
ANTH 483. *Medical Anthropology (3)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services (3)
NFM 312. *Issues in Nutrition and
Health (3)
MB 390. *The World According to
Microbes (3)
Additional Suggested Electives
H 250. Introduction to Health Care
Organization and Administration (3)
PH 202, PH 203. *General Physics (5,5)
PSY 432. Physiological Psychology (3)
PSY 442. Perception (3)
SOC 205. *Institutions and Social
Change (3)
SOC 340. Deviant Behavior and Social
Control (3)
It is strongly suggested that the courses
above also be taken in the normal
grading basis, A–F.
2. Professional Track:
Occupational Therapy
Science and Social
Science Courses (87)
BI 101. *General Biology (4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
CH 122, CH 123. *General Chemistry (5,5)
Choose one of the following
communication courses:
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
COMM 218. *Interpersonal Communication (3)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201, PH 202. *General Physics (5,5)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(3,3)
PSY 330. Brain and Behavior (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
PSY 381. Abnormal Psychology (3)
SOC 204. *Intro to Sociology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342, Z 343. Human Anatomy
and Physiology Lab (2,2,2)
Applied Art Courses (choose two) (6)
Cross-Cultural Studies/Diversity Course
(choose one) (3)
Humanities Courses (choose three) (9)
Total=87
College of Health and Human Sciences
Total Credits Required for this
Option 165–168.
Additional elective credits to complete a
total of 180 credits is required for a
degree.
Strongly Suggested Electives
ANTH 483. *Medical Anthropology (3)
BI 103. *General Biology (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
PAC Physical activity course (3)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PSY 432. Physiological Psychology (3)
PSY 442. Perception (3)
SOC 205. *Institutions and Social
Change (3)
SOC 340. Deviant Behavior and Social
Control (3)
Additional Suggested Electives
H 210. *Intro to Health Sciences (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 312. *AIDS and STDs in Modern
Society (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
MB 390. *The World According to
Microbes (3)
NFM 312. *Issues in Nutrition and
Health (3)
It is strongly suggested that the courses
above also be taken in the normal
grading basis, A–F.
3. Professional Track:
Physical Therapy
Science and Social
Science Courses (79)
BI 211, BI 212, BI 213. *Principles of
Biology (4,4,4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
and CH 122, CH 123. *General
Chemistry (5,5)
or CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
Choose one of the following
communication courses:
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
COMM 218. *Interpersonal Communication (3)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201, PH 202, PH 203. *General
Physics (5,5,5)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(3,3)
Choose two of the following psychology
courses:
PSY 330. Brain and Behavior (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development (3)
PSY 381. Abnormal Psychology (3)
SOC 204. *Intro to Sociology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342, Z 343. Human Anatomy
and Physiology Lab (2,2,2)
Total=79
Total Credits Required for this
Option 166–169.
Additional elective credits to
complete a total of 180 credits is
required for a degree.
Strongly Suggested Electives
BB 350. Elementary Biochemistry (4)
BI 311. Genetics (4)
CH 331, CH 332. Organic Chemistry (4,4)
CH 337. Organic Chemistry Lab (4)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
Additional Suggested Electives
ANTH 483. *Medical Anthropology (3)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services (3)
H 312. *AIDS and STDs in Modern
Society (3)
MB 390. *The World According to
Microbes (3)
NFM 312. *Issues in Nutrition and
Health (3)
PSY 432. Physiological Psychology (3)
PSY 442. Perception (3)
SOC 205. *Institutions and Social
Change (3)
SOC 340. Deviant Behavior and Social
Control (3)
It is strongly suggested that the courses
above also be taken in the normal
grading basis, A–F.
4. Professional Track: Physician
Assistant and Medicine
Science and
Social Science Courses (90)
BI 211, BI 212, BI 213. *Principles of
Biology (4,4,4)
BI 314. Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
CH 122, CH 123. *General Chemistry
(5,5)
or CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
CH 331, CH 332. Organic Chemistry (4,4)
CH 337. Organic Chemistry Lab (4)
Choose one of the following
communication courses:
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (3)
MB 302, MB 303. General Microbiology,
Lab (3,2)
MTH 112. *Elementary Functions (4)
PH 201, PH 202, PH 203. *General
Physics (5,5,5)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(3,3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342, Z 343. Human Anatomy
and Physiology Lab (2,2,2)
Total=90
Total required credits for this
option=175–178.
Additional elective credits to
complete a total of 180 credits is
required for a degree.
Strongly Suggested Electives
BB 350. Elementary Biochemistry (4)
BI 311. Genetics (4)
H 320. Intro to Human Diseases (3)
317
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PSY 330. Brain and Behavior (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
PSY 381. Abnormal Psychology (3)
Additional Suggested Electives
ANTH 483. *Medical Anthropology (3)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 312. *AIDS and STDs in Modern
Society (3)
MB 390. *The World According to
Microbes (3)
NFM 312. *Issues in Nutrition and
Health (3)
PSY 432. Physiological Psychology (3)
It is strongly suggested that the courses
above also be taken in the normal
grading basis, A–F.
NUTRITION AND FOOD
MANAGEMENT (BS, HBS)
Baccalaureate Core (48)
Nutrition and Food
Management Core (23–25)
COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
or COMM 114. *Argument and Critical
Discourse (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
or MB 302, MB 303. General
Microbiology and Lab (3,2)
NFM 104. Orientation: Nutrition and
Food Management (1)
NFM 235. Science of Foods (5)
NFM 240. Human Nutrition (3)
NFM 241. Applications in Human
Nutrition (1)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
or ST 351. Intro to Statistical Methods
(4)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
DIETETICS OPTION
Meets the American Dietetic Association
academic and accreditation requirements.
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BB 350. Elementary Biochemistry (4)
CH 121, CH 122, CH 123. General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
or CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
CH 331, CH 332. Organic Chemistry (4,4)
or CH 334, CH 335, CH 336. Organic
Chemistry (3,3,3)
NFM 219. Promoting Food and
Nutrition (2)
NFM 311. Foodservice Production and
Purchasing (4)
NFM 325. Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3)
NFM 340. Principles in Nutrient
Metabolism (3))
NFM 407. Seminar (1)
NFM 417, NFM 418. Human Nutrition
Science (4,4)
NFM 419. ^Human Nutrition
Laboratory (3)
NFM 420. Medical Nutrition Therapy (4)
NFM 423. Community Nutrition (4)
318
Oregon State University
NFM 439. Communications in Dietetics
(3)
NFM 445. Cost Control (3)
NFM 446. Foodservice Organizations (3)
NFM 447. Management of Food
Systems Lab (2)
PSY 201, PSY 202. *General Psychology
(3,3)
Z 331, 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Electives
Sufficient (together with baccalaureate
and nutrition and food management
cores) to ensure 180 total credits
(60 must be upper division).
NUTRITION SCIENCE OPTION
BB 350. Elementary Biochemistry (4)
or BB 450, BB 451. General
Biochemistry (4,3)
BI 211, BI 212, BI 213. *Principles of
Biology (4,4,4)
CH 121, CH 122, CH 123. General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
or CH 221, CH 222, CH 223. *General
Chemistry (5,5,5)
CH 331, CH 332. Organic Chemistry (4,4)
or CH 334, CH 335, CH 336. Organic
Chemistry (3,3,3)
CH 324. Quantitative Analysis (4)
MTH 251. *Differential Calculus (4)
NFM 325. Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3)
NFM 340. Principles in Nutrient
Metabolism (3)
NFM 417, NFM 418. Human Nutrition
Science (4,4)
NFM 419. ^Human Nutrition Lab (3)
NFM 420. Medical Nutrition Therapy (4)
NFM 439. ^Communications in
Dietetics (3)
PH 201, PH 202. *General Physics (5,5)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Electives
Sufficient (together with baccalaureate
and NFM cores) to ensure 180 total
credits (60 credits must be upper
division).
RESTAURANT/FOODSERVICE
MANAGEMENT OPTION
Please contact Dr. Mary M. Cluskey,
541-737-0960, [email protected]
oregonstate.edu for more information
about the Restaurant/Foodservice
Management option.
Introductory Core
NFM 104. Orientation (1)
or CA 8.301. Culinary Arts Career
Planning (1) (LBCC)
NFM 240. Human Nutrition (3)
NFM 241. Applications in Human
Nutrition (1)
CA 8.310. Culinary Arts Practicum I (7)
(LBCC)
CA 8.311. Culinary Arts Practicum II (8)
(LBCC)
CA 8.312. Culinary Arts Practicum III
(8) (LBCC)
General Education Core
COMM 218. *Interpersonal
Communication (3)
or COMM 111. *Public Speaking (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
or MB 302, MB 303. General
Microbiology, General Microbiology
Lab (3,2)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
or ST 351. Introduction to Statistical
Methods (4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
PSY 202. *General Psychology (3)
ECON 201. *Introduction to
Microeconomics (4)
ECON 202. *Introduction to
Macroeconomics (4)
Restaurant/Foodservice Courses
BA 390. Marketing (4)
or BA 498. Services Marketing (4)
BA 211. Financial Accounting (4)
or BA 215. Money and Investment
Management: Manager, Lender,
Investor Viewpoint (4)
BA 213. Managerial Accounting (4)
BA 230. Business Law I (4)
BA 340. Finance (4)
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
BA 453. Human Resources Management
(4)
or BA 455. Management and Union
Relations (4)
CA 8.336. Food Service Safety and
Sanitation (3) (LBCC)
CA 8.337. Stations, Tools, and Culinary
Techniques (1) (LBCC)
CA 8.345. Service Techniques (1) (LBCC)
FST 251. Introduction to Wines, Beers
and Spirits (3)
NFM 219. Promoting Food and
Nutrition (2)
NFM 311. Food Service Production and
Purchasing (4)
NFM 407. Seminar1 (1)
NFM 410. Field Experience2 (8)
Pre-arrange NFM 410 with department
NFM 416. ^Cultural Aspects of Foods (3)
NFM 445. Cost Control (3)
NFM 446. Foodservice Organizations (3)
NFM 447. Management of Food
Systems Lab (2)
Electives
BA 495. Retail Management (4)
FST 480. Topics in Fermentation (1–2)
Credits needed to graduate=180
Upper-division credits needed=60
Home Economics upper-division
credits needed=24
(Also count toward 60 above; 15 at OSU)
Maximum S/U credits=36
Note: Departmental courses within
major may not be taken S/U.
Transfer Students: See Schedule of
Classes, Academic Regulations 18a.1).
Footnotes:
* Baccalaureate core course
^ Writing intensive course
1
Recommend fall term of senior year.
2
Recommend spring term of senior year.
ATHLETIC
ADMINISTRATION MINOR
The Athletic Administration minor
provides professional preparation for
students who seek sport and athletic
administrative positions while completing an undergraduate major in another
field.
Required:
EXSS 312. Sociocultural Dimensions of
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 340. Organization of Sport
Programs (3)
or EXSS 463. Administration in
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
EXSS 370. Psychology of Sport and
Physical Activity (3)
EXSS 399. Special Topics (3)
EXSS 406. Projects: Athletic
Administration (advising office
approval required) (6)
EXSS 465. Facilities (3)
H 199. Special Topics: Drugs in Sports (2)
Complete a minimum of two
courses from the following:
(Business majors must select two
courses from outside the College of
Business.)
BA 230. Business Law I (4)
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
COMM 280. Media Communication in
the Information Age (3)
COMM 482. The Media in Culture and
Society (3)
COMM 486. Media Aesthetics (3)
EXSS 340. Organization of Sports
Programs (3)
or EXSS 463. Administration of
Exercise and Sport Science (3)
(Select either EXSS 340 or EXSS 463 not
previously used in the required section.)
H 364. Drugs, Society, and Human
Behavior (3)
SOC 454. Leisure and Culture (3)
Total=29–31
EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE MINOR
Please check with the Office of Academic
Advising and Student Support in
116 Milam Hall for minor requirements.
EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY MINOR
This minor is directed toward students
in the biological sciences, nutrition, pretherapy or pre-medicine who want to
acquire a strong background in exercise
physiology.
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (3)
EXSS 325. Fitness Assessment and
Exercise Prescription (2)
EXSS 406. Projects (Athletic
Administration) (3)
EXSS 434. Applied Muscle Physiology (3)
EXSS 436. Cardiovascular Dynamics (3)
EXSS 474. Exercise Physiology Lab
Methods (2)
College of Health and Human Sciences
Z 331, Z 332. Human Anatomy and
Physiology (3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Note: Prerequisite for EXSS 324 is
chemistry sequence CH 121, CH 122,
CH 123 or CH 130, and Z 332.
EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (MS, PhD)
Total=31
The graduate program in Exercise and
Sport Science offers graduate courses in
programs for students seeking theoretical and practical information about
exercise and sport and their relationship
to the discipline of human performance
and to the teaching of physical activity.
The Master of Science and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in Exercise and Sport
Science and the MS degree in Movement
Studies in Disability are offered in the
department. In addition, the department participates in the Master of Arts
in Interdisciplinary Studies (MAIS)
degree.
Graduate fields available through
graduate study in Exercise and Sport
Science include exercise physiology,
biomechanics, sport and exercise
psychology, sport pedagogy, sports
medicine, and movement studies in
disability. For further information about
graduate programs, contact the
Graduate Coordinator, Hans van der
Mars, 543-737-4649, Department of
Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, or visit
the department's website at http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/nes/
index.html.
The MS degree can be completed via a
thesis/project or comprehensive
examination option. The PhD degree
requires the completion of a dissertation. For the MAIS, a substantial
research paper or thesis is required.
FOODSERVICE
MANAGEMENT MINOR
This minor requires 27 credits, including
12 credits at the upper-division level.
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
NFM 104. Orientation: Nutrition and
Food Management (1)
NFM 219. Promoting Food and
Nutrition (3)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
NFM 235. Science of Foods (5)
NFM 311. Foodservice Pr oduction and
Purchasing (4)
NFM 416. ^Cultural Aspects of Foods (3)
or NFM 445. Cost Control (3)
NFM 446. Foodservice Organizations (3)
NFM 447. Management of Food
Systems Lab (2)
NUTRITION MINOR
This minor requires 30 credits, including
12 credits at the upper-division level.
Students are strongly encouraged to
consult an advisor in the Department of
Nutrition and Food Management to be
sure that prerequisites are taken.
BB 350. Elementary Biochemistry (4)
NFM 235. Science of Foods (5)
NFM 240. Human Nutrition (3)
NFM 241. Applications in Human
Nutrition (1)
NFM 312. *Issues in Nutrition and
Health (3)
or NFM 325. Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3)
NFM 417, NFM 418. Human Nutrition
Science (4,4)
Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy and
Physiology (3,3)
SPORTS INJURY CARE MINOR
This minor is for students interested in
learning more about sports injury
recognition, immediate care, clinical
treatment and rehabilitation.
Required Courses
EXSS 158. Intro to Athletic Training (3)
EXSS 265. Emergency Management of
Sports Trauma (3)
EXSS 322. Anatomical Kinesiology (4)
EXSS 380. Therapeutic Modalities (4)
EXSS 385. Therapeutic Exercise (4)
H 364. Drugs, Society, and Human
Behavior (3)
Required prerequisites
Z 331, Z 332, Z 333. Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3,3,3)
Z 341, Z 342. Human Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2,2)
Total=34
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Biomechanics, exercise physiology,
movement studies in disability, sport
and exercise psychology, sport
medicine, sport pedagogy
MOVEMENT STUDIES
IN DISABILITY (MS)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Biomechanics, exercise physiology,
movement studies in disability, sport
pedagogy, sports medicine, sport
and exercise psychology
NUTRITION AND FOOD
MANAGEMENT (MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Applied nutrition and dietetics,
bionutrition, food service
management
The Department of Nutrition and
Exercise Sciences offers graduate
programs leading to the Master of
Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy
(PhD) degrees in nutrition and food
management. Study may emphasize
nutrition or dietetic management. All
programs integrate related disciplines. A
thesis based on original research is
required for the MS and PhD degree
programs.
319
Research in the Department of
Nutrition and Exercise Sciences is
focused in the areas of human nutrition
and the nutrients needed to promote
health, the interaction of nutrition and
exercise on health. The research within
the department seeks the discovery of
new knowledge, information, techniques and/or interventions that can
promote the optimal health of individuals and families in Oregon, nationally, and worldwide.
Since these majors build upon the
natural and social sciences, entering
graduate students should have a
background in chemistry, physiology,
nutrition, statistics, biochemistry and/or
foods.
Depending upon their concentration,
graduates are prepared for positions in
college and university teaching; research
and development in industry, the
university, or government; Extension
education; and dietetics management.
Information on graduate assistantships and fellowships are available from
the department’s graduate program
website.
For additional information, contact
the Graduate Coordinator, Hans van
der Mars, 543-737-4649, Department of
Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, or visit
the department's website at http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/nes/
index.html.
EXERCISE AND SPORT
SCIENCE GRADUATE MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
MOVEMENT STUDIES IN
DISABILITY GRADUATE MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
NUTRITION AND FOOD
MANAGEMENT GRADUATE
MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
SPORT AND EXERCISE
PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE MINOR
Students pursuing this minor develop a
deeper understanding of the motivational, psychosocial, and lifespan
factors affecting human behavior within
the context of sport and physical
activity settings. A theory-to-researchto-practice approach is followed in the
core course work, with supplemental
course work focusing on the individual
needs and interests of the students.
Core Courses (9 credits)
EXSS 560. Motivation in Physical
Activity (3)
EXSS 561. Psychosocial Factors in
Physical Activity (3)
320
Oregon State University
EXSS 562. Lifespan Sport and Exercise
Psychology (3)
with emphasis on applications in exercise and
sport science.
Elective Courses (6–9 credits)*
EXSS 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3).
AHE 681. Recreational Sports
Administration in Higher Education (3)
EXSS 512. Applied Motor Learning (3)
H 571. Principles of Health Behavior (3)
PSY 585. Behavior Modification (3)
PSY 598. Health Psychology (3)
SOC 599. Special Topics: Sociology of
Sport (1–16)
WS 599. Topics: Women and Eating
Disorders (3)
* To be selected in consultation with the
minor professor. This is not an exhaustive
list.
EXSS 301. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE
EXSS 131. INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (1). Overview of the field; career
opportunities in exercise and sport science and
other professions dealing with the discipline of
human movement; orientation to support services.
Graded P/N.
EXSS 132. INTRODUCTION TO THE ALLIED
HEALTH PROFESSIONS (1). Overview of allied
health professions including physical and
occupational therapy, physician assistant,
nursing, athletic training and others. Discuss job
responsibilities, employment opportunities and
educational requirements.
EXSS 158. CARE AND PREVENTION OF
ATHLETIC INJURIES (3). Introduction to the
athletic training profession. Lecture and laboratory
experiences related to the prevention,
assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of
sport-related injuries. May be repeated once for
credit.
EXSS 159. DIRECTED OBSERVATION IN
ATHLETIC TRAINING (1). Directed observational
experiences in the profession of athletic training
under the supervision of certified athletic trainers.
Gives students a laboratory setting in which to
acquire the introductory skills of wound care,
taping, range of motion assessment, and modality
knowledge. May be repeated a maximum of
3 credits. ENFORCED PREREQS: EXSS 158
EXSS 194. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (1-2).
Basic movement skills, basic rhythms, track and
field. Course can be repeated for credit.
EXSS 199. SPECIAL STUDIES (1-3).
EXSS 235. LIFEGUARD TRAINING (2). Victim
recognition, surveillance, equipment-based rescue
skills, victim removal and resuscitation, care for
spinal injury. Red Cross Certification in Lifeguard
Training, First Aid and CPR for the Professional
Rescuer. OTHER PREREQS: Ability to swim
500 yards.
EXSS 257. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 158, EXSS 159.
EXSS 258. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 158, EXSS 159.
EXSS 259. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 158, EXSS 159.
EXSS 265. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OF
SPORTS TRAUMA (3). Knowledge and skills
related to the specialized care required for serious
and/or life-threatening sport-related injuries.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 158 or equivalent.
EXSS 271. PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTING IN
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE (3). Overview
of computer hardware and software structures
EXSS 305. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
EXSS 306. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 307. SEMINAR (1-3). Section 2: Seminar
Pre-Internship (1 credit).
EXSS 312. *SOCIOCULTURAL DIMENSIONS OF
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (3). Physical activity in
contemporary society. Relationships with the
social processes; interrelationships between
physical activity and cultural institutions. (Bacc
Core Course) OTHER PREREQS: Social
processes course.
EXSS 313. LIFESPAN MOTOR DEVELOPMENT
(4). Physical, neurological and physiological
changes occurring throughout childhood and
adolescence and their resultant effects upon
motor skill learning and performance. OTHER
PREREQS: Junior standing.
EXSS 322. ANATOMICAL KINESIOLOGY (4).
Anatomical aspects of human movement; actions
of bones and muscles in motor activities.
ENFORCED PREREQS: Z 331 and Z 341
EXSS 323. BIOMECHANICS OF SPORT AND
EXERCISE (4). The physical laws and mechanical
aspects governing human motor function;
analytical processes emphasized. ENFORCED
PREREQS: Z 331 and Z 341 and PH 201
EXSS 324. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (4).
Physiological effects of acute and chronic
exercise; factors affecting human performance;
exercise training principles. ENFORCED
PREREQS: Z 333* OTHER PREREQS: CH 121,
CH 122, and CH 123 or CH 130, and Z 331 or
equivalent.
EXSS 325. FITNESS ASSESSMENT AND
EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION (2). Introduction to
field-based physical fitness assessment;
application of physiological principles to design
safe and effective exercise programs for the
apparently healthy, as well as for individuals with
obesity, coronary disease, diabetes, and other
degenerative diseases. ENFORCED PREREQS:
EXSS 324*
allied health or related setting. Includes arranged
consultations with the instructor to discuss
current issues related to the allied health
professions. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 343.
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 345. ALLIED HEALTH PRACTICUM (2). Field
experience under professional supervision in an
allied health or related setting. Includes arranged
consultations with the instructor to discuss
current issues related to the allied health
professions. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 343.
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 353. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER
EDUCATION PRACTICUM (2). Supervised K-12
physical education field experience with seminars.
May include one instructor-approved coaching
experience in school setting. OTHER PREREQS:
OSU GPA 2.00, EXSS GPA 2.50, PETE GPA 2.25,
and departmental approval required.
EXSS 354. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER
EDUCATION PRACTICUM (2). Supervised K-12
physical education field experience with seminars.
May include one instructor-approved coaching
experience in school setting. OTHER PREREQS:
OSU GPA 2.00, EXSS GPA 2.50, PETE GPA 2.25,
EXSS 353 and departmental approval required.
Should also concurrently enroll in either EXSS 360
or EXSS 420.
EXSS 355. PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER
EDUCATION PRACTICUM (2). Supervised K-12
physical education field experience with seminars.
May include one instructor-approved coaching
experience in school setting. OTHER PREREQS:
OSU GPA 2.00, EXSS GPA 2.50, PETE GPA 2.25,
EXSS 354. Departmental approval required. Should
also concurrently enroll in either EXSS 360 or
EXSS 420.
EXSS 356. CARE AND PREVENTION OF
ATHLETIC INJURIES (3). Theoretical and practical
aspects of the prevention, treatment, and
rehabilitation of athletic injuries. OTHER PREREQS:
Z 331, Z 341. PHAR 210 recommended.
EXSS 357. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 257, EXSS 258, EXSS
259 and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 358. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 257, EXSS 258, EXSS
259 and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 333. EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE
PRACTICUM (2). Field experience under
professional supervision. May be repeated for
credit. OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 359. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 257, EXSS 258, EXSS
259 and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 334. EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE
PRACTICUM (2). Field experience under
professional supervision. May be repeated for
credit. OTHER PREREQS: Instructor approval.
EXSS 360. SPORT SKILL ANALYSIS (2).
Introduction to a variety of sports skills;
opportunities for sports skill analysis. May be
repeated for credit.
EXSS 335. EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE
PRACTICUM (2). Field experience under
professional supervision. May be repeated for
credit. OTHER PREREQS: Instructor approval.
EXSS 370. PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (3). Interaction between
psychological variables and human motor
performance.
EXSS 340. ORGANIZATION OF SPORT
PROGRAMS (3). Organizational theory of youth
and adult sport programs in a variety of
environments: includes competition schemes;
requires application of theory to a specific activity
experience. OTHER PREREQS: Sophomore
standing.
EXSS 371. MEASUREMENT IN EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (4). Techniques for constructing,
evaluating, and administering tests in the
psychomotor domain; analysis and interpretation
of test data. OTHER PREREQS: MTH 111 College
Algebra.
EXSS 343. ALLIED HEALTH PRACTICUM (2). Field
experience under professional supervision in an
allied health or related setting. Includes follow-up
seminars to discuss current issues related to the
allied health professions. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 132, Z 331, Z 332, Z 333, Z 342, Z 343, and
Z 344. Departmental approval required.
EXSS 344. ALLIED HEALTH PRACTICUM (2). Field
experience under professional supervision in an
EXSS 375. ADVANCED CONCEPTS OF ATHLETIC
TRAINING (3). Physical signs and symptoms of
illnesses and medical conditions common among
athletes. Actions of medications currently used to
treat systemic diseases, infections and
musculoskeletal conditions. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 259 or EXSS 343.
EXSS 380.THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES (4).
Indications, contraindication, techniques, and
effects of various physical agents used in the
College of Health and Human Sciences
care and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and
diseases. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the
Athletic Training option or enrollment in a pretherapy program in the Department of Exercise
and Sport Science or College of Science.
EXSS 381. ^ANALYSIS OF CRITICAL ISSUES IN
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCE (3). Review
current literature, professional issues, and
societal interrelationships in EXSS. The course
emphasizes writing as a tool for learning and the
products of writing. (Writing Intensive Course)
OTHER PREREQS: Junior standing.
EXSS 385. THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE (4).
Principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise;
rehabilitative activities and programs for
musculoskeletal injuries, conditions, and
diseases. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 322.
EXSS 394. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:
RESISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAM DESIGN (2).
Presents the conceptual basis for optimizing
resistance training program designs, exercise
routines for all ages and fitness levels, correct
exercise technique. ENFORCED PREREQS:
EXSS 324
EXSS 395. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: GROUP
FITNESS (2). Application of biomechanical,
physiological, psychological and safety principles
for the development of group exercise classes in
a variety of modes and settings. ENFORCED
PREREQS: EXSS 324 and EXSS 325*
EXSS 396. PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:
AQUATICS (2). Aquatic overview; emphasis on
underlying hydrodynamic principles; includes
safety, survival, stroke mechanics, aquatic
exercise, training, games; certification opportunity
in ARC Basic Water Rescue. OTHER PREREQS:
PAC 251.
EXSS 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3). Course can be
repeated for credit.
EXSS 401. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 403. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 406. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 407. SEMINAR (1-16).
EXSS 408. WORKSHOP (1-16).
EXSS 410. INTERNSHIP (3-15). Planned
experiences at selected cooperating agencies,
companies or institutions; supervised by
university and program personnel; supplementary
conference, reports and appraisal required. May
be repeated for credit. OTHER PREREQS:
Completion of required courses, cumulative EXSS
program GPA of 2.25 and EXSS overall GPA of
2.50, completion of 165 credits or departmental
approval.
EXSS 411. MOVEMENT SKILL LEARNING AND
CONTROL (3). Motor control and learning,
including neural and mechanical mechanisms
underlying motor behavior and application of
theoretical concepts to instructional and clinical
settings. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 322.
EXSS 414. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND AGING (3).
Examination of structural, physiological,
psychological, and functional changes occurring
during late adulthood and implications for the
planning, implementation, and evaluation of
physical activity programs for the older adult
population.
EXSS 415. ^MOTOR CONTROL AND MOVEMENT
DYSFUNCTION (3). Contemporary motor control
theories and their application to the development
of instructional and training programs for
individuals with movement disorders caused by
321
neurological disease and/or trauma. (Writing
Intensive Course) OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 411,
EXSS 444/EXSS 544.
consumption body composition, anaerobic power,
and electrocardiography. ENFORCED PREREQS:
EXSS 324 and EXSS 325
EXSS 420. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR CHILDREN
(3). Elementary school physical education
practices with an emphasis on effective
instructional strategies and developmentally
appropriate activities for children ages 5-12.
EXSS 475. *POWER AND PRIVILEGE IN SPORT
(3). Issues of power and privilege in sport
including race, gender, sexual orientation,
disability and aggression and the consequences
of long held societal norms and stereotypes.
(Bacc Core Course) OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 312
or 6 credits of social science.
EXSS 421. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR
ADOLESCENTS (3). Introduction for prospective
teachers in physical education in recent trends
and developments in delivery of physical
education programs at secondary school levels.
EXSS 425. BIOMECHANICS OF
MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY (3). Study of the
mechanical causes and effects of forces applied
to the human musculoskeletal system. Emphasis
on pathomechanics of injury and degenerative
changes associated with aging. Not offered every
year. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 323 and EXSS 356.
EXSS 434. APPLIED MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY (3).
Skeletal muscle structure, function, and
metabolism; applications to muscle fatigue,
exercise training, inactivity, and aging.
ENFORCED PREREQS: EXSS 324*
EXSS 436. CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY
AND DISEASE (3). Physiology of the
cardiovascular system, pathophysiology and
epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, and
practical principles of ECG, stress testing, and
CAD exercise prescription. ENFORCED PREREQS:
EXSS 325* OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 324.
EXSS 444. ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (4).
Overview of cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory
and orthopedic impairments; design and
implementation of physical activity programs for
individuals with disabilities. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 411, EXSS 324.
EXSS 450. ^ORTHOPEDIC PHYSICAL
ASSESSMENT (4). Advanced course designed to
develop knowledge and skills related to the
recognition, assessment, and appropriate medical
referral of athletic injuries and illnesses. (Writing
Intensive Course) OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 356.
EXSS 452. ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM
MANAGEMENT (3). Administrative aspects of
athletic training program management, including
medical-legal issues, personnel, budgetary, record
keeping, supply requisition and inventory, and
current professional issues. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 450.
EXSS 457. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 357, EXSS 358, EXSS
359 and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 458. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 357, EXSS 358, EXSS
359, and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 459. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM (2).
Clinical experiences in athletic training under
professional supervision with follow-up seminars.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 357, EXSS 358, EXSS
359 and admission into the Athletic Training option.
EXSS 463. ADMINISTRATION IN EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (3). Analysis of administrative
methods with unique applications to the
administration of programs in the school, in
commercial and industrial settings, and in sport
and recreational programs. OTHER PREREQS:
BA 302 or EXSS 340.
EXSS 465. FACILITIES (3). Planning construction
of indoor and outdoor physical activity facilities;
relationship of staff, architect, and community;
analysis of gymnasium and field space.
EXSS 474. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY LAB
METHODS (2). Practical experience and projects
in exercise physiology lab methods, including
measurement of submaximal and maximal oxygen
EXSS 499. SELECTED TOPICS (1-3). Impact of
human movement development on people, their
movement behavior, and environment. Topics vary
from term to term and year to year. May be
repeated for credit when topics differ. OTHER
PREREQS: Senior standing.
EXSS 501. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 503. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor’s approval required.
EXSS 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 506. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 507. SEMINAR (1-16). Section 1: Seminar.
Graduate research seminar that emphasizes
student oral presentations of current research
topics in exercise and sport science. One credit
required for all graduate students. Section 2:
Current Developments (1). Discussion of
contemporary issues in the exercise and sport
literature. Topics vary by term. May be repeated
for credit. Two credits required of all doctoral
students. Section 9: International Aspects (1).
Discussion of international aspects of study in
exercise and sport science. Required of all
doctoral students. Graded P/N.
EXSS 508. WORKSHOP (1-16).
EXSS 510. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP:
PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1-15). Field experience in
which the intern will integrate academic study with
classroom teaching experience to learn specific
competencies relating to functioning well in the
context of the classroom and the school, and
demonstrate this competency through the
assessment of work by supervisors and by
evidence collected and presented in work
samples. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to
MS-PETE program.
EXSS 512. APPLIED MOTOR LEARNING (3).
Application of research and theory to the teaching
of motor skills with emphasis on development of
instructional strategies related to modeling,
knowledge of results, practice, and motivational
aspects of learning. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 411.
EXSS 515. MOTOR CONTROL AND MOVEMENT
DYSFUNCTION (3). Contemporary motor control
theories and their application to the development
of instructional and training programs for
individuals with movement disorders caused by
neurological disease and/or trauma. OTHER
PREREQS: EXSS 411, EXSS 444/EXSS 544.
EXSS 523. BIOMECHANICS OF MOTOR
ACTIVITIES (3). Kinematic and kinetic analysis of
volitional human movement with emphasis on
analytical techniques and quantitative problem
solving. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 323 or PH 201.
EXSS 525. BIOMECHANICS OF THE SKELETAL
SYSTEM (3). Study of the mechanical causes and
effects of forces applied to the human
musculoskeletal system. Emphasis on
pathomechanics of injury and degenerative changes
associated with aging. Not offered every year. OTHER
PREREQS: EXSS 323 and EXSS 356.
EXSS 530. ORTHOPEDIC ASPECTS OF SPORTS
MEDICINE (3). In-depth study of the current
concepts and theories related to the epidemiology,
etiology, prevention, physical assessment, clinical
322
Oregon State University
management, and rehabilitation of sports-related
musculoskeletal injuries. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 450 or equivalent.
EXSS 533. ENERGETICS AND BIOCHEMISTRY
OF EXERCISE (3). Metabolic and energetic
responses to acute and chronic physical activity;
emphasis on recent research. OTHER PREREQS:
Undergraduate course in biochemistry or exercise
physiology.
EXSS 534. MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY AND
PLASTICITY (3). Physiological, metabolic, and
molecular aspects of muscle contraction; muscle
plasticity in response to mechanical loading,
exercise, aging, injury, and disease. OTHER
PREREQS: EXSS 324.
EXSS 536. CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY
AND DISEASE (3). Physiology of the
cardiovascular system, pathophysiology and
epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, and
practical principles of ECG, stress testing, and
CAD exercise prescription. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 324, EXSS 325.
EXSS 538. SKELETAL ADAPTATIONS TO
EXERCISE (3). Examination of alterations to and
adaptations of the skeletal system to exercise.
Includes bone modeling, remodeling and repair, as
well as clinical pathologies of the skeleton such
as osteoporosis and stress fractures.
EXSS 544. ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (4).
Overview of cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory
and orthopedic impairments; design and
implementation of physical activity programs for
individuals with disabilities. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 411, EXSS 324.
EXSS 547. MAINSTREAMING IN EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (3). Effectiveness of integrated
exercise and sport science and sport experiences
on handicapped and non-handicapped
participants.
EXSS 548. ASSESSMENT AND PROGRAMMING
FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3). Use of
appropriate assessment procedures for developing
effective psychomotor programs for the disabled.
OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 444, EXSS 471.
EXSS 549. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY FOR THE
SEVERELY DISABLED (3). Effectiveness of motor
programs, instructional strategies, behavior
management practices, and data analysis
systems on the psychomotor performance of the
severely disabled. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 444/
EXSS 544.
EXSS 551. CURRENT TRENDS AND RESEARCH
ISSUES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3). Current
trends and research issues in school physical
education; focus on national, state, and local
trends; the need for physical activity to promote
wellness; general guidelines of curriculum
development; introduction to instructional
components; research on teacher effectiveness;
and developing systematic observation skills.
OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the MS-PETE
Program.
EXSS 552. ANALYSIS OF MOVEMENT SKILLS
(3). Isolating and analyzing movement tasks;
organizing tasks into teachable components;
arranging sequences into logical progressions for
students; using information feedback to refine
skills; extending, refining, and applying movement
tasks. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the
MS-PETE Program.
EXSS 553. INSTRUCTIONAL ANALYSIS
TECHNIQUES I (3). Introduction to techniques of
instructional analysis. Provides in-depth
information and training in systematic observation
techniques, raw data conversion and inter/
intraobserver reliability. OTHER PREREQS:
Admission to the MS-PETE Program.
EXSS 554. INSTRUCTIONAL ANALYSIS
TECHNIQUES II (3). Laboratory/seminar
experience to accompany student teaching winter
and spring terms. Provides continued application
of systematic observation techniques throughout
the elementary student teaching experience.
OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the MS-PETE
Program.
EXSS 555. MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN
THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS (3). Introductory
course in measurement and evaluation for
physical education teachers. Focus on
measurement and evaluation in the cognitive,
affective and psychomotor domains as applied to
the physical education instruction setting. OTHER
PREREQS: EXSS 471 or equivalent.
EXSS 556. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS I (3). Skills
of planning, implementing, and evaluating
programs of instruction in physical education,
grades K-12. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the
MS-PETE Program.
EXSS 557. INSTRUCTIONAL SKILLS II (2).
Applying and refining skills of planning,
implementing and evaluating programs of
instruction in physical education, grades K-12.
OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the MS-PETE
Program.
EXSS 558. PHYSICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
DESIGN AND ORGANIZATION (3). Curricular
programs and variations from kindergarten through
grade 12, administrative policies and practices.
OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the MS-PETE
Program.
EXSS 559. THE PHYSICAL EDUCATOR AS A
PROFESSIONAL (1). Transitioning to teaching,
developing a portfolio, certification, obtaining a
position, teacher burnout, professionalism,
problems of first-year teachers, developing
patterns of behavior that lead to a successful
career. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to the
MS-PETE Program.
EXSS 560. MOTIVATION IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
(3). A social psychological approach to
understanding the role of self-perceptions and
cognitions in explaining motivated behavior in the
sport and exercise settings. OTHER PREREQS:
EXSS 370.
EXSS 561. PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS IN
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (3). A social psychological
approach to understanding the role of social
interactions and contextual factors in explaining
human behavior in the sport and exercise
settings. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 560.
EXSS 562. LIFESPAN SPORT AND EXERCISE
PSYCHOLOGY (3). Social-psychological issues
across the lifespan in the context of sport and
exercise. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 561.
EXSS 563. ADMINISTRATION IN EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCE (3). Analysis of administrative
methods with unique applications to the
administration of programs in the school, in
commercial and industrial settings, and in sport
and recreational programs. OTHER PREREQS:
BA 302 or EXSS 340.
EXSS 565. FACILITIES (3). Planning construction
of indoor and outdoor physical activity facilities;
relationship of staff, architect, and community;
analysis of gymnasium and field space.
EXSS 573. MEASUREMENT IN HUMAN
MOVEMENT (3). Measurement theory applied to
the study of human movement. Principles and
methods for assessing validity and reliability of
norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests in
the motor domain. OTHER PREREQS: EXSS 471,
ST 511.
EXSS 575. RESEARCH IN HUMAN MOVEMENT
(3). Investigation and evaluation of research
methods applicable to human movement study
and professional physical education. OTHER
PREREQS: EXSS 471, ST 511.
EXSS 577. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS IN HUMAN
PERFORMANCE RESEARCH (3). Using SPSS to
obtain and interpret multivariate analyses of data
collected in health and human performance
settings. OTHER PREREQS: Graduate standing,
and ST 411/ST 511 or ST 412/ST 512 or H 524.
EXSS 580. TEACHING BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT (3).
Introduction to current strategies used to analyze
and evaluate instruction in sport and physical
education settings.
EXSS 599. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3). Impact of
human movement development on people, their
movement behavior, and environment. Topics vary
from term to term and year to year. May be
repeated for credit when topics differ. OTHER
PREREQS: Graduate standing.
EXSS 601. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 603. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor’s approval required.
EXSS 605. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval
required.
EXSS 606. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
EXSS 607. SEMINAR (1-16). Section 1: Graduate
Research (1); Seminar emphasizes student oral
presentations of current research topics in
exercise and sport science. One credit required of
all graduate students. Section 3: Current
Developments (1); Discussion of contemporary
issues in the exercise and sport science
literature. Topics vary by term. May be repeated
for credit. Two credits required of all doctoral
students. Section 9: International Aspects (1);
Discussion of international aspects of study in
exercise and sport science. Required of all
doctoral students. Graded P/N.
EXSS 808. WORKSHOP (1-16).
HEALTH AND HUMAN SCIENCES
HHS 231. *LIFETIME FITNESS FOR HEALTH (2).
Physical activity and positive health behaviors in
human health; topics include physical fitness,
nutrition, weight control, stress management,
addictive behaviors, and sexually transmitted
infections. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 241. *LIFETIME FITNESS (1). Assessment,
evaluation and practice of physical fitness and
health behaviors leading to the development of a
personal fitness program. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 242. *LIFETIME FITNESS FOR HEALTH:
CARDIO CONDITIONING LAB (1). Assessment,
evaluation and practice of physical fitness and
health behaviors; development of a personal
fitness program with a focus on aerobic exercise.
(Bacc Core Course)
HHS 243. *LIFETIME FITNESS: RESISTANCE
TRAINING (1). Assessment, evaluation and
practice of physical fitness and health behaviors;
development of a personal fitness program with a
focus on muscular fitness. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 244. *LIFETIME FITNESS: WEIGHT
MANAGEMENT (1). Assessment, evaluation and
practice of physical fitness and health behaviors;
development of a personal fitness program
focusing on maintaining or achieving a healthy
body composition. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 245. *LIFETIME FITNESS: RUNNING (1).
Assessment, evaluation and practice of physical
fitness and health behaviors; development of a
personal fitness program with a focus on running
as a physical activity. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 246. *LIFETIME FITNESS: WALKING (1).
Assessment, evaluation and practice of physical
fitness and health behaviors; development of a
personal fitness program with a focus on walking
as a physical activity. (Bacc Core Course)
HHS 247. *LIFETIME FITNESS: AQUATIC
EXERCISE (1). Assessment, evaluation and
practice of physical fitness and health behaviors;
development of a personal fitness program
focusing on aquatic exercise as the physical
activity. (Bacc Core Course)
College of Health and Human Sciences
HHS 248. *LIFETIME FITNESS:YOGA (1).
Assessment, evaluation and practice of physical
fitness and health behaviors; development of a
personal fitness program with a focus on yoga
activities. (Bacc Core Course)
NUTRITION AND FOOD
MANAGEMENT
NFM 104. ORIENTATION: NUTRITION AND FOOD
MANAGEMENT (1). Identify professional
resources, job opportunities, markets and trends.
Study academic and professional requirements for
successful entry into professional careers in
dietetics, food systems management, foods in
business, and nutrition science. Graded P/N.
NFM 199. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3).
NFM 216. *FOOD IN NON-WESTERN CULTURE
(3). Cultural determinants influencing food habits
of humans. Interrelation of eating patterns and
socio-cultural, ecological, psychological and
economic factors in cross-cultural settings. Roles
of men and women in food provision. (Bacc Core
Course)
NFM 219. PROMOTING FOOD AND NUTRITION
(3). Strategies in promoting products, services or
ideas; negotiating, advertising, public policy,
consumer service, social marketing, market
research, trends and strategies.
NFM 225. HUMAN NUTRITION (3). The relationship
of food, its nutrients and other components to the
promotion of health and fitness with emphasis on
the young adult. Current health concerns on a
national and international level.
NFM 232. *NUTRITION AND LIFETIME FITNESS
(2). The role of foods, nutrition and physical
activity in developing and maintaining fitness and
health. (Bacc Core Course)
NFM 235. SCIENCE OF FOODS (5). Composition,
functional properties, and structure of foods,
including modified ingredients. Principles
underlying preparation of food products of
standard quality. Laboratory. ENFORCED
PREREQS: CH 123 or CH 223 OTHER PREREQS:
CH 123.
NFM 240. HUMAN NUTRITION (3). An introductory
nutrition course for exercise science, nutrition,
dietetics, food science, and health science majors
who have taken general chemistry. Concepts of
nutrient metabolism and utilization, nutrient
deficiencies and toxicities and their relationship to
disease prevention and treatment. ENFORCED
PREREQS: CH 121 OTHER PREREQS: May take
concurrently with NFM 241.
NFM 241. APPLICATIONS IN HUMAN NUTRITION
(1). Application of nutrition theory from NFM 240
using a dietary project and hands-on recitation
activities. A key focus of the course will be on
applying nutrition theory. OTHER PREREQS:
Enrollment in NFM 240 or completion of equivalent
prerequisite course.
NFM 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3).
NFM 311. FOODSERVICE PRODUCTION AND
PURCHASING (4). Food production, purchasing,
facility and materials management in foodservice
operations. Quantity production styles, safety and
sanitation, service methods and equipment.
Lec/lab. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 235, concurrent
enrollment in NFM 445, Cost Control.
NFM 312. *ISSUES IN NUTRITION AND HEALTH
(3). Impact of nutrition as one component of
complex environmental, behavioral, social, and
genetic factors significant to health promotion.
Apply scientific knowledge to current health
issues of changing dietary patterns, technological
development in food products and nutrition
controversies. Recognize economic and public
policy implications. (Bacc Core Course) OTHER
PREREQS: NFM 225; completion of science
requirement in baccalaureate core.
NFM 314. BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT (3).
Principles of food systems management applied to
beverage management for profit and nonprofit
organizations. Development of standards,
procedures, and controls for beverages: dairy
products, fruit juices, carbonates, nonalcoholic,
alcoholic, decaffeinated, and caffeinated.
Laboratory fee. Offered every other year.
NFM 325. NUTRITION THROUGH THE LIFE CYCLE
(3). Nutritional needs and concerns in pregnancy
and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence,
adult and later years. ENFORCED PREREQS:
(NFM 240 or NFM 225) and NFM 241 OTHER
PREREQS: Or equivalent, junior standing
recommended.
NFM 340. PRINCIPLES OF NUTRIENT
METABOLISM (3). Cellular mechanism for
digestion and utilization of nutrients; structure and
function of macronutrients; nutrients and gene
expression; relationship of nutrition to human
health. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 240, NFM 241,
CH 331 or equivalents.
NFM 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3).
NFM 401. RESEARCH (1-16).
NFM 403. THESIS (1-16). Graded P/N. OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
NFM 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
Graded P/N.
NFM 406. SPECIAL PROBLEMS; PROJECTS (1-16).
NFM 407. SEMINAR (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 408. WORKSHOP (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 409. PRACTICUM (1-16).
NFM 410. FIELD EXPERIENCE (3-12). Supervised
work experience with professional-level
responsibilities in community agency or business
firm. Supplementary conferences, readings,
reports. Supervised by agency/firm and instructor.
For advanced students. Applications made and
approved term preceding enrollment. May be
repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Graded P/N.
NFM 415. GLOBAL FOOD RESOURCES AND
NUTRITION (3). Resources and constraints
(natural, political, economic, and social) that
impact achievement of adequate food and nutrition
for all. Analysis of global interactions that influence
the prevention of hunger and malnutrition. OTHER
PREREQS: Economics, NFM 225.
NFM 416. ^CULTURAL ASPECTS OF FOODS (3).
Regional, ethnic, and religious influences on food
patterns; worldwide trends in food practices.
Laboratory experience with foods from several
cultures. (Writing Intensive Course) OTHER
PREREQS: NFM 235.
NFM 417. HUMAN NUTRITION SCIENCE (4).
Application of biochemistry and physiology to
nutrition of the individual. OTHER PREREQS:
NFM 340 or equivalent; BB 350 or equivalent; one
physiology course.
NFM 418. HUMAN NUTRITION SCIENCE (4).
Application of biochemistry and physiology to
nutrition of the individual. OTHER PREREQS:
Biochemistry, physiology.
NFM 419. ^HUMAN NUTRITION LABORATORY (3).
Techniques of nutritional assessment; laboratory
experiences covering basic nutrition and chemical
assays. Lab fee. (Writing Intensive Course)
ENFORCED PREREQS: NFM 417
NFM 420. MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4).
Application of nutrition principles to diseases/
disorders that may alter nutritional requirements or
respond to dietary modification. Lecture and case
study. ENFORCED PREREQS: NFM 418*
NFM 421. CHILD NUTRITION (3). Physiological
and biochemical bases for nutritional needs from
prenatal life through childhood, applications to
nutritional recommendations. ENFORCED
PREREQS: NFM 418*
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NFM 423. COMMUNITY NUTRITION (4). Meeting
nutritional needs in community settings; nutritional
status of individuals and groups; programs of
public and private agencies and industry;
intervention techniques. Roles of community
nutritionist. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 325.
NFM 429. NUTRITION AND AGING (3). Application
of research about nutritional status and services
for older people in various life settings. Physical,
social and demographic influences on food intake
will be considered. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
NFM 439. COMMUNICATIONS IN DIETETICS (3).
Theory and practice in food and nutrition
communications in dietetics. Experience in nutritional
counseling and interviewing, employee training and
nutrition educational materials development, public
speaking, and media presentation strategies. OTHER
PREREQS: NFM 325.
NFM 445. COST CONTROL (3). Cost control
techniques, budgeting, costing, menu pricing,
financial statements, inventory control, and
decision making.
NFM 446. FOODSERVICE ORGANIZATIONS (3).
Overview of organizational structure, functions of
managers in foodservice organizations: human
resources, regulatory influences, health care
organizations, current issues in operations.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 311, NFM 445.
NFM 447. MANAGEMENT OF FOOD SYSTEMS
LABORATORY (2). Application of foodservice
management theory by planning, providing, and
evaluating meals for the public in a university food
service facility. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 446/
NFM 546 or concurrent registration.
NFM 477. DIETARY INTERVENTIONS FOR
PUBLIC HEALTH (3). A public health perspective
on the practice of population-based dietary
intervention. Examination of relevant theories,
research, and practice that pertain to health
promoters/educators. CROSSLISTED as H 477/
H 577 OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
NFM 499. SPECIAL TOPICS IN DIETETICS (2-6).
Current issues, trends, and topics in nutrition and
dietetics. May be repeated for credit with different
topics.
NFM 501. RESEARCH (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 502. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16). Graded
P/N.
NFM 503. THESIS (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
Graded P/N.
NFM 506. SPECIAL PROBLEMS; PROJECTS (1-16).
Graded P/N.
NFM 507. SEMINAR (1-16). 1 credit graded P/N.
NFM 508. WORKSHOP (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 509. PRACTICUM (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 510. FIELD EXPERIENCE: INTERNSHIP (3-12).
Supervised work experience with professionallevel responsibilities in community agency or
business firm. Supplementary conferences,
readings, reports. Supervised by agency/firm and
instructor. Limited to students admitted to degree
program. Application made and approved in the
term preceding enrollment. No more than 6 credits
may be applied to a master’s degree program.
NFM 514. HEALTH BENEFITS OF FUNCTIONAL
FOODS, NUTRACEUTICALS, DIETARY
SUPPLEMENTS (3). Functional foods,
nutraceuticals and dietary supplements represent
a rapidly expanding segment of domestic and
international markets. This course will overview
the principles and procedures necessary to
evaluate and market these products. The
chemistry and mechanisms of major nutraceutical
ingredient categories and current scientific
information supporting their biochemical and
physiological efficacy will be addressed. Special
dietary products, such as medical, weight control,
sport, and herbal supplements, will be addressed.
324
Oregon State University
Regulatory aspects of labeling and structurefunction claims will be covered. CROSSLISTED as
FST 514. OTHER PREREQS: CH 332, BB 350.
NFM 515. GLOBAL FOOD RESOURCES AND
NUTRITION (3). Resources and constraints
(natural, political, economic, and social) that
impact achievement of adequate food and
nutrition for all. Analysis of global interactions that
influence the prevention of hunger and malnutrition.
OTHER PREREQS: Economics, NFM 225.
NFM 516. CULTURAL ASPECTS OF FOODS (3).
Regional, ethnic, and religious influences on food
patterns; worldwide trends in food practices.
Laboratory experience with foods from several
cultures. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 235.
NFM 517. HUMAN NUTRITION SCIENCE (4).
Application of biochemistry and physiology to
nutrition of the individual. OTHER PREREQS:
NFM 340 or equivalent; BB 350 or equivalent; one
physiology course.
NFM 518. HUMAN NUTRITION SCIENCE (4).
Application of biochemistry and physiology to
nutrition of the individual. OTHER PREREQS:
Biochemistry; physiology; NFM 517.
NFM 519. HUMAN NUTRITION LABORATORY (3).
Techniques of nutritional assessment; laboratory
experiences covering basic nutrition and chemical
assays. Lab fee. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 417/
NFM 517.
NFM 520. MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4).
Application of nutrition principles to diseases/
disorders that may alter nutritional requirements or
respond to dietary modification. Lecture and case
study. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 418/NFM 518.
NFM 521. CHILD NUTRITION (3). Physiological
and biochemical bases for nutritional needs from
prenatal life through childhood, applications to
nutritional recommendations. OTHER PREREQS:
NFM 418/NFM 518.
NFM 523. COMMUNITY NUTRITION (4). Meeting
nutritional needs in community settings; nutritional
status of individuals and groups; programs of
public and private agencies and industry;
intervention techniques. Roles of community
nutritionist. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 325.
NFM 529. NUTRITION AND AGING (3). Application
of research about nutritional status and services
for older people in various life settings. Physical,
social and demographic influences on food intake
will be considered. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
NFM 535. NUTRITION AND EXERCISE:
MACRONUTRIENT AND ENERGY METABOLISM
(3). Current research examining the
interrelationship of macronutrients and exercise
and energy balance will be reviewed, including
their roles in health, disease prevention and
exercise performance. OTHER PREREQS: NFM
517 or equivalent OR EXSS 533 or equivalent.
NFM 539. COMMUNICATIONS IN DIETETICS (3).
Theory and practice in food and nutrition
communications in dietetics. Experience in
nutritional counseling and interviewing, employee
training and nutrition educational materials
development, public speaking, and media
presentation strategies. OTHER PREREQS:
NFM 325.
NFM 542. ADVANCED PURCHASING (4). Decision
making and materials management of operational
resources. Evaluating services and contracts in
foodservice and dietetics related organizations.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 311.
NFM 545. COST CONTROL (3). Cost control
techniques, budgeting, costing, menu pricing,
financial statements, inventory control, and
decision making.
NFM 546. FOODSERVICE ORGANIZATIONS (3).
Overview of organizational structure, functions of
managers in foodservice organizations: human
resources, regulatory influences, health care
organizations, current issues in operations.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 311, NFM 445.
NFM 547. MANAGEMENT OF FOOD SYSTEMS
LABORATORY (2). Application of foodservice
management theory by planning, providing, and
evaluating meals for the public in a university food
service facility. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 446/NFM
546 or concurrent registration.
NFM 549. MANAGEMENT OF CLINICAL
NUTRITION SERVICES (3). Topics in management
practice relevant to the profession of clinical
dietetics in a variety of settings. Discussion and
activities using the World Wide Web. OTHER
PREREQS: NFM 420.
NFM 550. NUTRITIONAL STATUS (4). Research
studies with emphasis on estimation of nutrient
intake and assessment of nutritional status,
including biochemical, clinical, epidemiological and
anthropometric measures. Interpretation of status
indicators. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 418/NFM 518.
NFM 551. SELECTED TOPICS IN NUTRITION (3).
Topics vary but include protein and amino acid
metabolism, lipid metabolism, hormone and vitamin
interrelationships, intermediary metabolism,
nutrition behavior and education. Emphasis on
recent advances in human nutrition. May be
repeated for maximum of 6 credits. Not offered
every year. Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS:
NFM 418/NFM 518.
NFM 556. ADVANCED MANAGEMENT OF FOOD
AND DIETETIC SERVICES (3). Interpretation of
management principles and current research used
at the policy-making level to administer
foodservice, dietetic, or nutrition-related services.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 446/NFM 546; NFM 447/
NFM 547.
NFM 560. LIPID METABOLISM (3). Digestion,
absorption, and metabolism of lipids with
emphasis on lipoprotein metabolism, regulation of
lipid metabolism in various tissues and metabolism
of eicosanoids. Offered alternate years.
CROSSLISTED as ANS 560. OTHER PREREQS:
BB 452 or BB 492 or equivalent.
NFM 577. DIETARY INTERVENTIONS FOR
PUBLIC HEALTH (3). A public health perspective
on the practice of population-based dietary
intervention. Examination of relevant theories,
research, and practice that pertain to health
promoters/educators. CROSSLISTED as H 477/
H 577. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
NFM 599. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUTRITION (3-6).
Current issues, trends, and topics in nutrition and
health. May be repeated for credit with different
topics.
NFM 601. RESEARCH (1-16).
NFM 602. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 603. THESIS (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 605. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
Graded P/N.
NFM 607. SEMINAR (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 609. PRACTICUM (1-16).
NFM 610. INTERNSHIP (1-16). Graded P/N.
NFM 617. METABOLIC INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN
NUTRITION (3). Interrelationships between
nutrients and metabolism at the cellular and
human level as influenced by external and internal
factors, including age, and environment. Offered
alternate years. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 418/
NFM 518.
NFM 618. METABOLIC INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN
NUTRITION (3). Interrelationships between
nutrients and metabolism of humans at the cellular
level as influenced by external and internal
factors. May be taken out of order. Offered
alternate years. OTHER PREREQS: NFM 418/
NFM 518.
NFM 699. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUTRITION
RESEARCH (3-6). Current issues, trends, and
topics in nutrition research. May be repeated for
credit with different topics.
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
COURSES
The Physical Activity Course Program
(PAC) is an elective, academic-credit
program designed to provide OSU
students with the opportunity to learn
and engage in a wide variety of physical
activities with the goal of promoting
health and lifelong participation in
physical activity. Students may take any
number of PAC credits, but only
11 credits may be counted towards
graduation. Courses may be repeated
for credit and a grade. There is a PAC fee
for each class, and some courses have
additional fees. All fees are listed in the
online Schedule of Classes. Student
accounts are billed upon registration.
Refunds of the PAC fee are automatic
upon dropping or withdrawing from
the course and follow university policies
as listed in the Schedule of Classes. Some
additional fees are refunded through
the PAC Office (Langton 123). Social
dance classes are listed with a men’s and
women’s section in order to help
balance the number of students in the
traditional lead and follow roles within
the same class.
PAC 100. ADAPTED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (1).
Individual workout for students with permanent or
temporary physical disabilities and for students
enrolled in another PAC who sustain an injury.
PAC 102. AQUA AEROBICS (1). Fitness class
using a variety of movements in shallow and deep
water, mostly in a vertical position. Do not need
swimming skills.
PAC 103. DEEP WATER AEROBICS (1). Fitness
class using a variety of movements in a deep
water pool, mostly in a vertical position. Should be
comfortable in deep water.
PAC 106. AEROBIC MACHINE WORKOUT (1).
Fitness class using a variety of indoor stationary
machines.
PAC 107. DANCE AEROBICS (1). Fitness class
set to music using a variety of movement; high/
low intensity cardiovascular workout
supplemented with strength and flexibility
exercises.
PAC 108. STEP AEROBICS (1). Low-impact, high
intensity workout adjustable to all fitness levels
utilizing adjustable height benches. Strengthening
and flexibility exercises included.
PAC 109. POWER STEP AEROBICS (1).
Advanced high intensity step workout that
includes plyometric jumps and movements through
a wide range of motion. OTHER PREREQS: PAC 108,
Step Aerobics or equivalent.
PAC 113. BADMINTON I (1). Singles and doubles
skills, practice, rules, strategies and play.
PAC 114. BADMINTON II (1). Intermediate skill
development in badminton. OTHER PREREQS:
Fundamental skills, rules and strategy of singles
and doubles play.
PAC 116. BASKETBALL I (1). Fundamental
basketball skills, drills, rules, strategies, and
practice. Game play appropriate for the skill level.
PAC 117. BASKETBALL COMPETITIVE (1). Team
play, individual and team skills developed and
refined, competitive round robin tournaments.
OTHER PREREQS: Prior competitive experience.
College of Health and Human Sciences
PAC 120. MOUNTAIN BIKING (1). Touring trails in
Corvallis area; riding techniques, safety,
maintenance, environmental concerns. Required
equipment: mountain bike, tire repair kit, helmet.
PAC 122. BODY SCULPTING (1). Fitness workout
set to music using lighter resistance training aids
such as dumbbells, resistance tubing, bands, and
aerobic steps.
PAC 123. BOWLING I (1). Fundamentals of the
game including etiquette, spot bowling, natural
hook and straight ball delivery, scoring, handicap
computation, spare pickup, and error correction.
Additional fee; equipment supplied.
PAC 124. BOWLING II (1). Review and refinement
of basic fundamentals of bowling. Emphasis on
spot bowling, adjusting for lane conditions,
choices in equipment, league play, and mental
training. OTHER PREREQS: Bowling I or equivalent.
PAC 126. CARDIO KICKBOXING I (1). High
intensity group workout set to motivational music
and combining skills and techniques from boxing,
kickboxing, and other martial arts.
PAC 127. CARDIO KICKBOXING II (1). Applies
what students have learned in basic cardio
kickboxing and increases the difficulty of
combinations in a way that intensifies the workout
in complexity and cardio training; sometimes
referred to as turbo kickboxing. ENFORCED
PREREQS: PAC 126
PAC 128. CREW II (1). Review and refinement of
rowing techniques; appropriate water safety
instruction; technical and physical skills.
Conditioning oriented practices. OTHER
PREREQS: Crew I or instructor approval.
PAC 129. CARDIO COMBO (1). Combination of
aerobic training classes that use music such as
Cardio Kickboxing, Body Sculpture, Sports
Conditioning, and/or Step Aerobics. Actual
curriculum may vary with instructors.
PAC 130. CONDITIONING (1). Total body approach
to fitness, cardiorespiratory conditioning,
muscular strength and endurance; flexibility
emphasized. May follow a specific training format,
e.g. ROTC section follows Army conditioning
format.
PAC 131. SNOWBOARD-SKI CONDITIONING (1).
Strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, balance,
and cardiovascular exercises specific to downhill
skiing and snowboarding; designed to help
prepare students for participation in these sports.
PAC 135. BALLETSPORT: BALLET SKILLS FOR
ATHLETES (1). Fundamental ballet technique to
enhance balance, agility, alignment, strength and
rhythmic movement in sports. Stretching
techniques and Pilates mat-work included. No prior
dance experience needed. All students welcome.
Additional fee for accompanist.
PAC 136. DANCE: BALLET I (1). Introduction to
basic ballet technique and aesthetics,
terminology, alignment, stretch and strength
exercises. No previous dance experience needed.
Additional fee for accompanist.
PAC 137. DANCE: BALLET II (1). Review and
practice of beginning ballet technique, introduction
of more advanced stretches, steps, and
combinations. Additional fee for accompanist.
OTHER PREREQS: Ballet I or previous ballet
experience.
PAC 138. DANCE: BALLET III (1). Intermediate
and advanced ballet technique, comprehensive
exploration of the discipline. Additional fee for
accompanist. OTHER PREREQS: Ballet II,
previous comparable experience or instructor
approval required.
PAC 140. DANCE: JAZZ I (1). Introduction to jazz
dance, technique, isolations, and combinations.
Different jazz styles are explored. No previous
dance experience is necessary.
PAC 141. DANCE: JAZZ II (1). Intermediate jazz
technique, isolations and combinations. OTHER
PREREQS: Jazz I or comparable experience.
PAC 142. DANCE: JAZZ III (1). Advanced
approach to jazz technique; challenging warm
ups, combinations, and dances. Performance
opportunity. OTHER PREREQS: Jazz II,
comparable experience, departmental approval
required.
PAC 145. DANCE: MODERN I (1). Introduction to
modern dance movement fundamentals.
Technique, stretch, strength, and alignment are
included, as well as an appreciation for movement
expression. No previous dance experience
needed. Additional fee for accompanist.
PAC 146. DANCE: MODERN II (1). An intermediate
level of modern dance technique and movement
expression. Additional fee for accompanist.
OTHER PREREQS: Modern Dance I or comparable
experience.
PAC 147. DANCE: MODERN III, OREGON DANCE
PERFORMANCE (1). Modern dance advanced
technical skills, compositions, and combinations.
Additional fee for accompanist. OTHER
PREREQS: Previous intermediate modern dance
experience or instructor approval.
PAC 150. CULTURAL WORLD DANCE (1).
Introduction to traditional dance forms from
Europe, Israel, North America and Asia, focusing
on movement, cultural heritage, history, and
diversity.
PAC 152. DANCE: SALSA I (1). Steps and
rhythmic accent of Salsa and Merengue style;
fundamentals of leading and following; basic
moves and combinations. No prior experience
needed.
PAC 153. DANCE: SALSA II (1). Intermediate
moves, rhythmic accents and step combinations
of Salsa; development of leading and following.
ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 152 OTHER
PREREQS: Or instructor approval.
PAC 154. DANCE: COUNTRY WESTERN I (1).
Focus on traditional Country Western Swing
patterns. Emphasizes fundamentals of leading and
following. Also including introduction to waltz, twostep, cowboy cha-cha and 10-step polka.
PAC 155. DANCE: COUNTRY WESTERN II (1).
Build on CW I with advanced waltz, two-step, and
cha-cha patterns; introduces schottishe and East
Coast swing. OTHER PREREQS: Country Western
I or instructor approval.
PAC 158. DANCE: BEGINNING SWING (1).
Introduction to single time, double time, and triple
time (jitterbug) swing; variations for each style,
covering most swing music rhythms. Emphasizes
fundamentals of leading and following. Men/
women. May be repeated a maximum of 11 credits.
PAC 159. DANCE: BALLROOM I (1). Posture and
alignment, fundamentals of leading and following,
basic steps and variations for waltz, foxtrot,
swing, tango, and cha-cha.
PAC 160. DANCE: BALLROOM II (1). Additional
steps and patterns of popular ballroom dances.
ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 159
PAC 161. DANCE: BALLROOM III (1). Styling;
additional dances: rhumba, silver fox trot, and
Viennese waltz; advanced dance figures for tango
and cha-cha. ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 160
PAC 163. DANCE: LATIN I (1). Latin dances
including cha-cha, mambo, salsa, rhumba, merengue,
bolero, salsa, and paso doble. Emphasis on proper
styling and technical execution of each dance;
effective leading and following techniques. OTHER
PREREQS: Ballroom I.
PAC 164. DANCE: LATIN II (1). Continuation of
Latin Dance I; more advanced dance patterns in
cha-cha, salsa, merengue, rhumba and samba.
Introduction to mambo and bolero; emphasis on
technical and stylistic details of each dance.
OTHER PREREQS: Latin I.
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PAC 165. DANCE: WEST COAST SWING (1).
Focus on style, technique and many different step
patterns of the west coast swing dance.
ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 154 or PAC 159
PAC 166. BALLROOM 2 STEP, HUSTLE (MEN/
WOMEN) (1). Smooth, romantic social dance that
is neither ballroom, Latin, nor swing but a rhythm
dance identified as club-style, danced to
contemporary ballad-like music. Hustle is fastpaced, swing-related dance to disco beat. Class
encompasses intermediate step patterns,
technique and styling, stationary, traveling
patterns. ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 160
PAC 167. DANCE: LINDY HOP (1). Ballroom dance
style based on original eight-count swing dance
evolved in Harlem ballrooms during the late 1920s;
styling emphasized. ENFORCED PREREQS:
PAC 158 or PAC 159
PAC 169. COOL SHOES, BALLROOM
PERFORMANCE (1). Focus on advanced steps
and styling. A dance suite is choreographed each
term. Two to three performances each term.
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval by
audition required.
PAC 178. FLY FISHING I (1). Casting and fishing
techniques, lure making, equipment selection,
terminology, and regulation for fishing in Oregon’s
marine environment.
PAC 179. FLY FISHING II (1). Advanced fly
casting and fly fishing techniques for trout, flytying, equipment selection, basic aquatic
organism identification, terminology, and
regulations for fishing in Oregon’s freshwater
environment.
PAC 180. STEELHEAD FISHING (1). Casting and
fishing techniques, lure making, equipment
selection, terminology, and regulations for fishing
in Oregon’s marine environment for steelhead.
PAC 181. ADVANCED FLY TYING (1). Tying of
artificial flies useful for trout, steelhead, and bass
fishing; dubbing techniques, spinning hair,
parachute hackling, and precise winging methods
included. OTHER PREREQS: Fly Fishing I or
previous fly tying experience.
PAC 184. GOLF I (1). Basic fundamental principles
in all phases of golf; rules, terminology, etiquette,
safety and scoring. Equipment provided.
PAC 185. GOLF II (1). Individual practice and
course play; skill refinement as continuation of
Golf I. Equipment available. Course play expected,
additional fee. OTHER PREREQS: Golf I or equivalent.
PAC 186. GOLF III (1). Advanced skills,
knowledge involved in competitive play. Course
play expected, additional fee. OTHER PREREQS:
Handicap below 15 or Golf II; competitive play.
PAC 188. GYMNASTICS (1). Fundamental
techniques on vault, bars, beam, and floor.
PAC 189. GYMNASTICS II (1). Build upon previous
gymnastics experiences or classes; floor
exercise, uneven parallel bars, vault, minitrampoline and beam apparatus are available.
OTHER PREREQS: Gymnastics I or competitive
experience.
PAC 190. KARATE (1). Instruction in traditional
Japanese karate basic striking and blocking
techniques, kata (forms), philosophy, conditioning,
and etiquette. Self-defense applications are also
emphasized.
PAC 192. JUDO I (1). Skill instruction in landing,
throwing and grappling for this style of martial
arts; etiquette for practice and competition; basic
knowledge of vocabulary, rules and scoring.
PAC 194. PILATES (1). Non-impact, invigorating
approach to physical conditioning and mind/body
awareness; helps develop core body strength,
improve posture and balance, and increase
muscle endurance, tone, flexibility.
PAC 196. RACQUETBALL I (1). Individual skills;
rules, court positioning, player movement,
strategy, competitive play.
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Oregon State University
PAC 199. SPECIAL TOPICS (1). Experimental or
new classes.
PAC 201. RELAXATION (1). Introduction to
relaxation techniques; posture awareness, gentle
stretching, source of your energy, and creative
imagery to relieve stress.
PAC 205. ROWING, CREW I (MEN/WOMEN) (1).
Introduction to the sport of rowing; designed for
the novice (beginner). Includes basic technique
and terminology, related water safety, and
development of strength, endurance, and
flexibility. OTHER PREREQS: Swim Test (1).
PAC 209. ROCK CLIMBING, CONDITIONING I (1).
Physical conditioning for, and instruction in, the
skills and techniques of rock climbing;
environmental impact issues; held at on-campus
indoor climbing center.
PAC 210. ROCK CLIMBING, CONDITIONING II (1).
Advanced technical skills, training techniques,
rescue rigging, anchor and belay systems, basic
aid climbing, hauling, and other big wall
techniques; three-stage training; practice. Held at
on-campus climbing center. Additional fee may be
required for off-campus practice. OTHER
PREREQS: Rock Climbing and Conditioning I or
instructor approval.
PAC 212. RUNNING, JOGGING (1).
Cardiorespiratory fitness with scenic running
routes; training, nutrition, and physiology.
Beginning and intermediate level.
PAC 213. RUNNING: 10K TRAINING (1).
Intermediate to advanced conditioning and training
program for road racing. OTHER PREREQS: Prior
training in running.
PAC 217. SELF-DEFENSE (1). Nonviolent selfdefense. Develop self-confidence and skills for
assault situations. Conditioning and practical
skills. Men and women, all levels.
PAC 220. SKATING: IN-LINE (1). Aerobic fitness
(exercise) class utilizing rollerblades; emphasis on
safe and responsible participation. Must provide
skates, helmet, pads.
PAC 222. SKATING: IN-LINE HOCKEY (1). Ice
hockey on land using in-line skates. Skills,
games, and tournaments. Additional fee for facility.
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
PAC 224. TELEMARK SKIING (1). Winter sport
that is a cross between cross country and
downhill skiing. Requires telemark equipment
where the heel is unattached. Class
accommodates all levels and practices on the
downhill slopes. Additional fee covers bus
transportation, lessons, and lift ticket. Rental of
equipment is not included.
PAC 225. DOWNHILL SKIING (1). Travel to area
facilities, 1-1/2 hour lesson followed by open
practice, students grouped according to skill
level: beginner, intermediate, advanced, racer.
Special fee covers bus transportation, lessons,
and lifts. Additional fee for rentals.
PAC 227. SNOWBOARDING (1). Travel to area
facilities, 1 1/2 hour lesson followed by open
practice, students grouped according to skill
level: beginner, intermediate, advanced. Special
fee covers bus transportation, lessons, and lifts.
Additional fee for rentals.
PAC 229. SOCCER I (1). Basic skills of controlling
the ball; conditioning; lead-up games; team play.
PAC 230. SOCCER II (1). Review of basic skills of
offense and defense in controlled game play;
concepts of team position and play, pressure and
attack. OTHER PREREQS: Previous soccer
experience.
PAC 231. SOCCER III (1). High level soccer skills;
team play and transition concepts; set plays and
alignments for both offense and defense. OTHER
PREREQS: Soccer II or competitive playing
experience.
PAC 233. SOCCER: INDOOR (1). Skill instruction
and development; strategies and rules for indoor
play; game play in indoor gymnasium. OTHER
PREREQS: Previous soccer experience.
PAC 236. SOFTBALL, WHIFFLEBALL (1). Skills,
rules, strategies, practice, and game play of the
popular outdoor slow pitch game. Modified softball
with whiffleball when play is indoors.
PAC 242. SCUBA: OPEN WATER (2). Lecture
includes physiology, water environment,
equipment, and techniques for fundamental
SCUBA diving. Laboratory includes practice in
techniques, skills, and equipment usage;
sessions held in pool and open water. Successful
completion leads to PADI certification. Additional
fee covers most equipment, texts, certification,
and open water dive trip. OTHER PREREQS:
Mandatory 200-yard swim, 10-minute survival
skills and good health.
PAC 243. SCUBA: ADVANCED OPEN WATER (1).
Classroom lecture and laboratory in hypothermics,
natural navigation, dive physiology, compass
navigation, night and limited visibility procedures,
boat diving, search and salvage techniques, deep
diving procedures, health for diving, and an
introduction to dive rescue. Successful completion
of this course can lead to PADI certification.
Additional fee. OTHER PREREQS: PAC 242.
PAC 244. SCUBA: RESCUE DIVER (1).
Techniques, skills, knowledge, and practice in
self-rescue and rescue of others in underwater
emergencies; may lead to PADI certification;
lecture and pool laboratory; open water dive
required. Additional fee. OTHER PREREQS:
PAC 243 or equivalent.
PAC 245. SCUBA SPECIAL TOPICS (1).
Specialized courses requiring previous
certification in SCUBA. Check the current
schedule of classes for more information and
prerequisites. Possible classes: altitude diver,
night diver, search and recovery, deep diver,
underwater navigation, equipment specialist.
Additional fee. OTHER PREREQS: PAC 242.
PAC 246. DIVEMASTER TRAINING (2). A
structured certification course of lecture and lab
activities to prepare students to assist in SCUBA
instruction. Designed and monitored by PADI
(Professional Association of Diving Instruction).
Students must enroll for three consecutive terms.
Additional fee. OTHER PREREQS: PAC 244. PADI
Advanced, Advanced Plus, and Rescue Diver
certifications or equivalent; 20 logged dives.
PAC 247. SURFING (1). Knowledge and
fundamental skills of this aquatic sport including
history, terminology, safety precautions, the
ocean environment, and equipment. Additional fee.
OTHER PREREQS: Equivalent to Swim I (PAC
250). Students must pass a swim test in the pool
before going into the ocean.
PAC 258. TAP DANCE I (1). Basic vocabulary and
steps; will emphasize proper technique and
include a progression to more rhythmic
combinations using a variety of music and
creative styles.
PAC 259. TAP DANCE II (1). An expansion of the
skills and vocabulary of Tap Dance I; progression
to more advanced and longer combinations; may
be opportunities to perform in a concert. OTHER
PREREQS: Tap Dance I or instructor approval.
PAC 260. TENNIS I (1). Introduction to
fundamental strokes, singles and doubles play,
scoring, and basic concepts in tennis.
PAC 261. TENNIS II (1). Review and refinement of
fundamental strokes; volley, lob, return of serve;
introduction to singles and doubles strategy.
OTHER PREREQS: Tennis I or instructor approval.
PAC 262. TENNIS III (1). Focus on ground stroke,
serve consistency; approach shots and
overheads; tactics for net and baseline play.
OTHER PREREQS: Tennis II or instructor approval.
PAC 264.TEAM HANDBALL (MEN/WOMEN) (1).
Fast-paced indoor court game that combines skills
and strategies similar to water polo, basketball,
soccer and hockey; rules, regulations, strategies,
and skills introduced and practiced; requires
teamwork, cooperation, and court strategy.
PAC 265. TUMBLING I (1). Technical instruction,
progressions, and practice in basic, intermediate,
and advanced tumbling skills; emphasis on safety
and fitness concepts; floor and mini-trampoline
skills; no apparatus instruction.
PAC 271. ULTIMATE FRISBEE I (1). Fundamentals
for the beginning and intermediate player;
individual skill development, rules, game play, and
strategy.
PAC 273. VOLLEYBALL I (1). Fundamental
volleyball skills, drills, rules, strategies, and
practice. Game play appropriate for skill level.
PAC 274. VOLLEYBALL II (1). Fundamental skills
and knowledge refined; intermediate skills
developed, competitive play. OTHER PREREQS:
Volleyball I and good fundamental skills.
PAC 275. VOLLEYBALL III (1). Skill refinement
and development; intense, highly competitive drills
and game situations, doubles through sixes play.
OTHER PREREQS: Volleyball II and instructor’s
approval or varsity-level experience.
PAC 278. FITNESS WALKING (1). Establishment of
personal fitness programs through walking with
emphasis on technique and aerobic components.
PAC 282. WATER POLO (1). Team game, played in
deep water; instruction in skills, drills, strategies,
techniques; game play; knowledge of rules and
terminology. OTHER PREREQS: Swim I skills.
PAC 248. SWIM: NON-SWIMMER (1). Skills for
self-rescue; fundamental skills in swimming and
safety. Designed for people with a fear of water.
Recommended S/U grading.
PAC 286. WEIGHT TRAINING: CIRCUITS (1). Fastpaced fitness class using stations of resistance
training exercises. Designed to improve
cardiovascular fitness and muscular endurance
more than strength.
PAC 250. SWIM I (1). Swimming concepts,
survival and breathing techniques, front crawl and
elementary backstroke as minimum instruction.
OTHER PREREQS: Minimal swimming skill.
PAC 287. WEIGHT TRAINING I (1). Exercise
techniques in both free and fixed resistance
training equipment; safety procedures,
terminology, and principles of exercise.
PAC 251. LAP SWIM, STROKE ASSISTANCE (1).
Noncompetitive swim, exercise program with
individual stroke skill assistance.
PAC 288. WEIGHT TRAINING II (1). Intermediate
level of weight training in free and fixed weights.
OTHER PREREQS: Weight Training I.
PAC 252. SWIM II (1). Fitness swimming,
swimming strokes and skills. OTHER PREREQS:
75 yd. front crawl. Swim I skills.
PAC 292. WRESTLING (1). Collegiate wrestling fall
and winter terms; freestyle and Greco wrestling
spring term. All levels.
PAC 253. SWIM TRAINING WORKOUT (1).
Competitive skills and strokes; emphasis on
training. OTHER PREREQS: Ability to do interval
training.
PAC 294. YOGA I (1). Principles and practice of
basic yoga postures, techniques of posture
alignment, yogi breathing styles and their impact
on the body and mind.
PAC 256. TAI CHI (1). Traditional Chinese martial
art form; series of 88 moves with continually soft,
slow, steady motions broken into separate
movements and combinations intended to unite
body and mind.
PAC 295. YOGA II (1). Intermediate level course to
improve yoga practice and to develop overall
deeper understanding of yoga methodology in
more advanced posture. OTHER PREREQS:
Yoga I or previous yoga experience.
College of Health and Human Sciences
PAC 296. FITNESS YOGA (1). Dynamic sequence
of movements and sustained yoga positions;
regulated breathing; encourages systematic
discipline and approach to life. Open to beginners.
Options
General Health Care Administration
Long Term Care Administration
PAC 297. YOGATHON (1). Expands on knowledge
and skills learned in Yoga I or Fitness Yoga
through three to five class sessions, each 3-6
hours; longer sessions provide students with an
intensive mental and physical experience
centering on the concepts of yoga; includes
introductory relaxation and meditation skills.
ENFORCED PREREQS: PAC 294 or PAC 295 or
PAC 296 OTHER PREREQS: Yoga I or Fitness
Yoga highly recommended.
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior (BS)
PAC 299. SPECIAL TOPICS (1). Advanced
information, skills, practice, and application;
experimental and new classes. May have
additional fee. OTHER PREREQS: Intermediate to
advanced skills in an activity area or instructor
approval required.
Environment Safety and Health
Health Management and Policy
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior
Options
Allied Health
Applied Health and Gerontology
Community Health
Minors
Graduate Majors
PUBLIC HEALTH
Marie Harvey, Chair
258 Waldo Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331-6406
541-737-3824
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://
www.hhs.oregonstate.edu/ph/
index.html
FACULTY
Professors Catania, Duncan, Flay,
Harvey, Lachenbruch, Rossignol
Associate Professors Champeau, Chi,
Dolcini, Donatelle, Engle, Friedman,
Harding, Neumann, Thorburn, Tricker,
Veltri
Assistant Professors Bernell, Steele
Associate Professor Senior Research
Harper, Zakocs
Assistant Professor Senior Research
Dodge, Sherman, Zukoski
Instructors Hogan, Su
Research Associate Burns
Research Assistants Akintunji, Branch,
Casillas, M. Cervantes, R. Cervantes,
Hudson, Kimmons
ADJUNCT FACULTY
Bourdo; Fautin, George; Hess; Hope; Su;
Rossignol; Seifert
COURTESY FACULTY
Benjamin Bonnlander; Douglas
Bourdou; John Burnham; Brian
Churchill; Joe Finkbonner; John Fisher;
James Goes; Joshua Green; Charles
Hendricks; John Hogan; Michael
Holcomb; William Lambert; John
Lenssen; Mark Lovelass; James Mack;
Larry Mullins; Michael Nave; Anne
Nedrow; Jacqueline Paulson; Jackilen
Shannon; Daniel Sadakin
Undergraduate Majors
Health Management and Policy
(BS)
Environmental Health and
Occupational Safety
Management (MS)
Graduate Area of Concentration
Environmental Health and
Occupational Safety Management
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior (MS)
Graduate Area of Concentration
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior
Public Health (MPH, MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Environment, Safety and Health
(MPH, PhD)
Health Promotion (MPH only)
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior (PhD only)
Health Management and Policy
(MPH, PhD)
International Health (MPH only)
Public Health (MS only)
Graduate Minors
Community Health
Graduate Area of Concentration
Community Health
Environmental Health and
Occupational Safety Management
Health Promotion and Health
Behavior
Public Health
Graduate Certificate
Health Management and Policy
The Department of Public Health offers
study programs leading to the Bachelor
of Science (BS) and advanced degrees
(MS, MPH, PhD) for professionals
seeking public health careers.
Public health is an exciting and
diverse field for those interested in the
health and well-being of populations
and their environments. A variety of
public health careers in the public and
private sectors offer opportunities to
work locally, regionally, nationally and
internationally to promote health and
prevent disease. Recognizing that
multiple and complex factors affect the
327
public’s health, our faculty and students
examine environmental issues, access to
health care services, health policies, and
social and contextual factors as
determinants of health. We acknowledge that efforts to improve health must
go beyond the treatment of disease and
must address all conditions affecting the
health of populations including human
behavior, social conditions, health care,
institutions, governmental and corporate policies, and environments.
HEALTH MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY (BS, HBS)
This major prepares students for careers
in the fast-growing health care industry.
Graduates have the skills to work in
hospital administration, long-term care,
or other health services management
positions. The Health Management and
Policy program has full membership in
the Association of University Programs
in Health Administration. The curriculum comprises a series of courses relating
to a set of common requirements and to
a set of specialized options.
ADMISSION CRITERIA
To be accepted into the program, a
student must:
1. Complete 90 credits of course work
applicable toward a degree in health
management and policy with an
overall GPA of 2.80 or higher.
2. Complete the following pre-health
management and policy courses with
a GPA of 2.80 or higher:
BA 131. Business Productivity Software
(2)[Terminated fall 2007]
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(4)
ECON 202. *Intro to Macroeconomics
(4)
H 150. *Environmental Health and
Safety: Hits and Near Misses (3)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services and
Organizations (3)
H 220. Intro to Epidemiology and
Health Data Analysis (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 250. Intro to Health Care Organization and Administration (3)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
MTH 245. *Mathematics for Management, Life and Social Science (4)
All of the above courses must be taken A–F.
3. Submit a request for admission into
the health management and policy
program.
4. Complete the following courses:
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
18 of the 51 credits required by the
baccalaureate core may be satisfied by
health management and policy
curriculum.
328
Oregon State University
Department of Public Health Core (3)
+H 220. Intro to Epidemiology and
Health Data Analysis (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
Health Care Administration (52)
H 150. Environmental Health and
Safety (3)
+H 210. *Intro to Health Services and
Organizations (3)
+H 250. Intro to Health Care
Organization and Administration (3)
H 319. Health Policy Formation and the
Consumer (3)
H 407. Seminar (Sect. 1, Pre-Internship) (1)
H 410. Internship (12)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 425. Foundations of Epidemiology (3)
H 431. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 432. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 434. ^Health Care Law and
Regulation (3)
H 436. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
H 456. Strategic Management of Health
Service Organizations (3)
h 457. Financial Management of Health
Care Organizations (3)
H 458. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
Business (18)
BA 211. Financial Accounting (4)
BA 213. Managerial Accounting (4)
+BA 131. Business Productivity Software
(2)[Terminates fall 2007]
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
Supporting Courses (16)
+ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(4)
+ECON 202. *Intro to Macroeconomics
(4)
+MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
MTH 245. *Mathematics for
Management, Life, and Social Sciences
(4)
+ Classes are Pre-health management and
policy requirements. All classes must be
taken graded and have a GPA of 2.80 or
higher.
GENERAL HEALTH CARE
ADMINISTRATION OPTION
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
18 of the 51 credits required by the
baccalaureate core may be satisfied by
HCA curriculum.
Department of Public Health Core (9)
+H 220. Intro to Epidemiology and
Health Data Analysis (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
Health Care Administration (52)
+H 210. *Intro to Health Services and
Organizations (3)
+H 250. Intro to Health Care
Organization and Administration (3)
H 319. Health Policy Formation and the
Consumer (3)
H 407. Seminar (Sect. 1, Pre-Internship)
(1)
H 410. Internship (12)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 425. Foundations of Epidemiology (3)
H 431. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 432. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 434. ^Health Care Law and
Regulation (3)
H 436. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
H 456. Strategic Management of Health
Service Organizations (3)
H 458. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
Business (18)
+BA 131. Business Productivity Software
(2)[Terminated fall 2007]
+BA 215. Money and Investment
Management: Manager, Lender,
Investor Viewpoint (4)
BA 315. Accounting for Decision
Making (4)
BA 350. Organizational Systems (4)
BA 352. Managing Individual and Team
Performance (4)
Supporting Courses (16)
+ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics
(4)
+ECON 202. *Intro to Macroeconomics
(4)
+MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
MTH 245. *Mathematics for
Management, Life, and Social Sciences
(4)
+ Classes are Pre-HCA requirements. All
classes must be taken graded and have
a GPA of a 2.80 or higher.
Total=180
LONG TERM
HEALTH CARE OPTION
The following courses will be totaled in
lieu of elective credits.
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 467. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 468. Financing and Administration of
Long-Term Care (3)
HDFS 314. Adult Development and
Aging (4)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
NFM 429. Nutrition and Aging (3)
or SOC 432. Sociology of Aging (3)
Note: Students in the Long Term Care
option earn a Gerontology certificate
as part of their program. Application
for this certificate must be made.
Total=180
HEALTH PROMOTION AND
HEALTH BEHAVIOR (BS, HBS)
Graduates in this major hold positions
in a wide range of public and private
organizations. Careers focus on risk
reduction, program planning and
evaluation, health policy and advocacy,
and the prevention of disease, premature death, and disability among diverse
populations.
Students who major in health
promotion and education select one of
the following options:
• Allied Health
• Applied Health and Gerontology
• Community Health
Baccalaureate Core
Requirements (48)
18 of the 52 credits required in the
baccalaureate core may be fulfilled by
courses in the Health Promotion and
Health Behavior major.
Health Promotion
and Education Core (68)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services and
Organizations (3)
H 220. Introduction to Epidemiology
and Health Data Analysis (3)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 256. Foundations in Public Health
Promotion and Education (3)
H 263. Psychosocial Dimensions of
Health (3)
H 310. Health Field Experiences (3)
or H 349. Peer Helper Skills Practicum (3)
H 312. *AIDS and STDs in Modern
Society (3)
H 319. Health Policy Formation and the
Consumer (3)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)
H 364. Drugs, Society and Human
Behavior (3)
H 407. Seminar (Sect. 1, Pre-Internship)
(1–6)
H 410. Internship (12)
H 420. Health Disparities (3)
H 421. Mental Health and Social Policy (3)
H 449. Health Risk Communication (3)
H 461. Sexuality: A Health Science
Perspective (3)
H 473. Stress and Health: Controlling
Individual and Environmental
Hazards (3)
H 474. Public Health and Violence in
Society (3)
H 476. ^Planning and Evaluating Health
Promotion Programs (4)
Select one of the following courses:
BI 301. *Human Impacts on the
Ecosystem (3)
BI 306. *^Environmental Ecology (3)
BI 333. *^Understanding Environmental Problems (3)
H 344. Foundations of Environmental
Health (3)
Supporting Courses (35–36)
BI 101 or 102 or 103. *General Biology (4)
CH 121. General Chemistry (5)
or CH 130. General Chemistry of
Living Systems (4)
ES 101. *Ethnic Studies (3)
EXSS 324. Exercise Physiology (4)
MB 230. *Introductory Microbiology (4)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
PSY 201. *General Psychology (3)
SOC 204. *Introduction to Sociology (3)
Z 331. Human Anatomy and
Physiology (3)
Z 333. Human Anatomy and
Physiology (3)
College of Health and Human Sciences
ALLIED HEALTH OPTION
Required Courses (21–22)
H 250. Introduction to Health Care
Organization and Administration (3)
H 418. Public Health Ethics and Issues (3)
or PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 465. *Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 467. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 477. Dietary Interventions for Public
Health (3)
Select one elective in the Department of
Public Health (3)
Nursing Requirements:
(Additional courses recommended)
CH 122. *General Chemistry (5)
CH 130. General Chemistry of Living
Systems (4)
CS 101. Computers: Applications and
Implications (4)
PSY 202. *General Psychology (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
ST 201. Principles of Statistics (3)
Z 332. Human Anatomy and
Physiology (3)
Z 341, Z 342, Z 343. Human Anatomy
and Physiology Lab (2,2,2)
APPLIED HEALTH AND
GERONTOLOGY OPTION
Required Courses (24)
H 467. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
HDFS 314. Adult Development and
Aging (4)
SOC 432. Sociology of Aging (3)
Select one of the following courses:
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
Select 12 additional credits from the
following courses:
DHE 434. Housing the Aging Population (3)
EXSS 414. Physical Activity and Aging
(3)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 432. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 436. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
H 458. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (3)
H 465. *Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 468. Financing and Administration
of Long-Term Care (3)
NFM 420. Medical Nutrition Therapy
(4)
NFM 429. Nutrition and Aging (3)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
PHL 455. Death and Dying (3)
PSY 350. Human Lifespan Development
(3)
COMMUNITY HEALTH OPTION
Required Courses (21–22)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 425. Foundations of Epidemiology (3)
H 465. *Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 477. Dietary Interventions for Public
Health (3)
Select one elective in the Department of
Health (3)
Select one of the following courses:
H 418. Public Health Ethics and Issues (3)
PHL 205. *Ethics (4)
PHL 280. *Ethics of Diversity (4)
PHL 444. *Biomedical Ethics (4)
ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY
AND HEALTH MINOR
Required Courses (25)
H 320. Intro to Human Disease (3)*
H 344. Foundations of Environmental
Health (3)
H 385. Safety and Health Standards and
Laws (3)
H 407. Seminar (1)
H 410. Internship (12)
H 425. Foundations of Epidemiology (3)
Select two courses listed below for 6 cr:
H 445. *Occupational Health (3)
H 448. Public Health Toxicology and
Risk Assessment (3)
H 489. Emergency and Disaster
Management (3)
H 494. Applied Ergonomics (3)
H 495. Design for Environment, Safety,
and Health (3)
*Note: Students must have taken MB
230, Introductory Microbiology (4),
prior to enrolling in H 320. Students
should also take CSS 305, Principles of
Soil Science (4), as part of their major
program.
HEALTH MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY MINOR
ECON 201. *Intro to Microeconomics (4)
H 210. *Intro to Health Services and
Organizations (3)
H 220. Intro to Epidemiology and
Health Data Analysis (3) (not required
for business majors)
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 250. Intro to Health Care
Organization and Administration (3)
H 436. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
Check prerequisites/corequisites for H
250 and H 436.
Select 9 credits from the following
(business majors select 12 credits):
H 425. Foundations of Epidemiology (3)
H 431. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 432. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 434. ^Health Care Law and Regulation (3)
H 438. Public and Private Health
Insurance (3)
H 456. Strategic Management of Health
Service Organizations (3)
H 457. Financial Management of
Health Care Organizations (3)
H 458. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
H 468. Financing and Administration
of Long-Term Care (3)
329
HEALTH PROMOTION AND
HEALTH BEHAVIOR MINOR
H 225. *Social and Individual Health
Determinants (3)
H 263. Psychosocial Dimensions of
Health (3)
H 320. *Intro to Human Disease (3)
H 364. Drugs, Society and Human
Behavior (3)
H 461. Sexuality: A Health Science
Perspective (3)
NFM 225. Human Nutrition (3)
Select three of the following courses:
H 319. Health Policy Formation and
the Consumer (3)
H 420. Health Disparities (3)
H 421. Mental Health (3)
H 422. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 423. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 449. Health Risk Communication (3)
H 465. *Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 474. Public Health and Violence in
Society (3)
H 477. Dietary Interventions for Public
Health (3)
Total=28
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY
MANAGEMENT (MS)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Environmental health and
occupational safety management
Environmental Health and Occupational Safety Management is concerned
with the identification and control of
physiological, biological, chemical, and
safety factors that affect human health.
Specifically, the field specializes in
managing components of the environment and workplace that have a
negative impact on human health.
Management approaches include
regulatory, legislative, policy, and
behavioral techniques as well as the
development of local, national, and
global control plans.
The program builds on strong
prerequisite course work in the basic
sciences (chemistry, biology, and
physics), in mathematics, and in the
applied social sciences. Students are
encouraged to enroll in related courses
offered in the department and in other
departments at Oregon State University,
such as Environmental and Molecular
Toxicology, Business, Crop and Soil
Science, Civil Engineering, Biology,
Statistics, and Engineering.
Topics addressed in Environmental
Health core classes include: epidemiology, control of hazardous materials,
identification of environmental factors
that influence the transmission of
chronic and communicable diseases
(such as air and water pollution or
food-borne pathogens), international
aspects of environmental disease and
injury control, environmental justice,
330
Oregon State University
risk assessment and communication,
regulatory mechanisms, and current
developments in pollution prevention.
Topics addressed in the Occupational
Safety core classes include sustainable
resource development and use, risk and
cost burden analysis, strategy formulation and organizational structures,
safety management information
systems, program implementation and
auditing, product/technology/process
life cycle assessment, incident investigation, legal regulatory requirements,
ergonomics, fire, and emergency disaster
management and technical tools for
recognizing, evaluating and controlling
exposures to hazards.
The numbers and variety of professional employment opportunities in
environmental health and occupational
safety continue to expand and include
positions in industry, government,
manufacturing, consulting firms and
higher education.
Further information about the MS in
Environmental Health and Occupational Safety Management is available in
the Department's MS handbook.
The MS in Environmental Health and
Occupational Safety Management is a
49-credit program. This includes a
28-credit core in Environmental Health
and Occupational Safety (including
6 credits for a thesis or project), and
15 credits in a minor.
HEALTH PROMOTION AND
HEALTH BEHAVIOR (MS)
Graduate Area of Concentration
Health promotion and health
behavior
The MS in Health Promotion and
Health Behavior has the goal of
educating students in the foundational
areas of public health education.
Students work closely with their faculty
advisor to determine their program of
study. The typical MS program in the
Department of Public Health consists of
a minimum of 46 credits (a minimum of
31 credits for the area of concentration
and 15 credits for the minor). Students
are required to complete a 6-credit thesis
or project as part of the concentration.
Further information about the MS in
health education is available in the
department's MS handbook.
PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH, MS, PhD)
Graduate Areas of Concentration
Environment, safety and health
(MPH, PhD), health management
and policy (MPH, PhD), health
promotion (MPH only), health
promotion and health behavior
(PhD only), international health
(MPH only), public health (MS only)
The Department of Public Health's PhD,
MPH, and MS in public health degree
programs are summarized below.
For further information about the
department's graduate programs,
contact 541-737-2686.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PhD)
IN PUBLIC HEALTH
The PhD in Public Health is for individuals who wish to prepare themselves
for careers in university teaching,
research, consulting, policy development, or other high-level public health
positions. There are currently three areas
of concentration offered for the PhD
degree:
1. Environment, safety and health;
2. Health management and policy;
3. Health promotion and health
behavior.
A master's degree in a relevant field is
required before admission into the
PhD program.
The PhD program consists of a
minimum of 108 credits, including at
least 36 graduate credits devoted to
preparation of the thesis. Doctoral
students take courses in research and
quantitative methods, theory, ethics,
and their area of emphasis. Each student
and his or her doctoral committee
jointly determine the student's specific
program of doctoral study. This process
allows students to design a course of
study uniquely suited to their particular
needs and career goals. Further information about these requirements is
available in the department's PhD
handbook.
MASTER OF
PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH)
The Oregon Master of Public Health
(OMPH) program is a joint graduate
program offered by Oregon State
University (OSU), Oregon Health and
Sciences University (OHSU), and
Portland State University (PSU). Oregon
State University offers four tracks in the
OMPH Program:
1. Environment, Safety and Health
Track
2. Health Management and Policy Track
3. Health Promotion Track
4. International Health Track
All students in the OMPH must take a
common MPH core of five courses in
the following areas:
• Biostatistics
• Environmental health
• Epidemiology
• Health behavior
• Health systems organization
In addition, each OMPH track has
specific course requirements. The OMPH
tracks offered at OSU are summarized
below. The minimum number of credits
varies by track.
OMPH TRACK COMPETENCIES
Further information about the OMPH
program and tracks can be found at the
OMPH website at http://
www.oregonmph.org and in the
Department's OMPH handbook.
ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY
AND HEALTH TRACK
The MPH in Environment Safety and
Health will give students an understanding of how exposures to hazardous
chemical, physical, or biological agents
affect human health, the environment
and organizational resources. The
curriculum prepares students to: (1)
identify and assess the major environment, safety and health hazards that
impact workers and the general
population; (2) communicate (culturally appropriate) strategies for preventing and controlling environmental,
safety and health hazards; (3) contribute
to the field of environment, safety and
health through applied research; (4)
analyze the interrelationship among the
organization, delivery, and financing of
environmental, safety and healthrelated services; (5) apply environmental, safety and health knowledge and
skills in practical ways; and (6) adhere
to established ESH professional ethical
standards and practices.
HEALTH MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY TRACK
Students in the health management and
policy (HMP) track strengthen and build
upon the theoretical foundations
underlying health management and
policy to allow the student the opportunity to enhance their skills and
knowledge in these disciplines. The track
integrates the core concepts of public
health with specific instruction in
management, finance, strategy, policy,
information systems, quality improvement, marketing, law and regulation,
reimbursement, and human resources.
HEALTH PROMOTION TRACK
The health promotion track focuses on
ecological approaches to the promotion
of health and the prevention of disease,
premature death, and disability. The
curriculum prepares students to
recognize the unique needs of diverse
populations and to utilize public health
approaches to deliver culturally
appropriate prevention programs.
Graduates of this track have the
requisite knowledge and skills to plan,
develop, administer, implement, and
evaluate health promotion and health
behavior programs; communicate
health risks using principles of health
behavior; implement appropriate
theory-based practice and research and
mobilize community resources for
planned social change; aid others in
College of Health and Human Sciences
increasing their health enhancing skills;
and develop, analyze, and promote
policies that reduce health risk.
INTERNATIONAL HEALTH TRACK
The goal of the international health
track is to prepare public health
professionals for leadership roles in
international health, with an emphasis
in the health development of populations in low-income nations. This is an
interdisciplinary track that draws
resources from departments throughout
the university. Students coming from
different disciplinary backgrounds may
apply their knowledge in an appropriate area of international health studies,
and select from a number of different
areas of specialization.
MASTER OF SCIENCE
(MS) IN PUBLIC HEALTH
The MS in public health is a general
public health master's degree with the
goal of educating students in the
foundational areas of public health.
Students work closely with their faculty
advisor to determine their program of
study. The typical MS program in the
Department of Public Health consists of
a minimum of 46 credits (a minimum of
31 credits for the area of concentration
and 15 credits for the minor). Students
are required to complete a 6-credit thesis
or project as part of the concentration.
Further information about the MS in
public health is available in the
department's MS handbook.
ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY
AND HEALTH TRACK (59)
1. MPH Core Courses (16 credits)
H 512. Environmental and Occupational Health (3)
H 524. Introduction to Biostatistics (4)
H 525. Principles and Practice of
Epidemiology (3)
H 533. Health Systems Organization (3)
H 571. Principles of Health Behavior (3)
2. Environment, Safety and Health
Track Requirements (31 credits)
H 510. Internship (6)
H 514. ESH Seminar (1)
H 526. Epidemiologic Methods (3)
H 540. Environmental Health I: Food
Protection and Water/Wastewater (3)
H 541. Environmental Health II: Air
Quality and Hazardous Waste
Management (3)
H 546. Industrial Hygiene Instrumentation (3)
H 548. Public Health Toxicology and
Risk Assessment (3)
H 585. Environment, Safety and Health
Policy and Law (3)
H 588. Occupational Safety and Health
(3)
H 595. Design for Environment, Safety
and Health (3)
3. Recommended electives*
(minimum of 12 credits):
H 503. Thesis (6)
or H 506. Projects (6)
H 515. Research Methodology in
Health and Safety (3)
H 517. Medical and Public Health
Entomology (3)
H 518. Public Health Ethics (3)
H 527. Case Studies in International
Health (offered summers only) (3)
H 528. Global Health Issues (3)
H 529. International Health (3)
H 594. Applied Ergonomics (3)
*ESH students may also take courses
outside the department such as from the
Environmental and Molecular Toxicology Program, Department of Geosciences, College of Business, and
College of Engineering.
4. Final Comprehensive Examination:
All MPH students in the department
must do a 6-credit internship upon
completion of their core and track
classes. Upon completion of all required
course work and the internship, all MPH
students must schedule a final oral
examination. Students must receive
approval to take the exam from their
academic advisors. For MPH students
who choose to do a thesis or project,
the oral exam will be included as part of
the thesis/project defense.
HEALTH MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY TRACK (61)
Required Core Courses (16)
H 512. Environmental and
Occupational Health (3)
H 524. Introduction to Biostatistics (4)
H 525. Principles and Practice of
Epidemiology (3)
H 533. Health Systems Organization (3)
H 571. Principles of Health Behavior (3)
Required Track Courses (15)
H 518. Public Health Ethics and Issues (3)
H 530. Health Policy Analysis (3)
H 532. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 536. Healthcare Organization Theory
and Behavior (3)
H 556. Strategic Management of Health
Service Organizations (3)
Health Management and Policy
Electives (Select 12 credits)
H 515. Research Methodology in Health
and Safety (3)
H 531. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 534. Health Care Law & Regulation (3)
H 557. Financial Management of Health
Care Organizations (3)
H 558. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
H 591. Selected Topics: “Contracting
and Negotiation in Health Care” (3)
Suggested Electives (Select 12 credits)
H 521. Mental Health (3)
H 529. International Health (3)
H 537. Management of Human
Resources in Health Care Settings (3)
H 538. Public and Private Health
Insurance (3)
331
H 539. Health Care Information
Systems (3)
H 565. Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 567. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 568. Financing and Administration
of Long-Term Care (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal
Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
H 585. Environmental, Safety and
Health Policy and Law (3)
H 589. Emergency and Disaster
Management (3)
H 590. Systems Thinking and Practice (4)
H 595. Design for Environment, Safety,
and Health (3)
Organizational Experience (6)
All HMP track students will be required
to complete a minimum 6-credit
organizational experience at or near the
end of their course work. That experience will provide the student the
opportunity to apply what they have
learned in the classroom to an actual
organizational setting.
In consultation with their advisor,
students must enroll in either H 510,
Internship, or H 506, Project. Students
in either option will have to present
their final work product to a faculty
committee and that presentation will be
open to the university community.
Note: In consultation with their major
professor, students may opt to take
courses at PSU or OHSU.
HEALTH PROMOTION TRACK (59)
1. MPH Core Courses (16)
H 512. Environmental and Occupational Health (3)
H 524. Introduction to Biostatistics (4)
H 525. Principles and Practice of
Epidemiology (3)
H 533. Health Systems Organization (3)
H 571. Principles of Health Behavior (3)
2. Track Requirements (19)
H 515. Research Methodology in
Health and Safety (3)
H 549. Health Risk Communication (3)
H 572. Community Organization for
Health Promotion and Education (3)
H 575. Evaluation of Health Promotion
and Education Programs (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal
Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
H 591. Selected Topics: Foundations in
Public Health (3)
3. General Electives (choose one)
H 520. Health Disparities (3)
H 522. Control of Chronic Disease (3)
H 530. Health Policy Analysis (3)
H 565. Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
4. Area of Emphasis (15)
All students are required to select an
area of emphasis and take additional
course work in that area. In addition to
those listed under “General Electives”
above, suggested courses are listed
below. If a student wishes to complete a
332
Oregon State University
thesis or project, 6 of the 15 credits can
be thesis or project credits.
An advanced social, psychological,
and/or behavioral theory course (3)
H 518. Public Health Ethics & Issues (3)
H 521. Mental Health (3)
H 523. Health Aspects of Aging (3)
H 528. Global Health Issues (3)
H 529. International Health (3)
H 532. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 536. Healthcare Organization Theory
and Behavior (3)
H 569. Maternal and Child Health (3)
H 574. Public Health and Violence in
Society (3)
H 577. Dietary Interventions for Public
Health (3)
H 585. Environmental, Safety and
Health Policy and Law (3)
5. Internship (6)
INTERNATIONAL
HEALTH TRACK (62)
MPH Core Courses (16 )
H 512 Environmental and Occupational
Health (3)
H 524. Introduction to Biostatistics (4)
H 525. Principles and Practice of
Epidemiology (3)
H 533. Health Systems Organization (3)
H 571. Principles of Health Behavior (3)
Required International
Health Track Core (34)
H 510. Internship (6)
H 517. Medical and Public Health
Entomology (3)
H 518. Public Health Ethics and Issues (3)
H 528. Global Health Issues (3)
H 529. International Health (3)
H 531. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 572. Community Organization for
Health Promotion and Education (3)
H 575. Evaluation of Health Promotion
and Education Programs (3)
H 576. Program Planning/Proposal
Writing in Health/Human Services (4)
One of the following two courses:
ANTH 574. Cross-Cultural Health and
Healing (3)
ANTH 583. Medical Anthropology (4)
Recommended electives (min. of 12 credits)
H 503. Thesis (6)
H 506. Projects (6)
H 515. Research Methodology in
Health and Safety (3)
H 520. Health Disparities (3)
H 526. Epidemiologic Methods (3)
H 527. Case Studies in International
Health (3)
H 538. Public and Private Health
Insurance (3)
H 540. Environmental Health: Food
Protection and Water/Wastewater I (3)
H 541. Environmental Health: Air
Quality and Hazardous Waste
Management II (3)
H 548. Public Health Toxicology and
Risk Assessment (3)
H 565. Public Health and Women:
Social and Policy Issues (3)
H 569. Maternal and Child Health (3)
H 574. Public Health and Violence in
Society (3)
H 577. Dietary Interventions for Public
Health (3)
H 588. Occupational Safety and Health
(3)
COMMUNITY HEALTH
GRADUATE MINOR
Graduate Area of Concentration
Community health
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY
MANAGEMENT GRADUATE
MINOR
For details, see the departmental
advisor.
HEALTH PROMOTION AND
HEALTH BEHAVIOR GRADUATE
MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
PUBLIC HEALTH
GRADUATE MINOR
For more details, see the departmental
advisor.
HEALTH MANAGEMENT
AND POLICY CERTIFICATE
Required (12 credits)
H 434/H 534. Health Care Law and
Regulation (3)
H 456/H 556. Strategic Management of
Health Service Organizations (3)
H 532. Economic Issues in Health and
Medical Care (3)
H 536. Health Services Administration
and Management (3)
Electives (6 credits)
H 531. Health Care Marketing (3)
H 538. Public and Private Health
Insurance (3)
H 557. Financial Management of Health
Care Organizations (3)
H 558. Reimbursement Mechanisms (3)
H 567. Long-Term Care Alternatives (3)
H 568. Financing and Administration of
Long-Term Care (3)
H 590. Systems Thinking and Practice (3)
H 591. Selected Topics (1–3)
H 530. Health Policy Analysis (3)
H 537. Management of Human
Resources in Health Care Settings (3)
H 539. Health Care Information Systems
(3)
Other electives may be chosen with the
consent of the student's advisor.
COURSES
H 120. *HEALTH AND CULTURE: USING THEATRE
TO PROMOTE HEALTH (3). A fun and interactive
way to promote safer sex and communication with
your partner, cultural awareness, healthy body
image, responsible drinking, and other health
issues. Course work focuses on the major health
and social issues facing college students, health
disparities, cultural differences in health beliefs
and behaviors, acting techniques and performance
preparation skills. (Bacc Core Course)
H 150. *ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY:
HITS AND NEAR MISSES (3). Course work will
cover the role that the public and private sectors
have played in shaping social institutions to
adequately confront environmental health and
occupational safety hazards. (Bacc Core Course)
H 199. SPECIAL STUDIES (1-16). OTHER
PREREQS: Departmental approval/instructor
consent required.
H 210. *INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SERVICES
AND ORGANIZATIONS (3). An overview of the
United States health care system. Focus on
organization of public and private sector health
services at federal, state and local levels as well
as emerging health care issues. (Bacc Core Course)
H 220. INTRODUCTION TO EPIDEMIOLOGY AND
HEALTH DATA ANALYSIS (3). Introduction to the
application of epidemiologic biometry and
probability theory to the health sciences. Topics
include quantitative analysis and inference,
statistical and epidemiologic methodology, and
quantitative study to evaluate and control health
problems. Open to major or minor students in
public health, or by instructor approval.
ENFORCED PREREQS: MTH 105 or MTH 111
OTHER PREREQS: Or higher mathematics.
H 225. *SOCIAL AND INDIVIDUAL HEALTH
DETERMINANTS (3). Investigation through lecture,
presentation, discussion, and field study of the
major social and individual contributors to
preventable disease, premature death and general
health status. (Bacc Core Course)
H 250. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE
ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION (3). An
introduction to the administrative operations of
health care organizations. Examines the various
service settings and their organization, personnel
and resources. ENFORCED PREREQS: H 210*
H 256. FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC HEALTH
PROMOTION AND EDUCATION (3). History,
evolution, and current status of health promotion
programs and public health services in the United
States. Focus on core functions, professional
standards, competencies, and current issues in
health promotion and education practice.
H 263. PSYCHOSOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF
HEALTH (3). Examination of social, psychological,
cultural, attitude, behavior, and environmental
factors that influence individual and public health.
Overview of behavior models that influence
individual and society decision-making and
resultant health behaviors.
H 309. PRACTICUM IN HEALTH CARE SERVICES
(3-6). Supervised work experience in a health care
service setting or health-related agency or
program. Weekly progress reports and postexperience summary report and evaluation will be
expected. Preplanned with instructor approval.
Open to health care administration majors. Graded
P/N. OTHER PREREQS: Junior standing.
Instructor consent required.
H 310. HEALTH FIELD EXPERIENCES (3-6).
Introductory field experience in a health or healthrelated worksite. Graded P/N. ENFORCED
PREREQS: H 220 and H 225 OTHER PREREQS:
Junior standing. H 210.
H 312. *AIDS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED
DISEASES IN MODERN SOCIETY (3).
Fundamental principles relating to etiology, nature,
prevention, and control of AIDS and other
sexually transmitted diseases in contemporary
society; emphasis on social, psychological, legal,
economic, and ethical issues surrounding these
diseases. (Bacc Core Course)
H 319. HEALTH POLICY FORMATION AND THE
CONSUMER (3). History of consumer protection
laws and agencies; an examination of health care
providers and facilities; consumer advocacy
groups and their impact on policy decisions;
College of Health and Human Sciences
health insurance and its role in consumer health;
an examination of the media’s role in consumer
health.
H 320. *INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DISEASE (3).
Fundamental principles relating to etiology, nature,
prevention, and control of communicable and
noncommunicable diseases in human populations.
Special emphasis on disease prevention and
health promotion in the high risk diseases of
modern, industrialized society. (Bacc Core Course)
H 344. FOUNDATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH (3). Introductory course examining
environmentally-linked disease, and health effects
associated with toxic substances, food quality,
pesticides, air, water, and noise pollution, and
solid/hazardous wastes.
H 349. PEER HELPER SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
(3). Prepares the student for an active role as a
peer helper in alcohol and drug abuse prevention
and health education. Course work will include:
drug, alcohol, addiction and other related health
issues, basic listening and communication skills,
conflict resolution, crisis recognition and referral.
A major component will be affective learning
situations designed to promote self-awareness
and personal growth. OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 364. DRUGS, SOCIETY AND HUMAN
BEHAVIOR (3). Drug use and abuse; theories of
addiction; basic principles of drug action regarding
the use of sedative and stimulative compounds;
alcohol; opiates; hallucinogens; designer drugs;
cocaine; and over-the-counter products. Particular
emphasis on the role of the individual’s value
orientation, decision-making, and selfresponsibility in treatment and educational
approaches to prevention. ENFORCED PREREQS:
(PSY 201 or PSY 202) and (SOC 204 or SOC 204)
H 385. SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS AND
LAWS (3). Emphasis on the Occupational Safety
and Health Act; study includes the scope and
duties under the act, enforcement, and
adjudication procedures and OSHA litigation;
components of Oregon-OSHA.
H 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16).
H 399. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16). OTHER
PREREQS: Honors College approval required.
H 401. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Instructor’s consent required.
H 402. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-16).
H 403. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor’s consent required.
H 405. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Instructor’s consent required.
H 406. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor’s consent required.
H 407. SEMINAR (1-6). Internship (1) OTHER
PREREQS: Instructor’s consent required.
H 408. WORKSHOP (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor consent required.
H 409. PRACTICUM (1-6). Supervised work
experience in a public health or health care
administration setting. Open to majors in public
health. Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS: Senior
standing and departmental approval.
H 410. INTERNSHIP (6-12). Directed field
experience with participation in a community,
worksite, or health agency program. Experience is
individually arranged to meet student needs.
Graded P/N. ENFORCED PREREQS: H 407
OTHER PREREQS: Instructor consent required.
H 417. MEDICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH
ENTOMOLOGY (3). Arthropod pests of man and
domestic animals, including biology of pests,
disease transmission mechanisms, epidemiology
of important arthropod-borne diseases, and
prevention and control of pest-related problems.
CROSSLISTED as ENT 417/ENT 517 and FW 417/
FW 517. OTHER PREREQS: Two terms of biology
or general zoology.
H 418. PUBLIC HEALTH ETHICS AND ISSUES (3).
Current ethical issues in public health, including
gender and ethnicity in employment,
pharmaceutical controls, product liability,
advertising, and export of high technology. OTHER
PREREQS: Senior standing.
H 420. HEALTH DISPARITIES (3). Health
disparities based on race/ethnicity, culture, social
class, and rural/urban residence, among others;
strategies to reduce disparities, promote health,
and prevent disease in diverse populations.
H 421. MENTAL HEALTH (3). Examination of
social, governmental, legal and individual mental
health issues. Brief overview of some major
mental disorders.
H 422. CONTROL OF CHRONIC DISEASE (3).
Epidemiology of the major chronic diseases, risk
factors, potential methods of prevention, and
efficacy of current methods of control and
treatment. Includes an examination of
contemporary research on social, psychological,
ethical, economic, and health care issues and
their relationship to chronic disease. OTHER
PREREQS: 9 credits of health course work.
H 423. HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING (3).
Promotion of normal health in the aged;
physiological aspects of the normal aging
process; community, state and federal health
programs and services for the aged. OTHER
PREREQS: 9 credits of health course work.
H 425. FOUNDATIONS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY (3).
Measures of disease frequency; measures of
effect; association and causation; sources of
inaccuracy; experimental and observational study
designs. ENFORCED PREREQS: H 220 OTHER
PREREQS: Or equivalent.
H 427. CASE STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL
HEALTH (3). International, public health challenges
using case studies from different countries.
Includes tropical disease and injury epidemiology
in a variety of social, political, and economic
contexts. OTHER PREREQS: Junior or senior
standing.
H 429. INTERNATIONAL HEALTH (3). Overview of
the epidemiological, economic, political,
sociological, and cultural factors that impact on
international health. Special emphasis on the
methods of prevention/intervention utilized in
coping with health problems on an international
level. OTHER PREREQS: Senior standing.
H 431. HEALTH CARE MARKETING (3). Principles,
elements and methods of marketing health care
services. Role of the consumer, governing body,
administration and medical staff as well as impact
of professional ethics.
333
H 445. *OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH (3). Current and
historical topics in the area of occupational
health, with particular emphasis on the types of
materials that produce human health effects;
clinical and epidemiologic data used to assess the
public health importance of occupational
pollutants and to evaluate control strategies.
(Bacc Core Course)
H 448. PUBLIC HEALTH TOXICOLOGY AND RISK
ASSESSMENT (3). Principles of toxicology and
risk assessment with a public health perspective.
Topics covered include: toxico-kinetics, target
organ toxicity, carcinogenesis and chemicalspecific case studies relevant to public health and
risk assessments. OTHER PREREQS: One year
basic college chemistry and biology and two terms
organic chemistry.
H 449. HEALTH RISK COMMUNICATION (3).
Designed to improve the effectiveness of health
risk communication strategies in promotion of
health and prevention of disease and disability.
Review of applicable behavioral science theory,
research on risk perception and persuasive
communication; instruction in effective methods
and techniques of risk communication; initial
process by which risks are identified and
assessed; scientific, institutional, political and
social forces that affect the transfer of
information in public health programs.
H 456. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH
SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS (3). Theories and
methodologies of long-range planning and
strategic management in health care
organizations. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to
HCA program.
H 457. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH
CARE ORGANIZATIONS (3). Utilization of standard
financial tools needed to manage the capital
resources of health care organizations. Includes
funding capital projects, product costing,
budgeting methods, capital formation and
investment strategies.
H 458. REIMBURSEMENT MECHANISMS (3).
Techniques used in cost-effectiveness analysis.
Examples are drawn from the public health and
health economics literature. OTHER PREREQS:
Junior standing.
H 461. SEXUALITY: A HEALTH SCIENCE
PERSPECTIVE (3). Exploration of the meaning of
sexuality from a variety of contemporary health
science perspectives; aspects of sex and
sexuality fundamental to total health; issues
central to the health educator role examined.
OTHER PREREQS: Senior standing.
H 432. ECONOMIC ISSUES IN HEALTH AND
MEDICAL CARE (3). Application of economic
principles to the health care field: the demand for
medical care and insurance, health care suppliers,
health care markets. ENFORCED PREREQS:
ECON 201 or ECON 201H
H 465. *PUBLIC HEALTH AND WOMEN: SOCIAL
AND POLICY ISSUES (3). Public health approach
to the identification of women’s health needs in
the United States and in other countries as it
relates to the intersection of race, ethnicity, social
class, sexual orientation, age, and ability. (Bacc
Core Course) OTHER PREREQS: 6 credits in
public health.
H 434. ^HEALTH CARE LAW AND REGULATION
(3). Legal aspects of health care delivery; tort law
and its applications; professional liability and
liability insurance; laws relative to health care
institutions, cost controls, antitrust and access.
(Writing Intensive Course) OTHER PREREQS:
Admission to HCA program.
H 467. LONG-TERM CARE ALTERNATIVES (3).
Overview of the long-term care alternatives.
Comparisons of nursing homes with community
based facilities; adult day care centers, respite to
hospice facilities, social HMOs and other
services; cost, quality of life and practicality are
addressed.
H 436. HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
AND MANAGEMENT (3). Administrative practice in
health care settings with emphasis on long-term
care and acute care services. Provides a
framework for health care systems and managerial
process and roles. Focus on operations, planning,
marketing, human resources, finance, productivity
and control as well as emerging trends in health
services. ENFORCED PREREQS: H 210 and H 250
OTHER PREREQS: Admission to HMP program.
H 468. FINANCING AND ADMINISTRATION OF
LONG-TERM CARE (3). Examines the financing
and administration of long term care. Emphasis is
on a system-wide overview and specific
application to nursing facility management. OTHER
PREREQS: Admission to HCA program.
H 438. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HEALTH
INSURANCE (3). Introduction to the principles and
practices of public or social and commercial
health insurance, and their financial
reimbursement mechanisms.
H 473. STRESS AND HEALTH: CONTROLLING
INDIVIDUAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL (3). Study of
the physiological, psychological and behavioral
responses to stress and the resultant impact on
health. Development of programs and policies
designed to control and facilitate positive stress
management at the individual, community and
organizational levels.
334
Oregon State University
H 474. PUBLIC HEALTH AND VIOLENCE IN
SOCIETY (3). Examination of violence as a major
public health issue. Historical, social,
environmental, economic, behavioral and
psychological aspects of assaultive violence,
spousal abuse, rape and sexual assault, child
abuse, child sexual abuse, suicide, the effects of
the media on violence, drug abuse and violence,
and related public health problems in
contemporary American society. Emphasis on
health and the efficacy of current efforts aimed at
ameliorating these problems and potential for
alternative public health models for prevention and
intervention.
H 476. ^PLANNING AND EVALUATING HEALTH
PROMOTION PROGRAMS (4). A systematic
approach to planning, implementing and evaluating
health promotion programs in public agencies,
community settings, worksites, educational, and
health care settings. Students work consistently
throughout the term to develop writing skills that
effectively describe the design, development,
implementation, and evaluation of health
promotion programs. (Writing Intensive Course)
OTHER PREREQS: Senior standing.
H 477. DIETARY INTERVENTIONS FOR PUBLIC
HEALTH (3). A public health perspective on the
practice of population-based dietary intervention.
Examination of relevant theories, research, and
practice that pertain to health promoters/
educators. CROSSLISTED as NFM 477/NFM 577.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
H 489. EMERGENCY AND DISASTER
MANAGEMENT (3). Study of preparedness,
response, recovery and business resumption
strategies, activities and applications needed to
effectively deal with emergency and disaster
incidents.
H 490. *SYSTEMS THINKING AND PRACTICE (4).
Hard and soft system theories examined; methods
and techniques for dealing with real-world
problems; skills and dialogue techniques to
identify mindsets, define problems, and explore
alternative pathways for solutions. CROSSLISTED
as BA 465/BA 565. (Bacc Core Course)
H 491. SELECTED TOPICS (1-3). Recent changes
and advances in public health and health care
administration and their application to special
fields of study. Topics vary from term to term and
year to year. OTHER PREREQS: Senior standing.
H 494. APPLIED ERGONOMICS (3). A study of
the dimensions of occupational ergonomics
practice and applications that are intended to
reduce worker-hardware-environmental mismatch
problems that affect the effectiveness and
efficiency of worker performance.
H 495. DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY,
AND HEALTH (3). Systematic consideration of
environmental, safety, and health concerns at the
earliest possible stage in the lifecycle design
engineering of products, technologies, and
manufacturing processes. OTHER PREREQS:
Junior or senior standing.
H 501. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
H 503. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Instructor approval required.
H 505. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
H 506. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 507. SEMINAR (1-16). Section 1. Internship (1).
Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS: Departmental
approval required.
H 508. WORKSHOP (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 509. PRACTICUM (1-16). Supervised work
experience in a public health or health care
administration setting. Open to majors in public
health. Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS: Senior
standing and departmental approval.
H 510. INTERNSHIP (1-16). Directed field
experience with participation in a community,
worksite, or health agency program. Experience is
individually arranged to meet student needs.
Graded P/N. OTHER PREREQS: Graduate
standing in Public Health Department, instructor
approval required, departmental approval required.
H 512. ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL
HEALTH (3). Survey of basic concepts and issues
in environmental and occupational health,
designed as a core course in the Oregon MPH
program. Environmental and occupational hazards
that affect human health are examined in the
context of current social, political, and regulatory
pressures. Topics include current issues, food
protection, basic principles of toxicology and risk
assessment, indoor and air pollution, drinking
water and wastewater, solid and hazardous waste
disposal, pesticides and health issues, radiation,
and occupational injury. Global environmental
health issues are included in discussions as time
permits.
H 514. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH
SEMINAR (1). One-credit graduate seminar on
current topics of interest and importance to the
environmental health and occupational safety
field. Critical reading of research publications,
discussion of controversial issues facing ESH
professionals, and/or presentation of current ESH
research. May be repeated up to three times for
credit toward graduation.
H 515. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY IN HEALTH
AND SAFETY (3). Research methods used in
health and safety studies with emphasis on the
nature of research, problem identification and
formulation, methods of observation and data
collection, analysis and interpretation, research
communications, and project development.
H 517. MEDICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH
ENTOMOLOGY (3). Arthropod pests of man and
domestic animals, including biology of pests,
disease transmission mechanisms, epidemiology
of important arthropod-borne diseases, and
prevention and control of pest-related problems.
CROSSLISTED as ENT 417/ENT 517 and FW 417/
FW 517. OTHER PREREQS: Two terms of biology
or general zoology.
H 518. PUBLIC HEALTH ETHICS AND ISSUES (3).
Current ethical issues in public health, including
gender and ethnicity in employment, pharmaceutical controls, product liability, advertising, and
export of high technology. OTHER PREREQS:
Graduate standing.
H 520. HEALTH DISPARITIES (3). Health
disparities based on race/ethnicity, culture, social
class, and rural/urban residence, among others;
strategies to reduce disparities, promote health,
and prevent disease in diverse populations.
H 521. MENTAL HEALTH (3). Focus upon mental
health policy development, in relation to federal
and state government services and regulations,
implementation of services.
H 522. CONTROL OF CHRONIC DISEASE (3).
Epidemiology of the major chronic diseases, risk
factors, potential methods of prevention, and
efficacy of current methods of control and
treatment. Includes an examination of
contemporary research on social, psychological,
ethical, economic, and health care issues and
their relationship to chronic disease. OTHER
PREREQS: 9 credits of health course work.
H 523. HEALTH ASPECTS OF AGING (3).
Promotion of normal health in the aged;
physiological aspects of the normal aging
process; community, state and federal health
programs and services for the aged. OTHER
PREREQS: 9 credits of health course work.
H 524. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS (4).
Quantitative analysis and interpretation of health
data including probability distributions, estimation
of effects, and hypothesis-tests such as Chisquare, one-way ANOVA, and simple linear
regression. OTHER PREREQS: H 220, ST 201.
H 525. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF
EPIDEMIOLOGY (3). History of epidemiologic
thought; measures of disease frequency and
effect; etiologic fraction; design strategies;
sources of imprecision and bias; basic
epidemiological terminology.
H 526. EPIDEMIOLOGIC METHODS (3). Principles
and methods of epidemiologic analysis;
standardization; stratified analysis; confounding
and its control; planning and conducting
epidemiologic research; role of multivariate
analysis in epidemiologic research. ENFORCED
PREREQS: H 525
H 527. CASE STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL
HEALTH (3). International, public health challenges
using case studies from different countries.
Includes tropical disease and injury epidemiology
in a variety of social, political, and economic
contexts. OTHER PREREQS: Graduate standing.
H 528. GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES (3). Examines
major issues in health developments of global
significance, their causes and impacts on
international health, and methods and strategies
to address them.
H 529. INTERNATIONAL HEALTH (3). Overview of
the epidemiological, economic, political,
sociological, and cultural factors that impact on
international health. Special emphasis on the
methods of prevention/intervention utilized in
coping with health problems on an international
level.
H 530. HEALTH POLICY ANALYSIS (3). Analysis
of public policies affecting health care programs,
services and organizations and the impact of
those programs on citizens; processes by which
health policy proposals are generated, promoted,
defeated, modified and implemented.
H 531. HEALTH CARE MARKETING (3). Principles,
elements and methods of marketing health care
services. Role of the consumer, governing body,
administration and medical staff as well as impact
of professional ethics.
H 532. ECONOMIC ISSUES IN HEALTH AND
MEDICAL CARE (3). Application of economics
principles to the health care field: the demand for
medical care and insurance, health care suppliers,
health care markets. OTHER PREREQS: ECON 201.
H 533. HEALTH SYSTEMS ORGANIZATION (3).
Examines the nature of health and health care
services and reviews the role of government and
the free market on health services. Alternative
ways of organizing, financing, and delivery of
health care services are explored.
H 534. HEALTH CARE LAW AND REGULATION (3).
Legal aspects of health care delivery; tort law and
its applications; professional liability and liability
insurance; laws relative to health care institutions,
cost controls, antitrust and access. OTHER
PREREQS: Admission to HCA program.
H 536. HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION THEORY
AND BEHAVIOR (3). Administrative practice in
health care settings with emphasis on long-term
care and acute care services. Provides a
framework for health care systems and managerial
process and roles. Focus on operations, planning,
marketing, human resources, finance, productivity
and control as well as emerging trends in health
services.
H 537. MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
IN HEALTH CARE SETTINGS (3). Elements of
managing personnel in health care settings,
including the nature of the health professional,
motivation, communications, compensation, legal
issues, stress, time management, and achieving
excellence.
H 538. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HEALTH
INSURANCE (3). Introduction to the principles and
practices of public or social and commercial
health insurance, and their financial
reimbursement mechanisms.
College of Health and Human Sciences
H 539. HEALTH CARE INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(3). Information systems in health care
institutions, programs, and services; review of
managerial information needs and data collection
and reporting mechanisms.
H 540. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH I: FOOD
PROTECTION AND WATER/WASTEWATER (3). H
540 is the first of a two-course sequence (H 540,
H 541) addressing environmental factors affecting
public health. H 540 focuses on food safety and
protection and water/wastewater quality. Specific
topics include: foodborne illness; food protection;
pesticides/chemicals and food safety; human
illness and controls related to drinking water,
swimming areas and pools; public water supplies;
private and public sewage disposal; drinking water
security; applicable laws and regulations. H 540
and H 541 need not be taken in order. OTHER
PREREQS: H 320, H 344.
H 541. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH II: AIR
QUALITY & HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT
(3). H 541 is the second of a two-course
sequence (H 540, H 541) addressing
environmental factors affecting public health.
H 541 focuses on air quality and solid/hazardous
waste management. Specific topics include
sources, concentrations, exposure and adverse
health effects with exposure to ambient and
indoor air pollutants; global air quality issues;
generation, regulations and management
strategies for solid and hazardous waste; waste
reduction/minimization efforts; public health
impacts. H 540 and H 541 need not be taken in
order.
H 543. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND
ANALYSIS (4). Field sampling methods and lab
analyses of drinking water and surface water;
physical and chemical parameters of water;
microbiological criteria of drinking water.
Discussion of related topics: e.g. hazardous
materials sampling; inspection procedures for
food/dairy establishments; health hazard
assessment and documentation; regulatory
procedures. Lec/lab. ENFORCED PREREQS: H 540
and H 541
H 546. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
INSTRUMENTATION (3). Information and practice
related to routine sampling procedures and
measurement techniques used to evaluate
chemical, physical, and biological hazards in
places of work. OTHER PREREQS: H 281.
H 548. PUBLIC HEALTH TOXICOLOGY AND RISK
ASSESSMENT (3). Principles of toxicology and
risk assessment with a public health perspective.
Topics covered include: toxico-kinetics, target
organ toxicity, carcinogenesis and chemicalspecific case studies relevant to public health and
risk assessments. OTHER PREREQS: One year
basic college chemistry and biology and two terms
organic chemistry.
H 549. HEALTH RISK COMMUNICATION (3).
Designed to improve the effectiveness of health
risk communication strategies in promotion of
health and prevention of disease and disability.
Review of applicable behavioral science theory,
research on risk perception and persuasive
communication; instruction in effective methods
and techniques of risk communication; initial
process by which risks are identified and
assessed; scientific, institutional, political and
social forces that affect the transfer of
information in public health programs.
H 556. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH
SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS (3). Theories and
methodologies of long-range planning and
strategic management in health care
organizations. OTHER PREREQS: Admission to
HCA program.
H 557. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH
CARE ORGANIZATIONS (3). Utilization of standard
financial tools needed to manage the capital
resources of health care organizations. Includes
funding capital projects, product costing,
budgeting methods, capital formation and
investment strategies.
H 558. REIMBURSEMENT MECHANISMS (3).
Techniques used in cost-effectiveness analysis.
Examples are drawn from the public health and
health economics literature. OTHER PREREQS:
Graduate standing.
H 561. SEXUALITY: A HEALTH SCIENCE
PERSPECTIVE (3). Exploration of the meaning of
sexuality from a variety of contemporary health
science perspectives; aspects of sex and
sexuality fundamental to total health; issues
central to the health educator role examined.
OTHER PREREQS: Graduate standing.
H 565. PUBLIC HEALTH AND WOMEN: SOCIAL
AND POLICY ISSUES (3). Public health approach
to the identification of women’s health needs in
the United States and in other countries as it
relates to the intersection of race, ethnicity, social
class, sexual orientation, age, and ability. OTHER
PREREQS: 6 credits in public health.
H 567. LONG-TERM CARE ALTERNATIVES (3).
Overview of the long-term care alternatives.
Comparisons of nursing homes with community
based facilities; adult day care centers, respite to
hospice facilities, social HMOs and other
services; cost, quality of life and practicality are
addressed.
H 568. FINANCING AND ADMINISTRATION OF
LONG-TERM CARE (3). Examines the financing
and administration of long term care. Emphasis is
on a system-wide overview and specific
application to nursing facility management.
H 569. MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH (3).
Women’s reproductive health and health of
children stressing causation, management, and
prevention of public health problems.
Epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality
in children and women of childbearing age; impact
of social, political and economic influences on the
health of women and children; comparison of
issues and problems of industrialized versus
developing nations. Consideration of health issues
of interest to the many diverse racial and ethnic
groups of women and children in the U.S. as well
as the global village.
H 571. PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR (3).
Theoretical approaches to behavior change in
health promotion/education research and practice;
factors influencing health behaviors, ethical
behavior change issues, behavioral interventions
for special populations.
H 572. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FOR
HEALTH PROMOTION AND EDUCATION (3).
History, theory, and practice of community
organizing for health advocacy; focus on group
processes, use of media, leadership, coalitions,
grass roots methods and social change.
H 573. STRESS:THEORY AND RESEARCH IN
PRACTICE (3). Analysis of stress literature and
application of evidence-based strategies and
practices. Focus on theory-driven, ecological
interventions.
H 574. PUBLIC HEALTH AND VIOLENCE IN
SOCIETY (3). Examination of violence as a major
public health issue. Historical, social,
environmental, economic, behavioral and
psychological aspects of assaultive violence,
spousal abuse, rape and sexual assault, child
abuse, child sexual abuse, suicide, the effects of
the media on violence, drug abuse and violence,
and related public health problems in
contemporary American society. Emphasis on
health and the efficacy of current efforts aimed at
ameliorating these problems and potential for
alternative public health models for prevention and
intervention.
335
H 575. EVALUATION OF HEALTH PROMOTION
AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS (3). Fundamental
principles of evaluation theories; application of
process, impact, outcome evaluations for
determination of the efficacy and efficiency of
selected prevention and intervention strategies for
health promotion and education programs;
emphasis on formative and summative evaluations
using quantitative and qualitative measures.
H 576. PROGRAM PLANNING/PROPOSAL
WRITING IN HEALTH/HUMAN SERVICES (4).
Planning and preparing of proposals for program
initiation, financing, delivery and evaluation in
health-related settings; emphasis on funding
sources, community, individual, and organizational
support. OTHER PREREQS: 9 credits of graduate
course work in public health.
H 577. DIETARY INTERVENTIONS FOR PUBLIC
HEALTH (3). A public health perspective on the
practice of population-based dietary intervention.
Examination of relevant theories, research, and
practice that pertain to health promoters/
educators. CROSSLISTED as NFM 477/NFM 577.
OTHER PREREQS: NFM 225.
H 583. SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
MANAGEMENT (3). Analysis of the safety and
health management function; strategy, structure
and research. Emphasis on strategy formulation,
organization structure, positioning arrangements,
implementation strategy and evaluation. OTHER
PREREQS: Graduate standing and instructor
approval required.
H 585. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH
POLICY AND LAW (3). Survey of the environment,
safety and health policy and law in the United
States. Furnishes the basic knowledge and
general understanding about policy and lawrelated issues important to all environmental
health and safety professionals. OTHER
PREREQS: H 385 or graduate standing.
H 588. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (3).
Studies the strategic and technical practices and
tools for recognizing, evaluating and controlling
hazardous exposures that produce injury and
illness in the workplace.
H 589. EMERGENCY AND DISASTER
MANAGEMENT (3). Study of preparedness,
response, recovery and business resumption
strategies, activities and applications needed to
effectively deal with emergency and disaster
incidents.
H 590. SYSTEMS THINKING AND PRACTICE (4).
Hard and soft system theories examined; methods
and techniques for dealing with real-world
problems; skills and dialogue techniques to
identify mindsets, define problems, and explore
alternative pathways for solutions. CROSSLISTED
as BA 465/BA 565.
H 591. SELECTED TOPICS (1-3). Recent changes
and advances in public health and health care
administration and their application to special
fields of study. Topics vary from term to term and
year to year. OTHER PREREQS: Graduate standing.
H 594. APPLIED ERGONOMICS (3). A study of
the dimensions of occupational ergonomics
practice and applications that are intended to
reduce worker-hardware-environmental mismatch
problems that affect the effectiveness and
efficiency of worker performance.
H 595. DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY,
AND HEALTH (3). Systematic consideration of
environmental, safety, and health concerns at the
earliest possible stage in the lifecycle design
engineering of products, technologies, and
manufacturing processes. OTHER PREREQS:
Graduate standing.
H 599. SPECIAL TOPICS (1-16).
H 601. RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP (1-16).
H 603. THESIS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
336
Oregon State University
H 605. READING AND CONFERENCE (1-16).
OTHER PREREQS: Departmental approval required.
H 606. PROJECTS (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 607. SEMINAR (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 608. WORKSHOP (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 610. INTERNSHIP (1-16). OTHER PREREQS:
Departmental approval required.
H 612. SEMINAR: RESEARCH, THEORY, AND
PRACTICE IN HPE (1-9). Contemporary research,
theoretical constructs, and issues specific to the
discipline of health promotion and education. 1 to
9 credits are required of all health promotion/
education doctoral students. May be repeated for
credit.
H 699. SPECIAL STUDIES (1-16).
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