Collection 11 Drama

advertisement
Collection 11: Drama
Forms and Stagecraft
A
Play
play is a story
that is acted out
live and on
stage.
Tragedy
A
presentation of
serious and
important actions
that end unhappily.
Tragic Hero
A
noble character who
has a personal flaw
that leads to his or her
downfall or
destruction.
Tragic Flaw
Imperfections
that lead
an otherwise honest and
good character to make
poor decisions that
ultimately doom him or
her.
Comedy
A
play that has a happy
ending that forces the
audience to consider and
question an important
aspect of society.
Satire
A
type of comedy that
insults someone or
something with the
intent to change it for
the good.
Slapstick Comedy
Comedy
that involves
absurd physical violence
that does not truly harm
the characters
(ex: The Three Stooges)
Stage
The
location
where a play
takes place.
Proscenium Arch Stage
The
traditional stage.
The stage is a semi-circle with
a large rectangular arch in the
background that holds portions
of the set and the curtain.
Three-Quarter Thrust Stage
The
stage is “thrust” out into
the audience.
The audience sits on three of
the four sides of a rectangular
stage, thus giving some
audience members a profile
view of the play.
The Round Stage
The
stage is a circle or
rectangle where the
audience sits completely
around it.
There is no “off-stage”
Set
The
physical details added
to a stage to communicate
to the audience the place
and time where the play
takes place.
Costumes
The
clothing actors wear
to portray a character.
Costumes communicate
status, gender, and role
to the audience.
Props
Short
for “Properties”
They are portable items
that actors can move or
carry as they perform.
Dialogue
Characters
speaking
out loud to one
another.
Monologue
One
character
speaking out loud to
other characters on
stage.
Soliloquy
One
character
speaking out loud
to him/herself.
Aside
One
character
speaking out loud
directly to the
audience.
Tension
Suspense
and
anxiety built up in
the audience as the
conflict escalates.
Climax
The
turning point in a play.
The point at which a
character’s fate is ultimately
decided.
The Climax is not necessarily
at or near the end of a play.
Resolution
The
portion of the play
where the audience finds
out what ultimately happens
to the characters.
Exposition
 Often,
the beginning of a play
where a character or a chorus
introduces the basic situation.
 When not at the beginning, a
portion where a character or
chorus fills in the audience on
information not performed by the
actors.
Stage Directions
Commands
by the
playwright describing where
the actors should stand or
move, how they should
speak, or what props to use.
Download
Related flashcards
Alternate history

18 Cards

German plays

44 Cards

Create flashcards