Biology Course Outline

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Old Mill High School
AP Biology Fall 2013
Diversity
Excellence
Achievement
The mission of Old Mill High School, a community rich in diversity with a multitude of programs, is to promote academic excellence
and global perspective through collaboration and self-assessment in an effort to prepare productive citizens in an ever-changing world.
Welcome to AP Biology! This is a yearlong, challenging course taught on the university level. It requires students to do copious
amounts of reading, homework, labs, quizzes, exams, and paper based assignments. At the completion of the course students are
expected to take the AP Biology exam which if they score high enough will count towards college credit. All students are required to
come prepared to class. This includes completing the reading assignment before class, to bring a notebook, textbook, student study
guide, folder, pens, and pencils. There will be no late homework accepted!
Course Title - AP Biology
Email Address: [email protected]
Teacher Name - Dr. Hehl
Phone: (410)969-9010 x226
ROOM D222
Planning Period 3A & 1B
TEXTBOOK and MATERIALS
Name of textbooks:
1) Campbell, Neil A., and Jane B. Reece. Biology, 8th ed. (AP Edition) Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
2) Student Study Guide for Campbell-Reece Biology 8th ed., Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Materials: Students are required to bring the following to every class:
1) A notebook or binder containing loose-leaf. Loose paper will not be accepted! Notebooks will be subject to random checks
and graded for content.
2) A lab notebook separate from the notebook used to take notes!
3) Campbell, Neil A., and Jane B. Reece. Biology, 8th ed. (AP Edition) – must be brought to every class!
4) Student Study Guide for Campbell-Reece Biology 8th ed. – must be brought to every class!
5) A folder
6) Pens
7) Pencils (colored pencils as well as regular pencils)
8) $10.00 Lab Fee
Students are responsible for the care of the textbook and student study guide. Damaged or lost property will be reimbursed by the
student to OMHS at the replacement cost of $125.00.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
AP Biology covers the same material as a typical Biology course, but at a much greater depth. This course is meant to be the
equivalent of a year of Freshman Biology at a university, meaning that it is conducted at a college level; therefore, those enrolled are
expected to act and perform accordingly. The prerequisites for AP Biology are Biology and Chemistry, as it is essential that you have
a working knowledge of their concepts.
UNITS OF STUDY
This is a yearlong course presented in a block schedule format, providing 80 minutes of teacher/student interaction every other day.
Approximately one class per week is devoted to laboratory work. Throughout the course of the year students will study biology
covering three general areas: Molecules and Cells, Heredity and Evolution and Organisms and Populations.
The new AP Biology curriculum encompasses 4 ‘big ideas’, with Essential Knowledge and Process Skills that support each one.
1) Big Idea 1: Evolution – the process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life
2) Big Idea 2: Cellular Processes (Energy and Communication) – Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building
blocks to grow.
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3) Big Idea 3: Genetics and Information Transfer – living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential
to life processes
4) Big Idea 4: Interactions – Biological systems interact and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.
Units of Study:
Unit (1) Instructional Focus: Evolution - 7 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 22.2, 22.3 – Descent with Modification: A Darwinian View of Life
 Chapter 23.1, 23.2, 23.3, 23.4 – The Evolution of Populations
 Chapter 25.2 – The History of Life on Earth
Unit (2) Instructional Focus: Homeostasis - 10 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 3.1, 3.2, 3.3 – Water and the Fitness of the Environment
 Chapter 4.1, 4.2 – Carbon and the Molecular Diversity of Life
 Chapter 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5 – A Tour of the Cell
 Chapter 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5 – Membrane Structure and Function
 Chapter 36.2 – Resource Acquisition and Transport in Vascular Plants
 Chapter 39.5 – Plant Responses to Internal and External Signals
 Chapter 40.2, 40.3 – Basic Principles of Animal Form and Function
 Chapter 43.1, 43.2, 43.3, 43.4 – Immune System
 Chapter 45.2 – Hormones and Endocrine System
 Chapter 52.2, 52.4 – An Introduction to Ecology and the Biosphere
 Chapter 53.1, 53.2, 53.3, 53.4, 53.5 – Population Ecology
 Chapter 54.1, 54.2, 54.3, 54.4, 54.5 – Community Ecology
 Chapter 55.1, 55.2, 55.3, 55.4 – Ecosystems
 Chapter 56.1 – Conservation Biology and Restoration Ecology
Unit (3) Instructional Focus: Cell Structure and Function - 6 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5 – The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules
 Chapter 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5 – A Tour of the Cell
 Chapter 8.4, 8.5 – An Introduction to Metabolism
Unit (4) Instructional Focus: Communication - 10 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 11.1, 11.2, 11.3 – Cell Communication
 Chapter 48.1, 48.2, 48.3, 48.4 – Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling
 Chapter 49.2 – Nervous Systems
Unit (5) Instructional Focus: Energy Uses in Biological Systems - 10 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 8.1, 8.2, 8.3 – An Introduction to Metabolism
 Chapter 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5 – Cellular Respiration: Harvesting Chemical Energy
 Chapter 10.1, 10.2, 10.3 – Photosynthesis
 Chapter 40.1, 40.2, 40.3, 40.4 – Basic Principles of Animal Form and Function
 Chapter 51.1, 51.2, 51.3, 51.4 – Animal Behavior
 Chapter 53.2, 53.4 – Population Ecology
 Chapter 55.2, 55.3 – Ecosystems
Unit (6) Instructional Focus: Regulation - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 11.5 – Cell Communication
 Chapter 18.1, 18.2, 18.3 – Regulations of Gene Expression
 Chapter 24.1 – The Origin of Species
 Chapter 25.5 – The History of Life on Earth
 Chapter 38.1 – Angiosperm Reproduction and Biotechnology
 Chapter 39.1, 39.2, 39.3 – Plant Responses to Internal and External Signals
 Chapter 47.3 – Animal Development
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Unit (7) Instructional Focus: DNA Expression - 4 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 5.5 – The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules
 Chapter 16.1, 16.2 – The Molecular Basis of Inheritance
 Chapter 17.1, 17.2, 17.3, 17.4, 17.5 – From Gene to Protein
 Chapter 19.1, 19.2 – Viruses
 Chapter 20.1, 20.2 – Biotechnology
Unit (8) Instructional Focus: Cell Cycle, Mitosis, and Meiosis - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 – The Cell Cycle
 Chapter 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.4 – Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles
Unit (9) Instructional Focus: Genetics - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 14.1, 14.2, 14.3, 14.4 – Mendel and the Gene Idea
 Chapter 15.1, 15.2, 15.3, 15.4, 15.5 – The Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance
Unit (10) Instructional Focus: Gene Expression - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 11.1, 11.4 – Cell Communication
 Chapter 18.1, 18.2, 18.3, 18.4 – Regulations of Gene Expression
 Chapter 45.1, 45.2 – Hormones and the Endocrine System
Unit (11) Instructional Focus: Variation - 5 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 13.4 – Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles
 Chapter 15.4 – The Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance
 Chapter 16.2 – The Molecular Basis of Inheritance
 Chapter 17.5 – From Gene to Protein
 Chapter 19.1, 19.2 – Viruses
 Chapter 21.2 – Genomes and Their Evolution
 Chapter 23.4 – The Evolution of Populations
 Chapter 27.2 – Bacteria and Archaea
Unit (12) Instructional Focus: Response to Stimuli - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5 – The Structure and Function of Large Biological Molecules
 Chapter 14.3 – Mendel and the Gene Idea
 Chapter 18.4 – Regulation of Gene Expression
 Chapter 21.5 – Genomes and Their Evolution
 Chapter 48.4 – Neurons, Synapses, and Signaling
Unit (13) Instructional Focus: Communities and Populations - 4 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 40.1 – Basic Principles of Animal Form and Function
 Chapter 51.1 – Animal Behavior
 Chapter 53.1, 53.2, 53.3, 53.4, 53.5, 53.6 – Population Ecology
 Chapter 54.1, 54.2 – Community Ecology
 Chapter 55.1, 55.3, 55.4, 55.5 – Ecosystems
Unit (14) Instructional Focus: Ecosystems, Populations, Species Diversity - 3 days
Required Reading:
 Chapter 14.3 – Mendel and the Gene Idea
 Chapter 23.1, 23.2, 23.3 – The Evolution of Populations
 Chapter 24.5 – The Origin of Species
 Chapter 54.1, 54.2 – Community Ecology
 Chapter 55.5 – Ecosystems
 Chapter 56.1, 56.4 – Conservation Biology and Restoration Ecology
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***Note: There are certain areas in the Required Readings where reading assignments have been reassigned. Under those
circumstances the student is expected to review the material.
COURSE AND CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS/POLICIES
A/B Day Schedule:
The A/B day calendar is posted on the OMHS website, as well as the AACPS website. A/B days are locked in for the school year and
will not change, regardless of school cancellations. The A/B day calendar can also be found on the OMHS website,
www.oldmillhigh.org.
Academic Integrity Please see p. 18 in the Student Code of Conduct.
In order to promote the pursuit of academic excellence and learning, Anne Arundel County Public Schools expects its students to
conform to specific standards of academic integrity. Academic integrity is an integral part of promoting self-respect, trust, student
achievement, and positive relationships among all stakeholders in our school community. Academic integrity means exhibiting
honesty in all academic exercises and assignments. Academic Dishonesty refers to any form of misconduct that occurs in relation to
all formal academic exercises.
Behavioral Expectations
Anne Arundel County Public Schools works to advance academic achievement and unity among our students through mutual respect,
trust and excellence in both teaching and learning.
Biology classroom expectations, rules and procedures for the classroom are posted and include but are not limited to the following:
Be on time for class and in your seat before the bell rings.
Follow all safety rules.
Absolutely no food or drink in this classroom.
Students should leave the room and laboratory area the way in which they found it.
Have required materials with you every day.
Have assignments completed and submitted at the beginning of the class period.
Go to the restroom between classes. Do not ask to be excused from class.
Do not borrow thing from others, without asking permission to do so.
Do not use vulgarity/cursing at any time.
Obey the school rules.
Follow the Anne Arundel County Academic Integrity Policy.
Attendance:
Attendance is very important to your success. Whenever you are absent, your parent/guardian must provide a note of explanation to
the school within three days of your return to school. Absences in excess of five consecutive days require a physician’s note. When
you are absent, it is your responsibility to complete make-up work (see Make-Up work policy). You will be allotted the same number
of days equal to the number of days absent to make-up your work.
Students with three or more unlawful absences in a marking period may receive an “E” for the marking period.
In addition, Board of Education’s Administrative Regulation JBA defines excessive absences as “A student who is absent six or more
days a semester….regardless of cause.” This is twelve days per school year. In secondary school, credit may be withheld due to
excessive absences.
Tardiness:
Learning can only take place when students are present in class and ready to learn and teachers are ready to teach! Teachers will
consider a student late once the late bell rings and a student is not in the classroom.
Consequences for tardiness will be administered by the Tardy Table.
Grading:
Grades are earned by student to document mastery of course objectives, skills, content and concepts.
Rubrics will be provided to guide students for performance based assignments.
A student’s grade will be determined through a point system. These points will carry the following weights:
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Grading Scale:
A
B
C
D
E
100% - 90%
89% - 80%
79% - 70%
69% - 60%
59% or below
High School Quarterly Grades:
The class grade will be based on total points and will be the culmination of homework, labs, quizzes, and tests.
AP Biology Grading Policy:
Percentage
Type & Type Description
15 %
Completed Tasks/Homework
40%
Labs, Activities, and Projects (Processes & Skills)
45%
Unit Tests/Quizzes/And Other Assessments
1) Labs/Classwork
Including several recommended AP labs and supplementary labs. This will also include class participation which covers arriving to
class on time and actively participating in all labs and class discussions.
2) Tests
There will be at least one quiz and one test per unit. There may also be additional assessments and pop-quizzes. The Final Exam can
be waived for those students who take the AP Exam.
3) Homework
There will be reading assignments and homework problems assigned every night.
High School Semester Grades:
High School semester grades are determined by averaging three weighted letter grades.
--Marking Period = 40%
--Marking Period = 40%
--Final Exam = 20%
For AP students choosing to take the Final Exam, follow weighted grading as indicated above.
For AP students opting out of Final Exam (because they have taken the AP test), grade will be determined as follows:
--Marking Period = 50%
--Marking Period = 50%
Homework:
Homework is assigned on a daily basis! Homework will consist of reading assignments, written assignments, textbook/study guide
based assignments, handouts, and projects.
All work should be attempted and completed to the best of the student’s ability. Homework is posted in the classroom each day on the
“Homework” board. It is the student’s responsibility to record the Homework in their agenda! It is also the student’s responsibility to
hand in the homework on time. Excluding an excused absence all late homework will receive a deduction of 10% for each day it is
late. No late homework assignments will be accepted after 5 calendar days.
Interim Report and Report Card Distribution dates:
The distribution dates are posted on the www.aacsp.org website, as well as on the Old Mill High website, www.oldmillhigh.org.
Make-up work:
When a student is absent, it is the student’s responsibility to get the make-up work, missed notes, and complete any quizzes/tests, and
labs. Upon returning to class the student will be allotted the same number of days everyone else received to do the original
assignment to complete any missed work. Any missed tests or quizzes, due to an absence, will be expected to be taken after school
within seven days of the student returning to class! Any missed homework assignments and papers, due to an absence, are expected to
be handed in the next time the student returns to class! Any missed labs, due to an absence, are expected to be completed after school
within seven days of the original assignment. It is the student’s responsibility to hand-in/complete any missed work. All missed
assignments will receive a zero until completed.
Re-do and Intervention Procedures
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Students are permitted to redo tests and quizzes if they took the original test/quiz at the assigned time in class. If they missed the
quiz/test due to an absence they will be permitted to take the original test/quiz after school, but will not be permitted to do a retake
test/quiz. The students’ final grade for any test/quiz that has been redone will be an average of the original grade and the redone
test/quiz. The normal time to redo tests/quizzes is Tuesday or Wednesday after school from 2:15-2:50. Homework will be assigned
on a daily basis and should be turned in at the beginning of the class period. It is the student’s responsibility to hand in all homework.
Unless a student is absent, homework turned in late will receive a deduction 25% for each day it is absent. For those who are absent
they will be allotted the same number of days equal to the number of days absent to make-up work.
EXTRA HELP OPPORTUNITIES:
After school when the teacher is available.
Study buddies in class
Advisory Period
NHS Tutoring (during Advisory)
Extra Help Day: Tuesdays and Wednesdays 2:10 -2:50
“E” Free Zone
The staff at Old Mill High School is committed to providing a quality education to all students. As educators, we believe that all
students are capable of achieving academic success. Therefore, in an effort to insure that all Old Mill High School students reach their
full potentials, we have adopted a “no repeat/no failure policy,” entitled the “E Free Zone.”
Please be advised that starting in the 2011-2012 school year, students who fail a course will only be permitted to recover or earn that
credit through Twilight school (only offered for first time ninth graders), evening high school, or a summer school program. No
repeater classes will be offered during the regular school day. It is our hope that by holding our students to the highest academic
standard that all students will become productive citizens in a globally challenging world. Please remain encourage your student and
check grades regularly through Parent Connect or by calling or emailing teachers. Know when report cards and interims are
distributed and discuss them with your students.
Final Exams:
High School final examinations are comprehensive evaluations for the semester. Final examination periods are two hours in length
(with the exception of final exams for second semester seniors which are one class period in length).
Final examinations will include a variety of question types and at least one essay question.
Course requirements include the completion of a final examination/alternative assessment for each course; however, the final
examination or alternative assessment shall be waived at the election of a student should he/she take the Advanced Placement (AP)
examination in the same subject.
The principal may deny credit for those courses in which course requirements are not completed.
Students unable to take a final examination due to an emergency situation may, with the approval of the Principal, be permitted to take
a make-up examination at a later date. Exams are not given early. Under extenuating circumstances, and solely at the discretion of
the Principal, a waiver to the final examination may be considered.
Participation:
Instructional activities are used during every class to help the student think and reflect on course content. Students are encouraged to
actively engage in daily instruction.
Passes:
Students must receive permission from the teacher to leave the classroom. The teacher will complete the pass prior to the student’s
exit from the classroom with the necessary information. All students in the hallway during class time must have a pass indicating the
time, destination, and an approving signature.
Student Progress:
Because parents are partners in the education of their child, communication between teachers and parents is vital to student success.
Written notes, notes in the student agenda book , telephone conversations, e-mails, face-to-face Parent- Teacher conferences
(scheduled through the Counseling Department), student grade reports and interim reports are all excellent means of maintaining
appropriate and open communication with parents.
Parents can also monitor student progress with our electronic grading system, Parent Connect XP. Families are encouraged to refer to
www.oldmillhigh.org regularly for school news.
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Please sign and return to Teacher.
I acknowledge that I have read and understand the Course Syllabus and will comply with the expectations/policies as stated, along
with the policies/regulations of AACPS, specifically regarding the Academic Integrity policy.
Class ______________________________________________
Period/Day:
_____________
Student Name (Print):
_______________________________________________________
Student Signature:
_______________________________________________________
Parent Signature:
_______________________________________________________
Parent Email:
______________________________________________________
Parent Phone Number (During the Day):
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______________________________________________________
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