progressive tenses

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 The PRESENT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates continuing action,
something going on now.
 This tense is formed with the helping "to be" verb, in the present tense, plus
the present participle of the verb (with an -ing ending).
 The present progressive can suggest that an action is going to happen in the
future, especially with verbs that convey the idea of a plan or of movement
from one place or condition to another: "The team is arriving in two hours.
He's moving to Portland this summer." Because the present progressive can
suggest either the present or the future, it is usually modified by adverbs of
time.
I am buying all my family's Idd gifts early this year.
She is working through the holiday break.
Amal is being a really good girl these days.
 The PAST PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates continuing action, something
that was happening, going on, at some point in the past. This tense is formed
with the helping "to be" verb, in the past tense, plus the present participle of
the verb (with an -ing ending):
I was riding my bike all day yesterday.
Joel was being a terrible role model for his younger brother.
 The past progressive indicates a limited duration of time and is thus a
convenient way to indicate that something took place (in the simple past)
while something else was happening:
Carlos lost his watch while he was running.
 The past progressive can express incomplete action.
I was sleeping on the couch when Bertie smashed through the door.
(as opposed to the simple past, which suggests a completed action:
I slept on the couch last night.
 The past progressive is also used to poke fun at or criticize an action that is
sporadic but habitual in nature:
Tala was always handing in late papers.
My father was always lecturing my brother.
 The PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE TENSE indicates a continuous
action that has been finished at some point in the past or that was initiated in
the past and continues to happen. The action is usually of limited duration
and has some current relevance.
She has been running and her heart is still beating fast.
 The present perfect progressive frequently is used to describe an event of the
recent past; it is often accompanied by just in this usage.
"It has just been raining."
 This tense is formed with the modal "HAVE" or "HAS" (for third-person
singular subjects) plus "BEEN," plus the present participle of the verb (with
an -ing ending),
I have been working in the garden all morning.
George has been painting that house for as long as I can remember."
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