INR 3034 – Hozic

advertisement
INR3034 Politics of the World Economy
Spring 2015
Aida A. Hozic
Associate Professor
[email protected]
Anderson 331
Office Hours: T, R 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Course Description
This course introduces students to key concepts, issues and debates in international political
economy. The emphasis is on historical trends and analysis, which can provide us with a helpful
backdrop for understanding of current crisis and/or recovery in global economy.
Required Text
Herman M. Schwartz, States Versus Markets: The Emergence of a Global Economy, 3rd Edition (New
York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), ISBN: 978-0-230-5218-5 (paperback)
Select articles (see weekly schedule), which will be available on SAKAI.
Course Assignments and Requirements
Two pop quizzes (in class) – 20 points (10 points each)
Group project due April 22 (via SAKAI) – 15 points
Midterm Exam (in class) – February 17 – 20 points
Film review – 10 points
Final Exam (take-home, cumulative) – 35 points
Participation/attendance grade works the following way: students who do not miss a single class will
receive 5 extra points, students who miss up to 2 classes will receive 4 extra points, students who
miss 3 classes will receive 3 extra points, students who miss more than 4 classes will not receive any
extra points.
Students who miss more than 30% of classes (12) will not be allowed to take the exams and will
receive an F for the course.
Requirements for class attendance and make-up exams, assignments, and other work in this course
are consistent with university policies that can be found at:
https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/attendance.aspx
Grading Scale
Grade scale is 94-100 A; 90-93 A-; 87-89 B+; 84-86 B; 80-83 B-; 77-79 C+; 74-76 C; 70-73 C-; 67-69
D+; 64-66 D; 60-63 DFor current regulations on grades and grade point averages at the University of Florida please see
https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info/grades.aspx
Academic Honesty
UF students are bound by The Honor Pledge which states, “We, the members of the University of
Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honor and
integrity by abiding by the Honor Code. On all work submitted for credit by students at the University
of Florida, the following pledge is either required or implied: “On my honor, I have neither given nor
received unauthorized aid in doing this assignment.” The Honor Code. On all work submitted for
credit by students at the University of Florida, the following pledge is either required or implied: “On
my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in doing this assignment.” The Honor
Code specifies a number of behaviors that are in violation of this code and the possible sanctions.
Furthermore, you are obligated to report any condition that facilitates academic misconduct to
appropriate personnel. If you have any questions or concerns, please consult with the instructor.
Students with Disabilities
Students with disabilities requesting accommodations should first register with the Disability
Resource Center (352-392-8565, www.dso.ufl.edu/drc/ ) by providing appropriate documentation.
Once registered, students will receive an accommodation letter which must be presented to the
instructor when requesting accommodation. Students with disabilities should follow this procedure
as early as possible in the semester
Course Evaluations
Students are expected to provide feedback on the quality of instruction in this course by completing
online evaluations at https://evaluations.ufl.edu. Evaluations are typically open during the last two
or three weeks of the semester, but students will be given specific times when they are open.
Summary results of these assessments are available to students at
https://evaluations.ufl.edu/results/
Weekly Schedule
Week 1 (January 6, 8)
Course overview, syllabus and requirements
Week 2 (January 13, 15)
Basic macro-economic terms.
Week 3 (January 20, 22)
Rise of the Modern State (Chapter 1 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Charles Tilly “War Making and State Making as Organized Crime” in Peter B. Evans, Dietrch
Rueschemeyer, Theda Skocpol (eds.), Bringing the State Back In, Cambridge University Press, New
York, 1985, pp. 169-191
Week 4 (January 27 - no class, work on group projects, January 29)
Origins of International Economic Inequality (Chapter 2 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Immanuel Wallerstein, “Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for
Comparative Analysis,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 16:4 (Sept 1974), 387-415
Week 5 (February 3, 5)
Economic and Hegemonic Cycles (Chapter 3 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Peter Taylor “What is Modern About the Modern World System,” Review of International Political
Economy, 3:2, Summer 1996: 260-286
Week 6 (February 10, 12)
The Industrial Revolution and Late Development (Chapter 4 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Alexander Gerschenkron, "Economic backwardness in historical perspective" in Gerschenkron,
Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective (New York: Frederick A. Praeger Publishers)
Week 7 (February 17, February 19 – no class)
Midterm Exam in class on February 17th. Search for Labor (Chapter 5 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Week 8 (February 24, 26)
Expansion and crisis in the 19th Century Economy (Chapters 5-7 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
P.J. Cain and A.G. Hopkins, “Political Economy of British Overseas Expansion 1750-1914” Economic
History Review 33:4 (Nov 1980) 463-490
Michael Monteon, “The British in the Atacama Desert: The Cultural Basis of Economic Imperialism,”
Journal of Economic History 35:1, 1975
Week 9 (March 3, 5)
Spring Break
Week 10 (March 10, 12)
The “American Century” (Chapters 8 and 9 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
John Williamson, “On the System in Bretton Woods,” The American Economic Review 75:2 (May
1985), pp. 74-79
Week 11 (March 17, 19)
Transnational Corporations (Chapter 10 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Oliver E. Williamson, “Transaction-Cost Economics: The Governance of Contractual Relations,”
Journal of Law and Economics, 22:2 (October 1979), pp. 223-261
Week 12 (March 24, 26)
Industrialization of the Old Periphery (Chapter 11 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Alice H. Amsden, “The State and Taiwan’s Economic Development,” in Peter B. Evans, Dietrch
Rueschemeyer, Theda Skocpol (eds.), Bringing the State Back In, Cambridge University Press, New
York, 1985, pp. 78-106
Week 13 (March 31, April 2)
Trade, Protection and Globalization (Chapter 12 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Michael D. Bordo, Barry Eichengreen, Douglas A. Irwin, “Is Globalization Today Really Different than
a Globalization a Hundred years Ago?” NBER Working Paper 7195, issued in June 1999.
Week 14 (April 7, 9)
The End of the American Hegemony? (Chapter 13-14 in Schwartz, States vs Markets)
Susan Strange, “The Persistent Myth of Lost Hegemony,” International Organization 41:4 (Autumn,
1987), pp. 551-574
Week 15 (April 14, 16)
Financial Crisis and its Aftermath
Michael Lewis, “How the Eggheads Cracked,” The New York Times Magazine, January 24, 1999
Jeff Maddrick, “The Wall Street Leviathan” The New York Review of Books, April 28, 2011
Paul Krugman, “How the Case for Austerity Has Crumbled,” The New York Review of Books, June 6,
2013
Paul Krugman, “Why We’re in a New Gilded Age,” The New York Review of Books, May 8, 2014
Week 16 (April 21)
Recap – Global economy, where next? Questions, questions and more questions.
Download
Related flashcards
History

17 Cards

Holidays

32 Cards

Postmodernism

21 Cards

Create flashcards