PBIS in Maryland

advertisement
Positive Behavioral
Interventions and Supports
(PBIS)
School, School System, and State Level
Implementation
Milt McKenna
August 15, 2005
www.pbismaryland.org
www.pbis.org
www.swis.org
Advanced Organizer
Big Ideas
 Critical Features
 State Organization
 System Implementation
 School Information
 Project Evaluation

Main Message!
Successful Individual student
behavior support is linked to
host environments or school
climates that are effective,
efficient, relevant, & durable
(Zins & Ponti, 1990)
Discipline is….
The actions parents and teachers take to
increase student success (Charles, 1980).
Prevention
Rules,
Routines,
Arrangements
Reaction
Positive and
Negative
Consequences
Discipline Works When ….
Prevention creates more
POSITIVE than NEGATIVE consequences.
Reinforcement
(success)
4:1
Punishment
CONTINUUM OF
SCHOOL-WIDE
INSTRUCTIONAL &
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR
SUPPORT
~5%
~15%
Primary Prevention:
School-/ClassroomWide Systems for
All Students,
Staff, & Settings
~80% of Students
Tertiary Prevention:
Specialized
Individualized
Systems for Students
with High-Risk Behavior
Secondary Prevention:
Specialized Group
Systems for Students
with At-Risk Behavior
4 PBIS
Elements
Supporting Social Competence &
Academic Achievement
OUTCOMES
Supporting
Decision
Making
Supporting
Staff Behavior
PRACTICES
Supporting
Student Behavior
Critical Features









Establish Commitment
Establish and Maintain Team
Self-Assessment
Establish School-Wide Expectations
Establish On-Going System of Rewards
Establish System for Responding to
Behavioral Violations
Establish Information System
Build Capacity for Function-Based Support
Build District Level Support
The Power Of Teaching





“If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.”
“If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.”
“If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.”
“If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.”
“If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we … …
teach? … remove? … punish?”
Why can’t we finish the last sentence as
automatically as we do the others?
PBIS Philosophy
BIG Ideas
3-5 years
 Organizational Framework
 Critical Features same across schools


unique to the culture of the school
Invest in Coaching Capacity
Pennsylvania
D.C.
DRAFT
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Advisory Team
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Coordinator
Director SS
Director Sp. Ed.
Curriculum
Staff Development
School Board Member
Coach
Parent
•
•
•
•
Parent Advocacy
State Board Member
Policy Makers
PBS Executive Team
Core Agency
Gov office
Title I
MSDE
JHU
SP
Locals
Grant/foundation
LSS
SP
MSDE/SP
State Team
Regional Coordinator
PBIS Management Team
Project Target
Regional Coordinator
Regional Coordinator
District Team
District Team
Regional Team
District Team
(Multiple small counties)
Cluster Team
Cluster Team
School Teams
School Teams
School Teams
SST/RST
SST/RST
SST/RST
Cluster Team
Maryland PBIS
Partnership and Collaboration
Positive Behavioral
Interventions and Supports
Maryland State
Department of
Education
Sheppard Pratt
Health
System
Johns
Hopkins
University
Local
School
Systems
369
400
350
276
300
250
190
200
125
150
100
50
68
15
35
0
FY
99
FY
00
FY
01
FY
02
FY
03
FY
04
FY
05
100
90
93 93
86
80
70
65
60
67
57
50
50
49
40
30
33
20
10
0
20
15
3
1999
17
10
2000
2001
2002
Schools Trained
2003
Active
2004
2005
MD Implementation Model
 State
Leadership Team
 Local School System (LSS)
Contact
 Coach Facilitators
 Behavior Support Coaches
 School Teams
 Consistent Schedule of Events
Annual Events
Spring Forum (March/April)
 July Institute (July - 5 Days)
 Coaches Meetings (5 x year)
 Regional Team Leader/Coach
Meetings (2 x year)
 Schools serving students with
special needs - MANSEF (2 x year)
 High Schools – (2 x year)

Anne Arundel County
Public Schools

Large suburban school system between Baltimore City and
rural farm area, from the Chesapeake Bay to Fort Meade,
comprised of urban, suburban, rural areas.

75,000 students. Fifth largest school system in Maryland and
among the 50th largest in the country

44 Schools trained and implementing PBIS

18 elementary, 18 middle schools, 5 high schools and 3
alternative schools: one middle; one high school; one ED
Regional Program
Elements

Approach

Timing

Getting the right people on the
bus
Top Down-Bottom Up





NCLB, BTE, Goals2002-07
Central Office
Data driven
Structure and
organization-Project
Management
Organizational
Charters
Alignment with other
initiatives-Title I
schools: increased
funds for psychology
time to do PBIS




School House
Success breeds
success
Gaining support
through word of
mouth
Administrator as
leader- cheerleader
Alignment

Code of Conduct

AACPS Goals 2002-07

County-wide initiatives-Bully Prevention

Staff Development-para educators

Restructuring of in-school suspension areas
aligned with intervention and paradigm shift
Schools Trained
60
number of schools trained
50
40
30
49
44
20
10
19
8
0
1
1
2000
2
2
2001
3
2002
Year trained
4
2003
5
2004
6
2005
Cost Benefit Analysis AACPS 2005
800
700
600
Days Saved
500
Administrative Time Saved
400
Instructional Days Saved
300
200
100
0
Middle Schools
High Schools
Schools
Elementary
Time Saved


AACPS Saved 622 days of
instruction
AACPS saved 482 days of
administrative time
100
83.7
72.1
80
60
70.5
66.1
60.3
50.7
44.8
47.7
40
20
0
Annapolis
Arundel
Bates
Brooklyn Park Chesapeake
Bay
Middle school math
Corkran
Crofton
George Fox
84.6
100
75.3
84.8
80.9
79.7
85.3
75.9
80
60
40
20
0
Annapolis
Brock Bridge
George Cromw ell
Eastport
Georgetow n East
Elementary math
Germantow n
Glen Burnie Park
88.9
100
86.6
75.4
80
69.4
64.8
60
67.1
73.4
70.1
60
40
20
0
Lindale
Magothy
River
MacArthur
Marley
Meade
Old Mill
North
Middle school reading
Old Mill
South
Severn River
Southern
100
78.6
81.6
80.6
82.9
71.3
80
67.2
60
40
20
0
Harman
Hilltop
Jessup
Maryland City
Meade Heights
Elementary school reading
North Glen
December 2004
GERMANTOWN
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL:
Soaring with the Eagles
Positive Behavioral Intervention
Supports
Angie Wagaman, School Counselor
Mary Stuart Kempton, School Psychologist
Elements of a Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
1. Define Expected Behavior
CCode of Conduct
I
will respect myself, others, and
the environment.
I
will be responsible.
I will be safe.
GERMANTOWN STUDENT
PLEDGE
I promise to do my best at
Germantown Elementary by
showing respect for
myself and others, by working with
my teachers to learn everything
they need to teach me and by
using my hands
and feet for peaceful actions only.
2004–2005
Golden Eagle Guidelines
Elizabeth Kiefer
Principal
Donna Spencer
Assistant Principal
Eric J. Smith, Ed.D., Superintendent of Schools
Roy Skiles, Instructional Director, Annapolis and Southern Regions
Elements of a Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
2. Teach Expected Behavior
Behavioral
Expectations
Respectful
Responsible
Germantown Behavior Teaching Matrix
Classroom Cafeteria
Bus
Hallway
Playground
Bathroom
Use kind
words.
Use a quiet
voice. Raise
your hand.
Use a quiet
voice.
Follow
directions.
Use good
manners.
Use a quiet
voice.
Follow
directions.
Speak
politely to the
driver.

Obey the
Quiet Zones.
 Put hands
by your side
or on your
lips & hips.
TTake turns.
Share
equipment.
Use kind
words &
actions.
 Give others
AAccept the
consequences
of your
choices.
FFollow
teacher
directions.
BBring all
materials to
class.
 Complete and
return
homework &
classwork.
 Be on time.





Clean up
your eating
area.
 Follow
cafeteria
rules.
 Eat a
healthy
lunch.
 Know
your lunch
number.
Keep your
seat clean.
 Follow
bus rules.
 Be at your
stop on time.
 Have all
materials
ready for
dismissal.
Walk on
the silver
line.
 Obey the
Eagle Stop
Signs.
 Have a
hall pass.
Line up
promptly
when recess
ends.
 Clean up
equipment.
 Be
friendly.
 Use
problem
solving skills.
privacy.
 Keep it
clean.
Report
damaged
property.
 Use
materials
correctly.
 Return to
your class
promptly.
 Tell your
needs to a
teacher.
Germantown Behavior Teaching Matrix
Behavioral
Expectations
Safe
Classroom Cafeteria

Keep
chair legs on
the floor.
 Ask for
permission to
leave.
 Use hands
& feet for
peaceful
actions.


Walk.
Keep
your food on
your tray.
 Ask
permission to
leave your
seat.
 Use
utensils
correctly.
Bus

Stay in
your seat.
 Keep
aisles clear.
 Stay in
your personal
space.
Hallway


Walk.
Face
forward.
 Walk on
the right side
of the hall.
Playground

Use hands
& feet for
peaceful
actions.
 Use
equipment
correctly.
Bathroom

Use
fixtures
correctly.
Social Skills/Character
Education
 Second
Step
 No Put Downs
 Cores Essentials
 Steps to Respect
“May I have your attention, please.”
1. Stop moving.
2. Stop talking.
3. Look at the teacher.
4. Listen to the teacher.
5. Follow instructions.
From: Mychal Wynn, Building Dreams
Elements of a Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
3. Develop an Ongoing System
for Acknowledging Expected
Behavior
GERMANTOWN EAGLES
SOAR WITH PRIDE !!!
RESPECTFUL
 RESPONSIBLE
 SAFE

Student
________________
Teacher
________________
Germantown Elementary School
Golden Eagle Celebration Fall 2004
October
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
October 4 AM
October 11 AM
October 18 AM
October 25 AM
October 4 PM
October 11 PM
October 18 PM
October 25 PM
October 5 AM
October 12 AM
October 19 AM
October 26 AM
October 5 PM
October 12 PM
October 19 PM
October 26 PM
October 6 AM
October 13 AM
October 20 AM
October 27 AM
October 6 PM
October 13 PM
October 20 PM
October 27 PM
October 7 AM
October 14 AM
October 21 AM
October 28 AM
October 7 PM
October 14 PM
October 21 PM
October 28 PM
October 1 AM
October 8 AM
CLOSED
October 22 AM
October 29 AM
October 1 PM
October 8 PM
CLOSED
October 22 PM
October 29 PM
TOTALS
GRAND TOTAL
Bus Rewards Program Point System
Germantown Elementary School
Bus Rewards Program Bulletin Board Display
Elements of a
Schoolwide Discipline
Plan
4. Develop a System for
Responding to Behavioral
Violations
Classroom Interventions









Verbal warning
Time out
Time out in another classroom
Loss of privilege
Problem solving worksheet
A Sad Eagle Report – a minor referral
Parent contact
Student Support Plan
Referral to student support services: KidTalk Team, Student
Support Team, Learning Lab Coordinator, School
Psychologist, School Counselor
Sad Eagle Report
_____/____/____
Dear Parent or Guardian,
The rules that our school endorses are designed to ensure that all of our students can learn in a peaceful and safe environment.
Students who respect themselves, others and the environment, and who are responsible and safe are Germantown Golden Eagles.
Today, your child, ____________________________, did not follow Germantown’s school rules. The following describes the
improper behavior.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Unacceptable Physical Behavior
Abusive Language
Lack of Respect for Others
Lack of Respect for Another’s Property or School Property
Other
Please talk to your child so that we can continue to work together to help your child learn and be a Golden Eagle. Your
cooperation is appreciated.
_________________________
Teacher
Sad Eagle Report (page 2)
Student ____________________ Grade______ Date ________ Time ______
Referring Staff __________________________
Homeroom
________________
Problem Behavior __________________________________________________
Location
Classroom
Playground
Hall
Cafeteria
Bathroom
Gym
Library
Bus Zone
Special Event
Office
Other
Unknown
Others Involved
Motivation
None
Peer attention
Peers
Adult attention
Staff
Obtain objects
Substitute
Obtain activities
Unknown
Avoid tasks
Avoid activities
Avoid work
Avoid peers
Avoid adults
Don’t know
Discipline Referral for Major Offense
Elements of Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
5. Develop a System for Consistent
Implementation, Monitoring, and
Decision-Making
Elements of a Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
6. Provide Booster Procedures
During Targeted Times of the Year
Elements of a Schoolwide
Discipline Plan
7. Provide Alternatives/Options
for Students with Chronic
Problem Behaviors
Continuum of Behavior
1-7 %
Individual
(.24%)
5-15%
At Risk
(3.30%)
80-90%,
School-wide
(96.46%)
Student Support Team,
Functional Behavioral
Assessment, Behavior
Intervention Plans, School
Psychologist
KidTalk Team, Learning
Lab, Guidance
Counselor, Mentoring
Program
Second Step, No Put
Downs, Steps to Respect,
Core Essentials
Germantown Discipline Data
Referrals
450
400
Suspensions
Bus Referrals
425
359
350
300
265
244
250
216
200
150
164
129
119
90
100
147
115
73
74
67
27
50
23
13
0
19981999
19992000
20002001
20012002
16
20022003
36
27
15
20032004
20042005
Germantown Elementary Cost/Benefit Comparison
Referrals (1999-2005)
 Total referrals: 1999-2000 = 425
2004-2005 = 73
Total decrease = 352 referrals
 Administrator minutes consumed (15 minutes per referral)
1999-2000 = 6,375 minutes
2004-2005 = 1,095 minutes
Total decrease = 5,280 administrator minutes saved (88 hours=
11 school days)
 Instructional minutes consumed (45 minutes per referral)
1999-2000 = 19,125 minutes
2004-2005 = 3,285 minutes
Total decrease = 15,840 instructional minutes saved (264 hours =
37.7 school days)
Project Target
Evaluating PBIS in Maryland
JHU Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence
 5 Local School Systems
 37 Elementary Schools
 24 PBIS
 13 “Focus”
 Data Collection:
 1,400 teachers
 16,000 students
Project Target
Evaluate PBIS in Maryland
JHU Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence






Academic Achievement
Suspensions and Expulsions
Teacher Ratings of Disruptive Behavior
Referrals for Special Education Services
Staff Satisfaction and Turnover
Student Assessment of Climate
CONTACT INFORMATION
Susan Barrett - Sheppard Pratt Health System,
[email protected], 410-938-3650
Milt McKenna – Maryland State Department of
Education, [email protected],
410-767-0304
Virginia Dolan - Anne Arundel County Public Schools,
[email protected] , 410-222-5321
Philip Leaf – Johns Hopkins University Center for the
Prevention of Youth Violence, pleaf[email protected],410
955-3962
Mary Stuart Kempton, [email protected]
Positive Behavioral
Interventions and Supports
(PBIS)
School, School System, and State Level
Implementation
Milt McKenna
August 15, 2005
www.pbismaryland.org
www.pbis.org
www.swis.org
Download