Engl105_Wk5

advertisement
Engl 105
Tosspon
Turn in research scaffold and
vocabulary
1. Run-On sentences
2. Incorporating research
3. Quoting/paraphrasing
4. CARS – checking sources
5. Your paper!
Quick review: Fragments
• To be a complete sentence– Subject
– Verb
– Express a
complete thought
• Watch for words
like “although”
and “because”!
Review: Run ON
•
Fragment= incomplete
• 2 or more independent clauses
(whole sentences) combined
incorrectly.
bought
me a(goal
coke1-2
so we
went
–Kevin
Too
many
ANDS
“and”s
per
Kevin bought me a coke, we went to
tosentence)
the park together.
the park together
– Fused
• Jammed
together
punctuation
I went
to the
store with
and no
bought
a
barSplice
and who did I see there
–candy
Comma
but
Kevin who
got me
coke
and so(need
• Jammed
together
withajust
a comma
we comma
went toconjunction!!!)
the park together.
Game!
• Run-On Race
• 4-5 Teams: Each team runs this like a
relay
– Identify Sentence, Fragment, or Run On
– Fix the Fragments and Run Ons
– I will send you back to your group if the
answer is wrong.
– Form a “batting order” – the first person
cannot go again until every person on the
team has been up.
• Every 5 questions you complete, your
race car will move forward.
• First to the end wins!
A note about your papers
• Your grade is not who you are.
– Just because you got a C, doesn’t mean
you are a C (or a failure).
• #18, 19, 20 – Write a different
introduction & conclusion
– Look it up in Chpt 4. Write a different
TYPE/STYLE of intro from what you
already have
Incorporating Research
 Read the paper
 Highlight/circle each quote
 Take notes in the margin
 What kind of hook is it?
 What is the thesis?
 what is each main point?
Create a Reverse Outline
 Separate piece of paper
 Choose 1 article w/ a partner
 Each Paragraph
 Each main point
Using Quotes/Evidence
Throughout story each character’s mindset and outlook..
• Look @ each paragraph
1. Write the thesis @ the
top of the paper
2. What is the main point
of the paragraph?
3. How does the author
use each quote?
– How does she introduce
the quote?
– What quote is used
– What does it mean to
her paragraph?
– How does it prove her
thesis?
Haymitch, who starts out a drunk… actually becomes very helpful..
As he trains her, he tells Katniss
“You’ve got about as
much charm as a
dead slug”
Pg 67
He insults her because he can’t
trust himself to care for her, as
he knows she will likely be dead
in a matter of days
It shows that both Haymitch first
showed dislike to protect himself
from the hurt her death would
cause.
Quoting
• Pg 393
• Quotations must be identical to the
original, using a narrow segment of the
source. They must match the source
document word for word and must be
attributed to the original author.
– Direct quotation. Jon Krakauer says, “I
had been granted unusual freedom and
responsibility at an early age, for which I
should have been grateful in the extreme,
but I wasn’t” (Krakauer, 148).
Paraphrasing
• Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from
source material into your own words. A
paraphrase must also be attributed to the
original source. Paraphrased material is usually
shorter than the original passage, taking a
somewhat broader segment of the source and
condensing it slightly.
– Paraphrase. In Chapter 11 of Into the Wild, Walt,
McCandless’s father, remembers an early hike with
twelve-year-old Chris. They made it to 13,000 feet
before turning back from the 14,256-foot summit
in Colorado. Chris did not want to quit, and
complained all the way down (Krakauer, 109).
Summarizing
• Summarizing involves putting the main
idea(s) into your own words, including only the
main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to
attribute summarized ideas to the original
source. Summaries are significantly shorter
than the original and take a broad overview of
the source material.
Summary. In Into the Wild, Krakauer
seems to be working out his own past
and his relationship with his father as
well as telling the sad story of Chris
McCandless. Because Krakauer, too, is a
man of the outdoors, he understands
something about the call of the wild.
Practice
Paraphrase, Quote, Summary
• Handout
Practice
3.
2.
1.
Quotation Punctuation
• Period goes AFTER the quote
Citation: use 1st thing in the
Works Cited page (usually
author’s last name or article
title)
Using Quotes/Paraphrases
• Your quote can’t make your point for
you. YOU must make your point.
• Use a quote,
tell the reader
WHAT it shows
and why.
Signal the Use of a Source
Read & highlight the handout
• Introduce your sources
– Dialogue Tags
– Phrases
– Sentences
• Divide your sources
• Use Key Phrases
Throughout story each character’s mindset and outlook..
Try it on
YOUR
quote(s)
• Fill out a
paragraph
organizer
for YOUR
main
points/
quotes
Haymitch, who starts out a drunk… actually becomes very helpful..
As he trains her, he tells Katniss
“You’ve got about as
much charm as a dead
slug”
He insults her because he can’t trust
himself to care for her, as he knows
she will likely be dead in a matter of
days
It shows that both Haymitch first
showed dislike to protect himself from
the hurt her death would cause.
Pg 67
Works Cited
• Use www.easybib.com
• Make sure ALL information is correct
• Works Cited goes on its OWN PAGE
– Do NOT trust Microsoft! It uses MLA 2007
Plagiarism & Citing
Sources
Tosspon’s English 105
Heald College
Obvious Plagiarism
• buying, stealing,
or borrowing a
paper (including, of
course, copying an
entire paper or
• hiring someone to
article from the
write your paper for
Web);
you; and copying
large sections of
text from a source
without quotation
marks or proper
citation.
Cite It
• Words or ideas presented in a magazine, book,
newspaper, song, TV program, movie, Web page,
computer program, letter, advertisement, or any other
medium
• Information you gain through interviewing or conversing
with another person, face to face, over the phone, or in
writing
• When you copy the exact words or a unique phrase
• When you reprint any diagrams, illustrations, charts,
pictures, or other visual materials
• When you reuse or repost any electronically-available
media, including images, audio, video, or other media
DON’T Cite It
• Writing your own lived experiences, your own observations
and insights, your own thoughts, and your own conclusions
about a subject
• When you are writing up your own results obtained through
lab or field experiments
• When you use your own artwork, digital photographs, video,
audio, etc.
• When you are using "common knowledge," things like
folklore, common sense observations, myths, urban legends,
and historical events (but not historical documents)
• When you are using generally-accepted facts, e.g., pollution
is bad for the environment, including facts that are accepted
within particular discourse communities, e.g., in the field of
composition studies, "writing is a process" is a generallyaccepted fact.
Must Cite in 2 places:
In-text
Works Cited Page
(also known as ‘parenthetical documentation’)
In other words- in parentheses.
Your in-text citations work with your bibliography (works
cited) page to identify where any quotes or ideas borrowed
from another author came from.
“References in the text MUST clearly point to specific
sources
in the list of works cited.”
- MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed.
Works Cited
Halio, Jay L., "Elizabethan Age." Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Scholastic
Library Publishing, 2006. HF-L High School. 1 Apr 2006 <http://gme.grolier.com>.
Life in Elizabethan England. Summer 2005. 31 Mar 2006 <http://renaissance.dm
.net/compendium>.
Pressley, J. M. "An Encapsulated Biography." Shakespeare Resource Center,
February 10, 2005. 3 Mar 2006 <http://www.bardweb.net/man.html>.
Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1969.
Thomas, Heather. The Life in Times of Queen Elizabeth I. 23 Mar 2006. 1 Apr
2006 <www.elizabethi.org>.
In-text citations: Direct Quote
In the body of the paper, it looks like this:
When Mercutio is wounded, he screams “A plague on both your
houses!” referring to both the Capulets and the Montagues
(Shakespeare 70).
Works Cited
Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1969.
Direct Quotes
– Educators are cautioned that “…labels tend to
stick, and few people go back later to
document a shifting profile of intelligences”
(Gardner 139).
– Gardner explains that there are difficulties in
labeling children with a type of intelligence,
including the problem that labels may last,
while the assessment may change (139).
A. On September 11, 2001, the World
Trade Center and the Pentagon were
attacked by hijacked airplanes.
B. Atta, Binalshibh, al Shehhi, and Jarrah
had lived in Germany and were chosen
over more established Al Qaeda
members due to their exposure to the
West and ability to speak English.
B was correct: it is specific
and not commonly known
• How would you cite it? In the text of your
paper:
• Atta, Binalshibh, al Shehhi, and Jarrah had lived
in Germany and were chosen over more
established Al Qaeda members due to their
exposure to the West and ability to speak English
(National Commission 160).
In the Works Cited:
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the
United States. The 9/11 Commission Report. New
York: W.W. Norton, 2004.
Which of THESE
do you need to cite?
A. “The science labs at East St. Louis High
School are 30 to 50 years outdated.”
B. When public schools were segregated,
conditions were not equal.
How would you cite it? In-body:
• “The science labs at East St. Louis High
School are 30 to 50 years outdated”
(Kozol 27).
In the Works Cited:
Kozol, Jonathan. Savage Inequalities:
Children in America’s Schools. New York:
HarperCollins, 1991. Print.
Good Sources/Bad Sources
• Do NOT use wikipedia as a cited source.
• Sources that end in .edu
or .gov are more reliable.
• News agencies
often end in .com
• Beware of .org, .com, and .net
websites.
– Sometimes can be used to show people’s
opinions. Should NOT be used for facts
unless reputable source such as news site.
CARS
Is your web source
• Credible
• Accurate
• Reliable
• Supported
• See handout, analyze 1 source YOU
used.
• Sometimes you may use a non-credible
source, if you are quoting an opinion
and state it as such in your paper.
Peer Revision:
Compare/Contrast
• Use the Handout
• Remember to respond (questions 1721)
– Author- you are asked to write a
different STYLE of intro and a
different STYLE of conclusion (see
chpt 4)
• If you used a personal story, try using a
quote! If you used a call to action, try using
an anecdote!
Computer Room Assignments
1. CARS worksheet (due today)
2. Research Scaffold (due today)
• Title of the article
• Author of the article
• Source of the article
• Date the article published
3. Review your Narrative grade (emailed
to you if you submitted on time)
Begin working on Grammar log
Homework: Tuesday
• Compare/Contrast 1st Draft
DUE @ beginning of NEXT MEETING
(50 points)
• Grammar
Log
for Narrative
Homework: Thurs
• Compare/Contrast Final Draft
email to [email protected]
before class!
• If you email it on/before the 27th you
will get 10 points credit.
• Grammar Log
for Narrative
Download