Food Safty & Sanitation

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Family and Consumer Sciences
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION
Gwinnett County Schools
Middle School
Family and Consumer Sciences
2007
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
1
Family and Consumer Sciences
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION
Student Manual
Gwinnett County Schools
Middle School
Family and Consumer Sciences
2007
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
2
Be sure to check each module for additional handouts that are not on the CD.
Spoiled Rotten DVD
Hand Washing Close Up DVD
Germ Wars Game
Food Safety/Kitchen Safety Card Game Enrichment Activity
Food Safety Mobile Game (Internet Game)
Find the Hazards worksheet
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
3
FOOD SAFETY & SANITATION•
INTRODUCTION
Even the smallest things can become health and safety problems in the kitchen.
If a cutting board is not washed properly, it may transmit harmful bacteria that
can cause food poisoning. The symptoms of food poisoning can be similar to the
flu. Food poisoning may be caused by bacteria, which are very tiny organisms in
food. The most important thing to remember about keeping food free of bacteria
is to keep cold food cold and hot food hot; and to keep ourselves and the utensils
we use clean.
OBJECTIVES
1. Define sanitation.
2.Identify the causes of food borne illnesses.
3.Explain healthy sanitation practices.
AKS
#10,40,41
ESSENTIAL QUESTION Describe the Danger Zone? Why is it called that?
MATERIALS
videos/DVD
activity sheets
Glogerm or Glitterbug lotion
Hand soap
EQUIPMENT
TV/VCR
Headphones
Computer
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
black light
Revised July, 2007
4
Activity #1
Food Safety and Sanitation
1. Locate the pretest and complete it according to instructions before you go to the
next step.
2. Review the following vocabulary words before you begin the module. When you
find the words in the reading material or videos as you come to them during the
next four days, write the definitions on your own paper.
-
bacteria
cross contamination
food borne illness
perishable foods
contaminated food
danger zone
microorganisms
sanitation
3. In the textbook called Applying Life Skills, you will need to read Chapter 27,
pages 434-447. On your own paper answer the questions 1-10 on page 446 under
the section called Reviewing Key Terms and Ideas.
4. Locate and view the video “Spoiled Rotten”
5. On your own notebook paper list 10 facts from the video.
6. Clean up your module area and make sure everything is returned to its proper place.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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5
Pre-test
•
Directions:
Answer the following questions on your pretest/posttest answer sheet. Bubble in
the best answer.
1.The temperature range known as the “Danger Zone” is
A.
B.
C.
D.
40 –140 degrees F.
60-126 degrees F.
140-165 degrees F.
100-140 degrees F.
2.Harmful bacteria can be transmitted to food by_______________.
A. dirty hands
B. insects
C. dirty utensils
D. all of the above
3.In what order should be washed?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Silverware, glasses, pans, dishes
Glasses, silverware, dishes, pans
Dishes, silverware, glasses, pans
Glasses, pans, silverware, dishes
4.Always keep hot foods above ______ degrees and cold foods below_______ degrees F.
A.
B.
C.
D.
100/25
120/32
140/40
200/75
5.To make sure your hands are clean, wash them in hot soapy water for at least
_________.
A.
B.
C.
D.
20 seconds
2 minutes
20 minutes
60 seconds
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6.The protection of health by keeping area free from dirt or bacteria is called
A.
B.
C.
D.
bacteria
sanitation
cross contamination
food borne illness
7.What is needed for bacteria to grow?
A.
B.
C.
D.
the right temperature
moisture
food
all of the above
8.What should you do with food you think is unsafe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
throw it away
put it in the refrigerator to eat later
taste it to see if it tastes OK
give it to your pet
9.What can you do to keep foods safe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
wash your hands before you eat
keep cold foods cold
wash fruits or vegetables before you eat them
all of these will keep food safe to eat
10. Which foods do not need to be kept cold to be safe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
meats
eggs
dairy
fruits
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Activity # 2
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION
1. Locate and complete the worksheet “The Danger Zone”. Use a red marker, red
colored pencil or red crayon to color in the area known as the Danger Zone. Be
careful not to let the maker go through the paper onto the table. Be sure to put
this worksheet in your folder when complete. Don’t forget to put your
name on the worksheet.
2. Locate and read the facts sheets “Handling Food Safely” and “Sanitation”.
3. Locate and read the fact sheet “Bacteria That Causes Food Borne Illnesses”.
Complete the worksheet “Identifying Food Borne Illnesses” on your own paper.
When completed, put your name on your paper and put it in your folder.
4. Play the board game called “Germ Wars” with your partner. Write down 10 facts
that you learned while playing the game.
5. Clean up your module area and make sure everything is returned to its proper
place.
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FACT SHEET: HANDLING FOOD SAFELY
1. The grocery store should be the last shopping stop to keep food changes to a
minimum. Never leave groceries in a hot car and put foods away immediately to
avoid food spoilage.
2. Food should be stored under the best possible conditions. Keep food away from
dirt, pets and household chemicals. Never store food under the kitchen sink
because the drainpipes could leak and contaminate the food. Also, unsealed
drainpipes may allow insects and rodents to enter the kitchen.
3. Develop a system to identify when food was purchased and stored so the oldest
items will be used first.
4. Cooking and refrigeration slow the growth of disease- producing bacteria.
Bacteria need moisture, warmth, and a source of food to grow. Refrigeration
slows bacteria growth by removing the warmth needed for growth. Cooking
foods at high temperatures kills bacteria.
5. When preparing food, constant attention to the rules of personal hygiene and
food sanitation is most important.
MOST COMMON RULES:
A. Shop for food immediately before going home.
B. Buy perishable foods in small quantities.
C. When shopping, always select frozen foods and foods requiring
refrigeration immediately before paying for the purchases.
D. Wash hands before handling or preparing foods.
E. Wash hands after handling raw foods to avoid contaminating cooked
foods or utensils.
F. Wash raw foods thoroughly and carefully.
G. Follow label directions for storing, preparing and serving frozen foods.
H. Store all foods at proper temperatures.
I. Do not thaw poultry or meat at room temperature. Instead, thaw them in
the refrigerator or use cool, running water.
J. Promptly refrigerate leftover foods.
K. Heat leftover foods thoroughly before serving them again.
L. Promptly refrigerate all dairy products and mixtures made from dry milk.
M. Wash all utensils used in preparing raw poultry, meats eggs or pastry
mixes in hot, soapy water before re-using them.
N. Keep all picnic food cold until serving time.
O. Do not taste foods containing raw eggs, such as homemade cookie
dough.
P. Keep all food containers covered so particles will not fall onto the food.
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FACT SHEET: SANITATION
The kitchen is the workplace for food preparation in the home. Personal work habits
and conditions in the environment affect the final product and determine whether
the food being prepared will be free of harmful bacteria.
CONSIDER THESE PERSONAL WORK HABITS:
-
Always wash your hands with hot water and soap before handling food.
Use separate towels for drying hands and drying dishes.
Wash cutting boards, utensils, and hands after handling raw meat poultry
or seafood.
Never touch your hair, face, tissues or handkerchief without rewashing
your hands.
Do not put your dishtowel over your shoulders, use it to wipe up spills or
wipe your hands.
Always rewash any food that drops on the floor if you intend to reuse it.
Use a separate spoon each time you taste the food you are preparing.
If you leave the kitchen to do something else, always wash your hands
before continuing with your food preparation.
Fruits and vegetables to be used in cooking should be thoroughly washed.
If you have long hair, tie it back out of the way before you begin food
preparation.
If you are ill, avoid food preparation tasks.
If you have cuts or sores on your hands, wear gloves during food
preparation.
CONSIDER THESE PERSONAL WORK HABITS PERTAINING TO THE KITCHEN:
-
Always use clean utensils and a clean working surface.
When washing dishes and utensils by hand, add a measured amount of
detergent to a sink one-third full of hot water.
Wash least-soiled items first, rinse with hot water, dry if necessary and
return to storage.
When using a dishwasher, follow the directions in manual.
Use a damp cloth to wipe countertops, stove and other appliances.
Leave the sink clean and dry.
The floors, walls and cabinets should be kept free from grease and other
dirt.
Trashcans should be emptied before dishes are washed.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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BACTERIA THAT CAUSE FOOD BORNE ILLNESS
BOTULISM
Botulism is a most serious illness and can be fatal. Botulism causing bacteria can
occur in home canned or commercially canned foods that show warning signs such
as: clear liquids that turned milky, cracked jars, lose lids swollen or dented cans or
lids. If you have eaten foods containing botulism, within 12 to 48 hours your
nervous system could be affected. Symptoms include double vision, droopy
eyelids, trouble speaking and swallowing and difficulty breathing. To prevent
botulism carefully examine home canned foods before use and don’t use any
canned foods that show danger signs. If you or a family member has botulism
symptoms, get medical help immediately, then call health authorities.
E. COLI
The bacteria E.coli 0157 is a rare but dangerous type of E. coli. It lives in the
intestinal tracts of mammals and man. Undercooked beef, raw milk (milk that has
not been pasteurized) contaminated water, mayonnaise and vegetables or fruit
grown in cow manure have caused outbreaks in this country over the last 10 years.
Young children and the elderly are the highest risk groups. Children may develop
HUS, which can cause kidney failure, brain damage, strokes and seizures. A
similar problem, TTP, can cause strokes, a side –effect often seen in the elderly.
To protect yourself cook meat, poultry and fish to 160 degrees F.- until all pink is
gone. Return any undercooked food at a restaurant for further cooking. Don’t
drink raw milk. Use only safe, treated water. Wash all fruits and vegetables before
eating.
CLOSTRIDIUM- “THE BUFFET GERM”
This “buffet germ” is most likely present when large amounts of foods are prepared
and left at room temperature for a long time. It can also grow in chafing dishes that
may not keep food sufficiently hot and even in the refrigerator if food is stored in
large portions that do not cool quickly. In 8-24 hours you could have diarrhea and
gas pains, ending usually in less that a day. Older people and ulcer patients can
be seriously affected. Keep hot foods hot (over 140 degrees F.) and cold foods
cold (under 40 degrees F.). Divide bulk cooked foods into smaller portions for
serving and cooling. Be careful with poultry, meats, gravy, stews and casseroles.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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SALMONELLA
You can get salmonella by eating infected food- meat, poultry, eggs and fish- that
is raw or undercooked. When cooked food comes in contact with infected raw
food, or when an infected person contaminates food the bacteria may also be
spread. Within 12 to 36 hours you could have diarrhea, fever and vomiting lasting
2 to 7 days. To prevent salmonella keep raw food away from cooked food.
Thoroughly cook meat, poultry and fish. Be especially careful with poultry, roast
beef and hamburger. Don’t drink unpasteurized milk.
STAPH
Staph spreads from someone handling food. It is found on the skin, in the nose, in
pimples and throat infections. At warm temperatures, staph produces a poison
(toxin). Symptoms of staph include vomiting and diarrhea occurring 2 to 8 hours
after eating and lasting a day or two. Cooking won’t destroy the staph poison, so
wash hands and utensils before preparing food. Don’t leave food out over 2 hours.
Custards, cream-filled pastries, eggs, ham, chicken and potato salads are foods
most often involved.
.
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IDENTIFYING FOOD BORNE ILLNESSES
Identify the causes, symptoms, and prevention of the following 5 kinds of bacteria.
BACTERIA
BOTULISM
Clostridium
Botulinum
CAUSES
SYMPTOMS
PREVENTION
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E.COLI
Escherichia
coli0157:h7
“BUFFET GERM”
Clostridium
Perfringens
SALMONELLA
STAPH
Staphylococcus
Aureus
•
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Activity # 3
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION
1. Read the information sheets “Lunch Packing Tips” and “Packing Your Lunch the
Safe Way” and “Dishwashing Procedures”.
2. Locate the magazines, scissors, and tape in the Tote Tray Cabinet. Find and cut
out a picture showing an example of a food that should be kept COLD at lunch and one
that does not need to be kept cold. Tape these to a piece of notebook paper and label
each picture to clarify between the two.
3. Using Microsoft Word create a “Lunch Packing Tips” flyer to go in a child’s
lunchbox. Be creative and use clipart and word art to capture the child’s attention.
You will need to include five tips. Print your flyer and put your name on the back.
4. Locate and view the “Hand Washing Close Up” DVD.
5. Locate the cassette player and tape titled “Hand washing Rap”. (Get from Mrs.
Baggett) Listen to the tape using earphones, then go to the sink area and wash
your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds.
6. Locate the Glo-Germ lotion. Follow the instructions in your module notebook to
make sure you use this properly.
7. Locate and watch the DVD called “Just the Facts – Food Safety”. List 10 facts
you learned from watching this DVD on your own paper.
8. Clean up your module area and make sure everything is returned to its proper
location.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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LUNCH PACKING TIPS
Always prepare foods with clean hands, clean equipment and in a clean
work area.
Make sure that cold foods are thoroughly chilled before packing with a
freezer pack.
Add a freezer pack to keep “cold food cold” until lunch.
Pack cold and frozen foods together. This keeps the food cold longer.
Pack your lunch in a clean container. Wash out your lunch box with warm
water and soap after every use. Use clean paper bags.
Pack a hand washing wipe in your lunch in case soap and water aren’t
available.
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PACKING YOUR LUNCH THE SAFE WAY
Foods that must be kept cold in packed lunch:
*Anything that you take out of the refrigerator and put into your lunch must be kept cold.
Meat sandwich
Tuna or egg salad sandwich
Milk cheese or yogurt
Canned fruit that has been opened
Fresh vegetables
Foods that DON’T need to be kept cold in a packed lunch
Peanut butter sandwich
Cookies, crackers, chips
Fresh fruit (in the peel)
Unopened cans of fruit or pudding
 Tip: Freeze sandwiches to keep them safe. They will thaw by lunch but will stay
cold enough to be safe. Lettuce , other greens and tomatoes don’t freeze well.
Pack these separately and add to your sandwich before you eat.
TYPES OF FREEZER PACKS
When refrigeration isn’t possible, there are ways to keep a lunch cold.
You can:
- Buy a commercial gel pack. There are several types available.
- Freeze water in a rigid, leak-proof plastic freezer container. Be sure to leave room
for the water to expand as it freezes.
- Put ice cubes in a leak-proof freezer container.
- Freeze a juice box. It will keep the lunch cold and be thawed to drink by lunchtime.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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GLOGERM DIRECTIONS
1. Locate the GloGerm kit. Squeeze a very small amount of the lotion into the palm
of your hand ( the size of a green pea).
2. Rub the lotion in completely, and allow it to dry.
3. Locate the black light. Turn it on and allow it to warm up.
4. Look at your hands (top and bottom) in the glow of the black light. See how it
glows? Turn the black light off.
5. Go to the kitchen area and wash your hands like you have been instructed.
Allow them to dry completely.
6. Go back to the black light and follow steps 3 &4. Did you wash ALL the lotion off
thoroughly? If you see any “glow” remaining on your hands, you DID NOT wash
thoroughly enough. Your washing procedure would not remove all germs and
bacteria. If you see no remaining traces of the lotion, GREAT JOB!!!!!!
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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DISHWASHING PROCEDURES
1. Scrape food particles off dishes.
2. Pre-rinse dishes lightly.
3. Sort and stack dishes by groups.
4. Wash in HOT, SOAPY water.
5. Wash dishes in correct order by groups.
A. glasses
B. silverware
C. dishes
D. pots and pans
6. Rinse in hot water.
7. Air dry or dry with a clean towel.
•
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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Food Safety and Sanitation
Activity # 4
1. Locate the worksheet labeled Food Safety Mobile Game. Go to a computer and
follow the directions to play the game. Be sure to write your five facts on your
worksheet. You may want to write these as you play the game.
2. Locate and watch the DVD called “Food Safety” by Learning Seed.
3. Enrichment Activity If you have finished all of your work you can play the card
game “Food Safety/Kitchen Safety”. Write down 10 facts you learned from
playing this card game.
4. Locate the post test and complete it according to your instructions.
5. Get a piece of notebook paper and place your name,class and folder # in the
upper right hand corner. Place your module name on the top line. Copy the
following list and gather your assignments in order. Place the list on top and
staple the stack together. Paperclip your pre/post-test answer sheet on top.












Vocabulary words
Reviewing Key Terms and Ideas
Spoiled Rotten Video facts
Danger Zone worksheet
Identifying Food Borne Illnesses
Germ Wars facts
Two food picture
Lunch Packing Tips flyer
Just the Facts – Food Safety facts
Food Safety Mobile Game
Enrichment: card game facts
Extra Credit summaries
6.. Clean up your module area and make sure everything is returned to its proper
location.
7. For Extra Credit: Locate and read the fact sheets, “Food Safety after School”
and” A Concerned Stomach Talks About Food Safety”. Write a paragraph summary on
each article.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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POSTTEST
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION
•
Directions:
Answer the following questions on your pretest/posttest answer sheet. Bubble in
the best answer.
1.Which foods do not need to be kept cold to be safe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Meats
EGGS
Dairy
Fruits
2.What can you do to keep foods safe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Wash your hands before you eat
Keep cold foods cold
Wash fruits and vegetables before you eat them
All of these will keep food safe to eat
3.What should you do with a food you think is unsafe to eat?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Throw it away
Put it in the refrigerator to eat later
Taste it to see if it tastes OK
Give it to your pet
4.What is needed for bacteria to grow?
A.
B.
C.
D.
The right temperature
Moisture
Food
All of the above
5.The protection of health by keeping work areas free from dirt or bacteria is called
A.
B.
C.
D.
Bacteria
Sanitation
Cross contamination
Food borne illness
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
20
FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION POSTTEST, cont.
6.To make sure your hands are clean, wash them in hot soapy water for at least
___________.
A.
B.
C.
D.
20 seconds
2 minutes
20 minutes
60 seconds
7.Always keep hot foods above ______ degrees and cold foods below______ degrees F.
A.
B.
C.
D.
100/25
120/32
140/40
200/75
8.In what order should dishes be washed?
A.
B.
C.
D.
Silverware, glasses, pans, dishes
Glasses, silverware, dishes, pans
Dishes, silverware, glasses, pans
Glasses, pans, silverware, dishes
9.Harmful bacteria can be transmitted to food by________.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Dirty hands
Insects
Dirty utensils
All of the above
10. The temperature range known as the “Danger Zone” is
A.
B.
C.
D.
40-140 degrees F.
60-126 degrees F.
140-165 degrees F.
100-140 degrees F.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
21
Food Safety and Sanitation
Answers to the Pre and Post tests
Pre-test
1. A
2. D
3. B
4. C
5. A
6. B
7. D
8. A
9. D
10. D
Post –test
1. D
2. D
3. A
4. D
5. B
6. A
7. C
8. B
9. D
10. A
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
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Food Safety and Sanitation
Food Safety Mobile Game
Log onto the computer and click on Internet Explorer
Type in Google.com
Type Food Safety Mobile Game/ Click on the USDA Food Safety
Mobile Game
In the right column you will find a category for kids and teens. Click
on this link. It will take you to the Food Safety Mobile Game. Click on
the game and take the quiz.
When you have finished write five facts from the quiz..
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Modules/Food Safety and Sanitation
Revised July, 2007
23
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