M678 Pastoral Care in Times of Crisis AA2014

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McCormick Theological Seminary
Doctor of Ministry Program
M678--PASTORAL CARE IN CRISIS SITUATIONS
January 20-24, 2014
Professor: Daniel S. Schipani, Dr. Psy., Ph.D.
[email protected] -- (574) 296-6237
Course Description
This course consists in an in-depth practical-theological exploration of pastoral care ministry in
crisis situations. It includes principles—that is, dependable guides to practice—of prevention,
early intervention, and recovery, in light of a vision of pastoral wisdom and of the church as an
ecology of care, healing and wholeness.
The substantive content and the goals and objectives of this course have been chosen with
special attention to the realities of Hispanic faith communities in the United States. Those whose
ministry focuses on the spiritual nature and care of God’s people in congregations and other
ministry settings (e.g. health care centers) will find the course particularly useful in terms of their
ongoing personal-spiritual, academic, and professional-ministerial formation.
Goals and Objectives
Students who fulfill all the course requirements will meet the following goals and
objectives:
To nurture their identity and vocation as Christian pastoral caregivers and pastoral
theologians (being)
 To foster core values, virtues, and attitudes of pastoral caregivers in terms of
identity and vocation.
 To develop the disposition of pastoral “presence”
To enhance their understanding of, and theological reflection on pastoral care as a
ministry of the church (knowing)
 To contextually integrate biblical, historical, and theological themes of Christian
pastoral care
 To further develop their theological approach to pastoral care
To be equipped with practical knowledge, skills and tools to enhance care practice in
crisis situations (doing)
 To be introduced to selected resources on crisis pastoral care and, in turn,
generate practical resources for competent practice
 To create a strategy for pastoral care in crisis situations
1
Methodology and Course Requirements
In this course, the processes of teaching and learning build on but go beyond masters-level
methodology. They do so by increasing the level of complexity and overall rigor associated with
presentation of material and research on the part of both professor and students. The utilization
of electronic technology before, during, and after the week of January 20-24 is expected to
facilitate communication and collaboration among all the participants.
Class work is approached with a practical theological framework and methodology. It
includes case study presentations and analysis, lecture and discussion, and small group dynamics
and role-playing exercises. In addition to the reading, students are involved in an ongoing
pastoral theological reflection by focusing on key questions and approaches, methods and
techniques of pastoral care in crisis situations. Each student chooses a topic for class presentation
which will also be the subject for a course project to be completed according to McCormick’s D.
Min guidelines.
Pre-class assignments (35%) – To be brought to class on January 20, 2014
Case study of pastoral care in a crisis situation. Students will prepare a 3-5 page case
study dealing with either having received, provided, or observed pastoral care in a crisis situation
(e.g. sudden death of a loved one, diagnosis of a terminal illness, etc.). (20 %) The required case
study is a critical ministry reflection report following the four movements of practicaltheological construction: observation-description, analysis-interpretation, evaluation, and
strategizing for further ministry work. The process and the structure of a written case is
analogous to the format and structured process of the class or seminar group where the case is
considered, and include the following dimensions:
(1) Background and description of the ministry event: providing information
regarding context and settings of the crisis situation, relevant facts about the actors; what
took place, with whom, when and where.
(2) Analysis: determining what was involved in the critical event and the pastoral
care action, and why; dynamic of interactions; key issues viewed and interpreted in
human science and theological perspectives (including material from class required
readings, Bible, etc.)
(3) Evaluation: determining whether certain ministry goals were met focusing on
both care receivers and care giver(s); assessment of the quality of the pastoral care
practice as such, including possible alternative or preferred lines of action.
(4) Projections: identifying new learnings and challenges; making decisions and
planning for further ministry work; strategizing for next steps of professional formation
and growth and for equipping the faith community for primary, secondary and tertiary
prevention.
Reading and written evaluative response to the two books listed below. The written
response, one for each text, will be an 800-900 word evaluation of the book that highlights key
insights or other learnings, and two or three questions for possible discussion in connection with
the reading. (15%)
Bueckert, Leah Dawn & Daniel S. Schipani, eds. Spiritual Caregiving in the Hospital: Windows
to Chaplaincy Ministry, rev. ed. Kitchener: Pandora Press, 2011.
2
Howard Clinebell, Asesoramiento y cuidado pastoral. Grand Rapids: Libros Desafío, 1999;
focus especially on chapters 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 12, 16, 17.
Jorge E. Maldonado, Crisis, Pérdidas y Consolación en la Familia. Grand Rapids: Libros
Desafío, 2002.
Howard W. Stone, Crisis Counseling, 3rd edition. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2009.
In-class assignments (45%)
Informed participation in all class sessions is expected. Specific assignments include
the presentation of case study, and guided discussion of key topics in pastoral care in times of
crisis stemming from both ministry experience and readings.
Post-class assignment (20%)
Final paper (15-20 pages, double spaced), to be submitted by March 21, 2014. Suggested
topics: (a) a reexamination of the case originally presented, in light of the course work during the
week, with an enhanced understanding and approach to pastoral care in times of crisis; (b) a
presentation and analysis of a new case in the student’s ministry setting in light of the course
material and learning; and (c) a topic to be negotiated with the instructor. Full guidelines for
this post-class assignment will be given in class.
Selected Bibliography
Acosta, Judith & Judith Simon Prager, The Worst is Over: What to Say when Every Moment
Counts.
San Diego: Jodere Group, 2002.
Bueckert, Leah Dawn & Daniel S. Schipani, eds. Spiritual Caregiving in the Hospital: Windows to
Chaplaincy Ministry, rev. ed. Kitchener: Pandora Press, 2011.
Cisney, Jennifer S. & Kevin L. Ellers. The First 48 Hours: Spiritual Caregivers as First Responders.
Nashville: Abingdon, 2008.
Clinebell, Howard. Asesoramiento y cuidado pastoral. Grand Rapids: Libros Desafío, 1999
Everly, George S., Assisting Individuals in Crisis, 3rd. ed., Loyola College in Maryland and The John
Hopkins University, 2004.
Floyd, Scott. Crisis Counseling: A guide to Pastors and Professionals. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2008.
Maldonado, Jorge E. Crisis, Pérdidas y Consolación en la Familia. Grand Rapids: Libros Desafío, 2002.
Mottram, Kenneth P. Caring for Those in Crisis: Facing Ethical Dilemmas with Patients and
Families. Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2007.
Roberts, Albert R. Crisis Management & Brief Treatment. Chicago: Nelson-Hall, 1996.
Schipani, Daniel S., ed. Multifaith Views in Spiritual Care. Kitchener: Pandora Press, 2013.
Stone, Howard W. Crisis Counseling, 3rd edition. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2009.
Switzer, David K. Pastoral Care Emergencies. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2000.
Switzer, David K. The Minister as Crisis Counselor, Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1986.
Waintrub, Barbara Rubin & Ellin L. Bloch, Crisis Intervention and Trauma Response: Theory
and
Practice. New York: Springer, 1998.
Wright, H. Norman. The New Guide to Crisis & Trauma Counseling. Ventura: Regal, 2003.
Weaver, Andrew J., Laura T. Flannelly, and John D. Preston, Counseling Survivors of Traumatic
Events: A Handbook Pastors and Other Helping Professionals. Nashville: Abingdon, 2003.
3
Class Itinerary
Monday, January 20 -- 1:00 to 5:00 pm
Personal introductions and introduction to the course: expectations, agreements, and projections.
A paradigmatic biblical case: the walk to Emmaus as an illustration of pastoral accompaniment
during a crisis situation. (Case studies and written evaluative responses to texts due)
Tuesday, January 21 -- 8:30 to 12:00 am
Biblical-theological devotional and reflection time
Case study presented by a student: discussion, role-playing
The case study method as a tool for critical reflection and research of pastoral care in crisis
situations
Tuesday, January 21 – 1:00 to 5:00 pm
Case studies presented by students: discussion, role-playing
Issues of prevention, early intervention, and recovery in pastoral care in the face of crisis
Taking stock: evaluation of class work in light of course and students’ goals and objectives
Wednesday, January 22 – 8:30 to 12:00 am
Biblical-theological devotional and reflection time
Case studies presented by students: discussion, role-playing
Issues of prevention, early intervention, and recovery in pastoral care in the face of crisis
Individual student work: proposal for the post-class assignment.
Wednesday, January 22 – 2:30 to 5:30 pm
Sharing proposal for class project
Case studies presented by students: discussion, role-playing
Understanding the dynamics of crisis situations and care giving in times of crisis: foundations
and principles viewed from an interdisciplinary perspective
Thursday, January 23 – 8:30 to 12:00 am
Biblical-theological devotional and reflection time
Case study presented by a student: discussion, role playing
Review of “good practices” in pastoral care in crisis situations
Core competencies of being, knowing, and doing, and self-assessment exercise
Thursday, January 23 – 1:00 to 5:00 pm
“Being here for those in Crisis”: planning and leading a workshop for pastors, volunteers and
others Practical ideas concerning focus, objectives, content, methodology, and resources
Friday, January 24 – 8:30 to 12:00
Biblical-theological devotional and reflection time: Jesus and the Syrophoenician woman
Challenges and opportunities for pastoral care in interfaith crisis situations
Further guidelines for hospital visitation
Final review of the course agenda. Evaluation of the class. Closing and blessing.
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