Art Education 655 - The Ohio State University

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New Course Request Documentation
Art Education 655
History, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education
Submitted to
ASC Curriculum Office
by
Kevin Tavin
Associate Professor of Art Education
341 Hopkins Hall
128 North Oval mall
614-292-0273
[email protected]
December, 28, 2006
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
OSU College of the Arts and Sciences New Course Request (original faxed to ASC)…………...3
Rational for Art Education 655…………………………………………………….….…………. 5
Art Education 655 Course Syllabus…………………………………………………………….....6
Quick-Glance Art Education 655 Course Schedule.......................................................................15
Art Education 655 Course Bibliography........................................................................................16
Recommended Reading List ..........................................................................................................19
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The Ohio State University
Colleges of the Arts and Sciences New Course Request
Art Education
Academic Unit
Art Education
Book 3 Listing (e.g., Portuguese)
655
History, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education
Number
Title
VISCULT INARTED
18-Character Title Abbreviation
Level
Credit Hours
Summer
Autumn X
Winter
Spring
Year 2007
Proposed effective date, choose one quarter and put an “X” after it; and fill in the year. See the OAA curriculum
manual for deadlines.
A. Course Offerings Bulletin Information
Follow the instructions in the OAA curriculum manual. If this is a course with decimal subdivisions, then use one New
Course Request form for the generic information that will apply to all subdivisions; and use separate forms for each
new decimal subdivision, including on each form the information that is unique to that subdivision. If the course
offered is less than a quarter or a term, please complete the Flexibly Scheduled/Off Campus/Workshop Request
form.
Description (not to exceed 25 words):
An examination of the antecedents, history, politics, and practices of visual culture, with a specific focus on
the literature in art education
Quarter offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Distribution of class time/contact hours: 1X5
Quarter and contact/class time hours information should be omitted from Book 3 publication (yes or no): No
Prerequisite(s): N/A
Exclusion or limiting clause:
Repeatable to a maximum of _____ credit hours.
Cross-listed with:
Grade Option (Please check):
Letter X
Honors Statement: Yes
No
Off-Campus:
Yes
No
Embedded Honors Statement: Yes
S/U
Progress
GEC: Yes
EM:
Yes
What course is last in the series? ______
No
No
Admission Condition
Course: Yes
No
No
Other General Course Information:
(e.g. “Taught in English.” “Credit does not count toward BSBA degree.”)
B. General Information
Subject Code________________________ Subsidy Level (V, G, T, B, M, D, or P) M, D_______________________
If you have questions, please email Jed Dickhaut at [email protected]
1. Provide the rationale for proposing this course:
There is a need for a course on antecedents, history, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education.
There is a desire for this course by Art Education faculty and a demand by Art Education students.
This course will be offered once as an experimental 795a course in art education.
2. Please list Majors/Minors affected by the creation of this new course. Attach revisions of all affected programs.
This course is (check one):
Required on major(s)/minor(s)
A choice on major(s)/minors(s)
An elective within major(s)/minor(s)
A general elective:
Art Education
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3.
Indicate the nature of the program adjustments, new funding, and/or withdrawals that make possible the
implementation of this new course.
N/A
4. Is the approval of this request contingent upon the approval of other course requests or curricular requests?
Yes
No
List:
5.
If this course is part of a sequence, list the number of the other course(s) in the sequence:
N/A
6.
Expected section size: 15
7.
Do you want prerequisites enforced electronically (see OAA manual for what can be enforced)? Yes
8.
This course has been discussed with and has the concurrence of the following academic units needing this
course or with academic units having directly related interests (List units and attach letters and/or forms):
Not Applicable
9.
Attach a course syllabus that includes a topical outline of the course, student learning outcomes and/or
course objectives, off-campus field experience, methods of evaluation, and other items as stated in the
OAA curriculum manual and e-mail to [email protected]
Proposed number of sections per year: 1
No
Approval Process The signatures on the lines in ALL CAPS ( e.g. ACADEMIC UNIT) are required.
1.
Academic Unit Undergraduate Studies Committee Chair
Printed Name
Date
(Original document with signature Faxed to ASC Curriculum Office)
2.
Academic Unit Graduate Studies Committee Chair
Printed Name
Date
(Original document with signature Faxed to ASC Curriculum Office)
3.
ACADEMIC UNIT CHAIR/DIRECTOR
4.
After the Academic Unit Chair/Director signs the request, forward the form to the ASC Curriculum Office, 105 Brown
Hall, 190 West 17th Ave. or fax it to 688-5678. Attach the syllabus and any supporting documentation in an e-mail to
[email protected] The ASC Curriculum Office will forward the request to the appropriate committee.
5.
COLLEGE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
Printed Name
Date
6.
ARTS AND SCIENCES EXECUTIVE DEAN
Printed Name
Date
7.
Graduate School (if appropriate)
Printed Name
Date
8.
University Honors Center (if appropriate)
Printed Name
Date
9.
Office of International Education (if appropriate)
Printed Name
Date
Printed Name
Date
10. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Colleges of the Arts and Sciences Curriculum Office. 10/02/06
Printed Name
Date
5
Rational for Art Education 655
History, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education
As a result of recent ontological, theoretical, and philosophical shifts, and new transdisciplinary
fields of study, the concept and practice of art education in the U.S., specifically art teacher
training, has expanded to the realm of visual culture. This development is considered by many to
be nothing less than a paradigm shift; a re-conceptualization of the field. The reconceptualization includes epistemological mutations, the broadening of content and curriculum,
and new forms of praxis. These changes have been met with support and resistance, and have
manifested in numerous and disparate projects under the rubric of visual culture. There is a need
for a new graduate level course that helps students navigate these changes in art education, not
abstracted from their political context and historical presence.
Offered through the Department of Art Education, History, politics, and practices of visual
culture in art education explores the discourse of visual culture in art education, with a specific
focus on the antecedents, recent history, politics, criticisms, and practices in art education. This
course will provide an in-depth investigation of literature in the field which may help graduate
students in general and art education students in particular understand and utilize theories of
visual culture in art education for their own scholarly and pedagogical practices.
Through this course, students will be able to




strengthen their capacity to critically interpret the call for, and resistance to, the
reconceptualization of art education in the U.S. under the rubric of visual culture
understand key concepts, theories, and criticisms of visual culture in the field of art
education
historicize, contextualize, and politicize arguments for or against visual culture in art
education
recognize different definitions, philosophies, and pedagogical formations of visual
culture in art education
The learning objectives for History, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education
described above are becoming increasingly important in the field of art education as all of the
major journals in art education have had theme issues on visual culture, including Studies in Art
Education, Art Education, Visual Arts Research, Journal of Cross-Cultural Research in Art
Education, Arts Education Policy Review, and the Journal of Social Theory in Art Education. In
addition, there have been numerous local and national conferences on visual culture in art
education and the number of presentations on this topic at the National Art Education
Association’s Annual Conference has grown exponentially. Clearly, visual culture is an urgent
topic in the field of art education that is currently attracting a great deal of attention.
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COURSE SYLLABUS
Art Education 655
History, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education
5 Credits
Dr. Kevin Tavin, [email protected], 614.292.0273
Department of Art Education
The Ohio State University
Office: 341 Hopkins Hall
Prerequisites: N/A
Course Description:
In this course we will critically examine the discourse of visual culture in art education, with a
specific focus on the professional literature in the field. We will explore writings that address the
antecedents, recent history, politics, and practices of visual culture in art education. We will also
focus on some of the criticisms against visual culture in art education. By navigating the
discourse in the field you may be better able to understand and utilize theories of visual culture
in art education for your own scholarly and pedagogical practices.
Some key questions we will consider include:







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How are art educators defining visual culture?
How are art educators employing visual culture?
What are some of the ways of mapping the antecedents of visual culture in art education?
What are some of the early writings on visual culture in art education?
What are some examples of visual culture classroom practices, K-12 and post-secondary?
How are art educators making connections between visual culture and other areas,
theories, concepts, and positions, such as critical pedagogy, social reconstruction, popular
culture, the art world, transdisciplinarity, aesthetics, discipline-based-art education, and
war?
What are some of the ongoing ideological debates that influence how visual culture is
understood in the field of art education?
What are some of the possibilities for the future of visual culture in art education?
Course Goals:
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
Students will be introduced to a broad range of issues, theories, and practices of visual
culture in the field of art education
Students will investigate the antecedents, history, politics, current practices, and
criticisms of visual culture in art education
Students will strengthen their capacity to critically interpret the call for, and resistance to,
the reconceptualization of art education in the U.S. under the rubric of visual culture
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Learning Objectives:



Students should be able to understand key concepts, theories, and criticisms of visual
culture in the field of art education
Students should be able to historicize, contextualize, and politicize arguments for or
against visual culture in art education
Students should be able to recognize different definitions, philosophies, and pedagogical
formations of visual culture in art education
Required Texts:
A course packet with all required readings is available from UniPrint, 2055 Millikin Way (Tuttle
Park Place). Some required readings are available as PDF or Word documents on the course
website (carmen). You are responsible for accessing, reading, and printing the readings. All
digital and hard-copy readings must be brought to class. On occasion, I will distribute other
documents or instructional handouts in class or via email.
Structure of the course
The emphasis in this course is on engaging the discourse of visual culture in art education
through careful reading of the literature, discussion of various texts and ideas, and informed,
thoughtful, and critical response. Therefore, reading the texts, discussion, and general
participation are vital to a meaningful learning experience in this course.
Discussion requires more than just talk. You should pay attention and listen to others, ask
questions of your peers and the instructor, engage your peers in student-to-student cross talk,
take responsibility for picking up the dialogue when we hit silences or points of disagreement,
and help keep the conversation on track. This will help keep the discourse in the class moving in
a democratic direction, where a variety of ideas, theories, and interpretations coexist and help
inform one another.
Your participation includes being prepared and offering thoughtful comments throughout the
course. Participation also means that you give your full attention during the class discussion,
individual and group presentations and guest lectures, and asking questions and provide feedback
afterward.
Discussion, participation, active engagement in the course materials, and characteristics of
comments will be assessed each class session. Failing to pay attention, not contributing to
discussions, or exhibiting distracted or distracting behavior (including, but not limited to, using
electronic devices for non-course related activities, reading or engaging in discussion about noncourse related material, or acting inappropriate with, or having disregard for, students, guests, or
the instructor) during class will negatively impact your grade. If there is any reason that you
cannot fully participate in class please let me know as soon as possible so we can discuss your
options.
In this course I am committed to engaging you as critical citizens who value social and cultural
difference, free speech, democracy, and self-reflection. As critical citizens, you are expected to
demonstrate integrity, be responsive to the welfare of others, foster a positive classroom climate
based on trust and mutual responsibility, and exhibit sensitivity to and respect for multiple sociocultural realities, diversity and difference including, but not limited to, sexual identity, ability,
class, race, gender, ethnicity, and age. This includes using suitable language, mannerisms and
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interpersonal skills. Together, we will learn from each other as we build and strengthen our
critical skills for understanding the discourse of visual culture in art education.
Assignments
 Readings
You are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the material assigned for that day.
Therefore, all reading assignments must be completed before class. In preparation for the class,
you should pay close attention to the required readings. You should attempt to interweave your
own ideas into the assigned texts by taking a position on the readings that helps open dialogue
and debate in the class with your peers; to link theoretical issues with everyday life. You are
required to bring your readings to class as we will refer to them often and in specific ways.
Marking your text with questions, comments, observations, and ideas that you want to discuss in
class is strongly encouraged.
 Dialogic Seminar
Once during the quarter, a group of students (to be determined by the instructor) will engage the
class in a dialogic seminar in response to the readings for that class session. The group can
integrate and synthesize their response(s) to the readings (they do not need to respond to each
reading as if it were discrete from the other readings assigned for that class). In their seminar, the
group should present a critical response and engage the class in discussion/debate/exchange. In
preparing for the seminar, the group should pay close attention to the readings and analyze and
respond to them through critical commentary, personal narrative, and intertextuality. In other
words, they should attempt to insert themselves into the assigned texts by taking a position on
the readings that opens dialogue and debate and links theoretical issues with wider practical and
pedagogical concerns. The seminar must include a handout for each member of the class.
 Visual Culture Extra
Once during the quarter, a group of students (to be determined by the instructor) will present a
visual culture extra. This will be an opportunity for each group to draw on their personal
experiences and make connections to other ideas, images, objects, articles, etc., outside of the
text. In other words, each group will bring in something to “show and tell” the class that related
to the readings. Examples can include artwork, films, videos, other readings, posters, fieldtrips,
etc. Each group should strive to be creative as they explore these connections. Each group must
articulate the connections between their visual culture extra and the readings.
 Midterm Proposal
For the midterm, students will develop a proposal for the topic of their final paper. The topic for
the final paper should explore some area of visual culture that you find both relevant to your own
scholarship and personally interesting. Each student will hand in a proposal and schedule a
meeting with the instructor to discuss the details of their final paper. Proposals should be a
minimum of 2 pages, double spaced, typed, and include a separate list of
references/bibliography. The proposal should include a brief outline of the topic to be explored
and a description of how the paper will unfold.
 Final Paper
You will write a final paper for the course. In this paper, you should explore some area of visual
culture that you find both relevant and interesting. The paper should be between 10 and 15 pages.
Other requirements for the final paper will be made available during the quarter. Students
interested in discussing the feedback on their paper should make an appointment with the
instructor.
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Course policies
 Attendance
Timely attendance is vital to the success of the class and required. Each session will begin
promptly at the scheduled time and attendance will be taken. Any and all absences require
an email to me explaining the reason for the absence. In order for an absence to be excused,
students must provide appropriate documentation (medical note from doctor, family
tragedy, etc.) or have my approval.
A student’s final grade will be reduced by one half a letter grade for each unexcused
absence following the first absence (excused or unexcused). This means that a student can
fail the course due to poor attendance. IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT STUDENTS
DISCUSS WITH THE INSTRUCTOR EXTENDED PERIODS OF ABSENCE DUE
TO MEDICAL OR OTHER CONDITIONS.
If you enter the class up to 30 minutes late, that will be considered a late arrival. If you
arrive beyond 30 minutes late, it will be considered a full unexcused absence. Three late
arrivals equal one unexcused absence. If you leave the class early without prior
consultation and consent from the instructor it will constitute a late arrival.
 Late assignment:
Specific due dates are provided for each assignment. Late assignments will not be accepted.
 Incompletes
Incompletes are for emergencies only.
 Academic Integrity and Misconduct
The values that underpin the concept of academic integrity go beyond simply not cheating or
plagiarizing. Embracing these values mean that you are responsible for your own learning; you
have an obligation to be honest with yourself and others; and you have the responsibility to treat
other students and your professors with respect and fairness.
The Ohio State University and the Committee on Academic Misconduct (COAM) expect that all
students have read and understand the University’s Code of Student Conduct, and that all students
will complete all academic and scholarly assignments with fairness and honesty. Students must
recognize that failure to follow the rules and guidelines established in the University’s Code of
Student Conduct and this syllabus may constitute “Academic Misconduct.”
The Ohio State University’s Code of Student Conduct (Section 3335-23-04) defines academic
misconduct as: “Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the University, or
subvert the educational process.” Examples of academic misconduct include (but are not limited to)
plagiarism, collusion (unauthorized collaboration), copying the work of another student, and
possession of unauthorized materials during an examination.
Per University Rule 3335-31-02, "Each instructor shall report to the committee on academic
misconduct all instances of what he or she believes may be academic misconduct." Cheating on
examinations, submitting work of other students as your own, or plagiarism in any form will
result in penalties ranging from an "F" on an assignment to expulsion from the University,
depending on the seriousness of the offense. For additional information, see the Code of Student
Conduct (http://studentaffairs.osu.edu/info_for_students/csc.asp). If you have any questions about
the above policy or what constitutes academic misconduct in this course, please contact the
instructor.
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 Students with special needs/ Disability Services
Students with disabilities that have been certified by the Office for
Disability Services will be appropriately accommodated, and should
inform the instructor as soon as possible of their needs. The Office for
Disability Services is located in 150 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue;
telephone 292-3307, TDD 292-0901; http://www.ods.ohio-state.edu/.
Grading, assessment, and evaluation
Your grade in the course is based on the number of points achieved out of 400 possible points.
The final letter grade is determined by dividing the final accumulated point total by 100 and then
by using the Grade Scale. For example, if a student’s final accumulated points are 325, the final
grade will be a 3.25 or B+. Please note, final grades will be reduced based on your attendance
record as indicated in the attendance section, under course policies, in this syllabus. Please make
sure you have read and understand these policies, as they will affect your final grade.
Art Education 655 Point Scale
PREPARATION AND PARTICIPATION (10 points per class x 10 classes)
DIALOGIC SEMINAR
ART EXTRA
MIDTERM PROPOSAL
FINAL PAPER
100
100
50
50
100
TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS
400
Grade scale
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
3.85-4.00
3.50-3.84
3.15-3.49
2.85-3.14
2.50-2.84
2.15-2.49
1.85-2.14
1.50-1.84
1.15-1.49
1.00-1.14
Please note: The point scale above is exclusive of any and all grade
reduction percentages based on attendance. Final grades will be reduced
based on your attendance record as indicated in the attendance section,
under course policies, in this syllabus. Please make sure you have read
and understand these policies, as they will affect your final grade.
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THE HISTORY, POLITICS, AND PRACTICES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART
EDUCATION CALENDAR
▓ WEEK 1: WHAT IS VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION?
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Introductions; discuss syllabus, course requirements and
expectations; instructor’s PowerPoint; An introduction to visual culture; Group discussion on
assigned readings.
Assignments Due Today:
Boughton, D., Freedman, K., Hausman, J., Hicks, L., Madeja, S., Metcalf, S., Rayala, M.,
Smith-Shank, D., Stankiewicz, M., Stuhr, P., Tavin, K., & Vallance, E. (2002). Art
education and visual culture. NAEA Advisory. Reston: NAEA.
Duncum, P. (2001). Visual culture: Developments, definitions, and directions for art
education. Studies in Art Education, 42(2), 101-112.
Tavin, K. (2003). Wrestling with angels, searching for ghosts: Toward a critical
pedagogy of visual culture. Studies in Art Education, 44(3), 197-213.
(These readings are available via carmen prior to the beginning of the quarter)
▓ WEEK 2: FRAMING THE HISTORY OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART
EDUCATION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group discussion on assigned readings. Instructor led dialogic
seminar.
Assignments Due Today:
Anderson, T. (2003). Roots, reasons, and structure: Framing visual culture art education.
International Journal of Arts Education, 1(3), 5-25.
Chalmers, F.G. (2005). Visual culture education in the 1960s. Art Education, 58(6), 6-11.
Duncum, P. (2003). The theories and practices of visual culture in art education. Arts
Education PolicyReview, 105(2), 19-25.
Stankiewicz, M. A. (2004). A dangerous business: Visual culture theory and education
policy. Arts Education Policy Review, 105(6), 5-13.
Tavin, K. (2005). Opening re-marks: Critical antecedents of visual culture in art
education. Studies in Art Education, 47(1), 5-22.
▓ WEEK 3: WRITING THE ANTECENDENTS OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART
EDUCATION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group discussion on assigned readings. Instructor led dialogic
seminar.
Assignments Due Today:
Bersson, R. (1980). Toward a socially progressive conception of art education. The Caucus on
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Social Theory and Art Education, Atlanta Papers, 1-2.
Duncum, P. (1987). What, even Dallas? Popular culture within the art curriculum. Studies
in Art Education, 29(1), 7-16.
Hobbs, J. (1984). Popular art versus fine art. Art Education, 37(3), 11-15.
Hobbs, J. (1985). Response to Smith’s “A right to the best.” Studies in Art Education,
26(3), 176-180.
Hicks, L. (1989). Cultural literacy as social empowerment. The Journal of Social Theory
in Art Education 9, 45-58.
Kauppinen,H. (1987). The contemporary image in art education. Art Education, 40(2),
39-45.
Nadaner, D. (1985). Responding to the image world: A proposal for art curricula. Art
Education. 38(1), 9-12.
Chapman, L. H. (1967). Subject matter for the study of art. Art Education, 20(2), 20-22.
Lanier, V. (1957). An excess of art. School Arts, 57(9), 27-28.
Lanier, V. (1969). The teaching of art as social revolution. Phi Delta Kappan, 50(6), 314- 319.
McFee, J. K. (1968). Why do we teach art in the public schools? Studies in Art
Education, 9(2), 1-4.
Wilson, B. & Wilson, M. (1977). An iconoclastic view of imagery sources in the drawing
of young people. Art Education, 30(1), 4-12.
▓ WEEK 4: WRITING VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION AT THE
CLOSE OF THE CENTURY
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group 1 dialogic seminar and Group 1 art extra.
Assignments Due Today:
Duncum, P. (1997). Art education for new times. Studies in Art Education, 38(2), 69-79.
Freedman, K. (2000). Social perspectives on art education in the U.S.: Teaching visual
culture in a democracy. Studies in Art Education, 41(4), 314-329.
Wilson, B. (1997). Is art education obsolete? Unpublished paper presented at the
International Symposium in Art Education. Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
Wilson, B. (2000). The parable of the para-site that ate art education. Journal of Multicultural
and Cross-Cultural Research in Art Education, 18, 24-30.
▓ WEEK 5: K-12 PRACTICES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group 2 dialogic seminar and Group 2 art extra.
Assignments Due Today:
Barrett, T. (2003). Interpreting visual culture. Art Education, 56(2), 6-12.
Keifer-Boyd, K., Amburgy, P., & Knight, W. (2003). Three approaches to teaching visual
culture in k-12 contexts. Art Education, 56(2), 44-51.
Tavin, K., & Anderson, D. (2003). Teaching (popular) visual culture: Deconstructing
Disney in the elementary art classroom. Art Education, 56(3), 21-23/ 33-35.
Staikidis, K. & Higgins, W. (2006). Visual culture in Mr. Higgin’s fifth grade art classroom. In
P. Duncum (Ed.), Visual culture in the art class: Case studies (pp. 12-23). Reston, VA:
NAEA.
13
Polaniecki, S. (2006). Teaching through TV: Transformative encounters with constructed
reality. In P. Duncum (Ed.), Visual culture in the art class: Case studies (pp. 39-46).
Reston, VA: NAEA.
Tavin, K. & Toczydlowska, B. (2006). Constructing a (virtual) president: An uneasy classroom
case study. In P. Duncum (Ed.), Visual culture in the art class: Case studies (pp. 56-64).
Reston, VA: NAEA.
▓ WEEK 6: PRACTICES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN TEACHER EDUCATION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group discussion on assigned readings. Prepare for visit with Oliva
Gude. Guest lecture: Oliva Gude.
Assignments Due Today:
Pauly, N. (2003). Interpreting visual culture as cultural narratives in teacher education.
Studies in Art Education, 44(3), 264-284.
Gude, O. (2000). Investigating the culture of curriculum. In D. Fehr, K. Fehr, & KeiferBoyd, K. (Eds.), Real-world readings in art education: Things your professor never told
you (pp. 75-82). New York: Falmer Press.
Gude, O. (2004). Postmodern principles: In search of a 21st century art education. Art
Education, 57(1), 6-14.
Gude, O. (2006) Principles of possibility: Considerations for a 21st-century art and culture
curriculum. Art Education, 60(1), 6-17.
▓ WEEK 7: VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND ART(IST)
PRODUCTION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group discussion on assigned readings. Prepare for visit with Dr.
Sydney walker. Guest lecture: Sydney Walker
Assignments Due Today:
Walker, S. (2004). Artmaking in an age of visual culture: Vision and visuality. Visual
Arts Research, 59, 23-37.
Walker, S. (2006). How shall we teach? Rethinking artmaking instruction. Teaching
Artists Journal, 4(3), 190-197.
Duncum, P. (2003). Visual culture and studio practice? The International Journal of
Arts Education, 1(3), 45-57.
Freedman, K. (2003).The importance of student artistic production to teaching visual
culture. Art Education, 56(2), 38-43.
Tavin, K., Kushins, J., & Elniski, J. (in press). Shaking the foundations of art(ist)
education. Art Education.
▓ WEEK 8: CRITIQUES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group 3 dialogic seminar and Group 3 art extra.
14
Assignments Due Today:
Tavin, K. (2005). Hauntological shifts: Fear and loathing of popular (visual) culture.
Studies in Art Education, 46(2), 101-117.
Bauerlein, M. (2004). The burden of visual culture studies. Arts Education Policy
Review, 106(1), 5-12.
Dorn, C. (2005). The end of art education. Art Education, 58(6), 47-51.
Eisner, E. (2001). Should we create new aims for art education? Art Education, 54(5), 610.
Kamhi, M. M. (2004). Rescuing art from visual culture studies. Arts Education Policy Review,
106(1), 25-31.
Smith, P. (2003). Visual culture studies versus art education. Arts Education Policy
Review, 104(4), 3-8.
▓ WEEK 9: VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND THE WAR OF
TERROR
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group 4 dialogic seminar and Group 4 art extra.
Assignments Due Today:
Tavin, K. & Robbins, C. (2006). If you see something, say something: Visual culture,
public pedagogy, and the war of terror. In J. Milam, K. Sloan, S. Springgay, & B.S.
Carpenter (Eds.), Curriculum for a progressive, provocative, poetic, + public pedagogy
(pp. 97-112). Troy, NY: Educator’s International Press.
Pauly, N. (2005). Abu Ghraib: (Un)becoming photographs: How can art educators
address current images from visual culture perspectives. The Journal of Social Theory in
Art Education, 25, 158-187.
Sweeny, R. (2006). Visual culture of control. Studies in Art Education, 47(4), 294-307.
Duncum, P. (2002). Visual culture and the conduct of war. Journal of Cross-Cultural
Research in Art Education, 19/20, 30-35.
▓ WEEK 10: VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND AESTHETICS
Class activities
Discussions and activities: Group discussion on assigned readings. Prepare for visit with Dr.
Arthur Efland. Guest lecture: Arthur Efland
Assignments Due Today:
Efland, A. (2004). The entwined nature of the aesthetic: A discourse on visual culture.
Studies in Art Education, 45(3), 234-251.
Smith, R. (2005). Efland on the aesthetic and visual culture: A response. Studies in Art
Education, 46(3), 284-288.
Tavin, K. (2006). Eyes wide shut: The use and uselessness of the discourse of
aesthetics in art education. Art Education, 60(2), 40-45.
Duncum, P. (in press). Nine reasons for the continuing use of an aesthetic discourse in art
education. Art Education.
This syllabus is subject to change.
15
Art Education 655: Quick Glance Course Topics and Dialogic Seminar, Art Extra
Schedule
Week 1
Topic
WHAT IS VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION?
Dialogic Seminar Instructor led
Art Extra
Instructor led
Week 2
Topic
FRAMING THE HISTORY OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART
EDUCATION
Dialogic Seminar Instructor led
Art Extra
Instructor led
Week 3
Topic
WRITING THE ANTECENDENTS OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART
EDUCATION
Dialogic Seminar Instructor led
Art Extra
Instructor led
Week 4
Topic
WRITING VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION AT THE
CLOSE OF THE CENTURY
Dialogic Seminar Group 1
Art Extra
Group 1
Week 5
Topic
K-12 PRACTICES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION
Dialogic Seminar Group 2
Art Extra
Group 2
Week 6
Topic
PRACTICES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN TEACHER EDUCATION
Dialogic Seminar Guest Lecture: Oliva Gude; Instructor led
Art Extra
Week 7
Topic
VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND ART(IST)
PRODUCTION
Dialogic Seminar Guest Lecture: Dr. Sydney Walker; Instructor led
Art Extra
Week 8
Topic
CRITIQUES OF VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION
Dialogic Seminar Group 3
Art Extra
Group 3
Week 9
Topic
VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND THE WAR OF
TERROR
Dialogic Seminar Group 4
Art Extra
Group 4
Week 10
Topic
VISUAL CULTURE, ART EDUCATION, AND AESTHETICS
Dialogic Seminar Guest Lecture: Dr. Arthur Efland; Instructor led
Art Extra
16
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Duncum, P. (2002). Visual culture and the conduct of war. Journal of Cross-Cultural
Research in Art Education, 19/20, 30-35.
Duncum, P. (2003). The theories and practices of visual culture in art education. Arts
Education PolicyReview, 105(2), 19-25.
Duncum, P. (2003). Visual culture and studio practice? The International Journal of Arts
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EA\RECOMMENDED READINGS
VISUAL CULTURE IN ART EDUCATION
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