Syllabus Template-Required Content

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Hist 322—Spring 2014
Texas A&M University Central Texas
History 322-110 History of Texas
INSTRUCTOR AND CONTACT INFORMATION
Instructor: John T. Broom, Ph.D.
Office: N/A
Phone: 417-451-0359
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours:
Available by phone 8am-8pm M-F Weekends by appointment Mode of instruction and course access:
Student-instructor interaction: I generally check Blackboard e-mail twice during the day in the morning
and again in the afternoon. You can expect a response to e-mail within 24 hours during the week and 48
hours on weekends. I do check the classroom on Saturdays but I generally do try to avoid working on Sunday
if at all possible. I am available by phone (417.451.0359) between 8am and 8pm Central Time MondayFriday. You can also schedule a time over the weekend to speak on the phone if necessary.
I prefer course related e-mails in the Blackboard system rather than the @ct.tamus.edu system.
Mode of Instruction and course access:
This course is a 100% online course and uses TAMUCT Blackboard Learn system
(http://tamuct.blackboard.com). You will use the Blackboard username and password communicated to you
separately to logon to this system. (As of Spring 2012, Texas A&M Central Texas uses its own Blackboard
system and the usernames and passwords that you used to logon to Tarleton State University’s Blackboard
are no longer valid.)
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By enrolling in UNILERT, university officials can quickly pass on safety-related information,
regardless of your location. Please enroll today at http://TAMUCT.org/UNILERT
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
COURSE INFORMATION
1.0
Course Overview and description: A survey of Texas from the Spanish colonial period to the present,
with special attention to the Hispanic heritage, the Revolution and Republic, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the
political and economic developments of the modern state.
2.0
Course Objectives:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Describe the demographic changes in Texas between 1000 and 1980.
Discuss the cultural changes in Texas between 1500 and 1980.
Explain the political changes in Texas History from 1750 through 1980.
Discuss the economic changes in Texas between 1750 and 1980.
3.0
Required Reading and Textbook(s):
Campbell, Randolph B. Gone to Texas: A History of the Lone Star State. New York: Oxford
University Press, 2003. ISBN: 978-0-19-513843-6
Haynes, Sam and Cary D. Wintz. Major Problems in Texas History. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin,
2002. ISBN: ISBN: 978-0395-858332.
Tucker, Philip. EXODUS FROM THE ALAMO: The Anatomy of the Last Stand Myth. Havertown PA,
Casemate, 2011. ISBN: 978-1612000763.
Silbey, Joel, H. Storm over Texas: The Annexation Controversy and the Road to Civil War (Pivotal
Moments in American History. New York: Oxford. 2007. ISBN: 978-0195315929.
Gould, Lewis J. Progressives and Prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson Era. Austin
TX: Texas Historical Association. 1992. ISBN: 978-0876111215.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
4.0
Course Requirements: (include point values for each- not just a percentage)
Exams: there will be two exams, equally weighted, a midterm and a final. Each will be 100 pts. They
will be a combination of short answer identifications (two sentences, a definition of the term and
statement as to why it is significant in the History of the Texas) and essay questions requiring a three
to five paragraph response addressing significant themes in each half of the course. The exams will
focus on the specified objectives listed in the classroom.
Film Review: Each student will complete a film review of a feature length film dealing with some
aspect of Texas History (title of the movie will be submitted for approval on Sunday at the end of
Week 3 of the course). The review will be due on Sunday at the end of Week 7 of the course. The
film review will be worth 50 points. The review will be written in Chicago Manual of Style format, 12
point Times New Roman font, with one inch margins. The review should be 750-1000 words. Late
papers will only be accepted with prior approval of the professor.
Film Review Rubric
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
Grading Area
Appropriate Film
Historical Accuracy of the film's story
Historical Accuracy of the film's feel
Entertainment Value
Grammar, Spelling and Usage
Chicago Manual of Style
Timeliness
Total
Total Points Possible
5
10
10
10
5
5
5
50
Total Points
Awarded
Book Review: Each student will complete a book review of a scholarly work on Texas History that is
not an assigned work for the course. The book review cannot be over a children, young readers,
adolescent, fictional, or picture book. Submit your title for approval on Sunday at the end of Week 9.
The book review will be due on Sunday at the end of week 14. The book review will be worth 50
points. The review will be written in Chicago Manual of Style format, 12 point Times New Roman
font, with one inch margins. The review should be 750-1000 words. . Late papers will only be
accepted with prior approval of the professor.
Book Review Rubric
Grading Area
Appropriate Book
Identify the Author’s Thesis and
Perspective (historiographical
school)
Specific Strengths and Weaknesses
of the Author’s argument and
evidence
Grammar, Spelling and Usage
Chicago Manual of Style
Timeliness
Total
Total Points Possible
5
Total Points
Awarded
15
15
5
5
5
50
Weekly Discussion: there will be 14 weeks discussion, weeks 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and weeks 9,10,11,12, 13,
14, 15. You are required to respond with a minimum of a substantive 150 word response to two of
the discussion questions for the week (primary posts) and post four substantive peer responses that
move the conversation forward each week(secondary posts). Your first primary post should be
posted by 11:55 pm CST on Thursday of each week and your second primary post should be posted
by 11:55pm CST on Friday of each week. Your four peer responses can begin to be posted as early as
students begin posting their primary posts and as a minimum four secondary posts must be posted
by 4:55pm CST on Sunday of each week. Each week’s postings are worth 14 pts, 5 pts for each
primary posting and 4 pts for the peer responses. Content and substance are the core of points but
timeliness, spelling and proper English are also important.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
Discussion Rubric:
Length of 2 main posts: minimum of 150 words on the initial discussion
response: 1 point each main post, (2 points possible each week)
Conventions (grammar/punctuation/spelling/and citation if needed): 1 point
overall on each topic, (2 points possible each week).
Content (relevant to the discussion question): 3 points overall in each topic, (6
points possible each week).
Peer Responses: in each topic, post two separate Peer Responses consisting of
thoughtful and detailed comments: 1 points each for a total possible of 4 points
possible each week
Total Possible on each week's discussion: 14 points overall, (7 points in each
topic)
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
5.0
Grading Criteria Rubric and Conversion
Midterm Exam – 100 pts
Final Exam – 100 pts
Film Review – 50 Pts
Book Review – 50 Pts
Discussion – 140 pts.
Total 440 pts.
A= 90% and above 396 and above
B=80% - 89.99% 352-395
C=70%-79.99% 308 - 351
D=60%-69.99% 264-307
F=59.99% and below 263
6.0
Posting of Grades:
All student grades should be posted on the Blackboard Grade book and students should monitor their
grading status through this tool.
Grades for Exams will be posted 72 hours after the window for the exam has closed. Review grades
will be posted 96 hours after the due date. Discussion grades will be posted within 72 hours of the
end of the week.
TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS AND SUPPORT
7.1
Technology Requirements
This course will use the new TAMU-CT Blackboard Learn learning management system for class
communications, content distribution, and assessments.
Logon to http://tamuct.blackboard.com to access the course.
Username: Your Tarleton email address (the complete email address, e.g. [email protected])
Initial password: Your DuckTrax ID (UID)
For this course, you will need reliable and frequent access to a computer and to the Internet. You will
also need a headset with a microphone or speakers and a microphone to be able to listen to online
resources and conduct other activities in the course. If you do not have frequent and reliable access to a
computer with Internet connection, please consider dropping this course or contact me (youremail and
phone number) to discuss your situation.
Blackboard supports the most common operating systems:
PC: Windows 7, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 2000,
Mac: Mac OS 10.6 “Snow Leopard®”, Mac OS 10.5 “Leopard®”, Mac OS 10.4 “Tiger®”
Check browser and computer compatibility by following the “Browser Check” link on the TAMUCTBlackboard logon page. (http://tamuct.blackboard.com) This is a CRITICAL step as these settings
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
are important for when you take an exam or submit an assignment.
Upon logging on to Blackboard Learn, you will see a link to Blackboard Student Orientation under My
Courses tab. Click on that link and study the materials in this orientation course. The new Blackboard is a
brand-new interface and you will have to come up to speed with it really quickly. This orientation course
will help you get there. There is also a link to Blackboard Help from inside the course on the left-hand
menubar. The first week of the course includes activities and assignments that will help you get up to
speed with navigation, sending and receiving messages and discussion posts, and submitting an
assignment. Your ability to function within the Blackboard system will facilitate your success in this
course.
Technology issues are not an excuse for missing a course requirement – make sure your computer is
configured correctly and address issues well in advance of deadlines.
7.2 Technology Support
For technological or computer issues, students should contact the TAMU-CT Blackboard
Support Services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:
Support Portal: http://www.ct.tamus.edu/bbsupport
Online chat (through the support portal at: http://www.ct.tamus.edu/bbsupport)
Phone: (855)-661-7965
For issues related to course content and requirements, contact your instructor.
Course outline and calendar continue on the next page
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
COURSE OUTLINE AND CALENDAR
Date Unit Topics
1
1/13-1/19
1
Objectives
Activities and Assignments
Course Welcome,
Introduction,
and
Expectations
Weekly Objective
Describe the Native
American cultures
present in Texas upon
the arrival of the
Europeans.
Purchase and receive
Texts
Complete Blackboard
Tutorial & Browser
Tune-Up
Pre-Columbian
Texas
Read Syllabus in-depth
Read Randolph B.
Campbell, Gone to
Texas (hereafter
Campbell)
Introduction and
Chapter 1
Read Sam W. Haynes
and Cary D. Wintz
Major Problems in
Texas History
(Hereafter Haynes)
Introduction and
Chapter 1.
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 1:
· Read and Respond
to Welcome
Email from the
instructor
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
2
1
The Spanish Explore
Texas
1//20-1/26
Weekly Objectives.
A. Discuss the
exploration,
colonization, and
settlement of New
Spain and the region
now known as Texas
(between 1600-1800).
B. Compare and
contrast the Spanish
colonial/mission
system with the
English
colonial/mercantile
system.
3
1/27-2/2
1
Texas under the
Spaniards
Weekly Objectives
a. Discuss the
exploration,
colonization, and
settlement of New
Spain and the region
now known as Texas
(between 1600-1800).
b. Compare and
contrast the Spanish
colonial/mission
system with the
English
colonial/mercantile
system.
Read Campbell Chapter
2 and Haynes
Chapter 2
Interactive Weekly
Assignment 2:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 3and
Haynes Chapter 3
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 3:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
· Submit title of film
to be reviewed
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
4
2
2/3-2/9
Texas and the
Mexican
Revolution
against Spain
Weekly Objectives
a. Discuss the
exploration,
colonization, and
settlement of New
Spain and the region
now known as Texas
(between 1600-1800).
b. Compare and
contrast the Spanish
colonial/mission
system with the
English
colonial/mercantile
system.
5
2/10-2/16
2
Mexican Texas
Weekly Objective
Describe the
colonization of Texas
by Americans in the
1820s and the
resulting relationship
with the Tejanos.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 4 and
Haynes Chapter 4.
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 4:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Read Campbell, Chapter
5 and Begin Reading
EXODUS FROM THE
ALAMO: The Anatomy
of the Last Stand Myth
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 5:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
6
2
The Texas
Revolution
2/17-2/23
Weekly Objectives .
a. Describe the
colonization of Texas
by Americans in the
1820s and the
resulting relationship
with the Tejanos.
b. Explain the chain of
events in the 1820s
and 1830s that led to
the Texas Revolution.
c. Discuss the
dominant
personalities, military
strategies, and major
battles of the Texas
Revolution.
7
2
The Texas Republic
2/24-3/2
Weekly Objectives
a. Review the political
leadership during the
Republic of Texas
years and its effect on
Republic policies and
institutions.
b. Analyze the ethnic
diversity of Texas
during the Republic
years and the resulting
social, cultural, and
religious traditions.
8
3/3-3/9
Read Campbell,
Chapter 6 and
Haynes Chapter 5.
And complete EXODUS
FROM THE ALAMO:
The Anatomy of the Last
Stand Myth
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 6:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 7 and
Haynes Chapter 6.
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 7:
· Submit Film
review in drop
box
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Review All reading
Midterm Exam
Midterm Exam
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
Break Week
· Break Week
3/10-3/16
9
3
3/17-3/23
Break Week
Annexation and the
Breakdown of
the union
Weekly Objectives
a. Discuss “Manifest
Destiny” and the role
of Texas in the
expansion of the
United States.
b. Trace the expansion
of slavery in the
nineteenth century and
analyze the national
debate over slavery.
c. Describe the events
from the annexation of
Texas in 1845 through
the election of 1860
and show how they led
to Civil War.
10
3/24-3/30
3
Civil War and
Reconstruction
Weekly Objectives
a. Discuss the Civil
War from secession to
Appomattox and
observe the political,
economic, and social
effects on Texas.
b. Analyze the
Reconstruction Era in
Texas and its
governmental, social,
and political legacy.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 8 and 9
and Haynes
Chapter 7. Begin
reading Storm over
Texas: The
Annexation
Controversy and
the Road to Civil
War (Pivotal
Moments in
American History
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 9:
· Post Discussion
question responses.
· Submit Book title to
be reviewed in
drop box
Read Campbell,
Chapter 10 and 11
Haynes Chapter 8
and 9. Complete
reading Comanche
Empire
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 10:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
11
3
3/31-4/6
Texas as a Western
State, Cowboys,
Indians and
Settlers.
Weekly Objectives
a. Trace the closing of
the Texas frontier
from the Indian Wars
to the rise of
industrialization.
b. Review the rise and
development of the
Texas cattle culture
from the vaquero
tradition to the Cattle
Kingdom.
12
4/7-4/13
4
Populists,
Progressives
and Reform
Weekly Objectives
a. Analyze the rise and
development of the
Labor, Populist, and
Progressive
movements in Texas.
b. Discuss America’s
debate and subsequent
entrance into World
War I and the role of
Texans in the Wilson
White House.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 12,
Haynes Chapter 10
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 11:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Read Campbell,
Chapter 13and
Haynes Chapter 11
Begin reading:
Progressives and
Prohibitionists:
Texas Democrats
in the Wilson Era
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 1:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
13
4
4/14-4/20
Roaring 20s and the
Great
Depression
Weekly Objectives
a. Review the events
and people that
characterized life
during the 1920s in
Texas.
b. Describe the cause
and effects of the
Great Depression.
14
4/21-4/27
4
World War II and
the emergence
of a new Texas
Read Campbell,
Chapter 14 and
Haynes Chapter 12
Complete reading:
Progressives and
Prohibitionists:
Texas Democrats
in the Wilson Era
c.. Identify the
changes in the United
States and Texas
brought about by the
New Deal
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 1:
Weekly Objectives
Read Campbell,
Chapter 15 Haynes
Chapters 13 and 14
a. Discuss America’s
entrance and
participation in World
War II and the
importance of Texans
in the conduct of the
war.
b. Evaluate and
analyze the
consequences of
World War II from the
Cold War to the Civil
Rights Movement.
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 1:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
· Submit Book
Review in drop
box
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
15
4
Texas in the Recent
Past
4/28-5/4
Weekly Objectives
a. Review the
presidency of Lyndon
B. Johnson with focus
on Vietnam, civil
rights, and the legacy
of the Great Society.
b. Analyze the two
political parties in
Texas from the 1960s
to the 2000s and
review the Texas
political leaders from
that era.
16
Finals
Read Campbell,
Chapter 16 and
Haynes Chapter 15.
Interactive Weekly
Assignments 1:
· Post Discussion
question
responses.
Review all reading since
the midterm.
5/5-5/7
· Final Exam Due
11:50PM 7 May
2014
COURSE AND UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES AND POLICIES
9.0 Drop Policy
If you discover that you need to drop this class, you must go to the Records Office and ask for
the necessary paperwork. Professors cannot drop students; this is always the responsibility
of the student. The record’s office will provide a deadline for which the form must be
returned, completed and signed. Once you return the signed form to the records office and
wait 24 hours, you must go into Duck Trax and confirm that you are no longer enrolled.
Should you still be enrolled, FOLLOW-UP with the records office immediately? You are to
attend class until the procedure is complete to avoid penalty for absence. Should you miss
the deadline or fail to follow the procedure, you will receive an F in the course.
10.0 Academic Integrity
Texas A&M University - Central Texas expects all students to maintain high standards of
personal and scholarly conduct. Students found responsible of academic dishonesty are
subject to disciplinary action. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating
on an examination or other academic work, plagiarism, collusion, and the abuse of resource
materials. The faculty member is responsible for initiating action for each case of academic
dishonesty and report the incident to the Associate Director of Student Conduct. More
information can be found at
http://www.tamuct.edu/departments/studentconduct/facultyresources.php.
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
11.0 Disability Support Services
If you have or believe you have a disability and wish to self-identify, you can do so by
providing documentation to the Disability Support Coordinator. Students are encouraged to
seek information about accommodations to help assure success in their courses. Please
contact Vanessa Snyder at (254) 501-5836 or visit Founder's Hall 114. Additional
information can be found at
http://www.tamuct.edu/departments/disabilitysupport/index.php.
12.0 Tutoring.
Tutoring is available to all TAMUCT students, both on-campus and online. Subjects tutored
include Accounting, Finance, Statistics, Mathematics, and Writing (APA). Tutors are available
at the Tutoring Center in Founder's Hall, Room 204, and also in the Library in the North
Building. Visit www.ct.tamus.edu/AcademicSupport and click "Tutoring Support" for tutor
schedules and contact info. If you have questions, need to schedule a tutoring session, or if
you're interested in becoming a tutor, contact Academic Support Programs at 254-501-5830
or by emailing [email protected]
Chat live with a tutor 24/7 for almost any subject on your computer! Tutor.com is an online
tutoring platform that enables TAMU-CT students to log-in and receive FREE online tutoring
and writing support. This tool provides tutoring in Mathematics, Writing, Career Writing,
Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Spanish, Calculus, and Statistics. To access Tutor.com, click on
www.tutor.com/tamuct.
13.0 Library Services
Library distance education services aims to make available quality assistance to A&MCentral Texas students seeking information sources remotely by providing digital reference,
online information literacy tutorials, and digital research materials. Much of the A&M-CT
collection is available instantly from home. This includes over half of the library's book
collection, as well as approximately 25,000 electronic journals and 200 online databases.
Library Distance Education Services are outlined and accessed at:
http://www.ct.tamus.edu/departments/library/deservices.php
Information literacy focuses on research skills which prepare individuals to live and work
in an information-centered society. Librarians will work with students in the development of
critical reasoning, ethical use of information, and the appropriate use of secondary research
techniques. Help may include, but is not limited to: the exploration of information resources
such as library collections, the identification of appropriate materials, and the execution of
effective search strategies. Library Resources are outlined and accessed at:
http://www.ct.tamus.edu/departments/library/index.php
14.0
Instructor policies related to absence, grading, etc.
Participation in the course discussions is mandatory and absence or failure to meet the
minimum posting requirements can not be made up. Film and Book Reviews will not
be accepted after the due date without prior approval of the professor. There will be
no extra credit or make-up work permitted. I am willing to work with you but it is
imperative that you communicate with me if there is a problem, bad news does not get
better with age.
15.0
The Operation of the Online Course and Being an Online Student
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Hist 322—Spring 2014
Online learning requires students to be very self-disciplined, be sure you understand and are
prepared to comply with all required class assignments and deadlines. For this course, the
Weekly Discussion questions will be posted in the discussion forum each Thursday morning
for the week following except for the first week, which will be available prior to the start of
class. In your discussions, I want you to engage one another in discussion and debate. I
expect that the conversation may at times become lively, that is part of serious thinking and
discussion on historical topics. However, at the same time, it is important to remember that
civility is to be treasured. We can disagree strongly without being strongly disagreeable.
Keep the conversation civil and always remember that the person reading your comments
can not see your smile and the twinkle in your eye all they can see are the words themselves,
so think before you click “Send”.
16.0 Instructor’s Personal Statement
I hope that you are as excited about this course as I am. I hope to learn a lot myself this term
as we explore the History of Texas. This is the first time I’ve taught this course and while
hopefully it goes smoothly, please bear with me if we have a few bumps along the road. I am
here to help you learn but you are responsible for your own learning. Please feel free to call
me or to e-mail me if you have a problem or concern. I am generally available to you from
12 noon to 6 in the evening Monday through Friday and I am typically around on Saturdays.
Please read my bio posted in the classroom if you want to learn more about me as a person.
Now in the words of David Crockett, Congressman from Tennessee, “I’m going to Texas.”
Please join me on the journey.
.
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