Sample Resource 7-6

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Syllabus
Psyc 213: Psychological Research Design and Data Analysis II
Spring, 2009
4 credits
Instructor:
Kenn Barron
Office: 1161 Miller Hall
Phone: 568-4065
Email: [email protected]
Office hours: Tuesday 1:00-3:00 (and by appointment)
Graduate Teaching
Assistant:
Tyler Rosenberg
Office: 1170 Miller Hall
Phone: 568-8010 (office)
Email: [email protected]
Office hours: Thursday 3:15 - 5:00 (and by appointment)
Psyc 212 introduced the logic and use of science in psychology and covered two of the four major
research methods used in our field: descriptive and correlational approaches. It also covered the
statistical tools associated with these methods (namely, descriptive statistics, correlation and regression),
and it introduced the basics of inferential statistics and hypothesis testing.
Psyc 213 will build on Psyc 212 and will cover the other major research approaches used in our field:
experimental and quasi-experimental approaches. It will also cover the statistical tools associated with
these approaches (e.g., t-tests, ANOVA) as well as other more advanced topics in inferential statistics
and hypothesis testing.
Course Goals/Objectives for Psyc213
 To understand the different research goals and approaches used in psychology.
 To understand the process of scientific psychology and how it progresses and builds a valid body of
knowledge.
 To understand the vocabulary and terminology used in research.
 To critically read and evaluate research (i.e., recognize strengths and weaknesses).
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To apply the principles and tools of good research design to conduct your own independent research.
To understand the role of statistics in the field of psychology and apply statistics to your own
research.
To acquire library, database and Internet information-gathering skills.
To write using the professional guidelines established by the American Psychological Association
(APA).
To present research in professional oral and poster forms.
In other words, to continue your training in becoming al better consumer and producer of research.
Lecture/Lab Meeting Times
Lecture: Tues/Thurs 11:00-12:15 (Miller Hall 1107)
Lab: Thurs 1:25-3:15 (Miller, using 1108 and/or 1111).
2
Textbooks and Readings
1) Jackson, S. L. (2009). Research methods and statistics: A critical thinking approach (3rd Edition).
Belmont, CA; Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. (ISBN# 978-0-495-51001-7)
2) Kirkpatrick L.A., & Feeney, B.C. (2009). A simple guide to SPSS for windows. Belmont, CA;
Wadsworth/Cengage Learning. (ISBN# 978-0-49559766-7)
3) Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th Edition)  Note: only new text
4) Several reserved readings assigned periodically during the semester.
Other materials recommended for class:
1) A simple calculator that you can use to complete homework assignments and to take exams. Again it
doesn't need to be fancy. It just needs to be able to add, subtract, multiply, divide, square numbers,
and take the square root of numbers.
2) Three-ring binder.
Course Web Page
Again a web page has again been created for our class on Blackboard. You will find a wide variety of
helpful information posted (e.g., syllabus, class handouts, review sheets, links to important web sites,
etc). To access our web page go to http://blackboard.jmu.edu.
Course Evaluation
1) Exams
Three exams will be given during the semester. Each will be worth 50 points, for a total of 150 points.
Following the same format that we used in the fall, exams will consist of a combination of multiple choice,
short answer essay, and integrative questions that will ask you to apply what you have learned from
lecture, readings, and lab. Note: Exam #3 will be given during finals week.
2) Lab Reports
To develop your APA writing and research communication skills, a variety of written lab reports will be
completed over the course of the semester for another 140 points (a description of assignments appears
on the final page of the syllabus). All reports are to be typed and written in APA style. More details for
each report will be provided in lab sections.
3) Homework Assignments
In addition to lab reports, homework assignments will be assigned to practice and reinforce certain skills.
However, this semester since you’ll be practicing and using your method/stat skill training in each of your
lab reports, we only anticipate 2-3 assignments during the semester. Assignments will be posted at our
web site approximately a week before they’re due. Also, each assignment will indicate the time, date,
and where to turn it back in.
4) Class Participation Assignments
Up to 30 additional points will be awarded throughout the semester for participation in various lecture,
lab, and final project activities.
5) Additional Effort Points
Playing off your media report exercise last semester, you can earn bonus points throughout the semester
by critiquing research that you find in a newspaper, on the internet, or in a popular magazine. Simply turn
in a copy of the article and provide a short critique of the article (not to exceed 1-2 single spaced typed
pages). In your write-ups, describe the type of research method used (observational, correlational,
experimental, or quasi-experimental) and type of statistics reported. Evaluate the conclusions drawn by
the reporter, and discuss whether the research appears valid. If you find that you are unable to answer
these questions from the information given in the article, tell us what information you would need to know
to critique the article. You can turn in up to 4 article critiques throughout the semester. Each article will be
awarded 1-2 points depending on the quality of the write up. This opportunity is being given to allow you
to show us how you are becoming a better consumer of research. All additional effort point assignments
should be turned into Kenn.
3
Final Letter Grades
Final grades will be based on the # of points that you earn through our exams, lab reports, homework,
class participation, and additional effort point assignments, and will be assigned using a scale no more
stringent than: A = 93% or above, A- = 90-92.9%, B+ = 88-89.9%, B = 84-87.9%, B- = 80-83.9%, C+ =
78-79.9%, C = 74-77.9%, C- = 70-73.9%, D+ = 68-69.9%, D = 60-67.9%, F = Below 60%.
Late Assignment and Make-up Exam Policies
All of our assignments are designed to build your skills incrementally, providing you valuable feedback
along the way. Therefore, completing and turning in each assignment is essential, even if it is completed
after the due date. However late assignments will be penalized 5% of the total points you earn for that
assignment for each day it is late. Make-up exams will only be given to those who have legitimate
excuses and who see me at least two weeks prior to the exam. If some unforeseen event occurs, such
as an illness or family emergency, exceptions may be made with appropriate documentation.
Attendance and Class Participation Policy
Attendance at lectures and labs is obviously a must for your success. E.g., Lectures/labs will provide
unique hands-on learning opportunities and cover material not found in our text, and labs will cover
material critical for completing each of the lab report assignments. Also, points will be awarded for your
in-class participation in lecture/lab activities throughout the semester.
In addition, the schedules for both lecture and lab/discussion are tentative. Changes in the order that
material is presented or in due dates of assignments may occur, and any alterations to the syllabus will
be announced in class. In the event you need to miss a class, it is always your responsibility to find out
what material you may have missed, and what changes to our schedule may have occurred.
Finally, rather than just attending class, we want you to take an active role by participating in class
activities and sharing additional insights. But, most importantly, we want you to always ask
questions if something presented is unclear to you. If certain material is unclear to you, it’s likely
unclear to your classmates as well.
Academic Honesty
By enrolling in this course, you are agreeing to abide by all aspects of JMU's honor code. In particular,
we will be completing numerous writing assignments and plagiarizing others work is totally unacceptable.
The penalty for honor code violations will be awarding 0 points for that assignment.
Sources of Assistance
To help you succeed in this class, you have numerous resources available to you.
 Instructor Support (from the very beginning of the semester, please ask questions in lecture and lab,
and visit us in office hours or schedule appointments for assistance)
 Peer Tutoring Support (from Psi Chi and/or former 212-213 students, ask me for more information)
 JMU's Writing Center Support
 Your Classmates Support (e.g., study groups / peer reviewing)
4
Lecture and Reading Schedule
The following is a tentative lecture and reading schedule. Any changes will be announced in lecture.
Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Finals
Week
Date
1/13
1/15
1/20
1/22
Lecture Topic
Course Overview / Designing Simple Experiments
Reading
Ch. 8
Analyzing Simple Experiments (the t-test)
1/27
1/29
2/3
2/5
2/10
2/12
2/17
2/19
Designing Multiple Group Experiments
Ch. 9 (particularly
225-234)
and
REVIEW Ch. 7 basics
of hypothesis testing
and intro to t-tests
Ch. 10 (pgs. 256-261)
2/24
2/26
3/3
3/5
3/10
3/12
3/17
3/19
3/24
3/26
3/31
4/2
4/7
4/9
4/14
4/16
4/21
4/23
4/28
4/30
Analyzing Factorial Designs (the F-test expanded)
Ch. 11 (pgs. 290 –
298)
Ch. 11 (pgs. 298-309)
Between vs. Within vs. Mixed Designs
Article on reserve
Analyzing Multiple Group Experiments (the F-test)
Exam #1
Designing Your 3rd Lab Experiment: A Factorial Design
No Class: JMU ASSESSMENT DAY
Factorial Designs (continued)
Ch. 10 (particularly
pgs. 261-274)
Article on reserve
No Class: SPRING BREAK
Within and Mixed designs (continued)
Exam #2
Replication Research
Article on reserve
Reading and Evaluating Research Critically
Article on reserve
Reading and Evaluating Research Critically (continued)
Article on reserve
Single-N and Quasi-Experimental Designs
Ch. 12
Alternative Data Analysis Approaches
Ch. 13
Course Wrap Up
To Be Announced
Exam #3
Tuesday, May 5 (1:00 pm – 3:00 pm)
Article on reserve
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Lab and Reading Schedule
The following is a tentative lab and discussion schedule. Your TA will inform you of any changes to this
schedule.
Lab Topics
Lab overview /
Conducting a Simple Experiment (Lab Assignment #1)/
How to Write a Methods Section and Title Page
Lab Reading* and Due Dates
Ch. 13 on APA style, particularly
focusing on method section (and Ch. 14
for a complete example APA paper)
2
Using SPSS and practice exercises
Also Note: APA Manual (pgs. 3-12, pgs.
17-20, Sample Paper: 305-316)
Paper #1 due Fri, Jan. 23
3
Conducting a Multiple Group Experiment (Lab
Assignment #2)/ How to Write a Results Section and
Use Figures & Tables
Week
1
Ch. 13 on APA style, particularly results
section.
Also Note: APA Manual (pgs. 20-26,
Tables 147-155, Figures 176-186;
Presenting Stats 136-144)
4
Using SPSS and practice exercises /
Review Data Analysis for 2nd experiment
How to Write an Introduction and Abstract /
Library Tour (part 1)
Ch. 13 on APA style, particularly
introduction and abstract section.
6
Conducting a Factorial Design (Lab Assignment #3)
Also Note: APA Manual (pgs. 12-17)
Paper #2 due Fri, Feb. 20
7
8
Review Data Analysis for 3rd experiment /
Introduce “Final Project” Assignment
“Final Project” Brainstorming Session
9
“Final Project” Meetings with Tyler and Kenn
10
Peer Review “Final Project” Designs
11
“Final Project” Meetings with Tyler and Kenn / Library
Tour (part 2)
12
13
How to Write a Discussion Section and to Present
Research
Peer Review Introduction/Methods of “Final Project”
14
Data Analysis of “Final Project”
15
“Final Project” Presentations
5
Initial Brainstorming Session Work
Sheet Due in Lab
Paper #3 due Fri, March 6
Initial Project Presentation due in
Lab for Peer Feedback
Also Note: APA Manual (pgs. 26-27)
Proposals due no later than Monday,
March 30
Ch. 14 sections on APA style,
particularly discussion section.
Initial draft of Final Project due in
Lab
Final Project Presentation due in lab,
and Paper #4 due Friday, May 1
*Also NOTE APA style example paper in Ch. 14 of our Textbook (pgs. 357- 373).
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Lab Reports
Lab Report #1: Simple Experiment
Includes:
Title Page
Methods
Points: 5
Lab Report #2: Moving Beyond the Simple Experiment: Multiple Groups
Includes:
Points: 25
Title Page
Methods
Results
Table
Figure Caption Page
Figure (graph)
Lab Report #3: Moving Beyond Multiple Groups: Factorial Design
Includes:
Points: 35
Title Page
Abstract
Introduction
Results
References
Table
Figure Caption Page
Figure (graph)
Lab Report #4: Independent Research Project*
To help bring together all that you will learn in this course, you will conduct an original research
project that builds on existing psychological research. This will involve doing a literature search
on the subject you choose, designing a systematic/conceptual replication, collecting data,
analyzing the results, and writing a complete APA style report. The project will be completed in a
series of stages that we will guide you through.
Includes:
Points: 75
Title Page
References
Abstract
Tables
Introduction
Figure Caption Page
Method
Figure (graph)
Results
Appendices (if needed)
Discussion
In Lab Presentation
Also, additional components that will be evaluated and awarded points include:
1) Initial brainstorming session exercise
2) Final Project Proposal and IRB form
3) Peer review of project exercise
4) Initial draft of final project paper exercise
5) Teamwork/Project Participation exercise
*Note: more detailed information on the Independent Research Project will be provided in a
second handout.
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