secondary pgce - University Of Worcester

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Institute of Education
PGCE
Secondary
Mentor Handbook
2010 - 2011
1
2
CONTENTS
WHO’S WHO IN THE PGCE SECONDARY TEAM
(CONTACTS) ...................................................... 5
PGCE COURSE TIMETABLE 2010/2011 ............ 6
PROFESSIONAL MENTOR SEMINAR TOPICS ... 7
MENTOR MEETINGS 2010/2011........................ 9
KEY DATES FOR MENTORS ............................ 11
KEY DATES FOR STUDENT TEACHERS ......... 12
COURSE PHILOSOPHY & RATIONALE ........... 13
AIMS OF THE COURSE .................................... 14
THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT .................. 18
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ..................... 21
COURSE STRUCTURE & M-LEVEL WORK ...... 26
A WEEK BY WEEK FOCUS .............................. 28
PHASES OF THE COURSE ............................... 31
STAGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENT
TEACHERS ....................................................... 33
PATHWAYS & OTHER OPPORTUNITIES ........ 35
DEVISING A TIMETABLE ................................. 37
WORKING WITH STUDENT TEACHERS .......... 40
GIVING FEEDBACK ......................................... 46
REVIEWS AND TARGET SETTING .................. 49
PORTFOLIO REVIEW SHEETS 2010/2011 ....... 51
SETTING SPECIFIC TARGETS ........................ 52
A SUBJECT MENTOR’S DIARY ........................ 54
WEEKLY REVIEW CHECKLIST FOR SUBJECT
MENTORS ........................................................ 55
TUTOR VISITS ................................................. 56
WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COURSE ................ 56
ASSESSMENT .................................................. 57
3
THE FLEXIBLE PGCE....................................... 60
EVALUATIONS ................................................. 62
FORMS FOR COMPLETION BY MENTORS ...... 65
PROJECT ASSESSMENT FORM ...................... 66
REPORT ON FIRST SCHOOL EXPERIENCE ... 68
REPORT ON SECOND SCHOOL EXPERIENCE 73
REPORT ON FINAL SCHOOL EXPERIENCE ... 79
TEACHING EXPERIENCE OBSERVATION FORM
......................................................................... 86
SCHOOL BASED EVIDENCE ON SUITABILITY
FOR MASTER’S LEVEL .................................... 87
POSSIBLE EXAMPLES OF EVIDENCE ............. 88
4
WHO’S WHO IN THE PGCE SECONDARY TEAM (CONTACTS)
Tutor
Lorraine
Thomas
Role
Telephone
number
e-mail address
01905 542263
[email protected]
Alison
Winson
Head of Centre
for Secondary
and Post
Compulsory ITE
PGCE Course
Leader
01905 855108
[email protected]
Christine
Hinitt
Course
Administrator
01905 855070
[email protected]
Simon Butler History Tutor
01905 855049
[email protected]
Paul Clarke
Business and
Economics
Tutor
Maths Tutor
01905 855058
[email protected]
01905 855046
[email protected]
Dr Susan
Howarth
Linda Scott
Phil Collins
Science Tutors
01905 542082
[email protected]
01905 855048
01905 855570
[email protected]
[email protected]
Judy Miller
Psychology Tutor
01905 857538
[email protected]
Isabelle
Schäfer
Kerry
Whitehouse
Sue WoodGriffiths
Modern
Languages Tutor
Physical
Education Tutor
Design and
Technology
Tutor
English Tutor
01905 542152
[email protected]
01905 855510
[email protected]
01905 855244
[email protected]
01905 855039
[email protected]
Nigel Green
Trevor
Wright
5
PGCE Course Timetable 2010/2011
week
w/b
3
13/9
4
M
T
W
Th
F
DiS
DiU
0
2
20/9
0
5
5
27/9
0
5
6
4/10
5
0
7
11/10
5
0
8
18/10
0
5
Pre- Course
9
25/10
0
5
10
1/11
5
0
11
8/11
5
0
12
15/11
3
2
13
22/11
5
0
14
29/11
5
0
5
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
1
3
0
5
15
6/12
16
13/12
17
20/12
18
27/12
Asg 1 hand in
Portfolio review 1
Bank Holiday
P
Asg 2
hand in
19
3/1
20
10/1
21
17/1
5
0
22
24/1
5
0
23
31/1
3
2
24
7/2
5
0
25
14/2
5
0
0
5
P
Masters
Conference
26
21/2
27
28/2
5
0
28
7/3
5
0
29
14/3
4
1
30
21/3
5
0
31
28/3
5
0
32
4/4
3
2
33
11/4
0
0
34
18/4
0
0
35
25/4
Bank Holiday
4
0
36
2/5
Bank Holiday
4
0
Portfolio review 2
Asg 3 hand in
37
9/5
5
0
38
16/5
5
0
3
2
Portfolio
hand in
39
23/5
40
30/5
0
4
41
6/6
5
0
42
13/6
5
0
43
20/6
0
5
44
27/6
0
1
120
59
Bank Holiday
P
Exam Board
Pass List
Course ended
Totals
6
P
Directed
study
In school
Vacation
Subject
Prof.
Studies
Pathway
PROFESSIONAL MENTOR SEMINAR TOPICS 2010/2011
Below are the topics which need to be covered in school during the two teaching
experiences. Many of you cover other topics to support student teachers; however, it
is an important entitlement for students that the topics below do get covered. The
University Professional Studies Programme will be sent to you at the start of the year
so that you are able to have an overview of what the students have covered in
sessions at University.
FIRST SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
 School expectations and key people.
 School Policies including Health and Safety, Child Protection, bullying, esafety (to take place during the induction period)
 Inclusion, SEN and its implementation in the school inc. the role of the
SENCO
 Teaching & learning approaches inc. behaviour management strategies
 New Curriculum Developments in the School
 Assessment inc. Assessment for Learning
SECOND SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
 School expectations and key people.
 School Policies including Health and Safety, Child Protection, bullying, esafety (to take place during the induction period)
 Assessment inc. the use of Data, performance management & targets,
reporting to parents
 Interviews and applications
 Pastoral system and the role of the form tutor, SEAL, PSHE, Citizenship
 Equal opportunities/inclusion – including working with other adults
 New Curriculum Developments in the School
 Personalised learning
 Liaison with Primary feeder schools
Pre-and-post phase experience
During the course students are required to engage with the age ranges immediately
before and after the ones they are trained to teach. This means that all students
should have experience of primary provision (in particular at Key Stage 2), and Key
Stage 5 (sixth form).
This experience could be achieved in a number of ways:






During University subject and professional studies sessions
Wider reading
Exploring the data secondary school have, for example, on incoming pupils or
predictive data for sixth form.
Discussions in the secondary school with teachers and other professionals,
especially those dealing with transition arrangements
Studying primary/sixth form lessons, for example form ‘Teachers TV’ or a live
video conference
Observing practice in these phases.
7
In terms of the primary phase, students are required to undertake a school visit to
fulfil the following aims and specific requirements.
Aims:




enable fulfilment of the QtT Standards: Q14, Q15, Q18 and Q22
understand the similarities and differences in pedagogy and pastoral aspects
of teaching in secondary and primary schools
appreciate liaison arrangements and the transition needs of pupils (from
primary to secondary) - this would be best achieved in a feeder school
understand some issues not yet realised in the current placement – eg to
appreciate the needs of EAL pupils
Requirements:




A visit of between 1 and 3 days at a primary school during the main
placement. This could be at different schools; and for students in ‘high’
schools, the visit may be to a middle school (in particular, years 5&6 at key
Stage 2)
This visit should be arranged by the professional mentor at the main
placement school
Observe at least two different classes, and, if possible, one’s own subject
being taught
The form entitled “Record of Primary Visit” should be completed by the
student teacher. This will form part of the student teacher’s portfolio. This
should also be shared with the primary school, as a matter of courtesy.
Post 16
Those students who are following an 11-18 or 14-19 route will be expected to teach
Post 16. This should be arranged as part of their timetable. There are a few
occasions where a student on an 11-18 route has been placed in two 11-16 schools.
In these instances the University will organise a short third placement.
8
MENTOR MEETINGS 2010/2011
JOINT PROFESSIONAL & SUBJECT MENTOR MEETINGS
VENUE
DATE
TIME
Room
Stourport High
14/10/2010
4.30 – 6.00
tbc
School
Kingswinford
13/10/2010
4.30 – 6.00
tbc
School, Dudley
Pershore
12/10/2010
4.30 – 6.00
tbc
Whitecross, Hereford
12/10/2010
4.30 – 6.00
tbc
Ludlow
4.30 – 6.00
14/10/2010
tbc
Worcester
13/10/2010
4.30 – 6.00
EE1106
SUBJECT
Bus/Eco
D&T
English
SUBJECT MENTOR MEETINGS
DATE
TIME
26/01/2011
4.30 – 6.00
26/01/2011
4.30 – 6.00
26/01/2011
4.30 – 6.00
ROOM
CC008
EEG051
EEG027
History
Maths
MFL
PE
Psychology
Science
26/01/2011
25/01/2011
25/01/2011
26/01/2011
26/01/2011
25/01/2011
4.30 – 6.00
4.30 – 6.00
4.30 – 6.00
4.30 – 6.00
4.30 - 6.00
4.30 - 6.00
CC007
BY1148
CC008
BYG199
EE1100
CC009
SUBJECT
Bus/Eco
D&T
English
History
Maths
MFL
PE
Psychology
Science
SUBJECT MENTOR MEETINGS
SUMMER TERM
DATE
TIME
04/05/2011
4.30 – 6.00
06/06/2011
4.30 – 6.00
06/06/2011
4.30 – 6.00
03/05/2011
4.30 – 6.00
14/06/2011
4.30 – 6.00
18/05/2011
4.30 – 6.00
07/06/2011
4.30 – 6.00
11/05/2011
4.30 – 6.00
08/06/2011
4.30 – 6.00
ROOM
CC008
EEG051
BYG197
CC008
BY1148
BY1145
EE1102
CC007
BY1151
SUBJECT CO-ORDINATING GROUP MEETING DATES 2010/2011
SUBJECT
DATE
TIME
ROOM
Bus/Economics
D&T
English
History
Maths
MFL
PE
Psychology
Science
22/06/2011
25/05/2011
13/06/2011
14/06/2011
25/05/2011
18/05/2011
15/06/2011
11/05/2011
08/06/2011
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 – 4.00
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 –5.00
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 – 5.00
2.00 – 4.00
BYG198
EEG051
BYG197
BYG196
tbc
BYG196
BYG196
BYG196
BYG196
9
PROFESSIONAL MENTOR MEETINGS -2010 2011
SPRING
25/01/2011 4.30 – 6.00 UoW
27/01/2011 4.30 – 6.30 Ludlow
01/02/2011 4.30 – 6.30 Venue tbc
SUMMER
Prof Mentors Conference
UW
08/07/2011 12:00 to 16:30
EE1105 & EE1106 (from11:45)
BYG196 (13:30)
BYG197 (13:30)
NEW MENTOR TRAINING 2010 2011
14 September 2010
9.30-13.00 General Introduction Room EE1107
14.00 - 16.00 Subject sessions
Rooms:
BY 1145, BY 1147, BY 1148, BY 1151
BY G196, BY G197, EE 2011, EE 2019, CC 007
10 December 2010 9.30-13.00 General Introduction Room EE1107
14.00 - 16.00 Subject sessions
Rooms:
BY 1148, CC 008, EE 1062, EE 2019, EE G050
WB 137, HB 1004, HB 1009, HB G001
10
KEY DATES FOR MENTORS
w/b 13/09/2010
Plan induction programme and timetable using the guidance in the mentor handbook
(including weekly review session) for pairs of student teachers.
04 -1510/2010
Induction period. Pairs of student teachers in school 10 days in total
18 - 22/10/2010
Student teachers in University.
w/b 01/11/2010
Students return to school for 1st block placement on Monday 1st November
15 &16/11/2010
Student teachers in University Monday 15th & 16th November
29/11/2010
Subject mentors to start first school report and discuss with student teacher.
07/12/2010
Subject mentors to complete 1st school report deadline date 7th December 2010. This should
be discussed with the student teachers before submitting to university.
13 -17/12/2010
Student teachers in University
w/b 04/01/2011
Plan a draft 50 % timetable for student teachers using the guidance in the mentor handbook
(including weekly review session) in light of 1 st school report, which will be sent to arrive in
school by Tuesday 4th January. Preliminary Visit (Friday 7th January): subject mentor should
ensure they have time to talk to student teacher and that details of material to be taught are
available so that planning can start.
04 - 06/01/2011
Student teachers in University
w/b 31/01/2011
School experience begins: 1st week should be spent observing and teaching collaboratively.
Teaching should gradually increase over the next 10 days. 50% timetable to begin 24th
January 2011
Student teachers in University Monday 31st January & Tuesday 01st February
18/02/2011
Students email in Assignment 3 planning sheet and ethics forms to Prof Studies tutor.
w/b 17/01/2011
w/b 07/03/2011
15/03/2011
Start to negotiate outline plan for research project with student teachers and tutors.
Student teachers in University Tuesday 15th March
w/b 14/03/2011
Subject mentors to complete report forms and discuss them with student teachers.
w/b 23/03/2011
Despatch completed reports to arrive in University by 23 March 2011. Students & mentors
must sign the report. Please return to Christine Hinitt.
04 &
05/04/2011
02/05/2011
10 &11/05/2011
Student teachers in University Monday 4th & Tuesday 5th April with portfolios and details of
research project
Plan with the student, a reduced timetable for student teachers for final 5 weeks of placement
if on target.
External examiners visit the course and some student teachers in school 10th & 11th May
16/05/2011
Student teachers start reduced timetable on Monday 16th May.
23 &
24/05/2011
Student teachers in University Monday 23rd & 24th May
23/05/2011
Discuss CEDP with student teacher during weekly review meeting.
06/06/2011
13/06/2011
w/b 13/06/2011
28/06/2011
Subject mentors to complete final report forms and discuss them with student teachers
Students & mentors must sign the report. Please return to Christine Hinitt.
Despatch completed reports to arrive in University by Monday 13th June.
Students to present research project in school during this week. Subject mentors to complete
research project assessment form.
Board of Examiners on Tuesday 28th June 2011
11
KEY DATES FOR STUDENT TEACHERS
18 - 22/10/2010
29/10/2010
Start of Course & Registration. Complete 3 CV’s to send to schools.
Induction period. Pairs of student teachers in school 10 days in total (1st placement)
Complete the induction tasks during this period. Induction review to be completed by 18th
October
Student teachers in University.
Assignment 1 deadline Friday 29th October
w/b 01/11/2010
Students return to school for 1st placement on Monday 1st November
15 &16/11/2011
Student teachers in University Monday 15th & 16th November
w/b 13/09/2010
04 - 15/10/2010
29/11/2010
13 - 17/12/2010
13/12/2010
04/01/2011
04 - 06/01/2011
07/01/2011
Subject mentors to complete 1st school report: deadline date 29 November 2010. This
should be discussed with their student teachers before submitting to university.
Student teachers in University.
Deadline for first submission of portfolio with first commentaries
Assignment 2 deadline Tuesday 4th January 2011
Student teachers in University
First visit to second placement school Friday 7th January to discuss targets from 1st
placement and set up as much of the timetable as possible.
10 - 14/01/2011
Student teachers in University
w/b 17/01/2011
Second School experience begins
Start to plan assignment 3
Student teachers in University Monday 31st January & Tuesday 1st February
Students email in Assignment 3 planning sheet and ethics forms to Prof Studies
tutor.
Start to negotiate with tutor and mentors outline plan for research project
Subject mentors to complete 1st main placement school report: deadline date 23 March
2011. This should be discussed them with their student teachers before submitting to
university.
Student teachers in University Tuesday 15th March.
Monday 4th April Deadline for second submission of portfolio with second set of
commentaries. Tuesday 5th April - Hand in research project planning sheet and ethics
form to subject tutor. Students in University.
Assignment 3 deadline Thursday 21st April
w/b 31/01/2011
18/02/2011
w/b 14/03/2011
w/b 14/03/2011
15/03/2011
04 & 05/04/2011
21/04/2011
02/05/2011
10 &11/05/2011
23 & 24/05/2011
16/05/2011
23/05/2011
06/06/2011
w/b 13/06/2011
13/06/2011
w/b 20/06/2011
28/06/2011
Plan a reduced timetable with mentor for final 4 weeks of placement. Plan date to present
research project with mentor
External examiners visit the course and some student teachers in school on 10th & 11th
May
Student teachers in University Monday 23rd & Tuesday 24th May
Student teachers start reduced timetable on Monday 16 May 2011.
Hand in portfolio with final commentary on Monday 23rd May. Discuss CEDP with
student teacher during weekly review meeting.
Monday 6th June Complete draft of CEDP and email to tutor.
Student teachers studying at Master’s level (level 7) hand in 1500 literature review to
subject tutors. This can be emailed to subject tutors.
Students to present research project in school during this week.
Subject mentors to complete final report forms and discuss them with student teachers:
deadline Monday 13th June.
Final Week in University.
Monday 20th June and Tuesday 21st June presentation of research projects to subject
groups. Wednesday 22 June presentation of research project SEN, Citizenship pathways
& diploma pathways Wednesday 22nd June Valediction
Board of Examiners on Tuesday 28th June
12
COURSE PHILOSOPHY & RATIONALE
The Pupils
In the spirit of ‘Every Child Matters’ the partnership between Schools and the University
recognises that the well-being of pupils in partner schools takes priority over all other
considerations.
The Partnership
At the heart of the course is the notion of partnership. School staff are partners with their
University colleagues in planning, implementing, assessing, moderating and evaluating the
content, activities and procedures of the programme.
The partnership operates on the principle that different partners should each contribute their
specific expertise to the PGCE programme taking into account their place of work, their
professional role and the time they have available. Partnership implies a full recognition of
the part to be played by School and University staff and the close collaboration between
them (see section detailing the Partnership Agreement).
The second fundamental principle of the programme is that the School and University work
should be closely integrated. The tasks and experiences for the student teachers in
University and Schools are planned to complement and illuminate each other.
The course that is planned for each subject group is the result of co-operation between
University tutors and School mentors. For each subject, a co-ordinating group reviews and
develops the course to be offered in Schools and in University and identifies the ways in
which mentors and tutors can support each other’s work. Their planning takes place in the
light of the professional studies programme and the programme organised by professional
mentors; these two elements of the course are common to all subjects. Also basic to the
course is that student teachers will be involved in the work of at least two schools and in
some cases three.
Collaboration
The partnership believes that learning to teach should be an informed and gradual process
and not just a ‘survival’ approach. Research shows that collaborative work is a positive and
effective way to develop in vocational settings and offers the best support to develop skills
for a complex role. The course is structured to allow a range of collaborative opportunities
with peers and mentors and between mentors and tutors. Increasingly the school setting
requires collaborative work between a range of adults and the course design and content
reflects this.
Student Teacher Responsibility
Each student teacher enters the course with unique knowledge, skills and experience.
Collectively the cohort constitutes a rich resource. The course seeks to use the strengths of
individuals and to involve them in taking responsibility for monitoring their professional
development towards achieving the Standards and the aims of the course. They are
required to build up a portfolio (see section 3.6 & student handbook) which will help them to
assess their strengths and weaknesses and to plan a programme which will address gaps in
knowledge and experience and will at the end of the course provide evidence of their
achievements. The partnership believes that as far as possible student teachers should be
encouraged to take responsibility for their own development and for how they will achieve
the aims of the course.
Integration of the Course
The PGCE Course consists of a number of closely integrated elements. Work in School and
work in University is designed to provide an integrated approach to becoming a teacher.
13
Student teachers are the only people who will experience all the elements of the course and
their evaluations are therefore critical to the development of the programme.
The University element will consist of a professional studies and subject studies component.
The former will comprise issues that are of a generic or whole-school nature. The latter will
consist of subject-specific issues. Both aspects will be provided in taught sessions by tutors
and in supported self-study materials. The balance of these will vary between different
routes.
The School element will also consist of a programme of professional studies and subject
studies. These will be overseen by professional mentors who will have the overall
responsibility for the management of the provision, ensuring that student teachers have full
access to the appropriate age and ability range. Subject mentors are responsible for
providing a programme which will involve individual and collaborative teaching and weekly
mentor support.
AIMS OF THE COURSE
At the heart of good teaching is the desire to promote learning, and the love of learning, in
pupils.
Nothing is taught until it is learnt. To achieve this, the course aims to develop teachers who: are skilled;
 are reflective;
 are critically evaluative;
 are able to form effective relationships;
 are able to promote their own development;
 can demonstrate the values inherent in the profession.
Skilled
The Standards for the award of QTS set out the minimum statutory requirement for newly
qualified teachers (NQTs). The Standards are embedded in the course documentation,
taught sessions, and assessment procedures and are fundamental to discussions between
mentors, student teachers and tutors. In addition to aiming to ensure that all student
teachers achieve the Standards, the course also aims to develop professional teachers who
will enhance the quality of the education service and improve pupil learning, in years to
come. The process of developing such professionals starts with an understanding of the
complexity of the task of teaching and an appreciation by each student teacher of what s/he
might realistically expect to be able to achieve by the end of the course. Mentors and tutors,
therefore, are committed to providing student teachers with a graduated programme of
development based on regular individual target setting, so that they can achieve success as
an independent teacher in their first appointment. Thus student teachers move from
developing skills in sections of a lesson early on in their course, to managing whole lessons
in collaboration with partners and mentors and finally taking responsibility for whole lessons.
Alongside this initial focus on skills, student teachers are encouraged to evaluate their own
performance as well as that of their mentor and their partner. Their evaluations lead to target
setting and, more importantly, the identification of the means of achieving these targets. In
particular student teachers will need to develop the ability to assess pupils using national
test data, marking and questioning to inform their judgements. This will lead to an ability to
set clear targets for individual pupils. As the course progresses student teachers will be
expected to integrate their skills and develop the ability to translate their own understandings
into learning experiences that are meaningful for pupils. This pedagogical development will
lead to an overall competent and harmonious performance to enable pupil learning.
14
Reflective
The course aims to develop student teachers as reflective practitioners. This will enable
them to continue to see themselves as learners and to use their reflections in planning their
own, and their pupil’s development. The opportunity to reflect on their experiences during
the course is therefore crucial to the process of becoming reflective practitioners. Periods of
experience in school are interspersed with time in University to reflect on the overall
progress that has been made during a period of school experience. More immediate
opportunity to reflect and set targets is provided by the weekly review sessions with mentors
during school placements. The challenge to make sense of experience in the light of theory
and research and to share understandings with peers is regularly presented to student
teachers through discussions, workshops, supported self-study, assignments and reviews.
As well as time for reflection and reading, observation has a key role to play in developing
the reflective practitioner. As student teachers become more skilful performers, they also
become more sophisticated observers. It is important therefore that they continue to
observe throughout the course, using their observations to challenge their own practice and
to stimulate development, to enhance pupil learning.
The course aims to provide opportunities in all phases for student teachers to work
collaboratively with peers and mentors. These opportunities provide a gradual, supported
introduction to teaching and are the vehicle for meaningful reflections on practice which will
support the development of high quality teaching and learning.
Critically evaluative
As the course proceeds student teachers will move from critical reflection on their own
teaching and a focus on skill acquisition to the ability to ask more searching questions of the
nature of the whole enterprise and to see their own practice in a wider context.
Apart from critically reflecting on their own practice, student teachers need to develop as
thinking professionals who have a sound grasp of the wider context of education and the
capacity to challenge existing practice. The professional studies work in University, and in
taught sessions organised by professional mentors in schools, address these wider
concerns and seek to develop the student teachers’ understanding of their wider
professional role.
During the course they will develop their personal philosophies of education in the light
of reading, discussion and reflection on experience. They will critically examine the concepts
and values they meet and constructively evaluate their experience of the course. They will
become aware of the beliefs they hold about the nature of learning and be able to apply
them in their teaching. They will be informed of current issues in education and be able to
evaluate research findings and apply them to their practice. They will be prepared to play
their part in developing the institution in which they are working and in moulding the
education service of the future. They will adopt a constructively critical stance towards
current practice and be able to propose changes in a sensitive and productive way. They
will see themselves as professionals in the full sense, subject specialists with a commitment
to playing a full part in the whole life of the institution.
15
Able to form effective relationships
The quality of learning for pupils is directly affected by the skill of the teacher in organising
learning experiences and by the quality of the relationships achieved by the teacher.
Teachers must have the social skills, empathy and understanding to enable them to
communicate effectively and work with young people.
Teachers also have to work as part of a team. On placements in schools student teachers
are expected to work co-operatively with mentors and other teachers, teaching assistants,
ancillary staff and outside agencies. Student teachers will also need to develop their abilities
to manage teams of support staff. It is essential for today’s teachers to be able to form
effective professional relationships with colleagues irrespective of personal differences. The
partnership is committed to developing these skills and to raising and dealing with any
problems that may arise.
During the first placement experience most student teachers will work in pairs. This is a
practice designed to help support the development of effective collaboration and to allow the
partnership to address the issue of teamwork under mentor and tutor supervision. Where a
paired placement is not possible mentors will work with colleagues and student teachers
specifically to develop these skills.
Able to promote their own development
Initial teacher education is the beginning of a teacher’s professional development. The
complexity of the task of teaching presents the opportunity for teachers to become more and
more effective performers as their experience grows. In order to meet this challenge
teachers must develop the skills and attitudes necessary for their continuing professional
development. The course uses a portfolio which provides a vehicle for student teachers in
developing these skills and attitudes. They use it to chart their professional development,
identifying strengths and weaknesses and setting targets for improvement. In particular the
portfolio contains a subject knowledge and ICT audit which is used to identify areas of deficit
and to develop an action plan for remediation. The completed portfolio informs their Career
Entry & Development Profile and prepares them for their development as an NQT.
Demonstrate the values inherent in the profession.
Through the work outlined above the partnership will support the development of those
professional values currently specified by the TDA: “Those awarded Qualified Teacher
Status must understand and uphold the professional code of the General Teaching Council
for England by demonstrating all of the following;
Q1 Have high expectations of children/young people including a commitment to
ensuring that they can achieve their full educational potential and to establishing fair,
respectful, trusting, supportive and constructive relationships with them.
Q2 Demonstrate the positive values, attitudes and behaviour they expect from
children/young people.
Q3 (a) Be aware of the professional duties of teachers/the statutory framework within
which they work.
(b) Be aware of the policies and practices of the workplace and share in collective
responsibility for their implementation.
Q4 Communicate effectively with children, young people, colleagues, parents and
carers.
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Q5 Recognise and respect the contribution that colleagues, parents and carers can
make to the development and well-being of children and young people and to raising
their levels of attainment.
Q6 Have a commitment to collaboration and co-operative working.
Q7 (a) Reflect on/improve their practice, and take responsibility for identifying and
meeting their developing professional needs
(b) Identify priorities for their early professional development in the context of
induction.
Q8 Have a creative/constructively critical approach towards innovation, being
prepared to adapt their practice where benefits and improvements are identified
Q9 Act upon advice and feedback and be open to coaching and mentoring.
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THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT
Principles
The PGCE programme at University of Worcester depends on a partnership between the
University and individual schools. The Partnership is a shared commitment to pursue quality
in the programme and to provide intending teachers with the best possible preparation for
their chosen profession. The commitment recognises that teachers in partnership
institutions (mentors) and staff in the University (tutors) have distinctive contributions, roles
and responsibilities.
The partnership also recognises that the well-being of pupils and students in partner schools
and colleges takes priority over all other considerations.
For the rest of this document ‘school’ will be used to refer to all partner Institutions.
Responsibilities
The University undertakes to:
 manage overall training and fulfil a quality assurance role;
 provide a study course covering general and subject specific aspects of teaching as
set out in the DVD (Definitive Validation Document);
 make judgements on ‘fitness to teach’ of applicants;
 carry out CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) checks on applicants;
 support and organise mentor training;
 ensure a tutor makes a minimum of three visits in relation to each student teacher to
support supervising mentors;
 arrange access to student support services;
 provide additional support to schools where a student teacher is causing concern.
Schools undertake to:
 use the funding from the University to support the training of student teachers,
including the provision of subject and professional mentors
 provide high quality training and a supportive learning environment for student
teachers;
 ensure that mentors engage in training provided by the University through mentor
meetings;
 deliver the teaching, support and assessment programme set out in the course and
subject handbooks;
 contribute to the process of selection of candidates, the work of committees and
working parties and the general management involved in the partnership.
Procedures
Confirmation of Placements
Each year during April schools will be asked to sign an agreement indicating their
preferences for placements for the coming year. When students have registered on the
course, the University will be able to confirm placements. Usually, by this time (September)
CRB checks will have taken place. The University’s procedures are attached for information.
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Whilst most students have no criminal record, there are always a few with
cautions/convictions. For minor cases the University makes a decision on fitness to teach
and would not normally inform the school. In some cases, the University would inform the
school after gaining permission from the student.
If the school has a policy never to accept students with any caution or conviction, the
University will need to be informed on the placement offer form. Every year a few students
receive their CRB check results after the course start date. If this is the case, the University
will ensure a ‘list 99’ check has been carried out before a school placement begins.
Funding
The school will receive a daily rate payment of £10 for each day a student teacher is in
school. The rate of pay will be agreed annually by the Partnership Advisory Committee. In
return for the funding transferred, the school agrees to abide by its responsibilities and will
deliver the entitlements set out below.
Funding to schools is increased by £30 for each attendance by an active mentor at a termly
mentor meeting. Active mentors are those who have a student teacher during the year.
Mentors who are not active are very welcome to attend the meetings.
Schools can expect two transfers of funding to be made at the end of December and the end
of May. Where an additional school has to be used to ensure coverage of the age range, a
sum of £50 will be transferred from the main placement school to the additional school.
Student Teacher Entitlements
Standard Full-time Course – First Placement
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Subject mentor meetings for review and planning (one hour per week). Where
student teachers are paired this allocation will be mostly per pair, although there will
be times when student teachers need separate meetings;
Professional mentor taught programme - five sessions (45 mins each);
Professional mentor meeting - 45 minutes each week during induction;
Three formal subject observations per week in placement;
One joint observation by professional mentor (or deputy).
Standard Full-time Course - Main Placement:
 Subject mentor meetings for review and planning (one hour per week);
 Professional mentor taught programme - five sessions (45 mins each);
 Three formal subject observations per week in placement until the project starts;
thereafter, one per week;
 one joint observation by professional mentor (or deputy).
Flexible Full-time Course
 For those units requiring a few day visits student teachers are entitled to a planning
meeting (one hour) and two review meetings (45 mins each) with the subject mentor
and one with the professional mentor (45 mins);
 For the school experience times the normal expectations for the standard course
apply.
Part-time Course
 For the first teaching practice and any part-time experience during the main practice,
entitlements should be allocated pro-rata in relation to the standard course.
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For the final full-time teaching time (10 weeks) normal expectations for the standard
full time course apply.
Selection of mentors
Partner schools are responsible for selecting their mentors. In doing so they agree that they
will be looking for teachers who have:
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successful teaching experience;
the ability to analyse their own and others’ classroom performance;
a sympathetic approach to the needs of student teachers;
the ability to make good personal relationships with student teachers;
commitment to high standards from pupils and colleagues;
knowledge of the theory underpinning classroom practice;
the willingness to give the time required for effective support of student teachers;
commitment to ongoing development of mentoring skills;
commitment to their own continuing professional development.
Equal Opportunities
University Heath and Safety Provision
The University Policy relating to Health and Safety is available on the website at:
http://www.worc.ac.uk/personnel/documents/HealthSafetyPolicy.doc
It is the University’s responsibility to make students aware of this policy and to ensure that
they understand procedures related to their practice – in consideration of their own and
others’ welfare.
The University will also make students aware of:
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The agreement between the school and University (partnership);
Who to contact at the University should an issue arise relating to Health and Safety.
School Heath and Safety Provision
In placing a student teacher with the school, University of Worcester expects that the
necessary legal requirements in relation to health and safety, equal opportunities, disability
legislation and other relevant legislation are addressed by the school and its governing body
as part of its normal procedures and are applied to all those working in the school. In this
respect, the school agrees to ensure the following are in place:
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There is a recent, dated written Health and Safety policy?
The student should receive a copy of the above, or know where it is always available.
There is a policy regarding health and safety training for people working in your
undertaking, including use of vehicles, plant and equipment?
The student will be provided with a full induction on their first day, including all
necessary health and safety training including fire evacuation and workstation
assessment if applicable?
The school holds an Employer and Public Liability Insurance?
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School insurances cover any liability incurred by a placement student as a result of
his/her duties as an employee?
The school has carried out an assessment of work practices to identify possible risks
whether to the school’s own employees or to others within its undertaking?
Risk assessments are kept under regular review and the results of risk assessment
are implemented?
There is a formal procedure for reporting and recording accidents and incidents in
accordance with RIDDOR and other legislation?
There are procedures to be followed in the event of serious and imminent danger to
people at work in the school’s undertaking?
The school will report to the university all recorded accidents involving placement
students?
The school will report to the university any sickness involving placement students
which may be attributable to their work?
The school has a Child Protection Policy (CPA), which will this be made available to
the student and the student will be inducted in child protection issues
The student will be made aware of suitable contact persons within the school relating
to issues of Health and Safety (as above) and Equal Opportunities?
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
There are key groups of people involved in the partnership. Schools and the University
agree to provide staff who can professionally fulfil the roles and responsibilities set out below
and who will positively support student teachers.
The Professional Mentor
S/he is responsible for the overall welfare and supervision of student teachers whilst
the students are in school, for the organisation and quality assurance of the school
experience and for maintaining links with the University. In general s/he will:
 manage, moderate and support the work of subject mentors;
 organise appropriate experience for student teachers on a particular school
placement in line with agreed partnership expectations;
 liaise with subject mentors in the school and with the course leader in University;
 check regularly on the progress of each student teacher and discuss future
development;
 respond to student teachers who are causes for concern in line with the partnership
cause for concern procedure;
 arrange designated weekly mentoring sessions between the subject mentor and the
student teacher;
 carry out joint formal observations with each mentor as part of the moderation
process;
 provide a programme of taught sessions during placement one and placement two
on professional topics agreed by the partnership;
 ensure that reports on student teachers are written and discussed with student
teachers before being dispatched to University at the appropriate times;
 arrange for student teachers to visit a primary or middle school in order to engage
with the age ranges immediately before the one they are trained to teach;
 disseminate information to colleagues within school;
 attend all Professional Mentor meetings and report back to colleagues in school;
 inform and prepare Subject Mentors for the Student Teachers’ arrival;
 meet with the Student Teachers and clarify school expectations, procedures etc.;
 discuss the student teachers’ progress with visiting University tutors;
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provide training for colleagues within school and support them in their mentoring role.
The Subject Mentor
S/he is responsible for the day-to-day supervision of the student teacher in school.
In general s/he will:
 organise appropriate opportunities for student teachers on a particular school
experience including an induction to the subject department and to the requirements
of the subject (including the National Curriculum and its programme of studies, The
Secondary National Strategy, recording and assessment procedures);
 develop an open, honest, relationship with the student teacher;
 carry out informal and formal observations of lessons. Up to three formal
observations per week depending on the stage of the course;
 liaise with the professional mentor in the school and with the university tutor and
bring to his/her attention any cause for concern;
 support other class teachers whose pupils are taught by student teachers;
 arrange weekly designated mentoring sessions for reviewing, planning and target
setting including strategies to achieve targets set;
 confirm the evidence that student teachers gather about their level of performance;
 check and give advice on lesson planning, lesson evaluations, subject audits, the
portfolio, the CEDP;
 support the development of teaching and class management skills;
 support the development of subject knowledge and the use of ICT;
 advise student teachers on how to write reports to parents/give guidance at parents
evenings;
 advise student teachers on how to work as part of a team;
 encourage student teachers to operate as reflective practitioners;
 attend 3 mentor meetings per year;
 new mentors to attend new mentor training. In addition new mentors attend new
mentor training;
 observe lessons and give feedback with university subject tutors;
 ensure that reports on student teachers are written and discussed with student
teachers before being dispatched to University at the appropriate times;
 monitor and assess the research project;
 give immediate feedback to student teachers when they do not meet the professional
Standards required;
University Subject Tutor
S/he has overall responsibility for supporting, monitoring and recording the progress of the
student teacher. In particular s/he will:
 be well informed about the University programmes, procedures and standards in
relation to TDA ‘Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status’ and
Requirements for Initial Teacher Training;
 attend and contribute to monthly team meetings;
 recruit, interview and select applicants for the course;
 organise a programme of subject studies to enable student teachers to develop their
understanding of teaching their subject;
 set and mark assignments designed to develop student teachers understanding of
the nature of education both within the subject and across the school;
 give appropriate feedback on assignments;
 assess the final portfolio and give appropriate feedback;
 assess the research project;
 advise on suitability for studying at M level
 introduce student teachers to up-to-date research relating to teaching;
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keep up to date with curriculum changes and developments and leading research in
their field;
support student teachers with any difficulties they experience;
induct new mentors into the process of educating student teachers;
organise relevant mentor meetings;
organise annual co-ordinating group meetings to develop the course;
attend course committee meetings;
make visits to schools to support mentors in supervising and assessing student
teachers;
carry out joint observations and feedback with subject mentors and to moderate the
performance of subject mentors;;
write references for student teachers;
give advice and support on writing the CEDP;
be well informed about the trainee teachers’ previous experience and future
programme;
respond immediately where a student teacher is giving cause for concern making a
written statement recording areas in need of attention;
be responsible for moderating standards of competence demonstrated by trainee
teachers, the effectiveness of the assessment process and outcomes both between
and within school;
support teachers in their roles and ensure that trainee teachers are being given
appropriate support and guidance as well as setting targets for development;
evaluate their work and the work of the partnership to inform developments;
contribute to the course AER (Annual Evaluation Report).
University Professional Studies Tutor
S/he works closely with Subject Tutors to plan and teaches a programme of professional
studies designed to give student teachers an understanding of the place of schooling and
education in society. Tutors will have a particular concern for the general aspects of training
and will teach appropriate sessions in the planned course. They also mark assignments and
give feedback related to this aspect of the course.
The PGCE Course Leader
S/he is responsible for the day-to-day management of the course. In particular this
involves:
 liaison with professional mentors and tutors over placements;
 organising team meetings;
 organising mentor meetings for professional mentors and new mentors;
 overseeing mentor training;
 recruitment policies and strategies;
 organising interviews;
 organising exam boards;
 organising external examiners and mentors who act as moderators;
 liaising with committees over term dates, structure of the course and financial
payments;
 liaising with the TDA and other national bodies about developments in the structure
and management of ITE (Initial teacher Education) courses;
 co-ordinating inspections;
 developing the course in light of feedback from OfSTED, external examiners and
students;
 evaluating and reviewing course structures and procedures;
 acting as second viewer for failing student teachers;
 liaison with external bodies;
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 supporting tutors and mentors in their roles;
 advising student teachers who are a cause for concern;
 staff development.
Head of Centre for Secondary ITE
Has overall responsibility for the secondary team. S/he has a strategic role with responsibility
for directing any strategic university/school issues.
Student Teachers
Student teachers are expected to behave as teachers, maintaining a professional stance at
all times (i.e. to meet the standards that are expected of a teacher). This involves:
 attending all University sessions and school days. Taking all possible measures to
make sure that they are not late or absent. Where absence is unavoidable, the tutor
should be contacted, the reasons given and arrangements made to cover what has
been missed. An absence from school requires a phone call to the mentor setting
work and notification to the course administrator and the relevant subject tutor.
Messages MUST be given direct to the appropriate member of staff following normal
school procedures. Third parties should only be used as messengers in
emergencies. An absence of five days should be followed up by a Doctor’s
note;
 seeking formal permission to be absent from school. Normally, permission should
only be sought for the purpose of attending graduation, an interview for a teaching
post or the funeral of a close relative. Absence should be for the shortest possible
time;
 being prepared to suggest work for classes in the event of absence;
 being in school at an appropriate time before school starts and being prepared to
stay reasonably after lessons finish for meetings or other commitments; arrive in
good time for lessons;
 dressing and behaving appropriately when in school;
 preparing lessons carefully and providing evidence of this in teaching files, which
should always be available for inspection by mentors and tutors;
 getting everything ready for lessons beforehand;
 discussing plans with mentors in advance;
 regularly updating subject audits;
 completing lesson evaluations (Placement 1: an evaluation should be completed
after every lesson. Placement 2: three detailed evaluations each week)
 preparing and follow up weekly/periodic review meetings;
 meeting all University and school deadlines;
 maintaining the portfolio to a professional standard;
 accepting constructive guidance from mentors and tutors and acting upon it to
improve performance;
 leaving the rooms they teach in as they would wish to find them;
 assessing pupils’ work quickly and return it promptly. Ensuring that pupil’s progress is
assessed and recorded in conjunction with school procedures and related to
subsequent planning;
 avoiding over-familiarity with staff and pupils;
 addressing staff according to the practice in the school;
 taking an active interest in the life of the school, including extra-curricular activities;
 attending staff meetings, parents evenings, open days and INSET days, unless
asked not to do so;
 attending assembly, where appropriate;
 contributing (as invited) to tutorial/registration procedures;
 taking every opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to teaching;
 being prepared to ask when in doubt;
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being sensitive towards the ethos of the school and the role of parents, governors
and the wider community.
keeping the University tutor informed of developments or of any concerns;
attend meetings with parents and contribute to reports for parents as appropriate;
establishing and maintaining appropriate and effective professional relationships with
tutors, mentors, teachers, other student teachers, pupils and all those other persons
with whom they come into contact.
maintaining these relationships following any due warning and appropriate support;
failure to do so may result in the school placement being suspended and may result
in a student teacher’s registration on the course being terminated. In these
circumstances the Partnership cannot guarantee to find an alternative placement and
the Board of Examiners may decide that the student teacher has failed the
placement.
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COURSE STRUCTURE & M-LEVEL WORK
The aim of the course structure is to attempt to integrate the components of the course as
fully as possible. Taught sessions, tutorials, school experience and individual study need to
be integrated so that student teachers recognise that teaching is grounded in study and
research as well as personal experience. To this end we have described the course both in
terms of study units and time phases.
Modules
The course is packaged as five modules although it is taught in a more holistic fashion with
constant re-visiting of themes, topics and skills. Some of the five modules are time related
but two are effectively “long thin” modules whose outcomes are being addressed throughout
the course. Content details of the course will be found in the subject and professional studies
handbooks. The five modules are:
Module 1:
Introduction to teaching and learning
This involves a five and a half week induction period including two weeks in your first
placement school. This culminates in Assignment 1.
Module 2:
Developing teaching and learning
This is the first block placement plus a few review days in University. This culminates in
Assignment 2.
Module 3:
Educational investigation
This involves all the study relating to educational research and application of theory to
practice. This work commences in September and culminates in Assignment 3 and the
Research Project.
Module 4:
Becoming a professional
This is the time spent in University from January and through the second placement. This
culminates in the final portfolio commentary.
Module 5:
Meeting the standards
This involves all study from September that relates to meeting the standards for Qualified
Teacher Status as assessed by the school report.
Phases
The course is also divided into time phases which are shown on the year outline (page 25).
These comprise ‘Induction’; ‘School Based development’; ‘Extension’; ‘Second School
Placement’ and ‘Transition’.
M-Level
All student teachers are initially registered for the Professional Graduate Certificate in
Education. This is a course of 120 credits at level 6. In December student teachers may
apply to be registered on the Post-Graduate Certificate in Education where 60 M-level
credits can be gained from subsequent work. Thus the PGCE(M) will result in 60 credits at
level 6 and 60 at level 7.
The application process for the M-level modules is to be found in the Assessment
Handbook.
Those student teachers who are accepted onto the PGCE(M) will have assignment 3, the
project and the final portfolio assessed against level 7 criteria (i.e. modules 3 & 4, see also
the Assessment Handbook for details of the criteria for each assessment).
The criteria for acceptance onto the M-level work are:
 Can analyse their own practice using appropriate research methods
 Can critically reflect on their own practice, both orally and in writing
 Can synthesize ideas drawn from literature, teaching and their own practice
 Can present their work to a professional standard
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Have organised and managed their work time effectively
Have successfully completed their first school experience
The Mentors’ Role
The mentors’ role in supporting this work will be crucial. The criteria expect a much more
rigorous approach to research in the work and a greater integration of theory and practice.
Tutors will have provided support and an introduction to educational research for these
students but mentors will need to support the research approach that will be required of
these student teachers. The proforma entitled ‘School based evidence on suitability for
Master’s level’ included in the final section of this handbook (Forms for completion by the
Mentor) asks mentors with students on the first school placement to comment on the
student’s ability against the criteria for acceptance onto the Masters level work. These
criteria are:
 Can analyse their own practice using appropriate research methods
 Can critically reflect on their own practice, both orally and in writing
 Can synthesize ideas drawn from literature, teaching and their own practice
 Have organised and managed their work time effectively
An example of a completed form has been included.
These comments will help tutors judge applicants readiness to take on the M-level work.
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A WEEK BY WEEK FOCUS
Stages in the Development of Student Teachers
Induction September 16th – October 29th
(Module 1 and parts of modules 3 & 5)
During this phase student teachers will work in University for twelve days and then in their
first School for the next two weeks followed by a week and a half full time in University. This
arrangement allows the student to gain a short consolidated block of experience which can
then be used to inform the rest of the course. The opportunity is thus provided for relating
theory to their practice and of being supported in this by tutors in University as well as
mentors in School.
Student teachers will usually be placed in school in subject pairs. They will bring with them a
structured induction pack which is to be the common basis of their experiences. The pack is
to be used flexibly and the learning outcomes are more important than the specific tasks.
Professional Mentors are responsible for organising this programme of induction to
the school and to teaching.
This period is not intended as a full ‘teaching practice’. Its purpose is to induct student
teachers into the ways of working in the school; to gather evidence that will inform their
University course sessions later in the term and to meet the classes they will teach after half
term. Nonetheless we would expect you to do some joint planning with students and for
students to teach parts of lessons e.g. starters and plenaries.
Subject mentors will provide an induction to the department, its schemes of work,
assessment and recording procedures and its resources. They will also help student
teachers to make sense of their observations. Student teachers will work in collaboration
with their mentor and other student teachers and thus gain some experience of working as
part of a team.
The school experience is designed so that student teachers begin to explore and develop
classroom management skills, to examine their subject specialism as a context for learning
and to develop an understanding of how children learn with particular reference to their
chosen subject. Collaborative teaching is an essential element of that framework. The
mentor or class teacher will work with the student teachers, providing them with
opportunities to try out particular skills in a safe environment, planning lessons or parts of
lessons and evaluating performance. By the end of this phase student teachers should have
a good understanding of the kind of planning needed to produce a sound lesson.
School based development - November 1st – December 10th
(Parts of modules 2, 3 & 5)
During this first block of teaching, student teachers will have review time in University on
specified days in order to allow them the opportunity to reflect on progress and to share
experiences with tutors and peers.
Although student teachers will be working as a pair it is also important that they are given the
opportunity to take full responsibility for at least one class so that they gain confidence in
operating on their own and so that any weaknesses in their performance can be identified
and addressed at an early stage (although individual targets can be set, even when working
as a pair).
When planning a timetable for this block placement please use the guidance on page
38. Normally the timetable for the pair should be approximately 50% of a normal teaching
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load. The focus should be on quality rather than quantity. Where students are not able to
be working in pairs, they should have an individual timetable of about 25%. They should
make up the other 25% by collaborative work with the mentor or other class teachers as
appropriate.
Towards the end of this placement a school report will be written by the Subject and
Professional Mentors. (See ‘key dates for Mentors’). This school report should be agreed
and signed by all parties. In the last week of the placement mentors will review the progress
of the student agreeing targets and experiences needed for the next phase of the course.
By this stage they should be confident and competent in handling whole classes and ready
to take on full responsibility for pupils’ learning.
Extension 13th December – 14th January
(Parts of modules 2, 3, 4 & 5)
In this period of full time work in University student teachers will be helped to reflect on their
first placement and taken into thinking more deeply about pupil needs and school systems of
care. They will focus on moving their teaching forward from a whole class approach to
meeting the needs of individuals by differentiation, to a concern for progression in pupils’
learning and to assessment that records the progress of individuals and informs planning.
This will be underpinned by an understanding of the nature of inclusion.
Student teachers will develop an action plan for the second school experience by January
before the first day visit.
Preliminary Visit January 07th January
At the beginning of term schools will receive a report on the student teacher’s performance
in the first placement school, along with a CV completed at the start of the course. Mentors
should use this information to draft a timetable and to plan their approach to mentoring. This
should be discussed at the first visit and modified accordingly.
When planning a timetable for this block placement please use the guidance on page
38. Please note that student teachers should have a gradual introduction to the 50%
timetable. They should begin teaching week beginning 24th January. This allows a one
week induction period before teaching begins.
After the preliminary visit in January student teachers need to come away with a clear idea
of at least some of the classes and details of what they will be expected to teach so that they
can begin to plan lessons and schemes of work in University and have access to support
from tutors. Planning can then be checked on the second preliminary visit. It is vital that
subject mentors have time to spend with their student teachers on these days.
Second School Placement January 17th – June 17th
(Parts of modules 3,4,& 5)
The second teaching experience will be in a different school. This experience gives student
teachers an opportunity for sustained planning, delivery and evaluation of teaching and
learning in your subject area and for the assessment of pupils. It will build on earlier work,
demanding more sophisticated planning, action and appraisal. Student teachers will develop
work in their subject, by concentrating on lesson planning in more detail and by the planning
of schemes of work linked to school plans, the NC Programmes of Study, national strategies
and examination specifications as appropriate. In particular students will concentrate on
addressing the needs of pupils of varying abilities and aptitudes and to planning schemes of
work which incorporate inclusion, differentiation and progression.
Student teachers will spend specified days in University to review and reflect on their
experiences and to enable them to keep in touch with the tutors and peers who also support
your progress.
29
During this placement student teachers must experience the pastoral aspects of the
teacher’s role – so their timetable should include attachment to a form tutor group and,
where appropriate, some involvement in PSHE / Citizenship work.
For some subjects, it is important that student teachers can offer a second subject. School
experience is the only opportunity for them to develop their ability in a second subject and
schools are therefore asked to look favourably on requests for experience in a second
subject. Student teachers are likely to work collaboratively rather than independently with
second subject mentors. Overall their timetable should be approximately 50% of a normal
teaching timetable.
Please note that during this period student teachers will be in university on the
following days;
Monday 31st January
Tuesday 01st February
Tuesday 15th March
Monday 04th April
Tuesday 05th April
Monday 23rd May
Tuesday 24th May
It is a good idea when planning the timetable to take into account that students will
not be in school on these 3 Mondays & 4 Tuesdays). If lessons are planned for a
Monday/Tuesday it is not unreasonable to ask a student to leave lesson plans/
resources (Up to two lessons only). This is a good training opportunity as the mentor
can use the plan then feedback to the student on how the lesson went.
Initial weeks
However well student teachers have performed in one school, they will have to establish
their authority with pupils and make new relationships with staff, when they start in a new
one. They therefore need a period of induction. The focus of the mentoring therefore at this
stage will be on checking that the basic skills of planning and classroom management are
being successfully demonstrated. New schools present new challenges and student
teachers will need some time to adjust. It may be that some groups will be taken on at a
slightly later date than others.
Main Teaching Experience
By the 7th February the student teacher should be teaching the full 50% timetable. It is in this
phase that student teachers demonstrate they can meet the standards. Where student
teachers progress slowly, or have difficulties, concerns should be raised and appropriate
action taken in consultation with tutors and the Course Leader before Easter.
It is particularly valuable for student teachers to continue to observe and work collaboratively
with mentors at this stage, but with a clearly defined set of objectives. Their greater
experience will hopefully enable them to make more sense of what they see and do, and to
appreciate the involvement in joint planning and teaching with an established professional.
Student teachers may want to focus down onto the fine tuning of particular skills or try an
innovative approach to a topic and may ask mentors to provide feedback on their
performance using evidence of pupils’ learning. Possible topics to explore in this way may
be: - questioning skills, explaining skills, group work, differentiation, active learning
techniques, formative assessment especially target setting, vocational teaching, and field
work. After Easter please start to arrange a timetable for the final block of weeks in the
Summer. The purpose of this experience is set out below.
A school report is due during this phase of the course – see ‘key dates for mentors’.
30
Transition Phase
May 16th – June 17th
(Parts of modules 3,4,& 5)
In this final phase a further period of continuous school experience is undertaken by student
teachers. Student Teachers will build upon your prior experiences and further develop your
roles as future members of a department and a school. The aim is to move beyond the
classroom competence required simply for QTS into that required of a full member of a
departmental and school team.
During this experience student teachers will have a smaller amount of teaching (about 30%
of a normal load) but will seek to achieve very high standards in that teaching (in P.E. a
higher percentage may be necessary to allow them to gain experience of the range of
Summer activities). Student teachers will be expected to research and extend your
performance by continuing in a more systematic way the activities described for the later
stages of the main practice. It is likely that they will continue to teach some of the groups
they have taught during this earlier period of experience, but it may be appropriate for them
to meet a new group even for such a short time. The project time may also involve teaching
additional groups in order to trial materials. Observation and collaborative teaching with the
subject mentor may be very valuable at this stage. The student teacher should be
researching your teaching and looking for quality work to add to their portfolio.
During this period, if not before, professional mentors will arrange for student teachers to
learn about the arrangements for liaison with feeder schools both at a school and
department level and will arrange a visit to a feeder school.
During the Summer term student teachers must complete a Career Entry and Development
Profile, which you will take with you into your first teaching post. The CEDP belongs to the
student teacher and it is your responsibility. The Profiles will be given out in May and
discussed with tutors and mentors. We would expect student teachers to use oral feedback
from mentors as well as the end of course reports to help them identify strengths and areas
for future CEDP. The portfolio will also provide material for the CEDP.
So during this period student teachers will: work on a project beneficial to the school and to the extended professional
development of the student. This would involve the application of research to an
aspect of teaching and learning e.g. differentiation in materials, development of
programmes for citizenship, Special Needs teaching, studying the effects of different
groupings on learning;
 support subject departments in terms of teaching, preparation of schemes and
resources, visits and other practical activities;
 extend the range and depth of your skills of teaching and evaluating your own
performance;
 be involved in the wider life of the school;
 complete their Career Entry and Development Profile;
Thus student teachers will show in this final phase that you have achieved the aims of the
course by demonstrating your reflective and critical abilities, your commitment to continuing
development using the Career Entry and Development Profile, your ability to relate
effectively to colleagues and pupils and your development of teaching skills.
A school report is due during this final phase of the course – see ‘ key dates for
mentors’.
Phases of the course are shown on the following page.
31
week
w/b
3
M
T
Th
F
DiS
DiU
13/9
I
i
0
2
4
20/9
I
I
I
I
I
0
5
5
27/9
I
I
I
I
0
5
6
4/10
I
I
I
I
I
5
0
7
11/10
I
I
I
I
I
I
0
I
I
I
I
0
5
I
I
I
0
5
I
I
W
8
18/10
I
9
25/10
I
10
1/11
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
5
0
11
8/11
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
5
0
12
15/11
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
3
2
13
22/11
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
5
0
14
29/11
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
5
0
15
6/12
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
SBD
5
0
16
13/12
EP
EP
EP
EP
EP
0
5
17
20/12
V
v
v
v
v
0
0
18
27/12
v
v
v
v
v
0
0
19
3/1
Bank Holiday
EP
EP
EP
EP
1
3
20
10/1
EP
EP
EP
EP
SP
0
5
21
17/1
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
22
24/1
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
23
31/1
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
3
2
24
7/2
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
25
14/2
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
26
21/2
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
0
5
27
28/2
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
28
7/3
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
29
14/3
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
4
1
30
21/3
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
31
28/3
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
32
4/4
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
3
2
33
11/4
v
v
v
v
v
0
0
34
18/4
v
v
v
v
v
0
0
35
25/4
Bank Holiday
SP
SP
SP
SP
4
0
36
2/5
Bank Holiday
SP
SP
SP
SP
4
0
37
9/5
SP
SP
SP
SP
SP
5
0
38
16/5
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
5
0
39
23/5
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
3
2
40
30/5
Bank Holiday
TP
TP
TP
TP
0
4
41
6/6
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
5
0
42
13/6
TP
TP
TP
TP
TP
5
0
43
20/6
TP
TP
TP
0
5
44
27/6
0
1
I
Course ended
Totals 120
59
I – Induction SBD – School Based Development EP – Extension Phase SP – Second School Placement TP – Transition Phase
Directed Study
In school
vacation
University
32
STAGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENT TEACHERS
Inevitably all student teachers have areas of strength and areas that are weaker than others.
There are a variety of ways of looking at development and probably no model is true
for all. However, it is helpful to try to categorise the stages in which student teachers
develop as a way of looking at how best to support them. Below are two models
which may help you to have a clearer understanding of the development of student
teachers.
Developing Skills
The overall aim of a PGCE course is to develop the skills of teaching – implicit in this is the
skill of reflection and evaluation. We use the phrase reflective practitioner. Mentors and
class teachers are encourage to ask open questions “What went well? Why? What needs
improving? How? Lesson evaluations are crucial in developing this skill – it is the quality of
the reflection, the depth of awareness and understanding of what needs developing that
mentors and tutor are aiming to extend and eventually assess.
Early stages of teaching:
 The ability to plan a lesson with clear objectives
 The ability to deliver a lesson:
 To teach the material
 To manage the class
 To build a rapport with children
The focus is inevitably on TEACHING
Later stages of teaching:
All the above plus:
 The ability to differentiate effectively
 The ability to assess effectively pupils’ learning in the lesson
 The ability to use a range of strategies to facilitate learning
 The ability to reflect and know independently what you need to do in order to ‘move
on’ i.e. to continue your own professional development. This involves a high level of
awareness.
The focus is therefore on LEARNING
Maynard & Furlong use the following 5 stage model:
Early idealism – tend to see pupils as ‘children’ rather than individuals. Have a
clear view of what they want to be like and how they would like to be seen. Often
hostile to class teachers as they observe them.
Personal survival – this relates to fitting in and achieving control. Problems of
conflict of authority and making sense of what they see. Wanting to be seen as a
teacher. Feelings of having to do things to maintain the status quo even when they
would rather do something else. Ideal replaced by practical necessity. Reliance on
what is planned.
33
Dealing with difficulties. Beginning to make sense of what they see. Acting like a
teacher without yet fully understanding the rationale for what they are doing
(mimicry). High anxiety levels about ‘failing’. Consequent need to impress. Tutors
often seen as ‘Assessor’ and mentors collude with this. Identifying key issues like
use of language but self focused. Mostly teacher led activities. Over long planning
and reliance on worksheets.
Hitting a plateau. Have gained success in a limited range of strategies and are
content. Start to take shortcuts in planning. Less willing to try new things.
Evaluations become weaker. ‘Acting’ like a teacher rather than ‘thinking’ like a
teacher. Still having a narrow view of the role of a teacher and the nature of
learning.
Moving on. Students need to be challenged with questions that demand reflection
on their role as professional educators. ‘Why do pupils have to learn this?’ ‘What
exactly do you want them to learn?’ ‘What is the best way of teaching this?’ ‘What do
pupils already know? How do you know?’
There are other models in Furlong J. & Maynard T. (1995), Mentoring student
teachers, Routledge.
The following list are ideas from Tutors and Mentors and may help in challenging
and moving on outstanding students;




















Planning and delivering enrichment activities for Gifted and Talented pupils
Contributing to new education contexts e.g. cross curricular work, 14-19
Diplomas
Working with “unorthodox” courses
o Learning to learn
o Building learning power
Develop ‘discovery learning’
Working with more challenging groups
Teaching without using technology (PowerPoint)
Learning about pupil backgrounds through Heads of Year and form tutors and
show how this knowledge is used to plan and teach effectively
Plan and teach activities that will promote inclusion and challenge students
Using feedback effectively to demonstrate impact on pupil learning
Teaching outside the classroom using school site (not trips)
Planning and delivering an assembly
Involvement in whole school cross curricular activity / citizenship / enrichment
days
Further developing the pastoral role with guidance from mentors
Developing charity work in a school
Greater involvement in extra curricular activities
Act as a mentor/coach to pupils
Asking a student to lead a Professional Study sessions in school
Developing a school web page
Developing revision packs
Developing display materials
34









Taking an active role within subject department – lead discussion (CPD
benefit for team)
Paired observation – Student teachers give feedback observed by the mentor
Observe a class they teach in a different subject and provide feedback to the
class teacher
Department ‘tap into’ the expertise of students creativity
Attendance at middle/senior management level meetings as an observer.
Join and make contributions to a working group in school
Presenting research project to a wider audience
Attend / present workshops at the Professional Mentor conference
Working with the Core Standards and developing evidence
PATHWAYS & OTHER OPPORTUNITIES
Pathways are designed to provide a different emphasis within the PGCE routes that start in
September. They may be validated from time to time to take account of particular National
developments and changes in the curriculum. They involve some additional taught sessions
but no change in overall workload in school. Assignment 3 and the project will have a focus
on the particular emphasis of the pathway. There may be constraints on the number of
places available due to subject availability and the geography of placement offers.
Student teachers may only take one pathway for which they have to apply in November of
the year they are training.
There are currently three pathways:
SEN PATHWAY (Special Educational Needs)
Aims:
 allow greater development of the standards related to SEN and inclusion
 develop greater awareness and sensitivity towards pupils with special needs
 Provide a greater understanding of the role of the subject teacher in collaboration
with the SENCO and Teaching Assistants.
Workload: Student teachers will be expected to do the following:
 attend 10 hours extra in University
 write Assignment 3 on aspects of the school SEN policy
 develop and present a research project in the SEN area usually in relation to their
subject teaching
Criteria for acceptance:
 To be considered for the Pathway, students should normally:
 have made satisfactory progress in the first placement school
 have an interest in and understanding of, the area of special needs
 provide a letter of application
 have previous experience of working with children (or adults) with special needs
Entitlements in the main placement:
 About half the timetable to involve groups with pupils with SEN as a minimum
 Nonetheless a full range of ages and abilities to be covered in the main placement
time
 Regular meetings with the SENCO (or equivalent) to discuss progress of pupils who
have special needs
 Meeting with any external specialists who come in as support
35




A visit from the University SEN pathway coordinator or your subject tutor. The
purpose of the visit is to meet with student teachers and the subject mentors to
review progress and ensure the pathway is fully understood. It will usually involve a
lesson observation.
Assignment 3 will focus on the schools special needs policies and their
implementation
The research project will focus on supporting pupils with special needs in their
subject.
The research project time will also involve visits to special schools organised by
University and where possible reciprocal visits between pathway members.
CITIZENSHIP PATHWAY
Aims:
 allow greater development of the standards related to citizenship and whole school
curriculum provision
 develop greater awareness and understanding of the nature of pupils’ citizenship
knowledge, skills and participation
 provide a greater understanding of how citizenship can be developed across school
in collaboration with other staff
Workload:
Student teachers will be expected to do the following:
 attend 10 hours extra in University
 write Assignment 3 on aspects of the school Citizenship policy
 develop and present a research project in the Citizenship area
Criteria for acceptance:
To be considered for the Pathway, students should normally:
 have made satisfactory progress in the first placement school
 have an interest in and understanding of, the area of citizenship
 provide a letter of application
Entitlements in the main placement:
 About a quarter of the timetable to involve citizenship teaching within a specialist
subject and across other subjects. Further time may be given to support pupil
participation activities.
 Nonetheless a full range of ages and abilities to be covered in the main placement
time
 Regular meetings (fortnightly) with the citizenship co-ordinator (or equivalent) to
discuss progress in terms of pupils’ citizenship learning and of school citizenship
provision
 Meeting with adults who come in to school as support for citizenship programmes
 An visit from University tutors with citizenship experience. The purpose of the visit is
to meet with student teachers and the subject mentors to review progress and ensure
the pathway is fully understood. It will usually involve a lesson observation.
 Assignment 3 will focus on the school’s citizenship policies and their implementation
 The research project will focus on supporting pupils and schools with their citizenship
development
 The research project time will also involve visits to other schools organised by
University and where possible reciprocal visits between pathway members.
36
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 14-19 PATHWAY (PE student teachers only)
Aims:
 For trainees to gain a clear understanding of the different routes that can be taken by
pupils with an interest in PE.
 For trainees to have teaching experience of a variety of routes in KS4/KS5, for
example Sports leader Awards, BTEC, GCSE, A’ level and Vocational qualifications
 For trainees to understand and be able to critically analyse the policy and practice of
the 14 – 19 curriculum within schools and nationally (through assignment 3)
Workload:
 Student teachers will be expected to do the following:
 attend 10 extra hours in University
 write Assignment 3 on 14-19 policy reform and impact on practice
 develop and present a research project in 14-19 PE area
Criteria for acceptance:
 To be considered for the Pathway, students should normally:
 have made satisfactory progress in the first placement school
 have an interest in and understanding of, the 14-19 area in PE
 provide a letter of application
Entitlements in the main placement:
About a quarter of the timetable to involve 14-19 teaching
Trainees to teach on a variety of routes from 14-19. Nonetheless a full range of ages and
abilities to be covered in the main placement time. Regular meetings (fortnightly) with the PE
14-19 co-ordinator (or equivalent) to discuss progress in terms of pupils’ opportunities and
development. Meeting with adults who come in to school as support for 14-19 PE
programmes Assignment 3 will focus on the school’s 14-19 policies and their implementation
The project will focus on supporting pupils and schools within the 14-19 age range.
DEVISING A TIMETABLE
Considerations
When devising a timetable it is important to consider the phase of the teaching experience
and the individual needs of the student teacher. Student teachers need to experience the full
age range for which they are being trained. This means that whether they are in the first
school or second school they should have experience of the full age range the school can
offer. It is a myth to think that 6th form teaching is necessarily harder, for example, than
year nine on a Friday afternoon! We are particularly concerned that students in the first
placement in a 13(12)-19, or 11-18, school should gain experience of teaching post 16 since
their second placement may well be in an 11-16 school.
It is obviously best in the first placement if student teachers mostly teach their main subjects.
This particularly applies to Design and Technology, Science and Modern Language students
who need to gain confidence in their subject specialism before being helped in areas they
have not themselves studied for some time.
At the start of the second placement student teachers will arrive with a previous report and
an action plan. These should be used to help devise the timetable. Please remember that
they will have had limited teaching experience at this stage. First placements involve largely
collaborative teaching with a partner and last only 5 full weeks. Those who have never
37
taught before embarking on the course will still be very inexperienced and probably lacking
in confidence. They are also having to get to know an entirely new school – do not expect
too much too soon. They are with you for 18 weeks so there is plenty of time for them to
develop.
Given the length of time the students are with you they do not necessarily have to maintain
exactly the same timetable for the whole placement. Especially at the start of the project
time, think creatively about other experiences the student teacher may still need and feel
free to rearrange the classes significantly. Similarly if problems occur during the placement it
may be that temporarily swapping groups, or altering the collaborative arrangements, will be
helpful. Feel free to do this but please include the subject tutor and the student teacher in
such discussions.
Concerns
Mentors are understandably concerned about the achievement of their pupils. Again we
would urge you to consider the presence of a student teacher as an opportunity. Having
another, hopefully, enthusiastic, qualified adult working with you in a group ought, for the
most part, to be beneficial for pupils. The opportunity for collaborative work should be
seized! Although student teachers need to be able to teach ‘alone’ and sustain this at any
level for which they are trained, for much of the time the mentor will also be present, if only
as an observer. This should provide opportunities for the mentor to work as a TA with small
groups, to split classes by taking out the gifted, the most disruptive, or just a proportion to
make things more manageable, to help both pupils and student teachers develop. With a
positive and creative approach the worries over pupil progression and achievement should
disappear.
Teaching Post-16 for those on the 11-18/14-19 courses
It is essential to get a full range of experience in this area if the student teacher is to be
considered adequately trained. The emphasis is on quality rather than quantity, but there are
essential ingredients that should be evident from teaching files and portfolios.
Student teachers should observe a range of post-16 provision, not just A/AS level work. This
can be across subject boundaries, so that they understand the post-16 and 14-19
frameworks. They should teach collaboratively at least one group with a mentor/class
teacher. Within that they should be solely responsible for planning and teaching at least 3
sequential lessons, all of which should be thoroughly evaluated and at least one of which
should be formally observed. They should have marked work produced by pupils and had
this moderated by the class teacher/mentor. This does not necessarily have to be from the
class they have taught, although often it will be. It is good to have practice in a range of
marking from course work to exam papers.
The benefits of having a student teacher as a flexible and enthusiastic colleague may be felt
particularly with sixth-form teaching. A student could, for example, research a particular ‘A’level topic and then present a lesson or two on it. A busy sixth-form teacher should see the
advantage of this. A good time to gain this experience is in the first placement (if available)
since such experience allows student teachers to focus on planning and pedagogy rather
than behaviour management.
If a student teacher has been placed in two 11-16 schools and is on an 11-18 route, a third
placement school or college will be arranged for the student teacher. In this case a separate
report will be completed detailing the post 16 experience.
38
Summary Grid with Approximate Time Allocations
The grid below indicates the number of periods per week that student teachers should spend
on each activity. In certain cases the timings will need to be significantly different in order to
support the development of the student teacher. In PE in the autumn term there will be a
higher percentage of teaching alone and less paired teaching; however, collaborative work
with mentors and other teachers should still continue. Where ML, Science and D and T
student teacher pairs have different specialisms these proportions will also need variation.
The table below shows the approximate number of periods per week and is based on a 25
period week.
Dates in
school
Part of the
Course
Collaborative
working
with a mentor
and /or partner
Solo
teaching
Observation
Study and
preparation
Time
Research
Project
4.10.10 –
15.10.10
Induction
period
3
0
17
5
0
1.11.10 –
10.12.10
Placement 1
8
4
5
8
0
Placement 2
main teaching
3
10
4
8
0
Placement 2
The research
project time
2
6
3
4
10
*17.1.11 –
13.5.11
16.5.11 –
17.06.11
*The timetable during placement two should be introduced gradually. The student
teacher should not begin teaching the full ten periods until the third week of the
practice (Wednesday 2nd February).
If the school works on a two-week timetable then there may be differences between the time
spent on certain of the above activities between week one and week two.
39
Explanation of each activity
The grid below explains the activities student teachers should be engaged in.
TYPE OF WORK
Collaborative working
with partner
EXAMPLES
Joint planning; leading parts of a lesson; acting as TA; acting as
observer; teaching half the class while someone else teaches the
other half, joint assessment of children’s work
Collaborative working
with mentor(s)
Acting as TA; Leading parts of lesson to practise particular skills
e.g. demonstration; acting as observer; planning lesson for mentor
to teach; teaching parts of the lesson mentor has planned;
teaching part of a lesson to a selected group while mentor takes
the rest Joint assessment of work
Solo teaching
Fully responsible for group. Planning alone. Partners/Mentors can
still help with ideas and act as TAs or observers. However, one
student teacher must lead the lesson and assess the work.
Observation
Observing other teachers in the school. These observations
should always have a clear focus. At times it will be necessary for
observations to be targeted at a particular area of a student
teachers development, for example behaviour management or
pace.
Study and preparation Prepare lessons; practice experiments; write evaluations; collate
time
portfolio evidence; prepare weekly reviews/periodic reviews; work
on University tasks; subject mentor meeting; professional mentor
meeting: primary school visits; professional development; subject
knowledge development; carry out research for
assignments/project.
WORKING WITH STUDENT TEACHERS
Collaborative working
Throughout the course mentors and student teachers will need to work collaboratively. This
is a strong focus in the new standards. The mentor should not expect the student teacher to
undertake teaching whole lessons from the beginning of the school experience. A
programme of gradually widening responsibility needs to be arranged. The transfer of
responsibility to the student teacher has to be explained and carried out with clarity and tact.
When the student teacher is in charge of part of a lesson any questions from the pupils to
their class teacher should be re-directed to the student teacher. Pupils must recognise
when the student teacher is responsible for managing the class.
The benefits of collaborative work have been identified by mentors as falling into two
categories:
Benefits to student teachers & mentors
(i) Shared planning, although time consuming, helps the student teacher understand what a
teacher takes account of in preparing a lesson and it is a two way learning process in which
the student may well contribute novel ideas and approaches
(ii) By having responsibility for a specific component of a lesson they can concentrate on
particular skills without being overwhelmed by having to attend to everything at once.
(iii) Observing an experienced teacher and understanding why the lesson is planned and
carried out in the way it is helps the student teacher get on the inside of a teacher’s “craft
knowledge”.
40
Benefits to pupils
The gain from additional adult contact. This provides extra support and time and coverage,
and so on, for developing pupil learning whatever style of teaching is employed.
The gain in energising change away from transmissive modes of teaching by the discussion
between partners of how to approach and teach a particular topic. We could describe this as
‘extending perspectives on learning’
Modes of Collaborative Work (based on Arthur, Davison & Moss 1997). In all the modes
described below the notion of careful debrief and evaluation is essential. Without time given
to reviewing, the learning outcomes will be limited.
Observation
One partner watches the other. This can be a focused observation to analyse a particular
approach, or may be for the observer to raise questions as feedback. It could be used for
the observer to give feedback, although this is more likely if the pairs are of equal status.
With a mentor this is always used pre-teaching, but there is no reason why it could not be
used later for more specific purposes.
Teacher + Teaching Assistant
In this mode one partner leads and the other acts as a teaching assistant. In this model the
TA can work with an individual, a group with learning difficulties, or the high achievers to
stretch them. Having a clear lead teacher can allow for modelling a particular approach and
can help pupils by ensuring where the centre of authority sits.
Linear Sequence Mode
Here the partners compartmentalise the lesson into prearranged sections and take separate
responsibility for them. This can help individuals by allowing them to focus on particular
skills e.g. settling the class; conducting a demonstration; summarising; questioning;
managing group work or returning and commenting on written work etc. This can run into
problems if people overrun their section and may leave pupils confused as to who is in
charge.
Planning/teaching Split Mode
One partner plans the lesson and the other teaches it. This is only effective if the debrief is
carried out sensitively but thoroughly. One especially effective use of this is where a mentor
taught the lesson to one group, the student teacher then tried to use the same lesson plan to
another group and finally the student teacher developed his/her own way with a third group
in the light of that experience
Class Division Mode
In this version the class is split into two and each partner teaches one half the same content.
This gives more individual attention and allows clear responsibility. It can also be used to
teach each half different things on rotation thus playing to subject knowledge strengths of
individual partners. It still requires shared planning and a detailed debrief. It has been used
to great effect with exam classes, especially when in revision periods.
Whichever pattern is used it is important:(i)
to discuss beforehand and agree the role to be taken by each partner during the
lesson. The problem of shared leadership needs to be explicitly resolved to vary the
student teacher’s part in a lesson so they can practise a range of skills over a period
of time.
to discuss and evaluate the experience
41
Working with a pair of student teachers
Student teachers are expected to work as a subject pair on their first school placement.
This provides the opportunity to plan and review lessons and schemes of work together.
Where student teachers are unable to be placed as a pair they should work with the mentor
as the other pair member. In all cases it important that the pair have agreed beforehand how
they intend to work together.
Student teachers do not choose their partner - they are placed together often because of
where they are living. Some pairs will work well together, but it is possible that some pairs
will experience difficulties. They will certainly be different people and may well compare both
their previous experience and subject background as well as the progress they make in the
school. The mentor can help by avoiding public comparisons and by valuing the strengths of
each person. The mentor may sometimes have a difficult decision to make about when to
move from pair work to individual responsibility for classes. Where pairs clash either in
personal terms or in teaching style they may want to work separately from an earlier stage.
Where they lack confidence they may want to delay individual responsibility. One may be
straining at the leash, the other reluctant. However, experience shows that clashes are rare.
One of the things the course must develop in student teachers is the ability to work with
others as a team. Brilliant teachers who can’t do this are considerably less effective and may
be devastating in the school as a whole. Student teachers therefore have to learn to work
with others - both in a pair and as a member of a department. Conflicts need to be resolved
rather than ignored. Tutors and mentors can work together to help student teachers in
making these professional relationships work.
Helping student teachers with class management
It is vital that student teachers are able to establish their authority as a teacher in the
classroom and manage learning in a purposeful and controlled way. The pupils will inevitably
know that they are learners.
Confidence, and a confident appearance, are important factors in achieving authority.
Student teachers can be very nervous without showing it. Most experienced teachers find
themselves more inhibited when they are being observed and this applies to student
teachers. If there is a good relationship with the mentor, it helps considerably. Where
student teachers show signs of lack of didn’t do or say, that signalled lack of confidence.
Sometimes student teachers find it difficult to balance the need to be firm with the need to
make good relationships with pupils. They can be too strict or too friendly. They may need
help in finding the right balance and they may also need convincing that pupils expect and
want them to deal with misbehaviour. Student teachers can feel inhibited in intervening
effectively, thinking that their mentor will disapprove (because they are looking for ‘good
relationships’ and conflict doesn’t seem naturally part of this). It is useful for student teachers
to see a video of their own performance (agonising sometimes). There is nothing clearer
than for them to observe what you, the observer, have seen.
Evaluations
Crucial to the development as a teacher is the ability to observe teaching with an analytical
eye and to evaluate its effectiveness. Student teachers need all the practice they can get.
When working in pairs, they should be encouraged to analyse each other’s performance and
to do so in a constructive and positive way. Mentor feedback on their ability to analyse each
other’s teaching is important. Mentor feedback, written reviews and development targets
which focus on students’ self-evaluations of lessons are essential for professional progress.
It is an expectation that during placement 1 student teachers will complete an
evaluation after every lesson taught and on placement 2 three detailed evaluations
each week.
42
Supporting Assignments & the Project
Assignment work is often thought to be ‘University work’. However, the work has been
designed to support the student teacher to develop a better understanding of schools,
learning and teaching. NQT feedback shows that they have valued the insights gained from
their study and that they found the assignments useful.
Student teachers will be considering themselves as learners in assignment 1 and seeing
how learning theory applies to themselves and to pupils. They will be working towards this
assignment during the induction period and focussed observations on different teaching
styles will assist their understanding. Mentors can help by directing them to colleagues with
very different (but good) approaches.
Mentors will also want to consider the need to support student teachers in planning their
second assignment. This is the critical analysis of a scheme of work and this may well affect
the choice of classes on the timetable in order to give student teachers the chance to teach
some of their scheme of work. It is not essential to have taught all of it, but some experience
is needed for good evaluative reflection to be possible.
The third assignment is about the impact of a whole school policy. Since this may well
require questionnaires to, or interviews with, staff and pupils mentors should expect to see
any plans well in advance. This is often an area where the professional mentor will have a
larger role than the subject mentor. However, impact of policies on departments still has a
strong subject focus.
Alongside their teaching student teachers must carry out a research project on a topic
negotiated with their mentors and their subject tutor. The project should be negotiated and
planned during the main block of teaching before Easter and carried out during the final five
week block. Where a student teacher is having difficulty tutors and mentors may decide to
maintain a higher teaching load and focus the project on the teaching targets specifically.
Most of the work for the project should be done during the transition period when it will be
the main work that student teachers have to do alongside their teaching (assignments will
have been completed). At the planning stage it is important to remember that resources for
the production of new materials are limited and the time available in the summer is two and
half days times 4 weeks (2½ x 4 weeks). The time spent will be less for PE student teachers
who need to maintain a higher teaching load in order to ensure NC coverage. However, any
outcome will be of interest to school, student teacher and University - so some copying is
likely. Student teachers should not be expected to fund the projects. The project must
provide them with an academic/professional challenge and extend their professional abilities.
The project is assessed orally. A folder of evidence should also be presented. In addition
those student teachers studying at Master’s level will write a literature review.
Mentors should arrange for student teachers to present the results of their project to an
appropriate group of staff in their placement school. The exact composition should be
dictated by the nature of the project and could range from HoDs, department staff, TAs and
even Governors. In some schools student teachers and their mentors working in different
subjects have been the audience. This practice has been very successful. All student
teachers will also present to their peers and tutors in the final week of the course in
University.
Supporting the Portfolio
All teachers will find it helpful to keep a form of portfolio record of their professional
development. The PGCE portfolio has a similar purpose, to chart development, progress
and good practice. It is helpful for mentors to remind student teachers to be thinking about
the portfolio and in particular the evidence to support the commentaries. This can be done
formally during periodic reviews but is worth mentioning each week. When a student
teacher has done something that is noteworthy and exemplifies good practice s/he should be
43
encouraged to put a record in their portfolio. This makes it easier for them to complete the
commentaries when the time comes as the evidence is already accumulated.
Student Teachers Causing Concern
At any stage in the course a student teacher may become a cause for concern. This means
that there is a serious weakness which needs to be addressed, without which the student will
fail to meet the standards for QTS. Thus it is an issue which is more urgent and serious than
those for which developmental advice is given. However, many things in the student
teacher’s practice may be going well, or even very well, so the procedure is invoked in the
full expectation that a student teacher will be able to remedy the situation and achieve the
Standards. The following stages will occur:
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The student teacher will be informed of the concern;
Written targets will be set which offer strategies for development which are standards
related and time limited, which the student teacher should sign;
Progress on this action plan will be monitored and recorded;
If progress occurs further targets will be set until the student teacher is considered to
be back on track, at which point normal procedures resume;
If there is no progress the student teacher will be given one further chance to move
on through a short very focussed action plan;
If this has no impact the student teacher will be asked to leave the course.
If the process is invoked during University time, a written action plan will be provided and the
subject tutor and course leader informed and, if the student teacher is due to go on
placement, the school subject and professional mentors. If the designation occurs whilst in
school mentors and tutors should ensure the following:
 That the cause for concern has been noted on a formal observation sheet, or on the
weekly review and that the student teacher knows;
 That subject tutors and professional mentors are informed and involved in target
setting;
 That the subject tutor visits during the initial monitoring;
 In the event of reaching the final stage above the course leader (or another suitable
tutor) will visit near the end of the monitoring period.
A student teacher who is not making satisfactory progress by the end of the second school
placement may be asked to focus in the transition phase on a higher proportion of teaching
and a project aimed at meeting the required Standards.
In the event of a major sudden crisis (e.g. professional misconduct) that could lead to the
exclusion of a student teacher, the Course Leader should be contacted immediately and
before any precipitous action is taken. In the event of a situation such that a school is
unwilling for the student teacher to continue, the University will attempt to find an alternative
placement for the student teacher only if the cause is considered to have mitigating
circumstances. This will be done openly acknowledging to the new school the
circumstances that have lead to the need for a change. If a school cannot be found the
course will terminate.
At any stage in this process, if matters are considered serious enough, a student teacher
may be asked to leave the course. They may also be offered counselling through the
University services.
44
MENTORING DIFFERENT “TYPES” OF STUDENTS
Mentors shared their experiences of mentoring different types of students…
Stereotype of
Student
Strategies for Mentoring
The over familiar
casual student
The Professional Mentor in school should explain code within
the school & refer to staff handbook. Mention dress code to
student during weekly review. Child protection issues
(professional mentor) Explain that an over familiar manner
means lack of respect from pupils; need to keep their
distance.
The brain picker
Confidence boost when the student has a good idea & point
student
in the right direction. Fix a definite time to answer questions.
Suggest that they share ideas with their peer group.
The last-minute
Breakdown tasks – very structured approach, see daily to
student
check planning & targets.
The “Little Miss
Look at good examples within school. Give a very challenging
Perfect” student
activity. Extend the challenges. Feedback from outside of the
department. Examples of excellent plans/evaluations. Be
firm; discuss the realities of full time teaching. Cover a
teacher for the day.
The having time off
Find out why they’re having time off informally. Keep
student
Alison/Sue informed. Adapt timetable, set short-term
achievable targets. Make a note of all absences.
The mechanical
Small activities/tasks. Targeted teacher observation, follow
student
up with observation of student implementing strategies.
The 25% lazy
Use time more usefully, go to other “practical” lessons, not
student
just D & T. Shadow other members of staff to find out jobs
other than teaching. Give target of “come up with 10 good
starter activities”. Fill their time till they feel pressured to “get
going”.
The ‘lots of
Tell them the realities. Ask them “Is this going to be the job
problems’ student
for you?” Short term support, give them strategies to solve
potential problems (child minders, support networks)
The “it’s not my fault” Target set. Be firm, specific. Put the ownership back on them.
student
The greedy student
Fix definite time to answer questions & defer all queries to
that time. Explain clearly what you expect them to come up
with before you give them all your ideas.
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GIVING FEEDBACK
Introduction
The following are guidelines only and should be used as such. Student teachers can receive
too little or too much feedback. How much feedback to give at a particular point in a student
teacher’s development is a matter of professional judgement on the part of the mentor.
Types of feedback
Oral feedback:
When a lesson has been observed some oral feedback should be given. Oral comments
should not be given when pupils are present; ideally it should be given in private, but this is
rarely possible. When written feedback only is possible it should be followed up later with a
quick oral check on how it was received and whether it was understood. All feedback should
lead to a potential dialogue.
Written feedback:
What is written down can be referred to later and reflected on - so it is helpful for student
teachers to have some written feedback to go back to when they evaluate their teaching.
Such feedback can be brief and might only pick out two points to work on. Although short
feedback of this sort need not use the normal observation form there is no reason why it
could not.
Giving feedback
The following advice about the feedback process is drawn from a number of sources and
provides a useful checklist.
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Arrange a quiet room, free from interruption and away from pupils and other student
teachers
Be clear about what you want to say
Feedback (oral and written) should also include comments on planning and subject
knowledge as well as the lesson
Start with the student teacher’s evaluation, allowing all points to be made without
comment. However, try to encourage them to make some positive comments first!
Then move into your evaluation by building on the student teacher’s evaluation
Give due emphasis to strengths. Students will often only hear negative points
Avoid vague or generalised praise or criticism. Be specific – comments such as ‘that
was brilliant’ or ‘that was great’ are not helpful on their own and need to be qualified.
Often students will give us feedback stating ‘I’m getting lots of positive (or negative)
feedback but nothing else’.
Allow time for setting targets and discussing how they can be achieved. Select
priority areas. If there are lots of negative points select a couple of points for the
student to work on and then gradually deal with the others
Deal positively with areas that need improvement. Set SMART targets. Most
importantly suggest strategies for achieving the targets set. See the grid on page 50
for guidance
Own the feedback. Rather than starting with ‘you are…’ use phrases such as ‘I
wonder if…, ‘I thought…’ or ‘in my view…’
Check the student teacher’s perception of what has been said and of how they are
progressing. Let them know how you think they are progressing.
The questions below may help you in your feedback to develop a mentoring conversation.
DEVELOPING A MENTORING CONVERSATION
The mentoring conversation can guide student teachers towards being reflective and support
them in improving their practice and taking responsibility for identifying and meeting their
developing professional needs (Q7). To enrich this mentoring conversation tutors have
devised a list of questions which mentors may use as prompts during feedback.
Mentoring Questions
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Do you feel pupils understood the relevance of the learning objective i.e...?
o What did the pupils learn?
o Why they are learning?
How was the learning assessed?
How effective was the assessment?
How effective were the resources used? How do you know they were effective?
What are the different ways in which the task could be assessed?
Did the pupils achieve what you expected them to?
If you were to plan this lesson again would you plan differently – are there any
resources that would have helped improve the lesson?
Were you confident that you had sufficient, detailed knowledge about this topic to
enable you to be comfortable teaching this?
Did you feel the resources you provided for this lesson covered everything the pupils
required?
What did you feel most confident talking to the pupils about…?
Were your timings accurate – if not – why?
What strategies did you use to manage the time and resources? Which strategies
were most effective?
What strategies did you use to manage behaviour? Which strategies were most
effective?
Were your resources pitched at correct level for pupils? How do you know?
What did the pupils learn this lesson – how do you know?
Did the lesson have an effective pace? How do you know?
How was pace achieved in the lesson?
Tell me about … the positive things.
Can I help you with …?
Can I show you …?
What do you think about …?
What would enable you to progress further in your teaching?
What targets would you set yourself having planned, taught and assessed the
lesson?
How do you know …?
Take key points from the lesson and develop them e.g. Use interactive whiteboard.
How were SEN students supported effectively?
Talk me through the best bits of the lesson.
Would you plan that differently? If you could do it again what ?
How successful do you think your intended learning objectives were? Give reasons.
What alternative assessment strategies could have been used?
Have you achieved everything you planned to do? Give reasons for your answer.
What do you think the students have learnt today?
If you had another class to teach this to, would you change any of your resources?
What could you do to enable the same content to be delivered to a less/more able
class?
47
Frequency
Student teachers should be given:
 some feedback after every lesson that is observed, even if it is brief and oral.
 formal written feedback on at least 3 lessons per week.
Using the observation form
The observation form highlights Standards at the top. These can be identified by the student
teacher or selected by the observer, or both. It helps if the focus is discussed beforehand
and links to previous targets set through observation or weekly reviews. The largest section
can be used as a free account of the lesson or a summary whichever the writer finds most
convenient. However, the form should not need taking away to be written up neatly. It is
intended as an immediate record. Targets should offer strategies for achievement and may
be identified by the student teacher or observer.
It is not necessary to comment on all the Standards areas at one viewing and irrespective of
the focus comments should be made on any significant area observed. It is important to
recognise that over a number of observations it would be expected that comments would
refer to all standards areas and that comments on more than just class management should
appear. As student teachers get better we should move the focus to teaching and learning
and issues such as formative assessment.
Responsibility for giving feedback
Student teachers work with class teachers, subject mentors and professional mentors. All
are expected to give feedback. Class teachers gain from having a student teaching their
class by relief from preparation and marking. They can reasonably be asked to observe
and give feedback, following the guidelines on their role set out below. Feedback should, at
least in part, focus on the targets set in the weekly review.
It is for each school to decide who carries out formal observations; it is likely that the subject
and professional mentors will do most of them.
Guidance for non-mentors
The major responsibility for supervising a student teacher rests with the subject mentor who
handles most of the organisation of their workload, observes them teach, gives feedback
and conducts a weekly session reviewing progress and setting targets. In many cases the
majority of the classes taught by the student teacher will be those normally taught by the
mentor but, for example, where mentors have a student teacher for each practice, this may
not be the case. It is extremely valuable for student teachers to work with different teachers
so that they can observe a range of teaching styles. Partner schools have asked for some
guidance for teachers, who have student teachers in their classes but who have not been
trained as mentors, about how they can support the mentor and the student teacher.
The following points reflect the good practice that already exists in many schools.
 Student teachers need clear guidance from class teachers about what they have to
teach, what resources are available to support them and how much freedom they
have to vary their approach so that they can prepare efficiently.
 The class teacher remains responsible for the learning and the management of the
pupils and will therefore normally observe the lessons taught by the student teacher.
Student teachers cannot assume full legal responsibility until they have qualified.
 Feedback to student teachers on their performance is crucial to morale and
development. After every lesson observed some oral feedback from the class
teacher, however brief, is important.
 Written feedback is particularly valuable also because it is available to reflect on later
when the emotional pressure of teaching has subsided. We hope that class teachers
will be able to offer this support using the proforma provided or by providing brief
notes on a sheet of paper.
48
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Class teachers should liaise closely with the subject mentor, reporting progress and
helping to set targets for the weekly review session.
It is particularly important that class teachers signal at an early stage to the mentor
and student teacher any concerns they may have about a student teacher’s
progress.
REVIEWS AND TARGET SETTING
Student teachers have been provided with a printed set of weekly review and periodic review
sheets but forms can be adapted electronically if desired.
Induction Period
Initially student teachers will be observing and helping. As late in the second week as
possible an initial review should occur to set priorities for the school based development that
follows.
Weekly Reviews
Every student teacher is entitled to one session a week of ‘quality’ mentoring time devoted to
their professional development. This time must be given high priority by the school and
should be free from interruption. In the absence of a subject mentor, the professional
mentor, or other suitably trained mentor, would need to conduct the session. Student
teachers will prepare for the weekly meeting by thinking about their performance over the
week, and re-reading their own evaluations of the lessons they taught and any feedback
from their mentor and other teachers. This should enable them to collate targets ready to
draft ones for the coming week. Student teachers should complete the first part of the
review sheet. (This does not prevent mentors from adding things). Mentors will have
observed the student teacher teaching and will have received feedback from other teachers
who have observed the student teacher. Student teachers may select evidence of their
achievements to bring to the meeting and they should identify areas that they need to work
on.
During the session the mentor and the student teacher should:
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review the progress/achievements that has been made on the targets set the
previous week
discuss the evidence which highlights any achievements
set targets for the coming week
discuss how these targets will be met
complete the record of the review session
check that evaluations have been completed
check the progress of assignments, the portfolio and research project
The focus for development will clearly depend on the performance of the student teacher.
The mentor will prioritise targets and focus on what is essential to achieve improvement.
Targets set each week should be the focus of some formal observation.
In order to ensure that student teachers are familiar with and make use of the Standards
each weekly review should involve a quick look at a section of the Standards with brief
comments on any progress made towards achieving them. This should not be done in a
way that excludes reference to other key developments or other standards areas. The
Standards are set out in the Appendices. The agenda for a weekly review might be: Review of progress on last week’s targets (5 mins)
 Focus on key standards area to review progress and set targets (10 mins)
 Review of week’s performance (including other standards areas) and setting targets
for next week (25 mins)
49
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Checking evaluations, progress with assignments, the portfolio and the research
project (5 mins)
Mentors may find the weekly checklist on page 49 useful as an aide mémoire during the
weekly meetings.
Periodic Reviews
Every few weeks the weekly session will be a review of overall progress towards
achievement of the Standards. Ideally this review would be carried out by the Professional
mentor, but arrangements within the school may not allow this. Where it is carried out by
the subject mentor its different nature from the weekly review should be highlighted.
The tasks for this review are:to review the action plans from the subject and ICT audits
to review any other previous action plans and adjust the targets and time scales as
necessary
to discuss how targets will be achieved;
to review the evidence that is being gathered for the portfolio.
The periodic review is to remind student teachers of the big picture of their development. It
helps to focus on progress in the overall scale of things and should help them to re-prioritise
their way forward. It also gives time to focus on the portfolio and evidence needed to chart
best practice.
Periodic reviews take place in the weeks beginning:
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15th October
29th November
14th February
28th March
16th May
The table on the following page details the focus of weekly and periodic review meetings
50
Portfolio Review Sheets 2010/2011
Week beginning*
20/09/2010
27/09/2010
15/10/2010
18/10/2010
01/11/2010
08/11/2010
15/11/2010
22/11/2010
29/11/2010
06/12/2010
06/12/2010
13/12/2010
04/01/2011
04/01/2011
10/01/2011
17/01/2011
24/01/2011
31/01/2011
07/02/2011
14/02/2011
28/02/2011
07/03/2011
14/03/2011
21/03/2011
28/03/2011
28/03/2011
26/04/2011
03/05/2011
09/05/2011
16/05/2011
Activity and Focus
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Periodic Review of the induction period
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet - School
Periodic review sheet - school
Priorities for next placement
Action plan to be included with first set of commentaries
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Friday 7th January First day visit to second placement. Review targets
from first placement
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Weekly Review Sheet- University
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Periodic Review Sheet - School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Periodic Review Sheet - School
Action plan to be included with second set of commentaries
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Weekly Review Sheet -School
Periodic Review Sheet–School
* Dates may have to vary where school holidays are different in different Local Authorities
SETTING SPECIFIC TARGETS
Area to work
on
Use of voice
Increase pace
Give clear
instructions
Give praise
Set time limits
Suggestions
Ensure that you vary the volume and the pitch of your voice, along with the
speed of delivery,
Avoid shouting which can lead to your voice sounding shrill (and can wind
pupils up if sustained)
Aim to breathe from your diaphragm and project your voice
Imagine yourself yawning in order to get a deeper sound
Make sure that your voice does not come across as sarcastic or sound like
you are talking down to pupils
Timed activities
Go for a 20/80 lesson. 20% teacher 80% pupil. Focus on learning rather
than teaching
Clear ‘snappy’ content
Use starter and plenary
Put clear ILOs on the board ‘mission for the lesson’ and make reference
during the lesson
Monitor that pupils are on task
Organise resources
Give shorter rather than longer times
Be clear as to what you want pupils to have completed by end of lesson
Plan a variety of activities
Get pupils on task ASAP
Give frequent time checks to pupils
Break down tasks into manageable units
Smooth transitions
Knowing pupils names and directing questions at them
Quick fire oral work
Keep these short but concise. Not too wordy
Repeat them several times in different ways
Write the key things pupils need to do on the board to
reinforce/consolidate
Ensure pupils know how to structure their work…date, title, numbering
points etc.
Use questioning to check understanding
Pick up/ be aware of misconceptions and remedy
Be aware of pupils difficulties and remedy
Through spot dems. /exemplar work/staged examples
Judge number of instructions – not too many at once
Ask pupils to repeat back instructions to check they have understood
Write ILOs on board
Use appropriate vocabulary
Visual instructions
Give loads of praise, but make sure that it sound sincere
Using praise before a reprimand can be very effective (e.g. I know that you
can be sensible/do some good work etc, but I don’t like the way you
are….) This may be a method best used when talking to an individual at
the end of the lesson
If pupils cannot get attention for doing positive things they will seek
attention for doing negative things and it is quicker to get the latter!
Give written as well as verbal timings
52
Ensure smooth
transitions
Show
enthusiasm
Set appropriate
challenges
Be assertive
Use humour
Emphasise the
importance of
the work
Cut out
peripheral
chat/low level
disruption
Check
completion of
tasks
Avoid
confrontation
Start and end your lesson promptly. It is good role modelling
Always give a time limit for a task
Give the pupils less time than you think they need
Count down the time (with urgency)
Give them a warning towards the end to focus them on finishing
Avoid dead time. When off task, pupils will start to misbehave
Try using egg timer, stop clock, music, pingers etc
Practice how long things take
Time targets on the board
Keep to time targets set
Breakdown projects/activities into ‘bite sized chunks’
Set individual targets
Give out the next task before pupils have finished /whilst they are working
on the previous one
When sticking things/writing on the board, get pupils repeating/or doing
something so that they are active
Use your ILOs (on OHT or the board) as a map for the lesson to avoid
pauses whilst you look at your lesson plan
Have clear start, middle and finish to lesson
Organisation prior to lesson. Ensure everything is o hand
Assertive delivery
Gain pupil attention before giving next instruction
Refer to previous task so pupils see the link between tasks
Arrange furniture to suit activity
Recap – activity - recap
Smile
Focus on the positive aspects of the topic you are teaching
Use encouraging gestures
Encourage pupils to go “one step further”
Always have extension tasks ready and set them in advance (possibly with
a menu of activities to work through on the board)
Aim to be assertive rather than aggressive
Be decisive, e.g. when setting tasks, choosing pupils to do things,
collecting in materials etc
Use humour appropriately to defuse situations (but not sarcasm!)
Ensure that your body language fits what you are saying (don’t smile when
you are reprimanding a pupil)
Keep your focus on the work which needs to be covered
Keep coming back to this as the key issue
Tick your ILOs off to chart progress through the lesson
Do not get side tracked by irrelevant questions (be polite, but assertive)
Do not talk over pupils
Use a click, stare etc in the first instance
Use names to stop individuals
Wait for silence (and tell them what you are waiting for!)
Move pupils who continue to talk
Set up a seating plan if necessary
Avoid asking if they understand all the time
Try not to constantly ask, “Have you finished?”
Monitor body language and facial expression to gauge understanding
Focus on the ground rules and reasons for them
Don't get into arguments
Don't punish whole classes
Give pupils a chance to "put things right"/make amends
53
A SUBJECT MENTOR’S DIARY
Daily – Observation of students & feedback
A total of 3 full formative comments sheets are required for each student each week.
This should reduce to 2 when the student is on a 25% timetable.
Weekly –time must be set aside to complete the weekly reviews.
It is helpful to students if this is a regular slot where they can meet the mentor
without interruption. Mentors should use this time to check folders (inc. the portfolio),
the subject audit and the standards monitoring grid. These should assist you in
setting appropriate targets for the student.
Assignments may need to be discussed and towards the end of the second
experience the Career Entry Development Profile (CEDP)
Please note that the QTT Standards should be referred to on observation sheets
weekly/periodic reviews and school reports.
You may find the subject mentors checklist overleaf useful.
54
WEEKLY REVIEW CHECKLIST FOR SUBJECT MENTORS
Subject Mentors may find the following checklist useful when conducting weekly meetings.
WEEKLY REVIEW DATE :
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

WHAT TO CHECK
Has the student teacher completed
the first part of the Weekly/Periodic
Review sheet?
Has the student teacher completed
his/her evaluations from the past
week?
Has the student teacher’s progress
on last week’s targets been checked?
Has the student teacher’s planning
for next week been checked?
Have targets been set for the coming
week, including targets focusing on
subject knowledge/subject
pedagogy?
Has there been a discussion as to
how these targets might be met?
Have the Standards been referred to
Have the audits been checked?
Has the Portfolio been updated?
Have the lessons to be observed
next week been agreed?
Has progress with the assignment
been checked? (if appropriate)
Have we both completed and signed
the Weekly/Periodic Review form?
NOTES/THINGS TO DO/REMEMBER
55
Further comments
TUTOR VISITS
The purpose of the visit
The tutor is there primarily to visit and support the subject mentor. The purposes of joint
observation are to aid consistency of assessment across schools and to help develop the
skills of mentors. In the Autumn when student teachers are working in pairs, it is likely that
only one of the pair will be observed. The professional mentor is responsible for ensuring
consistency of judgement within the school and will therefore carry out some joint
observation with subject mentors. It may be desirable for a professional mentor to join
subject tutor and mentor in observing the student teacher.
During the lesson
The mentor(s) and the tutor should take care not to talk to each other during the lesson if it
creates a disturbance. By the end of the lesson they should each write their comments on
the observation sheet leaving space for the targets to be set.
After the lesson
The essential part of the visit for achieving consistency of judgement is for joint observation
to take place and for mentor and tutor to compare their assessment of the lesson. Ideally
this will happen immediately after the lesson. Ideally the lesson will be followed by a brief
discussion between the mentor and the tutor and then a feedback session with the student.
Feedback should always start with the student teacher being asked for their views. On the
first visit the mentor should lead the feedback session. On a subsequent visit the tutor
might lead it. This feedback session is a valuable opportunity for staff development both for
the mentor and the tutor and it is hoped that most visits will be able to incorporate it.
During the Autumn and the early weeks of the Spring experience the emphasis should be on
formative feedback and on the identification of priorities for development. Tutors and
mentors will be concerned about whether the right priorities are being identified, about the
quality of the evidence base of their comments and about whether progress is satisfactory
for this stage of the course. Later in the Spring and in the Summer there will be more
emphasis on summative assessment. Tutors and mentors will want to compare their
assessment of the student teacher against the Standards.
Following the feedback session one copy of the mentor’s comments and one copy of the
tutor’s should be given to the student teacher and one of each returned to University for
filing. It will provide evidence that we are seeking to achieve consistency. Mentors and tutors
will also complete a visit form.
WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COURSE
Background
Whilst not wishing to encourage students to think about leaving, for some student teachers a
time arrives in the course when they decide that teaching is not for them. This may be for
many reasons not related to the ability to perform well in the classroom.
We would hope that before this decision is made that student teachers have
 Discussed it with mentors
 Discussed it with tutors
 Talked to friends, partners and relatives
We would also hope that they have given themselves enough time to be really sure that they
are making the right decision.
Process
If on placement, students should agree a date with their school to finish and this should be
organised to support teachers who are taking their groups back. All work from pupils should
be marked and returned as well as any school materials that have been borrowed.
If not on placement students should agree a finish date with their subject tutor and
 Return any University library books, or tutors’ materials (including the NC document)
that have been borrowed.
 Make an appointment with the course leader, or deputy, who will ask for completion
of an exit questionnaire. Students should bring to that meeting
 a short letter saying why they are withdrawing
 the questionnaire
 their student card
 any University materials
The University will take care of the administration and notification of TDA and LA.
Use may be made of the University careers advisory centre in the Woodbury building in the
short term.
INTERCALATION
It may be that a student teacher’s circumstances change in a way that interferes with them
completing the course (e.g. pregnancy, or serious illness). In these circumstances students
should talk with their subject tutor and the course leader. Where appropriate a decision may
be granted that will allow intercalation (temporarily breaking off their studies) until
circumstances allow them the possibility of continuation. This would normally be within one
year. Intercalation is not a route to a part-time PGCE, nor is it granted where people are
simply failing the course. Students will be expected to pay course fees on their return.
FINANCES
Any money received from TDA is a grant and does not have to be paid back. This money
stops at the point where the student withdraws or intercalates (if the latter it will resume
when they restart). Student loans will require repayment in the usual way. LAs do not
usually ask for the fees to be repaid but they retain the right so to do. Course fees are paid
on a pro rata basis.
ASSESSMENT
Assessment consists of:
 3 written assignments of 3000 words;
 Assignment 1 on learning theory;
 Assignment 2 on a scheme of work;
 Assignment 3 on a whole school policy.
 A portfolio with a reflective commentary 3,000 words.
 An oral presentation of a school-based project with additionally for the M-level award
the completion a 1500 word literature review.
 A successful main school experience as shown by the school report.
It is necessary to pass all assessments and hence each module. The Portfolio will be
formatively assessed prior to final submission. The first school experience is assessed
formatively. Assignment 3, the final portfolio and the research project are available as Mlevel assessments.
57
School Experience
Assessing Progress at the end of the First School Experience.
Schools will be asked to complete the December report form. Part of the form asks for an
overall assessment of the student teacher’s performance under each of the Standards
headings. There is also a section for the mentor to comment on positive developments as
well as areas which need targeting. The report form should reflect the true progress of
the student teacher and give the second school a clear picture of the student
teacher’s strengths and weaknesses. The form also asks for an overall judgment of the
student teacher at this stage in the course. The categories used on the form are as follows;



On Target 1 (OT1) The student is on target
On Target 2 (OT2) The student is generally on target but with one or two
areas requiring serious attention and development
Not on Target (NOT) There are serious weaknesses in a number of areas
which require urgent improvement
The completed form should be discussed with the student teacher before the end of the
placement. The student teacher should also add their own comments and sign the report.
Part of the form involves ticking boxes to indicate how the student teacher is
progressing on selected areas of the standards that could be achieved by
Christmas. ‘Usually shown’ should indicate that the student teacher has provided
consistent evidence of the standard concerned and that this would therefore
constitute a target for maintenance. ‘Sometimes shown’ should indicate that
although there is some evidence of progress towards achieving the standard,
further work will need to be done in the next school. ‘Rarely shown’ indicates
serious concern about the lack of achievement in that skill and alerts the next
school to the fact that they will have to provide support in this area; it may be
enough to trigger a cause for concern assessment. ‘Little opportunity’ indicates
an area where the student teacher has yet to have any real experience, and so
again support will be needed. Itemising the standards in this way is for
convenience only. We recognise that to teach well their attainment must be
integrated.
Assessing Teaching Competence in Spring
Schools will be asked to report in the middle of the second school experience in a
similar way to the assessment in December. It is important to flag up any causes
for concern so that there is still time to deal with problems with support from the
subject tutor. Delaying judgement at this stage only leads to complications later in
the course. The tick box part of the form shows a progression within the standards
and an increased range of standards to be individually assessed.
58
Assessing Teaching Competence at the end of the Course
In order to award a student teacher a Pass grade the Board of Examiners
must be assured that the Standards for the Award of QTS have been
achieved. This is a shared responsibility between schools and the University.
Schools will be asked to confirm in their final reports that a student teacher has
achieved the Standards under the headings on the final report form. Tutors will be
asked to confirm that the Standards have been achieved. Clearly mentors and
tutors will liaise about the assessment of student teachers. On the tick list
embedded should be taken to mean something the student teacher now does well
as a matter of course. Functional should indicate something the student teacher
has achieved but which may still need conscious effort.
Note that students must meet all the standards. Any which are ‘not fully met’ therefore
would usually mean failing the course.
Assignments and Portfolio
Full details of the assignments and the portfolio can be found in the Student Teacher Course
Handbook along with the criteria for assessment. Your role in supporting them is to be found
in section entitled ‘Working with Student Teachers’ of this booklet.
The Research Project
The research project is a school based research activity that should deepen the student
teacher’s understanding of their work. Some notes of guidance are to be found in section 8
of this booklet. The presentation should be made to an audience appropriate to the nature
of the project. The Professional/Subject mentor should assess the presentation against set
criteria using the form provided in the last section of this booklet.
The role of the external examiners and moderators
The course employs four external examiners, two professional mentor moderators and two
subject moderators. Their role is to act as ‘critical friends’ of the course. They are asked to
comment on the efficacy of course developments and to moderate the judgements of
mentors and tutors. During the course of the year they will visit student teachers in their
second placement school and will review written work of a sample of student teachers. They
may meet with student teachers from a range of subjects or from within one subject to get a
better picture of how the course is developing.
The student teachers they see are from a range of subjects and will be at different stages of
development. No inferences should be drawn from the fact that a student teacher has a
visit; as far as possible we try to create a random sample. All examiners and moderators are
members of the final exam board which meets in the last week of the course.
THE FLEXIBLE PGCE
Rationale
This version of the PGCE is designed to enable student teachers to take a more
individualised approach to their studies and especially to take account of those with other
commitments (e.g. a young family).In terms of qualification, the course is an exact equivalent
to standard PGCE. It can be taken, full time, or part-time over a period of up to two years.
There are three possible start dates each year - September, January or after Easter.
The Structure
The philosophy of integration of study elements is maintained by having aspects of school
experience, professional studies and subject studies in each module. The modules are not
necessarily taken in chronological order. Module 4 is divided into 3 units for ease of
monitoring the longest phase of the course on a distance learning programme.
Module 1 – Introduction to teaching and learning. This includes the induction period in the
first placement school.
Module 2 – Developing teaching and learning. This includes the first school placement.
Module 3 – Educational Investigation. This includes the research project.
Module 4 – Becoming a professional
Unit 1 – Subject studies
Unit 2 – Professional Studies
Unit 3 – Integrating Teaching & Learning.
Module 5 – Meeting the standards. This includes the second school placement.
Entitlements
Entitlements for the flexible route are set out in the partnership
agreement (section 3) and generally involve greater input through tutorials and webbased distance learning rather than group teaching sessions.
APEL Procedures for the Flexible PGCE
Anyone with substantial teaching experience in a school following the National Curriculum
and who applies for the flexible route can be assessed to see if any of the course can be
disapplied, thereby shortening the training period.
Candidates will need to present a portfolio of evidence of the QTS standards they feel they
already meet. This should contain an explanation of the evidence in the form of a reflective
commentary. This evidence will be assessed by subject tutors and discussed with the
candidate.14.4.3 If the tutors judge there to be substantial evidence worthy of further
consideration candidates will be placed for 10 days in a partner school and set a specific
group of tasks designed to allow them to demonstrate the standards being claimed through
the portfolio.
The tutor and school mentor will meet the candidate after this experience to decide which
aspects of the course, if any, should be disapplied in the light of the evidence gathered.
Other Flexible Regulations
Modules 1,2 and 4 (unit 3) have to be taken in that order
Module 4 (unit 1) and 4 (unit 2) can be taken at any time in relation to the other modules and
units.
Module 3 can be taken separately or conjointly
Part-time student teachers will negotiate an individual pattern to suit their circumstances.
The number of days of study per week may vary over the course but will never be less than
50% of a week
The final teaching placement will always be full-time for 10 weeks. Section 7.6 illustrates a
variety of ways in which the route is flexible.
Patterns of Flexible Provision
Full-time
Some full-time flexible students begin in September and their course follows the standard
course very closely. Such arrangements allow (for example) for effective use of staff and
facilities.
Part-time September Starter
An individual training plan will be set out at the start which gives start and finish dates and
sequences of study for the modules and units designed to suit the candidate’s
circumstances. This plan is not to be considered fixed if the candidate’s circumstances
change, subject only to the regulations above. A student teacher in this category will be
accommodated for taught sessions in the standard course sessions in the first term if this is
possible. After this they will get out of phase with those on the full time course in relation to
modules studied. At this point their study will become individually based distance learning
supported by tutorials. They will negotiate the exact pattern and order in which they take the
modules and units within the regulations above and this will be recorded in the training plan.
Part-time January or Easter Starter
An individual training plan will be set out at the start which gives start and finish dates and
sequences of study for the modules and units designed to suit the candidate’s
circumstances. This plan is not to be considered fixed if the candidate’s circumstances
change, subject only to the regulations above. Such a candidate may well commence with
modules 1 & 4 (unit 1) through distance learning and tutorial support. It would also enable
them to spend some time in a school (as part of the study) which would become their first
placement school in module 2. This could be managed whilst still working two days a week
or whilst looking after small children or aging parents. S/he would then move on to module 2
where they would undertake their first teaching and so on. The flexibility of both the number
of days and the sequencing of the modules should be capable of being fitted to most sets of
need.
It is important that mentors involved with flexible students understand their courses.
Students are likely to be out of phase with their peers on the standard course and with the
expectations of their mentors. For example, students beginning placements in September
may be in the final stages of their training; and students beginning placements in the spring
may be at the beginning of their courses. Mentors should contact subject tutors or the
flexible co-ordinator if they need any clarification. They should rely on and refer to the
training plan and use it in the weekly review meetings to confirm the experiences that they
should be supporting for the students at any given time.
Flexible students may apply for Master’s accreditation and this will normally happen on
completion of assignment 2, which is part of Module 2.
61
Evaluations
Finally… Throughout the course we ask both mentors and students to evaluate their
experiences. Here is some feedback that we would like to share with you…
Student Teachers were asked ‘What makes a good Teaching Experience?’ Here are
their comments…

































Friendly, helpful, approachable mentor
An organised and welcoming mentor
Mentor meetings on a Friday if possible
Supportive mentor you can relate to who you can also get along with on a social
level
Supportive Peers on course
Constructive critical feedback on lessons
Making you feel “part of the team”
Ensuring domestic arrangements are sorted ASAP e.g. keys for department
Know what you are teaching in advance (subject & groups)
Knowing what resources are available
Having all relevant documentation available from day 1
Being made to feel welcome by all staff
Having storage area/space for our resources
Being given the option to make valid contributions to the department
Physical space to be able to work in
Being allowed to practice what has been taught on University course
Clear and precise explanations of systems in place
Strong links between subject/professional mentors
Well planned schemes of work to work from
Full introduction to all staff at the start of your placement
Rewards and Sanctions policy – what is it/how it works
Early full explanation of the schools systems and policies
Opportunity to trial new ideas
Not being asked to do the impossible
Consistency between schools
Equality – not feeling that you’re being ‘looked down on’
Clear achievable but challenging targets
Informal chats
Being valued
Advice
Praise
Encouragement
Enthusiasm
Mentors were similarly asked ‘What makes a good Student Teacher?’ Here are
their responses…
Organised
Confident demeanour
Excellent communication skills
Analytical mind
Good interpersonal skills
Calm
Interest and enthusiasm for subject
Versatile and willing to help
Using initiative
Able to plan and organize
Approach problems in an organized
manner
Strong commitment
Willingness to learn
Presence in the classroom
Good record keeping
A good decision maker
Innovative
Adaptability
Patience and understanding
Sound subject knowledge
Willingness to accept advice
Someone who has high expectations of
themselves
Enthusiasm
Smart
Reliable
Cheerful
Willing to experiment
Good attendance/punctual
Energy
Creativity
Mentors were also asked ‘What have been the benefits of having a student
teacher?’

Personal satisfaction in watching them progress and value your support

Good for recruitment

They offer excellent support to GCSE & A level groups

Brilliant resources

Keeps me up to date with recent initiatives in education

A pleasure to work with

New ideas

Renewed pupil interest

Reflect on own teaching / methods

Good classroom support

Further own professional development

Good for rest of department to have new blood

Sharing ideas

Reminder to self of any areas which are a little ‘tired’

Extension of teaching skills

Shared reports and marking

Another textiles colleague to talk to

Results of the summer research project

Discussing new ideas

Funding to put towards new equipment

A break from the routine
Now available ….
How to be a Brilliant Mentor – Developing Outstanding Teachers Edited by
Trevor Wright (2010) Routledge: Oxon
64
FORMS FOR COMPLETION BY MENTORS
SCHOOL REPORTS x 3
PROJECT ASSESSMENT FORM
LESSON OBSERVATION FORM
MASTERS FORM (with exemplar)
65
Project Assessment Form
[school]
Name of student: …………………………………………………
Please tick each category at the appropriate level, unless the level 6 category is not met, in
which case insert an X at level 6. Note that the statements across the columns are
cumulative. Please also see the assessment handbook for detailed exemplification of the
assessment criteria.
Once this section of the form has been completed please give a copy to the student teacher
so that they can add it to their portfolio.
At level 6 the student
…
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Additionally at level 7
the student …
Explains the broad
research question.
Justifies the RQ in the
context of their own
teaching.
Describes what current
literature suggests are
answers to the RQ (s).
Compares and contrasts
perspectives from
literature; refocuses
the RQ.
Justifies their
methodology; uses
triangulation; pilots
their research.
Is sensitive to the
effects of their
research – eg
intervention.
Uses well chosen means
to present data and
outcomes; articulates
choices.
Plans straight-forward
research methodology;
and considers ethical
issues.
Carries out (action)
research and reflects
on its effectiveness –
relates to own teaching.
Summarises outcomes,
presenting these
verbally and visually adapted to audience.
Reflects on the
implications for own
professional
development
Reflects on the
strengths &
weaknesses of the
project.
Gives clear messages
within a structured,
well timed
presentation.
Presents a folder of
suitable evidence – see
additional advice

Additionally for a
good level 7 the
student …
Justifies the RQ in the
context of the school
and the national
perspective.
Challenges the current
view on the research
question, following up
after research.
Explores the validity and
reliability of their
methodology.
Shows an adaptable and
formative approach
throughout the process.
Suggests explicit
strategies for
professional
development
Suggests improvements
for the overall research
process.
Critically analyses data.
Uses sophisticated or
novel means of
presenting data and
outcomes.
Uses theory to underpin
strategies for
professional
development
Returns to the RQ and
reviews how successfully
it has been answered.
Presents succinctly and
insightfully in an
articulate fashion.
Presents in a persuasive
way, tackling difficult
issues well.
Presents well organised
evidence with good links
to the presentation
Presents evidence with
justification and which
reflects perspectives.
66
Formative feedback:
Signed …………………………………………………………. [Mentor 1]
date
Signed …………………………………………………………. [Mentor 2]
date
Signed ………………………………………………………….. [Student]
date
67
Report on First School Experience 07th December 2010
Student teacher
School
Subject
PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES
STANDARDS
Relationships with Pupils
Q1
Has high expectations of pupils
Is committed to helping pupils meet their potential
Treats pupils fairly and with respect
Q2
Sets a good example to pupils
Frameworks
Q3a
Is aware of the professional duties of teachers
Q3b
Is aware of the policies of the school
Communicating and working with others
Q4
Communicates effectively with pupils and staff
Q5
Recognises the contribution of others to the
development pupils
Q6
Has a commitment to collaborative and cooperative working
Personal professional development
Q7
Reflects on and improves their practice
Q9
Acts upon advice and feedback and is open to
mentoring
Usually
shown
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Little
opportunity
Professional Attributes Summary
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Attributes
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
(On
Target
1)
The student is on target.
Development should be
focussed in the following
areas
OT2 □
(On
Target
2)
The student is generally
on target, but the following
one or two areas require
serious attention and
development:
68
NOT □
(Not On
Target)
There is serious
weakness in a number of
areas, which require
urgent improvement.
These areas are:
PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND
Usually
UNDERSTANDING
shown
STANDARDS
Teaching and Learning
Q10
Knows a range of teaching and learning
strategies
Has developed some behaviour management
strategies
Is aware of the need to personalise learning
Assessment and Monitoring
Q11
Knows the assessment requirements of their
subject
Knows about examinations/ qualifications in their
subject
Q12
Is aware of a range of approaches to
assessment
Understands the importance of formative
assessment
Subjects and Curriculum
Q14
Has a secure knowledge of their subject
Q15
Knows about the relevant curricula in their subject
Knows about the National Strategies
Literacy, Numeracy and ICT
Q16
Has passed the professional skills tests in numeracy
Yes
Has passed the professional skills tests in literacy
Yes
Has passed the professional skills tests in ICT
Yes
Q17
Knows how to use literacy to support their teaching
Knows how to use numeracy to support their teaching
Knows how to use ICT to support their teaching and
Achievement and Diversity
Q18
Understands how pupils develop
Understands the influences on pupils’ progress and
well being
Q19
Is aware of diversity, including English as an
Additional Language (EAL) and Special Educational
Needs (SEN)
Promotes equality and inclusion
Is beginning to personalise learning
Q20
Understands the roles of other colleagues
Understands the responsibilities for learners SEN
support staff
69
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
No
No
No
Little
opportunity
Health and well being
Q21a
Is aware of law/policy regarding the well being of
pupils
Professional Knowledge and Understanding summary
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Knowledge and Understanding
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
The student is on target.
(On
Development should be
Target 1)
focussed in the following
areas:
OT2 □
The student is generally on
(On
target, but the following one
Target 2)
or two areas require serious
attention and development:
NOT □
There is serious weakness
(Not On
in a number of areas, which
Target)
require urgent improvement.
These areas are:
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
STANDARDS
Planning
Q22
Plans for progression
Q24
Plans homework
Teaching
Q25 Teaches lessons and sequences of lessons in which they:
Q25a
use a range of teaching strategies and
resources
Q25b
build on prior knowledge and enables learners to
meet learning objectives
Q25c
adapt their language to suit learners
introduce new ideas clearly
use explanations and questions effectively
Q25d
manage the learning of individuals/groups and
whole classes
modify their teaching to the stage of the lesson
Assessment , Monitoring and Giving feedback
Q26a
Uses a range of assessment / monitoring
strategies
Q26b
Assesses the learning needs of those they teach
and sets challenging learning objectives
Q27
Provides constructive feedback on learners’
attainment and progress
Q28
Is beginning to use techniques to guide learners
to reflect on their own learning
70
Usually
shown
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Little
opportunity
Usually
shown
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Reviewing Teaching and Learning
Q29
Evaluates their teaching and modifies their
planning/practice where necessary
Learning Environment
Q30
Establishes a purposeful/safe learning
environment
Q31
Manages learners’ behaviour constructively
Team Working and Collaboration
Q32
Works as a team member
Q33
Understands the roles of colleagues and
ensures they are involved in supporting learning
Professional Skills Summary
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Skills
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
The student is on target.
(On
Development should be
Target 1)
focussed in the following
areas:
OT2 □
The student is generally on
(On
target, but the following one
Target 2)
or two areas require serious
attention and development:
NOT □
There is serious weakness
(Not On
in a number of areas, which
Target)
require urgent improvement.
These areas are:
Overall Comments: (subject mentor)
Overall Comments (professional mentor)
Overall comments from student
Key experiences needed for next placement:
71
Little
opportunity
Overall Grade: Please tick the appropriate box as a judgement of where the student teacher is at this stage of
the course. The grade should reflect the section grades entered above.
OT1
OT2
NOT
Signed ______________________________________________________________________(Professional
Mentor)
Signed _____________________________________________________________________(Subject Mentor)
I have seen this report, added my own comments and discussed it with a mentor
Signed ________________________________________________________________________(Student
teacher)
Signed hard copies to: Student teacher (for portfolio) and Christine Hinitt (University of Worcester, Institute of
Education, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ)
72
Report on Second School Experience 23rd March 2011
Student teacher
School
Subject
PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES
STANDARDS
Relationships with children and young people
Q1
Has high expectations of pupils
Is committed to ensuring pupils meet their potential
Establishes fair, respectful, trusting, supportive and
constructive relationships with pupils
Q2
Sets a good example to pupils
Frameworks
Q3a
Is aware of the professional duties of teachers/the
statutory frameworks in which they work
Q3b
Is aware and helps to implement the policies and
practices of the workplace
Communicating and working with others
Q4
Communicates effectively with pupils, colleagues,
parents and carers
Q5
Recognises and respects the contribution of others
to the development, well being and level of
attainment of pupils
Q6
Has a commitment to collaborative and co-operative
working
Personal Professional Development
Q7
Reflects on and improves their practice and
identifies and works towards meeting their
professional needs
Q8
Has a critical approach to innovation and is prepared
to adapt their practice accordingly
Q9
Acts upon advice and feedback and is open to
coaching and mentoring
Usually
shown
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
PROFESSIONAL ATTRIBUTES
SUMMARY
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Attributes
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
The student is on target.
(On
Development should be
Target 1) focussed in the following
areas
OT2 □
The student is generally on
(On
target, but the following one
Target 2) or two areas require
73
Little
opportunity
NOT □
(Not On
Target)
serious attention and
development:
There is serious weakness
in a number of areas, which
require urgent
improvement. These areas
are:
PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
STANDARDS
Teaching and Learning
Q10
Has a knowledge of a range of teaching/learning
strategies and knows how to use/adapt them
Has developed a range of behaviour management
strategies and knows how to use/adapt them
Knows how to personalise learning and provide
opportunities for all learners to reach their potential
Assessment and Monitoring
Q11
Knows the assessment requirements/arrangements
for their subject
Knows the assessment requirements/arrangements
related to public examinations and qualifications in
their subject
Q12
Knows a range of approaches to assessment
Understands the importance of formative assessment
Q13
Is aware of how local and national statistics are used
to evaluate teaching, monitor progress and raise
levels of attainment
Subjects and Curriculum
Q14
Has a secure knowledge and understanding of their
subject and related pedagogy to enable them to
teach effectively
Q15
Knows and understands the relevant statutory and
non-statutory curricula in their subject
Knows and understands the relevant frameworks for
their subject, including those provided through the
National Strategies
Knows about other relevant initiatives applicable to
the age/ability range for which they are trained
Literacy, Numeracy and ICT
Q16
Has passed the professional skills tests in numeracy
Has passed the professional skills tests in literacy
Has passed the professional skills tests in ICT
Q17
Knows how to use literacy to support their teaching
/wider professional activities
Knows how to use numeracy to support their teaching
/ wider professional activities
Knows how to use ICT to support their teaching
/wider professional activities
Usually
shown
Yes
Yes
Yes
Usually
shown
74
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Little
opportunity
No
No
No
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Little
opportunity
Achievement and Diversity
Q18
Understands how children/young people develop
Understands how learners’ progress/well being can
be affected by a range of developmental, social,
religious, ethnic, cultural and linguistic influences
Q19
Knows how to personalise learning for those they
teach (EAL, SEN)
Takes practical account of diversity
Promotes equality and inclusion
Q20
Knows and understands the roles of colleagues with
specific responsibilities
Knows and understands the roles of those with
responsibilities for learners with SEN
Health and well being
Q21a
Is aware of current legal requirements/national
policies on safeguarding and promotion of the well
being of pupils
Health and well being
Q21b
Knows how to identify and support children/young
people whose progress, development or well being is
being affected by a range of issues
Knows when to pupils to colleagues for specialist
support
PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
SUMMARY
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Knowledge and Understanding
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
The student is on target.
(On
Development should be
Target 1)
focussed in the following
areas:
OT2 □
The student is generally on
(On
target, but the following one
Target 2)
or two areas require serious
attention and development:
NOT □
There is serious weakness
(Not On
in a number of areas, which
Target)
require urgent improvement.
These areas are:
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
STANDARDS
Planning
Q22
Plans for progression, designing effective
learning sequences and demonstrating secure
subject knowledge
Q23
Designs opportunities for learners to develop
their literacy, numeracy and ICT skills
Q24
Plans homework to sustain learners’ progress
and to extend and consolidate their learning
Teaching
Q25
Teaches lessons and sequences of lesson
Usually
shown
Sometimes
shown
Rarely
shown
Little
opportunity
Q25a
Q25b
Q25c
Q25d
across the age/ability range in which they:
use a range of teaching strategies and
resources, including e-learning
take practical account of diversity and promote
equality and inclusion
build on prior knowledge and enable learners to
apply new knowledge, understanding and skills
and meet learning objectives
adapt their language to suit their learners
introduce new ideas and concepts clearly
use explanations, questions, discussion and
plenaries effectively
manage the learning of individuals/groups and
whole classes
modify their teaching to suit the stage of the
lesson
Assessment , Monitoring and Giving feedback
Q26a
Uses a range of assessment, monitoring and
recording strategies
Q26b
Assesses the learning needs of those they teach
in order to set challenging learning objectives
Q27
Provides timely and constructive feedback on
learners’ attainment, progress and areas for
development
Q28
Supports and guides learners to reflect on their
learning, and identify their emerging learning
needs
Reviewing Teaching and Learning
Q29
Evaluates the impact of their teaching on the
progress of learners and modifies their planning
and classroom practice where necessary
Learning Environment
Q30
Establishes a purposeful and safe learning
environment conducive to learning
Is aware of opportunities for learners to learn in
out-of-school contexts
Q31
Establishes a clear framework for classroom
discipline to manage learners’ behaviour
constructively
Team Working and Collaboration
Q32
Works as a team member and identifies
opportunities for working with colleagues
Shares effective practice with colleagues
Q33
Ensures that colleagues working with them are
involved in supporting learning
Understands the roles that colleagues working
with them are expected to fulfil
PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
SUMMARY
Mentors’ comments on positive developments in Professional Skills
76
Please place one tick in the left-hand column, and use the right-hand column for development areas.
OT1 □
The student is on target.
(On
Development should be
Target 1)
focussed in the following
areas:
OT2 □
(On
Target 2)
The student is generally on
target, but the following one
or two areas require serious
attention and development:
NOT □
(Not On
Target)
There is serious weakness
in a number of areas, which
require urgent improvement.
These areas are:
Overall Comments: (subject mentor)
Overall Comments (professional mentor)
Overall Comments (student teacher)
Key experiences needed for remainder of placement:
77
Overall Grade: Please tick the appropriate box as a judgement of where the student teacher is at this stage of
the course. The grade should reflect the section grades entered above.
OT1
OT2
NOT
Signed ___________________________________________________________________(Professional
Mentor)
Signed ____________________________________________________________________(Subject Mentor)
I have seen this report, added my own comments and discussed it with a mentor
Signed _____________________________________________________________________(Student teacher)
Signed hard copies to: Student teacher (for portfolio) and Christine Hinitt (University of Worcester, Institute of
Education, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ)
78
Report on Final School Experience 13th June 2010
ASSESSMENT AT END OF COURSE (PART 1)
Student teacher
School
Subject
Professional Attributes
Relationships with children and young people
Frameworks
Communicating and working with others
Personal professional development
Summative Comments:
Targets for CEDP and/or further professional development:
Professional Knowledge and Understanding:
Teaching and Learning
Assessment and Monitoring
Subjects and Curriculum
Literacy, Numeracy and ICT
Achievement and Diversity
Health and Well-being
Summative Comments:
79
Targets for CEDP and/or further professional development:
Professional skills:
Planning
Teaching
Assessing, monitoring and giving feedback
Reviewing teaching and Learning
Learning Environment
Team Working and Collaboration
Summative Comments:
Targets for CEDP and/or further professional development:
Overall Comments: (subject mentor)
Overall Comments (professional mentor)
80
Overall Comments (student teacher)
Grade: Please tick the appropriate box as a judgement of expectations of meeting the standards by the end of
the Course.
PASS
FAIL
Signed ______________________________________________________________________(Professional
Mentor)
Signed _______________________________________________________________________(Subject
Mentor)
I have seen this report, added my comments and discussed it with a mentor
Signed _______________________________________________________________________(Student
teacher)
Signed hard copies to: Student teacher (for portfolio) and Christine Hinitt (University of Worcester, Institute of
Education, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ)
81
ASSESSMENT AT END OF COURSE (Part 2)
Judgement based on meeting the standards for Qualifying to Teach.
1. Professional attributes
Embedded
Functional
Relationships with children and young people
Q1
Has high expectations of children/young
people including a commitment to
ensuring that they can achieve their full
educational potential and to establishing
fair, respectful, trusting, supportive and
constructive relationships with them
Q2
Demonstrates the positive values,
attitudes and behaviour they expect
from children/young people
Frameworks
Q3a
Is aware of the professional duties of
teachers/the statutory framework within
which they work.
Q3b
Is aware of the policies and practices of
the workplace and shares in collective
responsibility for their implementation
Communicating and working with others
Q4
Communicates effectively with children,
young people, colleagues, parents and
carers
Q5
Recognises and respects the
contribution that colleagues, parents
and carers can make to the
development and well-being of children
and young people and to raising their
levels of attainment
Q6
Has a commitment to collaborative and
co-operative working
Personal professional Development
Q7a
Reflects on/improves their practice, and
takes responsibility for identifying and
meeting their developing professional
needs
Q7b
Identifies priorities for their early
professional development in the context
of induction
Q8
Has a creative/constructively critical
approach towards innovation, being
prepared to adapt their practice where
benefits and improvements are
identified
Q9
Acts upon advice and feedback and is
open to coaching and mentoring
2. Professional Knowledge and Understanding
Embedded
Functional
Teaching and Learning
Q10
Has a knowledge/understanding of a
range of teaching, learning and behaviour
management strategies and knows how
to use/adapt them, including how to
personalise learning and provide
opportunities for all learners to achieve
their potential
82
Assessment and Monitoring
Q11
Knows the assessment
requirements/arrangements for the
subjects/curriculum areas in the age
ranges they are trained to teach,
including those relating to public
examinations and qualifications
Q12
Knows a range of approaches to
assessment, including the importance of
formative assessment
Q13
Knows how to use local and national
statistical information to evaluate the
effectiveness of their teaching, to monitor
the progress of those they teach and to
raise levels of attainment
Subjects and Curriculum
Q14
Has a secure knowledge/understanding
of their subjects/curriculum areas and
related pedagogy to enable them to teach
effectively across the age/ability range for
which they are trained.
Q15
Knows/understands the relevant
statutory/non-statutory curricula,
frameworks, including those provided
through the National Strategies, for their
subjects/curriculum areas, and other
relevant initiatives applicable to the
age/ability range
Literacy, Numeracy and ICT
Q16
Has passed the professional skills tests in
numeracy, literacy and ICT
Q17
Knows how to use skills in literacy,
numeracy and ICT to support their
teaching and wider professional activities
Achievement and Diversity
Q18
Understands how children/young people
develop and that the progress/well-being
of learners are affected by a range of
developmental, social, religious, ethnic,
cultural and linguistic influences
Q19
Knows how to make effective
personalised provision for those they
teach, including those for whom English
is an additional language or who have
special educational needs or disabilities,
and how to take practical account of
diversity and promote equality and
inclusion in their teaching
Q20
Knows/understands the roles of
colleagues with specific responsibilities,
including those with responsibility for
learners with SEN and disabilities and
other individual learning needs
2. Professional Knowledge/Understanding
Embedded
(continued)
Health and well being
Q21a Is aware of current legal requirements,
national policies and guidance on the
safeguarding/ promotion of the well-being
of children/young people
83
Functional
Q21b
Knows how to identify and support
children/young people whose progress,
development or well-being is affected by
changes/difficulties in their personal
circumstances, and when to refer them to
colleagues for specialist support
3. Professional Skills
Planning
Q22
Plans for progression across the
age/ability range for which they are
trained, designing effective learning
sequences within lessons and
across series of lessons and
demonstrating secure
subject/curriculum knowledge
Q23
Designs opportunities for learners to
develop their literacy, numeracy and
ICT skills
Q24
Plans homework/other out-of-class
work to sustain learners’ progress
and to extend/ consolidate their
learning.
Teaching
Q25
Teaches lessons/sequences of
lessons across the age/ability range
for which they are trained in which
they:
Q25a
use a range of teaching strategies
and resources, including e-learning,
taking practical account of diversity
and promoting equality and
inclusion
Q25b
build on prior knowledge, develops
concepts and processes and enable
learners to apply new knowledge,
understanding and skills and meet
learning objectives
Q25c
adapt their language to suit the
learners they teach, introducing new
ideas/concepts clearly, and using
explanations, questions,
discussions and plenaries
effectively
Q25d
manage the learning of individuals,
groups and whole classes,
modifying their teaching to suit the
stage of the lesson.
3. Professional Skills (continued)
Assessment , Monitoring and Giving feedback
Q26a
Makes effective use of a range of
assessment, monitoring and
recording strategies
Q26b
Assesses the learning needs of
those they teach in order to set
challenging learning objectives
Q27
Provides timely, accurate and
constructive feedback on learners’
attainment, progress and areas for
development
Q28
Supports and guide learners to
reflect on their learning, identify the
progress they have made and
identify their emerging learning
needs
Embedded
Embedded
84
Functional
Functional
Reviewing Teaching and Learning
Q29
Evaluates the impact of their
teaching on the progress of all
learners, and modifies their planning
and classroom practice where
necessary
Learning Environment
Q30
Establishes a purposeful and safe
learning environment conducive to
learning and identifies opportunities
for learners to learn in out of school
contexts
Q31
Establishes a clear framework for
classroom discipline to manage
learners’ behaviour constructively
and promote their selfcontrol/independence
Team Working and Collaboration
Q32
Works as a team member and
identifies opportunities for working
with colleagues, sharing the
development of effective practice
with them
Q33
Ensures that colleagues working
with them are appropriately involved
in supporting learning and
understands the roles they are
expected to fulfil
Copies to: Student teacher (for portfolio), Christine Hinitt, Subject Tutor
85
Teaching Experience Observation Form
Student teacher:
School:
Date:
Subject:
Group:
Topic:
Agreed focus for
observation
How will you achieve this?
(Student teacher to complete)
QTT
ref
(where
applicable)
Observer’s comments (ensure the focus areas above are commented on)
Comments on the planning
Comments on the lesson including subject knowledge and pedagogy
Summary of key strengths
Areas for Development
Suggestions for addressing the targets
(refer to the Standards where
appropriate)
Comments on concerns
Signed: Observer
Signed: Student Teacher
Mentors should keep a copy of this form for their records. A copy must be given to the student
teacher within one day of the observation. Subjects tutors will also require a copy of all
completed observation forms
86
SCHOOL BASED EVIDENCE ON SUITABILITY FOR MASTER’S LEVEL
The purpose of this form is to support you in your application for the Master’s level. You are
responsible for completing the form and both your subject and professional mentor should
verify the evidence. You should submit the form along with your application for Master’s
level.
Name of Student Teacher ____________________
School____________________________________
CRITERIA
Can
analyse
their own
practice
using
supporting
evidence
Can
critically
reflect on
their own
practice,
both orally
and in
writing
Can
synthesize
ideas drawn
from
literature,
teaching
and their
own
practice
Can
present
their work
to a
professional
standard
Have
organised
and
managed
their work
time
effectively
MENTORS’ SUPPORTING COMMENTS
STUDENT TEACHER
87
STUDENT TEACHER
MENTORS’ SUPPORTING
COMMENTS
CRITERIA
Additional
comments in
support of the
Master’s
application
Possible examples of evidence
Induction tasks and reviews
Reflection on lessons observed
Dialogue during feedback
Preparation for weekly/periodic reviews
Discussion during weekly/periodic reviews
Professional Mentor seminar sessions
Quality of independent subject study
Target setting
Action Plans
Case studies
Signature of Professional Mentor _______________________________
Signature of Subject Mentor________________________________________
EXEMPLAR SCHOOL BASED EVIDENCE ON SUITABILITY FOR
MASTER’S LEVEL
The purpose of this form is to support you in your application for the Master’s level. You are
responsible for completing the form and both your subject and professional mentor should
verify the evidence. You should submit the form along with your application for Master’s
level.
Name of Student Teacher _____________________________
School ____________________________________
CRITERIA
Can
analyse
their own
practice
using
supporting
evidence
Can
critically
reflect on
their own
practice,
both orally
and in
writing
Can
synthesize
ideas drawn
from
literature,
teaching
and their
own
practice
Can
present
their work
to a
professional
STUDENT TEACHER
Have created lesson plans which
have a specific space for
reflection after the lesson, and
any misconceptions pupils may
have had. This feature has
allowed me to alter lessons
before delivery to other classes,
for example, a year 10 D.O.R.A
lesson which was delivered twice,
and altered according to the
group.
Use of misconceptions box on
lesson plan, and space for
reflection. Regular reviews with
subject and professional mentors
have allowed me to discuss my
strengths and weaknesses, and
alter my practice.
Creation of lesson plans for
different ages across the
curriculum, displaying wider
reading and learning, alongside
experience from teaching and
observations. University
assignments also support the
synthesis of ideas from a range
of sources.
Have created lesson plans which
have been scrutinised and
agreed on by professionals.
Observations from my lessons
support this, alongside my
89
MENTORS’ SUPPORTING COMMENTS
* is able to reflect upon his lessons and
make necessary amendments. I can
confirm that the evidence provided is
accurate.
During feedback * is able to reflect
accurately and critically on the lessons
taught. Written evaluations are completed
in depth and show evidence of critical
reflection. Discussions during the weekly
and periodic review meetings have given
* the opportunity to reflect critically and
set targets and strategies for his own
professional development. These
discussions are documented on the
weekly and periodic review sheets.
I can confirm that * has created lessons
plans for KS3 and KS4 which
demonstrate that he has researched
ideas and referred to educational
literature.
I can confirm that * presented all lesson
plans and resources to a professional
standard. These are included in his
portfolio. * always has high professional
standards in relation to his conduct and
standard
Have
organised
and
managed
their work
time
effectively
CRITERIA
Additional
comments
in support
of the
Master’s
application
portfolio, and my general
professional attributes (e.g. smart
appearance, arriving on time,
professional duties when working
with pupils and staff).
I was able to successfully plan
my own lessons, and work
alongside another student
teacher to create collaborative
lesson plans during the course of
the placement. My folders and
resources were organised, and
maintained throughout.
STUDENT TEACHER
I have assisted at parents
evenings for all years, and was
given the opportunity to talk to
parents of selected pupils, having
prepared notes on the particular
student. I have marked mock
GCSE papers for year 10 pupils
using an official mark scheme for
guidance. and I delivered history
lessons on the school ACE day to
year 10 pupils.
appearance.
* met all deadlines and was organised
and prepared each day, this is reflected
on his first placement report and in the
evidence supplied in his portfolio.
MENTORS’ SUPPORTING COMMENTS
* is keen to tackle all tasks and embrace
opportunities provided in order to develop
his professional skills and knowledge. I
can confirm that the evidence supplied is
accurate and available within his portfolio.
I fully support *’s application to include
Master’s Level in his PGCE.
Possible examples of evidence
Induction tasks and reviews
Reflection on lessons observed
Dialogue during feedback
Preparation for weekly/periodic reviews
Discussion during weekly/periodic reviews
Professional Mentor seminar sessions
Quality of independent subject study
Target setting
Action Plans
Case studies
Signature of Professional Mentor _______________________________
Signature of Subject Mentor________________________________________
90
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