iii. general guidelines

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WHO CAN JOIN THE 13th PRO:
The competition is open to:
I.
1.
Elementary (Primary) School Age: Participants <13 years old in the year of
competition.
2.
High school (Secondary or Junior High) age: Participants <16 years old, but ≥ 13
years old in the year of competition
3.
Robot Soccer Team Age: Participants <20 years old, but ≥ 10 years old in the year of
competition
4.
College Category: ≥17 years old in the year of the competition
5.
Previous grand winners provided that they are still within age limit and currently
enrolled in either elementary & high school levels.
6.
Students not related up to the 2nd degree of consanguinity or affinity to any employee
of the Organizers/Sponsors and the Board of Judges (BOJ).
GAME CATEGORIES
HOW TO JOIN:
Category
Ages form andPlaying
Fields
1. Fill-up the registration
submit this
together with a Photocopy of Authenticated Birth
Participants
Certificate to the
NATIONAL SECRETARIAT on or before August 15, 2014.
<13 years old 1. ROCKET
in the year of (ELEMENTARY SCHOOL)
competition
Participants<1
6 years old,but 1. SPUTNIK
Regular Category:
≥ 13years old
Junior High School in the year of (JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)
competition
Date of birth THEME:
falls on or after “ROBOT AND SPACE”
Open Category:
January
01,
Elementary School 2000.
Date of birth
falls in the THEME:
period January
Open Category:
“ROBOT AND SPACE”
01, 1998 to
Junior High School December 31,
2000.
Participants
<20 years old
but ≥ 10 years ROBOT SOCCER
Robot Soccer
old in the year
of competition
Regular Category:
Elementary
College Category
≥17 years
old in the
MARS COLONY
year of the
competition
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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II.
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
A. Team Challenge Set Model # 9790 or 9794 is intended for teaching both teamwork and robotics. It
gives students opportunity to improve their designing, building, and programming skills.
B. LEGO Education Base Set # 9797 and #45545 Lego EV3 Core Set is the next generation in
educational robotics, enabling students to discover science, technology, engineering and math in fun,
engaging, hands-on way. Only kits with the LEGO Education and FELTA sticker can be used for both
Regular and Open Category.
III.
GENERAL GUIDELINES
I. Participants MUST:

Submit all the requirements to the National Secretariat on or before Aug. 15, 2014.

Secure TEAM CHALLENGE SET Model # 9790, 9794, 9797, 45544 and ROBOLAB Software with
sufficient supply of AA batteries, Laptop or PC and extension wire.

Read the Games Rules of the competition thoroughly. Questions, clarifications and suggestions must be
raised during Dry-Run and on or before the preliminary judging.

Wear school uniform and school ID, as well as the 13th PRO ID on all levels of the competition.

Bring own food and drinks.
1. The prescribed “one (1) kit, one (1) team and one (1) LAPTOP or PC policy applies to all levels,
categories and events.
Type
No. of Events
Regular: Elementary
1
Regular: Junior High
1
Open (Elem & Junior high)
2
Robot Soccer
1
2. If an official team member withdraws from the competition for whatever reason, the coach must submit a
waiver countersigned by the official participant who withdrew and his/her parent, duly approved by the
Principal or School Head. It is only until the waiver has been duly received and signed by the National
Secretariat that a replacement can be made.
General Rules – 2014 Season 2 A. Competition Categories
The World Robot Olympiad has four competition categories:
1. Regular Category
2. Open Category
3. WRO GEN II Football
4. College Regular Category
A team may only participate in one category.
B. Age Group Definition
1. Elementary (Primary) School Age: Participants <13 years old in the year of competition.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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2. Junior High (Middle) School Age: Participants <16 years old, but ≥ 13 years old in the year of competition
3. WRO GEN II Football: Participants <20 years old, but ≥ 10 years old in the year of competition
4. College Category: ≥17 years old in the year of the competition
NOTE:
• It is strictly enforced that students cannot be older than specified in the Age Group Definition and will not be allowed
to participate in the International Final.
• Students younger than the age group definition have to obtain permission from the Host Country for participation in
the international final and may only be approved if at least one other team member has the correct age
• If all members of a team are younger than required, then the team must participate in the corresponding competition
• Participants are not confined to school‐going students. Anyone can participate in the corresponding age groups except
for participants in the College Regular Category who MUST be either High School or undergraduate students
College and university students may participate if the individual students fit into the HS age group bracket!
C. Team Definition
The WRO is a team‐based challenge. To participate in each category of competition, students must work in teams.
General Rules – 2014 Season
A team consists of one (1) coach and two (2) or three (3) team members.
One (1) coach and one (1) team member is not considered to be a team and cannot participate.
D. Coaches
The minimum age of a coach in an international WRO tournament (and assistant coaches) is age 20 at the time
of registration for the WRO final.
Coaches may work with more than one team; however each team needs to be assisted by a responsible adult.
This person may be an assistant coach.
Coaches may offer students advice and guidance prior to the competition, however during the actual Olympiad
competition, all work and preparation must be performed by the student members of the team.
E. General Rules – Regular Category
1. The rules of competition at WORLD ROBOT OLYMPIAD are constituted by the WORLD ROBOT OLYMPIAD
Advisory Council (“the council” in the following paragraphs).
1.1. A surprise additional rule will be announced on the morning of the competition.
1.2. The announcement of this additional “surprise” must be handed over to each team in writing.
2. Qualification for participation and team composition
2.1. Age of participants – Please refer to Section B - “Age Group Definition”
2.2. Team composition – Please refer to Section C – “Team Definition”
2.3. Team coach – Please refer to Section D – “Coaches”
2.4. Participating teams cannot compete in any other WRO competition category.
3. Material
3.1. The controller, motors and sensors used to assemble robots must be from LEGO® MINDSTORMS ™ sets
(RCX, NXT or EV3) and the HiTechnic Color Sensor. Other LEGO branded elements may be used to construct the
remaining parts of the robot.
WRO recommends use of Education versions of LEGO MINDSTORMS due to extended service available from
LEGO Education distributors.
3.2. Teams should prepare and bring all the equipment, software and portable computers they need during the
tournament.
3.3. Teams should bring enough spare parts. Even in the case of any accidents or equipment malfunction, the
council (and/or organizing committee) is not responsible for their maintenance or replacement.
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3.4. Coaches are not allowed to enter the court to provide any instructions and guidance during the
competition.
3.5. All the parts for the robot should be disassembled and in their initial state (not pre‐built) when
the “assemble” time starts. For example, a tyre cannot be put on a wheel until assemble time begins.
3.6. Competitors may not use any instruction sheets/guides whether written, illustrated or pictorial
no matter what format they are in (including paper‐based and digital).
3.7. Contestants may make the program beforehand.
3.8. Robots are not allowed to use screws, glues or tape to fasten any components. Non‐compliance
with these rules will result in disqualification.
3.9. Control software must be either ROBOLAB® NXT®, EV3 software and LabView. See details on
eligible controller/software combinations for WRO
Regular Category in this chart:
*LabView is ONLY permitted in the High School and College age group
3.10. The motors and the sensors for the robot are supplied by LEGO® and HiTechnic.
Any other products are not allowed. Teams are not allowed to modify any original parts (for
example: EV3, RCX, NXT, motor, and sensors, etc). A robot made with modified parts will be
disqualified at that match. Allowed sensors and motors:
Note: The EV3 Gyro Sensor is not allowed for WRO Regular Category in 2014. Also, if you
are using the EV3 you may only use three (3) motor ports!
5225 - LEGO® TECHNIC Gear Motor
9758 - RCX Light Sensor
9889 - RCX Temperature Sensor (9v)
9891 - RCX Angle Sensor (9V)
9911 - Touch Sensor and Leads
9842 - NXT Motor with Tacho
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9843 - NXT Touch Sensor
9844 - NXT Light Sensor
9845 - NXT Sound sensor
9846 - NXT UltraSonic sensor
9694 - NXT Colour sensor
45502 – Large Motor
45503 – Medium Motor
44504 – Ultrasonic Sensor
44506 – Color Sensor
44507 – Touch Sensor
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44509 – Infrared Sensor
HiTechnic NXT Color Sensor V2
4. Regulations about the robot
4.1. The maximum dimensions of the robot before it starts the “mission” must be within 250mm × 250mm
×250mm. After the robot starts, the dimensions of the robot are not restricted.
4.2. Teams are allowed to use only one controller (RCX, NXT or EV3).
4.3. The number of motors and sensors to be used is not restricted.
4.4. Any actions or movements by the participants are not allowed to interfere or assist the robot while it
is running (performing the “mission”). Teams that violate this rule will be disqualified at that match.
4.5. A robot must be autonomous and finish the “missions” by itself. Any radio communication, remote
control and wired control systems are not allowed while the robot is running. Teams in violation of this
rule will be disqualified and must quit the competition immediately.
4.6. If the robot is equipped with NXT or EV3 as a controller, the Bluetooth and Wi-FI function must be
switched off at all times.
4.7. It is NOT allowed to use a Multiplexer (a multiplexer makes it possible to add to the number of sensors
and motors in use)!
5. prior to competing
5.1. Each team must prepare for the match in their specified place until the “check time”, when the team’s
robot must be placed in a designated area.
5.2. Teams cannot touch designated competition courts before the start of the “assembly time” is
announced.
5.3. Judges will check the state of parts before announcing the start of the “assemble time”. Teams must
show that their parts are separated. Team members cannot touch any parts or computer during this
“check time”.
5.4. The “Assemble time” doesn't begin until officially announced at the event.
6. Competition
6.1. The competition consists of a number of rounds (as decided by the Host Country), assembly time,
programming and testing time (150 minutes)
6.2. Competitors cannot assemble robot outside of specified assemble, maintenance and testing times.
6.3. Qualifying teams will be given time for assembling, programming and calibrating their robot before
each round.
6.4. Competitors begin assembly once assembly time is officially announced at the event and can
immediately start the programming and test runs. Teams must place robots in their designated inspection
area when any Assembly or Maintenance time ends, after which the judges will assess if the robot
conforms to all regulations. Upon successful inspection the robot will be allowed to compete.
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6.5. After rounds end, qualifying teams will be provided with additional maintenance and testing time.
Teams must place robots in their designated inspection area when any Assembly or Maintenance time
ends, after which the judges will assess if the robot conforms to all regulations. Upon successful inspection
the robot will be allowed to compete in the next stage of the competition.
6.6. The score calculation is done by the judges at the conclusion of each round. The team must verify and
sign the score sheet after the round, if they have no fair complaints.
6.7. The ranking of a team is decided by their best score of a round. If competing teams acquire the same
points, the ranking is decided by the record of time (where time has not already been taken into
consideration of the scores calculation). If teams still remain tied, rankings will be determined by
consistency of performance by examining which team achieved the next highest score during previous
rounds.
6.8. If a violation is found at the inspection, the judge will give the team three (3) minutes to convert the
violation. However, it is not possible to participate in the match if the violation is not corrected during the
time given.
6.9. Outside specified assembly, programming, maintenance and testing times, it is not allowed to modify
or exchange the robot. (For example, it is during inspection time teams are not permitted to download
programs to robots or change batteries). However batteries are allowed to be charged during any specified
“quarantine” time. Teams cannot request time out.
7. Court
7.1. Teams must assemble their robot in an area designated by tournament officials (each team has its
own area). People, other than competing students are not allowed to enter the competition area, apart
from authorized WRO Organizing Committee staff and special personnel.
7.2. The standard of all competition materials and courts are according to what are provided by the
committee on the competition days.
8. Prohibited matters
8.1. Destruction of competition courts/tables, materials or robots of other teams.
8.2. Use of dangerous items or behaviors that may create or cause interference with the competition.
8.3. Inappropriate words and/or behavior toward other team members, other teams, audience, judges or
staff.
8.4. Bringing a cellular/mobile phone or a medium of wire/wireless communication into the designated
competition area.
8.5. Bringing food or drink into the designated competition area.
8.6. Competitors using any communication devices and methods while the competition is in process.
Anyone outside the competition area is also banned from talking to or communicating with competing
students. Teams violating this rule will be considered as disqualified and should quit the competition
immediately. If communication is necessary, the committee may allow team members to communicate
with others under supervision by tournament staff or by exchanging a note under permission by judges.
8.7. Any other situation which judges might consider as interference or violation of the spirit of the
competition.
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“Rocket”
Elementary (Primary) School Age Group - preliminary
Gagarin, Sputnik, Lunokhod – all world famous Russian names in space. Since their
time space voyages have become common - in orbit are constantly dozens of people and
rockets are launched into space frequently. But the conquest of outer space is perhaps
the most exciting journey in the history of mankind.
New spacecraft fly themselves to the place of their permanent deployment. From the
launch area to their final destination they are on their own. But before they are ready to
go into space you must transport the rocket elements from the factory to the launch site.
Next, assemble the rocket and place the elements in your launch facility. Raise the
rocket to a vertical position and the rocket is ready to launch. Before launch, make sure
all persons are evacuated to the safe area.
IV.
Challenge
The robot’s mission is to assemble Rocket Elements in the Assembly Area (yellow),
place the Rocket Elements vertically over the Ramp (blue area + Ramp surface) in the
Launch Table Area, and evacuate all Civilians to the Safe Area (red). The robot must
finish in the Safe Area after completing the task.
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1.
Rules & Regulation
1. The combination of the rockets elements is determined in the competition
day before assembly time. In order to do this 6 cards with possible
combinations are put in a non-transparent box (download cards). One of
the card is taken for the box and it will determine the combination of the
rocket elements which will be used in all rounds during this competition
day.
2. Before the round starts (post-quarantine) the location of every rocket element on
the playing field is determined. 3 cards with numbers representing the rocket
parts in a rocket element are put in non-transparent box. The cards are taken one
after another and a rocket element with the corresponding number of parts is
placed in the Warehouse areas starting from the left rear area (the next area is
chosen by counter-clockwise). The rocket elements are located as so their LEGO
studs are in the TOP direction. The location of the elements will be fixed for all
participants in the round. This method to determine the location of the elements
will be made for every round during the competition day.
3. At the beginning of an attempt the Launch Facility can be placed in the Launch
Table Area:
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
The Launch Facility is a construction made of any parts of LEGO with maximum
dimensions 250x250x250 mm in initial state. The Launch Facility is allowed to
change its size after the attempt starts. The construction must not contain RCX,
NXT and EV3 brick - each team is only allowed to use one brick (RCX, NXT or
EV3) per pair of robot and Launch Facility in all attempts. The Launch Facility is
allowed to be built with electronic LEGO components listed in general rules (3.10)
only.
4. Multiple programs in the robot are allowed. For scoring rounds, the participants
are only allowed to choose a program and press the enter button to run it.
Participants are not allowed to make any additional input or setting to the chosen
program.
5. The time to set up the Launch Facility in the Launch Table Area is limited by 30
seconds.
6. The Launch facility that is set up in the Launch Table Area must be completely in
the Launch Table Area (grey square area 455 x 250 mm). The Launch Facility is
measured to correspond the size requirements and a signal to start is made. If the
size requirements are not satisfied a judge makes a decision to assign additional
time to fix the issue or their attempt is scheduled after all other teams attempts as
so the team has a time to address the requirement.
7. The robot begins in the Base area (green zone) and finishes in the Safe Area.
8. The robot must start within the Base area. The robot must be
placed completely in the Base area.
9. The robot is not limited by moving along the black line.
10. All Rocket Elements must be placed in the Assembly Area. The Ramp surface is
considered as the part of the Assembly Area.
11. The assembled Rocket must be placed vertically over the Ramp in the Launch
Table Area. The Rocket elements must be assembled in the correct order.
12. A judge will check verticality of the Rocket by using a steel wand (a pin or a
needle) 350 mm long, 3-5 mm in diameter. A mark in 250 mm on the wand
allows to determine the height of the Rocket.
13. The Rocket is considered to be in vertical position if the wand can be stuck into
the Rocket as so:


both ends of the wand are in the Rocket projection.
the mark on the wand is below of the highest part of the Rocket.
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14. The order of the Rocket Elements is correct if:



Colors of the Rocket Parts are in the same order as colors on the Russian
Federation Flag
The Rocket Parts are placed as so the LEGO studs are in the up direction.
Every Rocket Element touches the next Rocket Element in one point at least
(It is allowed that the very low Rocket Element does not touch the Ramp area)
(The order of the elements is correct on every picture above)
15. The Rocket must stay vertically on the Ramp more than 30 seconds after the
attempt ends or till that time when the judges check its verticality.
16. Civilians placed in the green circles of the Civilian Areas need to be moved to the
Safe Area.
17. The attempt will end and time will stop if:





14.
The robot enters the Base area completely (all wheels in the Base area).
Any team member touches any object on the field or the robot after the
attempt starts.
Challenge time (2 minutes) has ended.
Participant call for "Stop" of the match.
Violation of the rules and regulations herein.
Scoring
1. Score will only be calculated at the end of the challenge or when time stops-the
exception is scoring for placing all the Rocket elements in the Assembly Area.
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2. A Rocket Element is completely outside of a Warehouse Area = 5 points per
element (15 points max).
3. There is a moment during the attempt when all Rocket Elements touch
the Assembly Area at the same time = 20 points.
4. At least one Rocket Element is situated on the Ramp (the projection of the
element is completely in the Ramp area) = 10 points.
5. All Rocket Elements are placed vertically over the Ramp in a Launch Table Area
= 15 points.
6. All Rocket Elements are placed vertically and in the correct order over the Ramp
in the Launch Table Area = 15 points.
7. Each civilian completely moved to the Safe Area 5 points per civilian (15 point
max).
8. The robot finishes in the Safe Area = 10 points.
9. Maximum score = 100 points.
A Rocket
Element
is outside
of a
Warehouse
Area (max
15
points)
5 points per
element
All Rocket
Elements
touch the
Assembly
Area at the
same time
At least
one Rocket
Element
placed over
the Ramp
All Rocket
Elements
placed
vertically
All Rocket
Elements
placed
vertically in
the
correct
order
Civilians
completely
moved to
the Safe
Area
(max
15 points)
Finish
Safe
Area
20 points
10 points
15 points
15 points
5 points per
civilian
10 points
Table Specifications
1. Horizontal Dimensions: 2370 mm × 1150 mm.
(download the mat in .ai)
2. A wall that is 16 mm in width surrounds the table. The height of the wall is 50 mm.
3. The table base color is white.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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in
4. The width of black and red lines in the playing field area is 20 mm ± 1 mm.
5. The dimensions of the barrier delimiting the Safe Area from the main playing field area are 530
mm x 50 mm x 16 mm.
6. Civilians (one LEGO brick 2x4 and a mini figure per civilian) are placed in the Civilian Areas at
the beginning of every
round, one figure in each green circle.
7. The Ramp is an inclined surface with base 100x100mm and rise 30mm. The Launch Pad Base is 2
light grey
LEGO Technic 13 beams mounted on both sides of the Ramp. The holes in the LEGO beams marked
on the picture below
by blue color are used to mount the beams with screws on the table. All visible surfaces of the Ramp
are white.
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8. The error tolerance of the field is ± 10 mm.
9. The Rocket consists from 2х white, 2х blue, 2х red Parts.
10. Building Instruction for a Rocket Part:
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“Sputnik”
Junior High (Middle) School Age Group - preliminary
Prelude
In 1957 Soviet Union made the first launch in the Sputnik program - the very first satellite
designed and created by humankind. It was a 58 cm diameter polished metal sphere, with four
external radio antennae to broadcast radio pulses. The era of space exploration has begun. Since
that time hundreds of satellites continue to fill the space surrounding our planet and help people
in solving every day routine. One satellite usually serves the needs of people for several years and
then it goes down into the ocean or goes up to outer orbits and cannot return to the Earth.
However a lot of crashes happen as a result of satellite collisions with other objects in the Space.
Such kind of crashes leads to a large amount of debris polluting the near-Earth space. According
to scientists there is more than 100 thousand of debris 1x1 cm in size weighing more than 5000
tons on the orbits 2000 km above the Earth. Considering all the tiny objects the amount of debris
reaches 300 million. Meanwhile even the collision with 1 mm size element speeding up to 10-15
km/s is able to destroy the whole space station.
In order to resolve the space debris problem the area around the Earth should contain factoriessatellites for collecting and recycling any kind of space debris. The factories could be completely
automated and special robots will explore the Outer Space to discover artificial objects and distinguish
satellites in service from real debris.
Challenge
Game Table in 3D
Table Definitions
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Challenge Objects
• Five LEGO bricks in height, 6x6 studs in size represent Space Debris.
 Red balls represent Failed Satellites. Blue balls represent Valid Satellites. Red and blue balls
are placed on 2x2 LEGO plates.
Rules & Regulations
1. The number of the challenge objects is determined in the competition day before assembly time.
In order to do this, 10 cards with possible combination of the challenge objects are put in a nontransparent box (download cards). The number of the objects on the cards is from 6 to 8 and 2 or
more objects of the same type can be used. One of the card is taken from the box and it will
determine the combination of the challenge objects which will be used in all rounds during this
competition day.
2. Before the round starts (post-quarantine) the location of every challenge object is determined.
The following rule is used:
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every arc of the Satellite Orbit (the arcs between intersections of the Satellite Orbit and Factory
Satellite orbit) can contain from 0 to 2 challenge objects, two objects on the same type cannot be
located on the same arc and two adjacent positions (see markers on the Satellite Orbit) cannot be
occupied by the challenge objects. The location of the challenge objects will be fixed for all
participants in the round. This method to determine the challenge object positions will be made for
every round during the competition day.
3. Multiple programs in the robot are allowed. For scoring rounds, the participants are only allowed
to choose a program and press the enter button to run it. Participants are not allowed to make any
additional input or setting to the chosen program.
4. The robot begins in the Base area (Earth) and finishes in the same area.
5. The Factory Satellite moves counterclockwise along the Factory Satellite Orbit on the playing
field with a speed from 5cm/s to 10 cm/s.
6. The robot must start within the Base area (Earth). The robot must be placed completely in the
Base area. The participants arrange the physical position of the robot to their liking before the
attempt starts.
7. As soon as the robot has been arranged and the Factory Satellite has arrived at the starting
position at the playing field the judge gives the signal to start.
.
8. The mission of the robot is to collect all the Space Debris and Failed Satellites and to load them
into the Factory Satellite.
9. Valid Satellites must not be moved from their initial position. A Valid Satellite is considered as
moved if it is shifted from its plate or both the satellite and plate are completely outside of the
green line representing the Satellites Orbit. Penalty will be given for every Valid Satellite moved
from their initial position.
10. An object is loaded into the Factory Satellite only when the object is completely loaded into the
container of the Factory Satellite (the white cylinder).
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11. The robot is allowed to touch the Factory Satellite, to handicap its movements or to stop it. If
the Factory Satellite goes off its orbit as a result of the robot’s actions the attempt will be stopped.
Scoring will be made for all the challenge objects handled by the robot till this moment.
12. When the robot enters completely to the Base area and has stopped moving, attempt will be
stopped. The robot is allowed to pass through the Base area (even completely) without movements
ceasing. If the robot completely enters to the Base area and stops (for example to perform a turn),
this action will be considered as the finish and the attempt will be stopped.
13. The attempt and time will stop if:
The robot completely enters to the Base area and has stopped moving.
Any team member touches the robot after it starts or touches any object on the field.
The Factory Satellite got off its orbit as a result of the robot’s actions.
Challenge time (2 minutes) has ended.
Participant call for "Stop" of the match.
Violation of the rules and regulations here
2. Scoring
1. Score will only be calculated at the end of the challenge or when time stops.
2. A space Debris item or a Failed Satellite is completely outside of the green line representing the
satellites orbit = 5 pts per item.
3. Placing a Space Debris item completely into the container of the Factory Satellite = 40 points
per item.
4. Placing a Failed Satellite completely into the container of the Factory Satellite = 50 points per
item.
5. Moving of a Valid Satellite completely from its initial position, a penalty will be subtracted = 15
points per item.
6. The robot finishes completely in the Base area (at least one Space Debris item or Failed
Satellite is moved completely outside of the green line representing satellites orbit) = 20 points.
7. Maximum score = 330 points.
One
Space Loading of Space Loading of Failed Finish in Base
Debris item or Debris
Satellite
Failed Satellite
is outside the
Satellite Orbit
40 points per 50 points per item 20 points
5 points
item
Penalties:
15 points penalties will be subtracted for every Valid Satellite moved from its initial position on the
Satellite Orbit
Table Specifications
Horizontal Dimensions
1. Horizontal Dimensions: 2370 mm × 1150 mm.
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(download the mat in .ai)
2. A wall that is 16 mm in width surrounds the table. The height of the wall is 50 mm..
3. The playing field consists of the Base area, Black and Light Green Lines representing the orbits
4. The table base color is white, except for cyan Base area, Black and Light Green orbits.
5. The Base area a cyan circle 360 mm in diameter as a symbol of the Earth.
6. The width of the lines in the playing field area is 30 mm ± 1 mm.
7. The error tolerance of the field is ± 10 mm..
8. The playing field contains:
Valid and Bad Satellites are represented by red and blue balls
Space Debris is a LEGO construction built from red LEGO Technic beams.
The Factory Satellite introduced by a robotics vehicle with a cylindrical container 250 mm in
diameter and 160 mm
in height (with empty section about 100 mm height)
9. Red balls represent Failed Satellites. Blue balls represent Valid Satellites. Red and blue balls 52
mm in diameter are placed
on 2x2 LEGO plates.
10. Five LEGO bricks in height, 6x6 studs in size represent Space Debris: 10 red LEGO Technic
Brick 1x6 and 10 LEGO
Technic Brick 1x4
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
11. The robot in the Factory Satellite may be made of Lego Mindstorms Set and programmed with
any software.
Building Instructions
Building instructions for the Factory Satellite
The robot in the Factory Satellite may be made of Lego Mindstorms Set and programmed
with any software. Example of construction and program in Robolab 2.9.4 attached. Also,
construction based on t he RCX and EV3 will be later.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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PRO ROBOT Soccer: Rules 2011


Playing Field and Ball
Floor
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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 The playing field for the GEN II League is 122 cm by 183 cm. The field has white borders
30cm
wide.
Download
Diagram
from
http://www.robocupjunior.org.au/
All dimensions are in mm
 The floor of the playing field is covered with a printed vinyl, roll resistant mat.
 The central playing area should be placed so that it is flat and level. All white borders,
including the ends of the field inclined by raising the outside of the border by 1 cm.
 The field must be either placed on a carpet or felt base.
 Visit http://www.robocupjunior.org.au/ for field construction hints for competition and
the classroom.
 The
field
may
be
placed
on
a
table
or
on
the
floor.
Hint: It is recommended that teams design their robots to cope with slight imperfections up
to 5 mm on the surface and the incline.

Walls
 Matte black walls are placed all around the field, including behind the goals.
 The walls are 8 cm high.
 The walls can be constructed of any material as they are not essential to game play.

Goals
 The width of each goal is 45 cm.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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 The back and sides of the goal interior are painted sky blue. The floor is white. The external
sides of the goals are painted matte black.
 The depth of each goal is 8cm.
 Each goal will have a black cross bar 14cm above the playing surface
 The surface within the goal area is flat and level (horizontal).
 The side walls of the goals extend to the end wall to prevent ball from rolling behind the
goals.

Neutral Zones
1.4.1. There are two neutral zones, shown in white below, defined in the field.
1.4.2. They are defined as the line between the corners of the penalty boxes, running along the
field
on
the
boundaries
of
the
green
colour
zones

Lighting and Magnetic Conditions
 Teams must come prepared to calibrate their robots based on the lighting and magnetic
conditions at the venue. Every effort will be made by organizers to keep light levels as low
as possible and locate soccer fields away from magnetic fields such as under floor wiring
and metallic objects. However sometimes this cannot be avoided.
Hint: It is recommended that teams design their robots to cope with variations in
lighting and magnetic conditions, as these vary from venue to venue.

Ball
 Specification
 A well-balanced electronic ball diameter 7.5cm shall be used.
 The ball will be used in the following modes:
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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EK
RoboSoccer RCJ-05 ball operated in MODE D (1200Hz pulsed)
Hitechnic Infrared Electronic Ball(IRB 1005) in MODE D (1200Hz pulsed)
 Ball Suppliers
 The official balls for all WRO tournaments will be: Hitechnic Infrared Electronic Ball (IRB
1005)
available
from
www.Hitechnic.com


Robots
Dimensions
 Robots will be measured in an upright position and with all parts fully extended.
 The upright robot must fit inside an upright 22cm diameter cylinder.
 The robot height must be less than 22cm.
 RCJA
events
will
WRO
League:
Open League: not more than 2.5kg
run
not
in
more
two
than
leagues:
1kg
 While being inspected, each robot must be upright and at its maximum size; i.e., anything
that protrudes from the robot must be fully extended. If a robot has a moving part that
extends in two directions, it will need to be inspected with this part operating. The robot
must be able to operate without touching the measuring cylinder.

Control
 Robots must be controlled autonomously.
 Robots must be able to be started manually.
 The use of remote of control any kind is not allowed.
 Robots must be able to move in all directions.
 Type 2 (blue tooth) communications between robots is acceptable as long as it does not
interfere
with
the
performance
of
other
robots.
Robots must have the ability to have their communication disabled at the request of the
referee.
 Marking/Colouring
 Competitors must mark or decorate their robots to identify them as belonging to the same
team. These must not influence game play and will not be considered in the size restrictions.
 Colours of robots and/or light transmitters must not interfere with the sensor readings of
other
robots.

Teams and Leagues
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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 All teams shall consist of no more than two (2) robots. Any substitution of extra robots
during a tournament is forbidden and disqualification will result.
 Construction
 For Open League, any robot kit or building block, either commercial or from raw hardware
may be used, as long as the robot fits the above specifications and as long as the design and
construction are primarily and substantially the original work of the student(s) (see section
6.2).
 For the WRO League the following applies:

Robots are to be constructed using strictly LEGO® brand pieces, motors and sensors
only.

No other building materials can be used, including glue, tape, screws etc.

The following combinations of motors and sensors are allowable:






For RCX users:
For NXT users:
 NXT controller (1)
 motors (3)
 touch sensors (2)
 light sensors (2)
 lamp (1)
 rotation sensors (3 minus the
number of NXT motors present)
 ultrasonic sensor (1)
 HiTechnic NXT compass sensor(1)
 HiTechnic NXT IR seeker sensor
V2 (1)
RCX controller (1)
motors (3)
touch sensors (2)
light sensors (2)
lamp (1)
rotation sensors (3)



3rd touch OR light sensor (1)
RCX compass sensor(1)
RCX flyeye R0326(1)

Omni directional wheels are not permitted
 Robots must have a handle for referees to easily pick them up. The handle will not be
included in above measurements. For the Novice League, handles can be made from non
LEGO®
components.
Hint:
Cable
Ties
make
a
strong
lightweight
handle.
 Ball Capturing Zones and Movement
3.6.1.
Ball Capturing Zones are defined as any internal space created when a straight edge
is placed on the protruding points of a robot.
3.6.2.
The ball cannot penetrate the Ball Capturing Zone by more than 3cm.
3.6.3.
A robot cannot "hold" a ball.
Hint: Holding a ball means taking a full control of the ball by removing all of its
degrees of freedom. For example, this would mean fixing a ball to the robot's body,
surrounding a ball using the robot's body to prevent access by others, encircling the
ball or somehow trapping the ball with any part of the robot's body. If a ball stops
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
Page 25 of 35
rolling while a robot is moving, or a ball does not rebound when rolled into a robot, it
is a good indication that the ball is trapped.
3.6.4.
The ball cannot be held underneath a robot.
3.6.5.
The ball must be visible and other players must be able to access the ball at all
times.
3.6.6.
The only exception to rule (3.6.3) is the use of a rotating drum that imparts dynamic
back spin on the ball to keep the ball on its surface. This is called a "dribbler".
3.6.7.
A dribbler must comply with Rule (3.6.2). The 3cm is measured from the contact point
of
the
dribbler
on
the
ball.
3.7. Goalies
3.7.1.
If a goalie is used, it cannot limit its movement to a single direction on the field. It must
be programmed to move in all directions.
3.7.2. The goalie must respond to the ball in a forward direction in an attempt to intercept the
ball ahead of the goal. If required, its movement should be able to take some part of the robot
outside
of
the
penalty
box
(45
cm
from
goal).
Hint: The goalie cannot respond sideways and followed by a forward movement.
3.7.3. Failure to respond to the ball with forward movement down the field will result in the
robot
being
classified
as
"Damaged."
(Section
4.7.)
3.8. Kickers, Batteries and Robot Power
3.8.1.
If a robot damages a ball or the field, it will be removed from play and receive a time
penalty as damaged robots. A yellow warning sticker will be placed on the robot/s and
the referee will record the infringement on the score card.
3.8.2.
In the event of two colliding robots damaging a ball, both robots will be removed and
given a yellow sticker. If the referee considers one robot to be significantly more
aggressive than the other, they can choose to remove that robot from play.
3.8.3.
Adjustments must be made to the robot/s to prevent this from re-occurring.
3.8.4.
If a robot infringes again during the tournament, it will be disqualified from the
tournament.
If a robot has the power to damage an officially accepted WRO Football (RoboCup Junior
Soccer ball) (See 3.2.1 and 3.2.2), it is a strong indication that the robot has been built
with excessive power and the intention to damage other robots. The robot has not been built
with the ideals of WRO (RoboCup Junior) and fair competition in mind, so the tournament
committee has every right to remove that robot from the competition.
3.8.5.
If a robot has an electronic solenoid kicker, its voltage must be limited to the
OH&S (Occupational Health and Safety) Standard Safe Voltage of 70V.
3.8.6 .
Due to safety reasons, Lithium Polymer batteries can only be used in conjunction
with commercially produced, dedicated Lithium Polymer battery chargers.(These batteries can
explode due to incorrect recharging, or if they are damaged).
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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4.
Game Play
4.1.
Pre-game setup
4.1.1. Organizers will provide access to the competition area for calibration and
testing prior to the competition and according to a schedule that will be made
available at the start of the event
4.1.2.
Organizers will make every effort to allow at least 2 minutes of setup time before
each game.
4.1.3.
The ball will be checked for any damage by the referee before each half of the
game is started.
4.1.4.
This time is also for teams to express any concerns about the legality of opposing
robots.
4.2. Length of Game
4.2.1.
The game will consist of two 10-minute halves. Some competitions may choose to run 5
minute halves at the discretion of the tournament organizing committee.
4.2.2.
There will be a 5-minute break in between the halves.
4.2.3.
The game clock will run for the duration of the game (two 10-minutes halves), without
stopping (except as noted in Referees Time Out in Section 4.9.4).
4.2.4.
Teams can be penalized one goal per minute at the referee's discretion if they are late.
4.2.5.
If a team does not report within 5 minutes of the game start, it will forfeit the game and the
winning
team
awarded
a
5-0
score
line.
4.3. Start of Game
4.3.1.
At the start of the first half of the game, the referee will toss a coin and the team first
mentioned in the draw shall call the coin while it is in the air.
4.3.2.
The winner of the toss can choose either (a) which end to kick to, or (b) to kick off first.
4.3.3.
The loser of the toss will decide the other option.
4.3.4.
The team not kicking off in the first half of the game will kick off to begin the secondhalf.
4.4. Kick-Offs
4.4.1.
Each half of the game begins with a kick-off.
4.4.2.
All robots must be in located on their defensive side of the field.
4.4.3.
Robots must not be running.
4.4.4.
The ball is positioned by the referee in the centre of the field.
4.4.5.
The team kicking off places their robots on the field first. Robots cannot be moved once
they have been placed.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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4.4.6.
All robots on the team not kicking off must have some part of the robot in the penalty box.
4.4.7.
On the referee's command, all robots will be started immediately by human team members.
4.4.8.
The robot kicking off must make a clear strike of the ball and it must roll clear the robot by
at
least
5
cm.
A robot that does not have a kicker must visibly release the ball to a distance of 5cm and
not
continue
to
push
the
ball.
An illegal kick off will result in the opposing side being granted the kick off.
4.4.9.
Any robots that are started before the referee’s command will be removed from the field for
one
minute.
4.5. Scoring
4.5.1.
A goal is scored when the whole of the ball crosses the goal line. This coincides with the
ball striking the back wall of the goal. The referee will blow their whistle.
4.5.2.
The ball must be free rolling to score a goal, otherwise it will be deemed "pushed" by the
referee and disallowed. In the event of a pushed goal, play will not be stopped. The goal
will not be allowed. The ball is placed on the nearest available neutral zone and play is
continued.
The robot must make a visible effort to kick or release the ball otherwise a goal will be
deemed a “push”. If no attempt is made to release the ball and it momentarily rolls free
while in the control of a robot travelling towards goal, it will still be deemed a pushed goal.
4.5.3.
The only exception to this is when a robot makes first contact with the ball at less than
15cm from the goal. This includes contact being made by the ball or the attacking robot
with another robot or the goal post.
4.5.4.
A penalty goal will be awarded if a ball deemed to be travelling into the goal strikes a
defensive robot that has some part of it over the goal line and in the "in goal" area.
Robots should be built in a manner that the cross bar prevents them from going behind the
goal
line.
4.5.5.
After a goal is scored, a kick-off will occur. The non-scoring team will be awarded the ball.
4.5.6.
"Own goals" will be treated as a goal to the opposition, even if the ball is "pushed" into the
goal.
4.6. Lack of Progress
4.6.1.
“Lack of Progress” occurs if the ball is stuck between multiple robots (“forcing” situation)
for a reasonable amount of time and has no chance of being freed or if no robot has any
chance of locating the ball in a reasonable amount of time.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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4.6.2.
The referee will call "Lack of Progress" immediately when a robot is using greater power to
“force”
the
ball
past
the
opposition.
If a referee is slow to remove the ball and a goal is scored as a direct result of a robot
“forcing” the ball through, the goal will be disallowed and the ball placed on the nearest
neutral
zone.
4.6.3.
In the case of “Lack of Progress”, the ball will be moved to the nearest neutral zone. If this
occurs again, the ball will be moved to the centre of the field.
4.6.4.
When “Lack of Progress” is called, any robots stuck on other robots will be freed using
minimal movement by the referee or team captains at the request of the referee.
4.7. Damaged Robots
4.7.1.
If a robot does not move and/or does not respond to the ball, it will be deemed damaged by
the referee.
4.7.2.
If a robot remains in the in goal area for longer than 20 seconds, or is stuck against walls or
goals, and shows no indication of returning to the playing area, it will be deemed damaged
by
the
referee.
Hint: A small reverse command in a program will usually free a stuck robot. If a robot
remains in the white border area and shows no indication of returning to the playing area,
it
will
be
deemed
damaged
by
the
referee.
4.7.3.
The referee or players (with the referee’s permission) may remove damaged robot(s) from
the field.
4.7.4.
A
damaged
robot
must
remain
off
the
field
for
at
least
one
minute.
In a shortened (5 minute half) game the damaged robot can be replaced after a goal is
scored.
4.7.5.
A damaged robot must be repaired and may be returned with the referee’s permission to the
neutral zone that is closest to the position on the field from where the robot was removed
and does not advantage that robot, e.g. facing the ball.
4.7.6.
Goalies may be returned to the area in front of the goal.
4.7.7.
Play will continue during removal, repair and replacement. Note that the referee may
choose to interrupt play if robot damage occurred because of a collision with an opposition
robot.
4.7.8.
If a robot turns over on its own accord, it will be treated as a damaged robot and removed. If
the robot is tipped over after a collision with another robot, it can be righted by the referee
and continue playing.
4.8. Ball Out Of Play
4.8.1.
A ball is considered out of play if it strikes the outer wall or leaves the playing field.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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4.8.2.
After a ball is considered out of play, it will be moved to the nearest neutral zone to the
disadvantage of the team of that last touched it. i.e. the neutral zone in the direction that the
opposition are kicking.
4.9. Interruption of Game Play
4.9.1.
The situations listed in sections (4.6)-(4.8) may cause play to be interrupted, usually
resulting in the movement of the ball to the nearest neutral zone while play is allowed to
continue.
4.9.2.
Play may also be stopped by the referee blowing a whistle(Referees Time Out), but the
game clock is not stopped, all at the discretion of the referee. All robots must be stopped
immediately and returned to their position at the time the whistle was blown.
4.9.3.
After a stoppage in play, play will resume on the referee's command and all robots are
started simultaneously.
4.9.4.
A referee may call “Referee’s Time Out” for field repair, situations such as in (4.7.7) or
(4.11.3) or if the tournament referee is called for rule clarification. The referee can elect to
stop the match clock if the stoppage is lengthy.
4.10. Multiple Defence
4.10.1. “Multiple Defence” occurs if more than one robot from the defending side enters the
penalty area and substantially affects the game.
4.10.2. For a “Multiple Defence”, the robot having the least influence on play is moved to the
centre of field. In the case where a goalie is involved, the other player will be moved.
4.11. Fouls
4.11.1. If a robot utilizes a device or an action which continuously attacks or charges a robot not in
possession of the ball, the referee will call “Foul”. The team captain must then remove the
robot from the playing field for at least one minute and correct the problem; play will
continue (as in 4.7 “Damaged Robots”).
4.11.2. If the robot continues to foul, it will be permanently removed from the game, a yellow
warning sticker will be placed on the robot/s and the referee will record the infringement on
the score card.
4.11.3. If a robot is damaged by a foul, the referee will stop the game and stop the clock while
repairs are made. (See Referee’s Time Out - Section 4.9.4)
4.11.4. If a robot is removed from two games for “fouling”, it will be disqualified from the
tournament.
4.12. Free Kicks
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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4.12.1. There
are
no
free
kicks.
4.13. Penalty Kicks
4.13.1. There
are
no
penalty
kicks.
are
no
offside
rules.
4.14. Offside
4.14.1. There
4.15. Humans
4.15.1. In general, movement of robots by humans is not acceptable.
4.15.2. Humans can only move robots at the instruction of the referee.
4.15.3. Before the start of each match, teams should designate one human who will act as
"Captain", and be allowed to place, remove and replace robots during the game, based on
the stated rules and as directed by the referee.
4.15.4. Other team members within the vicinity of the playing field are to remain at least one metre
from the field while the ball is in play, unless otherwise directed by the referee.
5.
Conflict Resolution
5.1. Referee
5.1.1.
During game play, the referee's decisions are final. Any argument with a referee’s decision
will result in a Yellow Warning Card. If argument continues, the referee will give a Red
Card resulting in immediate forfeit of the game.
5.1.2.
If Team Captains are satisfied with the result of a game, they are to sign the score sheet at
the conclusion of game play.
5.1.3.
Any protest after the game should only be if the scoring is believed to be incorrect. Or if a
game
result
is
in
doubt.
5.2. Rule Clarification
5.2.1.
Rule clarification may be made by members of the RoboCup Junior Australia Technical
Committee (through WRO Advisory Council).
5.2.2.
If a rule clarification is needed, the referee should stop the game immediately, call
“Referee’s Time Out” (See Referee’s Time Out - Section 4.9.4) stop the clock and confirm
the ruling before continuing with the game.
5.3. Special Circumstances
5.3.1.
6.
Specific modifications to the rules to allow for special circumstances, such as unforeseen
problems and/or capabilities of a team's robots, may be agreed to at the time of the
tournament,
provided
a
majority
of
the
contestants
agree.
Inspection
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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6.1. Scrutineering
6.1.1.
All robots will be examined by a panel of referees before the start of each day of the
tournament to ensure that the robots meet all constraints described in Section 3.
6.1.2.
It is the responsibility of teams to have their robots re-inspected if their robots are not
passed at scrutineering or have been modified at any time during the tournament.
6.1.3.
Any violations of the inspection rules will prevent that robot competing until modifications
are effected.
6.1.4.
Modifications must be made within the time schedule of the tournament and teams must not
delay game play while making modifications.
6.1.5.
If a robot fails to meet all specifications (even with modification), the robot will be
disqualified for that game (but not the tournament).
6.2. Students
6.2.1.
Students will be asked to explain the operation of their robots in order to verify that the
construction and the programming of the robot is their own work.
6.2.2.
Students will be asked questions about their preparation efforts, and they will be requested
to answer surveys and participate in video-taped interviews for research purposes.
6.2.3.
Commercial kits may be used but must be substantially modified by the students.
6.2.4.
Proof (photos, log books, poster, plans etc) must be supplied that robots are constructed and
programmed by the students. The use of purpose built programs supplied with kits or at
training sessions should not be used without major modification. Proof of a full
understanding of the program must be shown.
6.2.5.
It is expected that tournament organizers will conduct verification interviews prior to the
finals of all events.
6.2.6.
Any violations of the inspection rules will prevent that robot competing until modifications
are effected.
6.2.7.
Modifications must be made within the time schedule of the tournament and teams must not
delay game play while making modifications.
6.2.8.
If a robot fails to meet all specifications (even with modification), the robot will be
disqualified for that game (but not the tournament).
6.2.9.
If there is excessive mentor assistance or the work on the robots is not substantially original
work by the students, then the team will be disqualified from the tournament.
7.
Code of Conduct
7.1. Fair Play
7.1.1.
Robots that cause deliberate interference and repeated damage to structurally sound robots
during normal game play will be disqualified (See Section 4.11. (Fouls)).
7.1.2.
Robots that cause damage to the field or the ball during normal game play will be
disqualified (see Section 3.8.).
7.1.3.
Humans that cause deliberate interference with any robots or damage to the field or the ball
will be disqualified.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
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7.1.4.
It is expected that the aim of all teams is to play a fair and clean game of robot soccer.
It is expected that all robots will be built with Rules 3.8 and 4.11 in mind.
If robots are built to the upper limits of power and weight, they must anticipate the
possibility of damaging other robots or the ball. Officially endorsed WRO balls have
been tested for robustness and are not damaged in normal WRO GEN II Football
game play.
7.2. Behaviour
7.2.1.
All movement and behaviour is to be of a subdued nature within the tournament venue.
7.2.2.
Competitors are not to enter setup areas of other leagues or other teams, unless expressly
invited to do so by team members.
7.2.3.
Participants who misbehave may be asked to leave the building and risk being disqualified
from the tournament.
7.2.4.
These rules will be enforced at the discretion of the referees, officials, conference
organizers
and
local
law
enforcement
authorities.
7.3. Mentors
7.3.1.
Mentors (teachers, parents, chaperones and other adult team-members) are not allowed in
the student work area.
7.3.2.
Sufficient seating will be supplied for Mentors to remain in a supervisory capacity around
the student work area.
7.3.3.
Mentors are not to repair robots or be involved in programming of student robots. Robots
should not need to leave the student work area during the day’s game play.
7.3.4.
Mentor interference with robots or referee decisions will result in a yellow card warning in
the first instance. If this reoccurs, a red card will be awarded and the mentor will be asked
to leave the venue.
7.4. Sharing
7.4.1.
Teams are encouraged to publish footage of highlights on YouTube using the tags WRO
GEN II Football. Prizes may be awarded for the best clips at the discretion of the
tournament organizers.
7.4.2.
Any developments may be published on the WRO (and/or RoboCup Junior website) after
the event.
7.4.3.
7.4.4.
This furthers the mission of RoboCup Junior as an educational initiative.
Teams are encouraged to publish footage of highlights on YouTube using the tags RoboCup
Junior Australia Soccer. Prizes may be awarded for the best clips at the discretion of the
tournament
organizers.
7.5. Spirit
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
Page 33 of 35
7.5.1.
It is expected that all participants, Students, Coaches and Mentors alike, will respect the
WRO mission.
7.5.2.
The referees and officials will act within the spirit of the event.
It is not whether you win or lose, but how much you learn that counts.
WRO, Open Category
2014 Season
Theme «Robots and Space”
Prelude
The black velvet sky studded with stars fills humankind with awe. From one side, stars
are beautiful, unattainable and cold but from other side they saved the lives of brave
travelers. Thankful people named stars and constellations, invented devices and tools to
observe night luminaries, drew celectial maps and created atlases.
From the very old times humans were interested in things related to the stars. Craving for
unknown pulled inventors up - into Space. Devices similar to rockets appeared at the
first time in the 2nd century B.C. in China. Now everyone can see them on holidays – it
is fireworks. Science and technology made a big step to have an ability to design
complex vehicles using jet propulsion just in the 19th century. The first man who
deducted a formula of rocket velocity was Russian scientist Constantine Tsiolkovsky.
Later, the desire to win Space turned into the Space Race. Hundreds and thousands of
people from different countries worked hard to invent and develop rockets, satelites,
space stations, robots which are capable to work in outer space and on other planets.
The first satellite - Sputnik, the first cosmonaut – Yuri Gagarin, the first robot on Moon Lunokhod, the first space station – Mir – this is the list of Russian scientists and
engineers achievements.
What will help humankind to subdue Space in the future? When will we be able to live
on other planetes in our Solar System? How will we reach the stars?
Your Mission
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
Page 34 of 35
Design and create robots which will assist humankind in solving different tasks in Space.
Scoring of Open Category
Project
1. Creativity & Quality of Solution
2. Research & Report
3. Entertainment Value
Programming
1. Automation
2. Good Logic
3. Complexity
Engineering Design
1. Technical Understanding
2. Engineering Concepts
3. Mechanical Efficiency
4. Structural Stability
5. Aesthetics
Presentation
1. Successful Demonstration
2. Communication & Reasoning Skills
3. Quick Thinking
4. Posters and Decorations
5. Project Video
Teamwork
1. Unified Learning Outcome
2. Inclusiveness
3. Team spirit
Maximum points:
Total Points: 50
25
15
10
Total Points: 45
15
15
15
Total Points: 45
15
10
10
5
5
Total Points: 40
15
10
5
5
5
Total Points: 20
10
5
5
200
Note, projects that are clearly not within the theme will be given a score of 0.
13th Philippine Robotics Olympiad v.6.28.2013
Page 35 of 35
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