CONTINUOUS COMPLIANCE REPORT OF USOC MEMBERS

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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
Please answer the following questions:
1. Is your organization incorporated as a Not-for-Profit Corporation as required by the Section 8.12b of the USOC
Bylaws?
Y
N In what State? Virginia
2. Has your organization been granted tax-exempt status by the IRS as required by Section 8.12c of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
3. Is your international sports federation recognized by the International Olympic Committee as administering a
recognized sport, as required by Section 8.12 of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
Please list the International Federation of which your organization is a member.
International Federation of American Football
4. Does your organization administer and support an annual national championship of athletes from several different
areas/regions of the United States, as required by Section 8.12d of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
Please substantiate compliance.
USA Football does not currently hold a national championship. It does, however, host National Development
Games each summer. Beginning with open invitation two-day regional development camps that take place each
spring throughout the United States (there are 24 locations for 2015), elite players are invited to participate in the
weeklong National Development Games and compete for positions on the U.S. National Football Team.
The National Development Games include a 7-on-7 tournament and a jamboree tournament in which four teams
are seeded 1, 2, 3 and 4 and then games are played 1 vs. 2 and 3 vs. 4. In summer 2014, USA Football hosted the
National Development Games across five age groups in three locations. Canton, Ohio, hosted 7th and 8th grades,
Los Angeles, California, and Towson, Maryland, hosted 9th and 10th grades, and College Station, Texas, hosted
10th and 11th grades. National Development Games are planned for Summer 2015.
The athletes’ performances are subjectively evaluated during the National Development Games. USA Football
uses these evaluations to select its national team. Each February, the U.S. National Football Teams compete at the
U-15, U-16, U-17, U-18 and U-19 age levels against Canada’s national teams. The national team then represents
the United States each the International Bowl each February. Every two years, the U-19 U.S. National Football
Team competes in the International Federation of American Football (IFAF) World Championships against seven
other countries for gold, silver and bronze medals. The 2014 World Championship took place in Kuwait in July
2014, and Team USA Football brought home the gold.
5. Does your organization have an active athlete training and competition program financially supported by selfgenerated funds, as required by Section 8.12e of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
Please substantiate compliance.
The Regional Development Camp, National Development Game, and U.S. National Football Team are funded by
participant fees and the operational budget of USA Football.
6. Is your sport widely practiced in the United States and in other countries and continents as required by Section
8.12 of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
Did your organization participate with a full contingent in two of the last three World Championships as
sanctioned by your International Federation as required by Section 8.12f of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
Please provide information confirming the extent to which your sport is practiced and the extent to which your
organization has participated in international competitions.
The U.S. National Football Teams compete in International Federation of American Football (IFAF) World
Championships against other national federations for gold, silver and bronze medals.
Every two years, the U-19 U.S. National Football Team competes for the World Championship. The 2014 World
Championship took place in Kuwait this July and Team USA Football brought home the gold. USA Football
hosted the 2012 U-19 World Championships in Austin, Texas, and sent a team to Canton, OH in 2009.
The IFAF Senior World Championship is held every four years, having first been contested in 1999 and is
considered to be the showpiece IFAF competition. The fifth IFAF Senior World Championship will be held in
2015. The United States is the reigning back-to-back senior world champions (2007 and 2011). Japan won in 1999
and 2003 before the United States joined.
In 2010, Sweden hosted the inaugural Women’s Tackle World Championship, furthering opportunities for female
participation in the sport at its highest level. Six nations competed in Stockholm, with the United States winning
its first crown. The 2013 IFAF Women’s World Championship brought six teams, USA, Canada, Finland,
Germany, Sweden, and Spain, to the world's stage in Vantaa, Finland. USA claimed its second gold medal, being
the only Women's team to win, twice. The Women’s World Championship games is played on a four-year rotation
with the next competition in 2017.
The Men’s and Women’s IFAF Flag Football World Championship has been held every two years since 2002. The
Men’s U.S. National Flag Team brought home gold from Italy in 2014 while the women brought home silver.
Please answer the following questions relating to your organization’s substantial compliance with Sections 220522
through 220525 of the Act.
7. Explain in narrative form your organization’s managerial and financial capability to plan and execute its
obligations as a Recognized Sport Organization (Section 220522(a)(2) of the Act).
USA Football employs a professional staff of more than 50 employees. Among those employees are a number of
experienced and highly qualified management professionals including:
 Scott Hallenbeck, Executive Director – Scott has more than 20 years of experience in executive leadership,
event management and sports marketing, including positions at the USOC, Reebok, Turner
Broadcasting/Goodwill Games, and Links Sports Marketing LLC.
 Jim Elias, Senior Director of Finance – A Certified Public Accountant, Jim has 25 years of professional
experience in finance and non-profit management, including senior positions at Ernst & Young, USA Track &
Field and USA Diving.
 Jennifer Phelps, General Counsel – Jennifer has practiced law for 15 years, including more than a decade at
Bingham McCutchen and Faegre Baker & Daniels, where she was exposed to a wide breadth of issues,
including corporate governance, statutory interpretation, and arbitration.
USA Football’s executive team also includes individuals with expertise in programs, marketing, events, strategic
planning, education, and communications. These individuals gained their experience at leading organizations such
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
as the USOC, NCAA, National Football League (NFL) teams and the League office, major Olympic NGBs, and
major corporations.
In addition to its professional staff, USA Football uses a number of best-in-class business tools to manage its
business operations, including accounting systems and policies, strategic planning processes, and office
productivity tools.
8. Does your organization agree to submit to binding arbitration in the following situations (Section 220522
(a)(4) of the Act):
a. Involving your organization’s recognition as a Recognized Sports Organization?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 7.12., p. 18
b. Involving the opportunity of any amateur athlete to participate in amateur athletic competition as provided for in
Section 9 of the USOC Bylaws?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your Bylaws (please list the article or section citation and page
number where the provision can be found).
Section 7.10., p.18
9. Is your organization autonomous in the governance of its sport in that it independently determines and controls all
matters central to such governance, does not delegate such determination and control, and is free from outside restraint
(Section 220522(a)(5) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 3.01., p.2
Does your organization delegate any responsibility to an independent committee or other organization?
N
Y
If so, please name the committee or organization and provide information as to the responsibility delegated.
Not applicable.
10. Certify that your organization is a member of no more than one international sports federation (Section
220522(a)(6) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 6.06(b), p.15
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
11. Is your organization’s membership open to those individuals and/or sport organizations described in Section
220522(a)(7) of the Act?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 2.02., p.1.
Please provide information on the voting strength of each member and how it is obtained.
USA Footballs members do not have any voting rights under the Bylaws (see Section 2.01). However, qualified
athletes vote for qualified athlete representatives to serve on the board of directors and other committees (see
Section 3.02(b)(ii), p. 4.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
12.(a) Does your organization provide an equal opportunity to participate in athletic competition without
discrimination (Section 220522(a)(8) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 7.01(b), p. 16
(b) Does your organization provide fair notice and opportunity for a hearing to any amateur athlete, coach, trainer,
manager, administrator, or official before declaring such individual ineligible to participate (Section 220522 (a)(8)
of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 2.04., p.2
(c) Does your organization provide for expedited hearings?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 7.09., pp.17-18.
(d) Does your organization suspend or otherwise impose penalties on athletes participating in domestic nonsanctioned events?
Y
N
(e) Does your organization provide for 20% athlete representation on hearing panels?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 7.07, p.17
(f) Does your organization have any published procedures relating to the denial of an athlete or other person’s
eligibility to participate that are not a part of your organic documents?
Y
N
13. Are all members of your organization’s governing board(s) selected/elected on a non-discriminatory basis
(Section 220527(a)(9) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 3.02.(a), p.3
14. Does your organization have a specific provision in your organic documents requiring at least 20% athlete
representation on your board of directors, executive committee and other governing board(s) (Section 220522
(a)(10) of the Act and Section 8.8.1 of the USOC Bylaws)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Board of Directors athlete representation is contained in Section 3.02.(b)(ii), p.4.
Executive Committee athlete representation is contained in Section 5.02.(a)(iii), p.8.
Other governing boards:
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
Nominating Committee athlete representation is contained in Section 5.03(c), p.9.
Audit Committee athlete representation is contained in Section 5.04(a)(iii), p.10.
Ethics Committee athlete representation is contained in Section 5.05(a)(ii), p.12.
Advisory Committees athlete representation is contained in Section 5.08.
Describe how the athlete representatives to the board of directors, executive committee and other governing
board(s) are elected. Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws. (please list
the article or section citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 3.02(a) lists the general qualifications for all board directors. In addition to those qualifications listed in
section 3.02, the athlete representatives are elected by athletes and “have demonstrated their qualifications as an
“Athlete” at the time of election by having within the ten years preceding the election, represented the United
States in an internal championship recognized by IFAF; or within the 24 months before selection, demonstrated
that he or she was actively engaged in amateur athletic competition.” Section 3.02(b)(ii).
Does your organization have a specific provision in your organic documents requiring at least 20% athlete
representation: (i) on all “Designated Committees,” and (ii) on all committees that are not “Designated
Committees” (Section 220522 (a)(10) of the Act and Section 8.8.1 of the USOC Bylaws).
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 5.01, p.8. Note that some advisory committees, such as USA Football’s Medical Advisory Committee
requires specialized expert knowledge. USA Football will strive for 20% athlete participation on these committees,
so long as qualified athletes are available and willing to serve.
Do you pay the expense of your athlete representatives to attend your organization’s board of directors, executive
committee, other governing boards and committee meetings?
Y
N
15. Does your organization provide an opportunity for reasonable voting representation on your governing board(s)
for amateur sport organization(s) that meet the definition of Section 220522 (a)(11) of the Act?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 3.02(a)(iii) – “Up to twelve (12) directors shall be elected by the directors then in office (including but not
limited to the directors appointed by the NFL) from the following constituencies in the discretion of the Board of
Directors: from grass roots football organizations, from among individuals with significant football coaching or
officiating experience, from the business community, and from among individuals with significant governmentrelated experience. It is the hope and intention of the Corporation that the elected directors shall be rotated on a
regular basis in order to allow the broadest possible participation on the Board of Directors of the many
stakeholders interested in promoting youth participation in football.”
Please identify those individuals you listed on Attachment L (your current roster of governing boards) who
represent amateur sport organizations and list the organization(s) they represent.
Woodie Dixon Jr. – Pacific-12 (“Pac-12”) Conference
Bob Gardner - National Federation of State High School Associations (“NFHS”)
Michael Strickland – Atlantic Coast Conference (“ACC”)
Grant Teaff - American Football Coaches Association (“AFCA”)
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
If amateur sport organizations take part in your governing board’s election process, please describe the voting
strength of each member/group and how it is attained.
Each member of the board of directors has one vote.
16. Are any of your organization’s officers also officers of any other Recognized Sport Organization or National
Governing Body as prohibited by Section 220522 (a)(12) of the Act?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your Bylaws (please list the article or section citation and page
number where the provision can be found).
Section 6.01, p. 14.
17. Does your organization provide procedures for the prompt and equitable resolution of grievances of your members
as required by Section 220522(a)(13) of the Act?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Article VII, pp.15-18
Does your organization have any published procedures relating to the resolution of grievances that are not a part of
your organic documents?
Y
N
Complaints of misconduct that fall within USA Football’s SafeSport policy are handled in accordance with that
policy.
Allegations of doping are handled in accordance with IFAF’s anti-doping policy.
18. Does your organization have eligibility criteria that are more restrictive than your organization’s International
Federation (Section 220522(a)(14) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your Bylaws (please list the article or section citation and page
number where the provision can be found).
Article II describes our membership criteria.
19. Please describe in narrative form how your organization informs your athletes about:
(i)
team selection procedures;
(ii)
procedures relating to the denial of an athlete or other person’s eligibility to participate; and
(iii) procedures relating to resolution of grievances.
USA Football posts information relating to the procedures for being selected to each of our national teams (men’s
tackle, women’s tackle, men’s flag, women’s flag, and the youth national team program) on its web page
(http://usafootball.com/teamusa). This information is also provided to athletes and coaches upon request.
Procedures regarding denial of eligibility and relating to the resolution of grievances are provided in the grievance
section of the national teams section of the USA Football website.
20. Please describe in narrative form what policies and procedures your organization has in place pertaining to drug
testing and adjudication of related doping offenses.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
USA Football subscribes to the IFAF Anti-Doping Rules that were adopted by the executive committee meeting in
April 2010. Athletes (and, as applicable, their parents) consent to drug testing during international competitions
and the adjudication procedures set forth by the IFAF Rules.
21. Explain in narrative form when your organization is able to amend its organic documents and how much notice is
needed.
USA Football can convene its Board of Directors telephonically to approve the bylaws and articles of
incorporation upon fourteen days’ notice.
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
Section 4.01
Is your organization capable of changing its organic documents by mail or electronic ballot?
Y
N
Yes, however consent by email or facsimile requires unanimous consent by all of the directors.
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your Bylaws (please list the article or section citation and page
number where the provision can be found).
Section 4.03
22. Please list the name and address of any other sports organizations known to you in the sport for which your
organization is seeking membership.
There are a myriad of football organizations. The major national organizations are as follows:
The National Collegiate Athletic Association
700 W. Washington Street
P.O. Box 6222
Indianapolis, Indiana 46206-6222
National Federation of State High School Associations
690 West Washington Street
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Pop Warner Little Scholars, Inc.
586 Middletown Blvd., Suite C-100
Langhorne, PA 19047
23. Please explain why your organization wishes to become a member of the USOC and indicate the benefits that
your organization can bring to the USOC as a member.
While USA Football is recognized by IFAF, the NCAA, the National Federation of State High School
Associations as the sport’s governing body (or its equivalent) in the United States with the authority to field
national teams to engage in international amateur competition, only the USOC has authority delegated by
Congress to regulate amateur sports. USA Football seeks the USOC’s recognition as well as the USOC’s reach to
grow the game domestically and internationally.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
By becoming a member of the USOC, American-rules football, one of the most beloved and active sports in the
United States, would come under the USOC’s tent. USA Football reaches over one million coaches, players,
officials and parents each season.
24. Please describe how your organization develops interest and participation throughout the United States and is
responsible to the persons and amateur sports organizations it represent (Section 220524(1) of the Act).
In 2012, USA Football launched a pilot program to holistically address safety in youth football called Heads Up
Football® (HUF). HUF stands for the proposition that coaches need to be certified before they step on the field;
that equipment should fit properly; and that coaches, players and parents should recognize signs of concussions,
heat stroke and cardiac arrest and know how to manage return to play protocols. Using a train-the-trainer model,
USA Football trains master trainers and those master trainers then deploy across the country to train player safety
coaches nominated by each youth football league or high school. Those player safety coaches are then charged
with training their coaches and monitoring the implementation of Heads Up Football in their organizations. In
2013, the first year of the national pilot, more than 2,800 youth football organizations (out of approximately
10,000 organizations nationwide) voluntarily signed up to be a part of Heads Up Football. In 2014, the number of
youth leagues grew to approximately 5,000 HUF youth members and 600 high school members.
USA Football also runs NFL Flag and NFL PUNT, PASS, KICK competitions as well as a non-contact program
for small children called FUNdamentals. These programs are engaging young athletes and providing non-contact
avenues for playing football. USA Football is also developing a program called USA Football Sevens that will
sanction 7-on-7 competitions.
25. Please describe how your organization minimizes, through coordination with other amateur sports organizations,
conflicts in the scheduling of all practices and competitions (Section 220524(2) of the Act).
Since football season falls primarily from August through the second week of December. USA Football primarily
holds its competitions and programs from February through July. By programming outside of the football season,
USA Football minimizes the scheduling conflicts.
26. Please describe how your organization keeps amateur athletes informed of policy matters and reasonably reflect
the views of such athletes in your policy decisions (Section 220524(3) of the Act).
Youth football in the United States in decentralized into independently run football organizations. USA Football
does not operate these clubs and leagues but rather provides them with resources and tools for better and safer
operations. These resources include a rule book, training player safety coaches, online coaching certification
courses, subsidy to conduct background checks, SafeSport Resources, equipment grants. Thus, USA Football
provides the youth organizations with best practices and recommendations but not policy decisions except as these
policies pertain to USA Football’s own operations.
27. Please describe how your organization disseminates and distributes to amateur athletes, coaches, trainers,
managers, administrators, and officials in a timely manner the applicable rules and any changes to such rules of the
National Governing Body, the USOC, the appropriate international sports federation, the International Olympic
Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, and the Pan-American Sports Organization (Section
220524(4) of the Act).
Not currently applicable. However, such information could be readily disseminated through membership emails,
USA Football web sites, blog posts, twitter, Facebook and other social media.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
28. Does your organization promptly (1) review every request submitted by an Amateur sports organization or person
for a sanction (i) to hold an international amateur competition in the U.S. or (ii) to allow U.S. Amateur athletes to
compete in international athletic competition held outside the U.S. and (2) determine whether to grant such
sanction, in accordance with Section 220525 of the Act?
Y
N
Please indicate where this provision is contained in your organization’s Bylaws (please list the article or section
citation and page number where the provision can be found).
(i)
Section 8.03, p. 19
(ii)
Section 8.04, pp.19-20
Does your organization have any published procedures relating to sanctioning that are not part of your organic
documents?
Y
N
Please describe your organization’s sanctioning procedures.
Not applicable at this time.
29. Does your organization allow an amateur athlete to compete in any international amateur athletic competition
conducted under your auspices or that of any other amateur sports organization or person as is required by Section
220524(5) of the Act, unless you established that denial was based on evidence that the organization conducting
the program did not meet the requirements stated in Section 220525 of the Act?
Y
N
Please describe your organization’s policy relating to the rights of athletes to compete.
USAFB will allow an amateur athlete to compete in any international amateur athletic competition conducted
under USAFB’s auspices or that of any other amateur sports organization as is required by Section 220524(5) of
the Act except in those situations where a denial is based on evidence that the organization conducting the
program did not meet the requirements of Section 220525 of the Act.
30. Does your organization provide equitable support and encouragement for participation by women where separate
programs for male and female athletes are conducted on a national basis (Section 220524(6) of the Act)?
Y
N
Please describe your programs for female athletes. Please provide the number of participants by gender.
-
Women’s National Team 2010 and 2013 – 45 participants (ages 18+)
Women’s National Trials Event – 177 participants (ages 18+)
Women’s World Tackle Games – 150 participants (Feb. 2014 and 2015) (ages 18+)
USAFB-NFL Girls Flag Program – more than 30,000 girls introduced to flag football at the elementary, junior
high school and high school levels (ages 6-17)
NFL FLAG – 42,000 female flag football players per year (ages 5-17)
31. Please describe how your organization encourages and supports amateur athletic sports programs for disabled
individuals in amateur athletic activity, including, where feasible, the expansion of opportunities for meaningful
participation by individuals with disabilities in programs of athletic competition for able-bodied individuals
(Section 220524(7) of the Act).
USAFB does not have any programs specifically designed for disabled individuals at this time. We have
accommodated individual disabled athletes at specific events.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
32. Please describe how your organization provides and coordinates technical information on physical, equipment
design, coaching and performance analysis (Section 220524(8) of the Act).
USA Football’s Medical Advisory Committee and Football Advisory Committee review and advise the
organization on best practices and new technological developments. The football development staff then takes
these best practices and innovations and continually updates coaching education materials, trainings, rule books
policy recommendations and other materials. The communications department disseminates this information
through usafootball.com, emails, blogs and social media.
33. Please describe how your organization encourages and supports research, development and dissemination of
information in the areas of sports medicine and sports safety (Section 220524(9) of the Act).
In addition to the Heads Up Football® program discussed in section 24 above and the medical advisory
committee discussed in 32 above, USA Football has made grants to an independent third party researcher who
conducts an injury surveillance study. The first two years of the three-year study looked at injury rates in youth
football and compared leagues that segregate youth athletes by age and size v. those that just segregate by age.
Year three compared both hit rates and injury rates for organizations that have adopted Heads Up Football v.
youth leagues that have not. We are currently engaged in discussions regarding future extensions of the
surveillance study for both youth and high school.
Please answer the following additional questions.
34. Does your organization have a strategic plan for supporting athletes in achieving sustained competitive excellence
and in growing the sport?
Yes. We are in the process of implementing a strategy to develop coaches and grow the sport for youth, high
school, and amateur adult athletes.
35. Does your organization have a code of conduct for its employees, members, board of directors and officers?
Yes.
36. Does your organization have an athlete safety (“Safe Sport”) program? Yes.
Modeled after the USOC’s SafeSport program, all USA Football staff members have completed the certification as
well as certain volunteers, contractors, adult participants, and clinicians who fall within certain parameters. A model
policy is available for youth football organizations to adopt.
37. Does your organization have an anti-doping program? Yes.
Please describe. The U.S. National Team is subject to drug screening as set forth in the IFAF Anti-Doping Rules.
Athletes (and their parents as applicable) consent to drug testing during international competitions and the
adjudication procedures set forth by the IFAF Rules.
38. Does your organization post on its website its Bylaws and other organic documents? Not yet.
If not, will your organization commit to doing so? Yes.
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Section II. MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS
39. Does your organization post on its website its IRS Form 990 for the three most recent years. Not yet.
If not, will your organization commit to doing so? Yes.
40. Does your organization post on its website its financial statements for the three most recent years? Yes
If not, will your organization commit to doing so?
41. Is your organization financially and operationally transparent and accountable to its members? Yes
42. Does your organization adopt a yearly budget and maintain accurate accounting records in accordance with
accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). Yes
43. Does your organization have insurance to protect from liability claims? Yes
If not, will your organization commit to doing so?
44. Will your organization cooperate with the USOC in preventing the unauthorized use of the names and trademarks
of the USOC, including the words “Olympic”, “Paralympic”, and “Pan American” and their derivatives, as well as
their symbolic equivalents? Yes
45. Will your organization permit the USOC to have reasonable access to all files, records and personnel necessary to
review compliance with membership requirements? Yes
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Section III. ATTACHMENTS
In addition to responding to the above questions, please attach the following attachments (labeled with corresponding
letter):
A. Bylaws and Constitution
B. Articles of Incorporation
C. Most recent Annual Report
D. Certificate of Good Standing from the State in which you are incorporated
E. IRS Form 990
F. Letter from your International Federation confirming your membership
G. Organizational chart showing the relationship between your governing boards, committees, officers and paid
staff
H. Most recent audit statement with management letter
I. Current and ensuing years’ budget
J. Chart that shows the various member components of your organization and their relationships
K. Denial of eligibility (If answered “Y” to the last question of number 12)
L. Narrative describing how the members of your governing board(s) are selected/elected.
M. List of:
a. “Designated Committees,”
b. All committees that are not “Designated Committees” within your NGB, and for each identify those
members that are athletes, and how they qualify as such
N. List the members of your board of directors, executive committee and other governing board(s) and identify
those members that are athletes, and how they qualify as such
O. Procedures for the prompt and equitable resolution of grievances (If answered “Y” to number 17)
P. International Federation’s eligibility requirements
Q. Published procedures relating to sanctioning (If answered “Y” to the 3rd question of number 28)
R. Organization’s strategic plan that addresses at minimum, the following components:
a. High Performance how the organization strives to achieve sustained competitive excellence on the
field of play.
b. Business Development/Revenue Generation – how the organization develops business operations to
maximize revenue to support athletes in their quest to achieve sustained competitive excellence on the
field of play.
c. Staffing Plan – Staff your organization has in place and their specific responsibilities.
d. Membership Development – how the organization recruits and retains members to provide a consistent
revenue stream and talent base to develop elite athletes.
Section IV. SUBMISSION
This form and its attachments should be returned to:
USOC Membership Task Force
c/o Rick Adams, Chief of Sport Operations and
NGB Relations
[email protected]
1 Olympic Plaza
Colorado Springs, CO 80909-5760
Fax (719) 866-2173
If you have questions regarding this application, please contact Rick Adams at (719) 866-4138 or [email protected]
Revised July 17, 2013
Page 14
Draft Bylaws January 2015
Board preliminarily approved October 2014
[DRAFT] BYLAWS OF USA FOOTBALL
(the “Corporation”)
ARTICLE I
Offices
Section 1.01. Registered Office. The registered office of the Corporation shall be in the
Commonwealth of Virginia. The Corporation may have such other offices either within or
without the Commonwealth of Virginia as the Board of Directors may from time to time
determine or as the business of the Corporation may require.
Section 1.02. Business Offices. The principal office of Corporation shall be in
Indianapolis, Indiana. Corporation may at any time and from time to time change the location of
its principal office. Corporation may have such other offices, either within or outside Indiana, as
the Board of Directors may designate or as the affairs of Corporation may require from time to
time.
ARTICLE II
Members
Section 2.01. Voting Members. The Corporation shall have no voting members. The
Corporation may have one or more classes of non-voting members, all of whose rights and
privileges shall be as determined from time to time by resolution of the Board of Directors.
Section 2.02 Categories of Membership. The Corporation shall have individual and
organization membership categories as follows:
(a)
Individual Membership Categories –
i. General members. General members include individuals who register
and pay all required membership fees as athletes eligible for
competition in football, coaches, officials, and parents/supporting
members who are interested in the purpose, programs, aims and
objectives of Corporation.
ii. Life members. Life members are those individuals who register as life
members and who pay to Corporation a life membership fee.
(b)
Organization Membership Categories – Organization members are those
amateur sports organizations that register as contributing organizations and
which conduct athletic programs or activities that further the sport of football
in the United States or which otherwise support the sport of football in the
United States.
Section 2.03. Membership Requirements and Dues. Membership in Corporation is a
privilege and creates with it certain obligations and duties. The Board of Directors may establish
such membership requirements and dues as the Board shall deem necessary or appropriate.
Further, the Board may establish such rules and procedures for the manner and method of
payment of dues, the collection of delinquent dues and the proration or refund of dues, as the
Board shall deem necessary or appropriate. No privilege of membership shall be available until
all membership requirements are satisfied and all dues are paid in full.
Section 2.04. Suspension and Termination of Membership. The membership of any
member may be terminated at any time with or without cause by the Board of Directors. A
member shall have the right to a hearing prior to termination. A member may only resign if the
member has paid all dues then payable.
Section 2.05. Transfer of Membership. Members may not transfer their membership in
Corporation. Members shall have no ownership rights or beneficial interests of any kind in the
property of Corporation.
ARTICLE III
Board of Directors
Section 3.01. Management of the Corporation. Subject to the rights of the Members
and any limitations set forth elsewhere in these Bylaws or the Articles of Incorporation of the
Corporation, the affairs of the Corporation shall be under the general direction of a Board of
Directors (also referred to herein as the “Board”), which shall administer, manage, preserve, and
protect the property of the Corporation. The role, powers and duties of the Board shall be to
make policy for the Corporation consistent with the goals and objectives stated within these
Bylaws, to determine the membership of the Corporation as set forth herein, to recommend all
dues and fix all fees to be paid by the members of the Corporation, to raise funds for the use and
benefit of the Corporation, and to oversee implementation of policy of the Corporation. Further
specific powers and responsibilities of the Board include, without limitation:
(a)
To formulate (in consultation with management) and monitor the
implementation of the strategic plan of the Corporation;
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(b)
To approve and monitor the implementation of the annual business plan,
operational plan, and budgets;
(c)
To appoint and oversee the activities of the standing and ad hoc committees,
sub-committees and advisory groups of the Corporation;
(d)
To formulate and implement sound corporate governance practices and to
ensure that the Corporation acts ethically and adheres to high standards of
corporate behavior;
(e)
To provide for the preservation and effective use of the assets of the
Corporation so as to ensure the long-term viability of the organization and the
availability of its resources, when needed; and
(f)
To ensure that the Corporation’s financial statements are true, fair, and
compliant with law and to provide for an annual independent audit of the
financial statements.
Section 3.02. Board Composition.
(a)
Qualifications.
i.
Each director of the Board of Directors must be a citizen of the United
States and eighteen years of age or older.
ii.
A director need not be a resident of Virginia or Indiana.
iii.
A director shall have the highest personal and professional values,
judgment and integrity, have demonstrated exceptional ability and
judgment, and be effective, in conjunction with the other members of the
Board, in collectively serving the long-term interests of the Corporation.
iv.
Directors shall possess an understanding of athletic competition and the
Olympic ideals, and have diverse experience in the key business,
financial, and other challenges that face the Corporation. Directors shall
have a high level of experience and capability in Board oversight
responsibilities, including in the areas of finance, marketing,
fundraising, audit, management, legal affairs, communications, and
sport.
v.
At least one of the directors, who shall also serve on the Audit
Committee, shall have financial expertise.
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vi.
Directors shall inform the Nominating Committee of any changes in
their employment responsibilities or other constraints on their time in
order for the Nominating and Governance Committee to determine
whether it is appropriate to nominate the Director for continuing Board
service.
(b)
The number of directors shall initially be five and shall thereafter be
increased, in one or more stages in the sole discretion of the Board of
Directors, up to a maximum number of nineteen, in order to encompass a
diversity of experiential backgrounds. Except for the directors named in the
Articles of Incorporation as constituting the initial Board of Directors,
directors shall be elected at meetings of the Board of Directors as follows:
i.
NFL Directors. Three directors shall be appointed by the Commissioner
of the National Football League (the “NFL”). All appointments of
directors by the NFL shall be made in writing to the Chair, with a copy
to the Executive Director. Amendments to these Bylaws shall ensure that
the NFL retains at least three directors on the Board of Directors.
ii.
Athlete Directors. At least twenty percent of the directors shall be
elected by athletes who have demonstrated their qualifications as
“Athletes” at the time of election by:
1. having within the ten years preceding the election, represented the
United States in an international championship recognized by
IFAF; or
2. within the twenty-four months before selection, demonstrated that
he or she was actively engaged in amateur athletic competition.
iii.
Amateur Football Organization Representative Director. One director
represent an amateur sports organization that conducts a national
program or regular national amateur athletic competition in football on a
level of proficiency appropriate for the selection of amateur athletes to
represent the United States in international amateur athletic competition.
The Amateur Football Organization Representative Director shall be
elected by a vote of the Board of Directors.
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iv.
Remaining Directors. The remaining directors shall be elected by the
directors then in office (including but not limited to the directors
appointed by the NFL). The Nominating Committee shall select
nominees to present to the full board for election using appropriate
processes that draw from the following constituencies in the discretion
of the Board of Directors: from grass roots football organizations, from
among individuals with significant football coaching or officiating, or
playing experience, from the business community, and from among
individuals with significant government-related experience
v.
Independence. The Board, through its Nominating Committee, shall
affirmatively make a determination as to the independence of a majority
of the directors and disclose those determinations. Under the definition
of “independence” adopted by the Board, an “independent director”
shall be determined to have no material or pecuniary relationship with
Corporation, either directly or through an organization or person that has
a material or pecuniary relationship with Corporation.
a.
A relationship is "material" if, in the judgment of the Nominating
Committee, it would interfere with the director's independent
judgment.
b.
Upon election to the Board, a director shall resign from any
affiliations they have with any national governing body (NGB)
constituent groups, though he or she may retain his or her
membership in the NGB.
vi.
Any ex-officio, non-voting members of the Board of Directors, including
but not limited to the Commissioner of the NFL and the Executive
Director, shall not be included in any calculation of the total number of
directors or total number of votes. The Commissioner of the NFL and
the Executive Director are invited to attend and speak at meetings of the
Board of Directors.
(c)
Notwithstanding anything contained in these Bylaws to the contrary, each
director shall hold office until a successor is elected and qualifies or until that
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director’s earlier resignation, removal or death. The directors shall hold such
election as soon thereafter as convenient.
(d)
Beginning with those directors then in office as of July 1, 2013, each director
not appointed by the NFL may be elected to no more than two consecutive
three-year terms; provided, however, that there shall be no limit on the total
number of non-consecutive terms a director may serve. The non-NFL Director
terms shall be staggered such that 1/3 of the non-NFL Directors shall be up for
election each year.
Section 3.03. Board Vacancy. A director may resign at any time by giving written notice
to the Chair of USA Football, and in the case of the NFL Directors, to the commissioner of the
NFL with a copy to the Chair of USA Football. Whenever a vacancy exists on the Board of
Directors, whether by expansion of the Board of Directors, death, incapacity, resignation or
otherwise, the vacancy shall be filled by the affirmative vote of a majority of the directors then in
office, except that any vacancy of a director appointed by the NFL shall be filled by the NFL and
any vacancy of an Athlete Director shall be elected by qualified Athletes.
(a)
A director elected to fill a vacancy shall hold office for the remainder of the
unexpired term of his or her predecessor in office, subject to the power of
removal stated in these Bylaws.
(b)
In order that an equal number of directors (or as close to equal number as
possible) are elected each year, the Board may elect directors to newly-created
Board positions and Board vacancies for an initial term of less than three
years.
(c)
A director elected for less than a three-year term subsequently may be elected
to two consecutive three-year terms.
Section 3.04. Board Removal. A director may be removed at any time, with or without
cause, by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the directors then in office, provided, however,
that a director appointed by the NFL may be removed only with cause.
Section 3.05. Amendment. This Article III may be amended only by the affirmative vote
of at least two-thirds of the total number of directors. (For example, if there are fifteen director
positions, regardless how many directors there are then in office, at least ten directors must vote
for the amendment).
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ARTICLE IV
Meetings of the Board of Directors
Section 4.01. Notice. Meetings of the Board of Directors, regular or special, may be held
within or without the Commonwealth of Virginia upon not fewer than fourteen days’ notice to
each director, either personally or by mail, email, telephone or facsimile, subject to waiver of
notice as provided in the Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act. Neither the business to be
transacted at, nor the purpose of, any regular or special meeting of the Board of Directors need
be specified in the notice or waiver of notice of such meeting. Regular meetings shall be held at
least once each year or more often as established from time to time by resolution of the Board of
Directors or as required by the business of the Corporation. Special meetings of the Board of
Directors may be called by the Chair, the Executive Director, or the Executive Committee at any
time and shall be called by the Executive Director upon the written request of a majority of
(i) the directors then in office or (ii) the members of the Executive Committee.
Section 4.02. Quorum. A majority of the number of voting directors then in office shall
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. Unless otherwise specified in these Bylaws,
the act of the majority of the voting directors present at a meeting at which a quorum is present
shall be the act of the Board of Directors. If a quorum shall not be present at any meeting of the
Board of Directors, the directors present thereat may adjourn the meeting from time to time,
without notice other than announcement at the meeting, until a quorum shall be present.
Section 4.03. Written Consent. Any action required or permitted to be taken at any
meeting of the Board of Directors, or any committee thereof, may be taken without a meeting if a
consent in writing (consent by email or facsimile shall suffice), setting forth the action so taken,
is signed by each director or committee member and such written consent is included in the
minutes or filed with the corporate records reflecting the action taken. Action taken by written
consent shall be effective when the last director or committee member signs the consent, unless
the consent specifies a prior or subsequent effective date. A consent signed as described in this
Section shall have the effect of approval at a meeting and may be described as such in any
document. For this purpose, a consent may be executed in more than one counterpart.
Section 4.04. Telephonic Participation. Any one or more members of the Board of
Directors may participate in a meeting of such Board by means of a conference telephone or
similar communications equipment allowing all persons participating in the meeting to hear each
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other at the same time. Participation by such means shall constitute presence in person at a
meeting.
Section 4.05. Proxy Voting. Proxy voting shall not be allowed for any action of the
Board of Directors, the Executive Committee, or any other committee which has the authority of
the Board of Directors in the management of the Corporation.
ARTICLE V
Committees
Section 5.01. Committee Formation. Except as otherwise provided by law or these
Bylaws, the Board of Directors, by resolution adopted by the affirmative vote of at least twothirds of the total number of directors, may designate or appoint one or more committees, each of
which shall consist of one or more directors except in the case of the Judiciary Committee, which
committees, to the extent provided in said resolution, shall have and exercise the authority of the
Board of Directors in the management of the Corporation. The designation and appointment of
any such committee and the delegation thereto of authority shall not operate to relieve the Board
of Directors, or any individual director, of any responsibility imposed by law.
Section 5.02. Executive Committee. There shall be an Executive Committee. The
Executive Committee shall consist of at least five and up to eight directors, with the total number
of directors to be determined at the discretion of the then current members of the Executive
Committee.
(a)
The members of the Executive Committee shall be selected as follows:
i. Each year the Chair shall recommend Directors to serve as Officers
and at-large members of the Executive Committee for approval at a
meeting of the Board of Directors.
ii. The Chair, and any Vice Chair, Secretary and/or Treasurer as elected
under Section 6.01, shall be appointed, ex-officio, to the Executive
Committee;
iii. At least twenty percent of the Executive Committee positions shall be
filled by Athlete Directors; and
iv. The Chair shall appoint, subject to the Board’s approval, at least two
of the three directors appointed by the NFL to serve on the Executive
Committee, either as an Officer or as a member at-large.
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v. In addition to the appointed or elected voting members of the
Executive Committee, the Executive Director shall be an ex-officio,
non-voting member of the Executive Committee. The Executive
Director shall be invited to attend and speak at Executive Committee
meetings, but shall not be counted in calculations of Executive
Committee membership, meeting attendance or votes, and may not
vote on Executive Committee actions.
(b)
The Executive Committee shall be solely responsible for (i) hiring and
removing the Executive Director; and (ii) setting the compensation of the
Executive Director of the Corporation. In addition, the Executive Committee
provide strategic counsel to the staff between meetings of the Board of
Directors.
(c)
All decisions of the Executive Committee require the affirmative vote of at
least two-thirds of the members of the Executive Committee, except that
decisions relating to the hiring and removing of an Executive Director require
only the affirmative vote of a majority of the members of the Executive
Committee.
Section 5.03. Nominating Committee. There shall be a Nominating Committee. Each
year for which a seat on the Board of Director is up for election, the Nominating Committee shall
present to the Board of Directors a slate of candidates for election to the Board of Directors. The
Nominating Committee shall consist of a committee chair, and at least two voting members of
the Board of Directors. The members of the Nominating Committee shall be selected as follows:
(a)
The Chair of the Board shall appoint the members of the Nominating
Committee and its chair, with approval of the Board and may include nonvoting members of the Board of Directors.
(b)
The Chair of the Board shall be appointed, ex-officio, to the Nominating
Committee;
(c)
At least twenty percent of the Nominating Committee positions shall be filled
by Athlete Directors; and
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Section 5.04. Audit Committee. There shall be an Audit Committee. The Audit
Committee shall consist of an Audit Committee chair, and at least two voting independent
members of the Board of Directors.
The Audit Committee shall consist of at least three and not more than five members, all
of whom shall be independent members of the Board.
(a)
The members of the Audit Committee shall be selected as follows:
i. The chair of the Audit Committee shall be the Treasurer.
ii. The Chair of the Board shall be an ex-officio member of the Audit
Committee and shall appoint the remaining members of the Audit
Committee with approval of the Board.
iii. The Audit Committee shall include at least one Athlete Director.
iv. Members of the Audit Committee should be financially literate and at least
one member shall have accounting or financial management expertise.
(b)
The purpose of the Audit Committee shall be to assist the Board in its
oversight of:
i. the integrity of the financial statements of the corporation;
ii. the Corporation’s compliance with legal and regulatory requirements
relating to corporation finances and reporting thereof;
iii. the Corporation’s compliance with the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur
Sports Act, 36 U.S.C. § 220501 et seq., these Bylaws, contracts and
agreements, and applicable laws and regulations;
iv. the independence and qualifications of the independent auditor; and
v. the performance of the corporation’s internal audit function and
independent auditors.
(c)
The responsibilities of the Audit Committee shall include the following:
i. to discuss with staff management the annual audited financial statements
and quarterly financial statements including matters required to be
reviewed under applicable legal, regulatory or other requirements;
ii. to approve the corporation’s financial statements prior to publication;
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iii. to discuss with staff management and the independent auditor, as
appropriate, press releases containing financial information and financial
information provided to the public;
iv. to select the independent auditor to examine the corporation’s accounts,
controls and financial statements (the Audit Committee shall have the sole
authority to approve all audit engagement fees and terms and the Audit
Committee must pre-approve any non-audit service provided to the
corporation by the corporation’s independent auditor);
v. to discuss with staff and the independent auditor, as appropriate, any audit
problems or difficulties and staff management's response, and the
corporation’s risk assessment and risk management policies, including the
corporation’s major financial risk exposure and steps taken by staff
management to monitor and mitigate such exposure;
vi. to review the corporation’s financial reporting and accounting standards
and principles, significant changes in such standards or principles or in
their application and the key accounting decisions affecting the
corporation’s financial statements, including alternatives to, and the
rationale for, the decisions made;
vii. to review and approve the internal audit staff functions, including
(i) purpose, authority and organizational reporting lines and (ii) annual
audit plan, budget and staffing;
viii. to periodically review with the independent auditor the qualifications and
performance of the corporation’s finance personnel as observed by the
independent auditor;
ix. to establish practices or procedures alone or in conjunction with the
Executive Director and or the Ethics Committee as appropriate, providing
effective mechanisms for employees and others to make complaints
relating to accounting practices, internal accounting controls, or audit
matters, with provisions for confidential anonymous submission by
employees and others (the Audit Committee shall be provided with an
analysis of all financial, accounting and audit related complaints and their
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disposition, and shall provide safeguards against retaliation against
employees and others who make such complaints); and
x. the Audit Committee shall perform those duties normally performed by a
finance committee.
Section 5.05. Ethics Committee. There shall be an Ethics Committee. The Ethics
Committee shall consist of at least three and not more than five members, all of whom shall be
independent members of the Board.
(a) The members of the Ethics Committee shall be selected as follows:
i. The Chair shall be an ex-officio member of the Ethics Committee and shall
appoint the remaining members of the Ethics Committee with approval of
the Board.
ii. The Ethics Committee shall include at least one Athlete Director.
(b) The responsibilities of the Ethics Committee shall include the following:
i.
oversee implementation of, and compliance with, the Code of Ethics
ii.
report to the Board on all ethical issues;
iii.
develop, and review on an annual basis, a Code of Ethics for the
Board, officers, committee and task force members, volunteers, staff
and member organizations for adoption by the Board;
iv.
review and investigate matters of ethical impropriety and make
recommendations on such matters to the Board;
v.
review and provide guidance on ethical questions presented to it by the
Board, officers, committee and task force members, volunteers, staff
and the Corporation members;
vi.
perform such other duties as assigned by the Board.
Section 5.07. Judicial Committee. The Judicial Committee shall be appointed and have
the responsibilities as follows.
(a) The Chair shall appoint the chair and members of the Judicial Committee with
approval of the Board. The Judicial Committee shall consist of at least three and not
more than five members, none of whom shall be members of the Board. The Ethics
Committee shall include at least one Athlete representative. Members of the Judicial
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Committee shall satisfy the standards of independence for “independent directors” as
set forth in these Bylaws.
(b) The Judicial Committee shall –
i.
generally administer and oversee all administrative grievances and
right to compete matters filed with the Corporation;
ii.
identify individuals who would be fair and impartial and who would
have the qualifications and ability to serve on hearing panels;
iii.
hear and render a decision, or appoint a panel to hear and render a
decision, on grievances and disciplinary matters;
iv.
perform such other duties as assigned by the Board.
Section 5.08. Advisory Committees. In the event that the Board of Directors creates one
or more committees not having and exercising the authority of the Board of Directors in the
management of the Corporation (which committees shall be known as “Advisory Committees”),
such Advisory Committees shall be required to report to the Board, or if requested by the Board,
to the Executive Committee or Executive Director, at such times and in such manner as
reasonably requested. Such Advisory Committees may be comprised of board members and nonboard members. The chair and members of such Advisory Committee shall be approved by the
Board. Such Advisory Committees shall endeavor, to the maximum extent possible, to organize
their affairs and meetings according to the rules of operation set forth herein for the Board of
Directors. At least twenty percent of Advisory Committees shall be comprised of Athletes as
defined in Section 3.02(b)ii above unless membership on such Advisory Committee requires
specialized knowledge and expertise and USAF is unable to find the requisite number of
qualified Athletes.
Section 5.07. Amendments. This Article V may be amended only by the affirmative vote
of at least two-thirds of the total number of directors.
ARTICLE VI
Officers
Section 6.01. Election of Officers. The officers of the Corporation shall be elected by
the affirmative vote of a majority of the directors then in office and shall consist of a Chair, up to
two Vice Chair, an Executive Director, a Secretary and a Treasurer, and may include such other
officers and assistant officers as may from time to time be deemed necessary. The Executive
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Director shall be chosen from a slate that includes at least one candidate proposed to the Board
by the NFL and at least one candidate proposed to the Board by the Executive Committee. Any
two or more offices may be held by the same person, except the offices of Executive Director
and Secretary. No officer may concurrently serve as an officer of any other amateur sports
organization recognized by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) as a national
governing body.
Section 6.02. Bonding. The Board of Directors may require any of the officers or
employees of the Corporation to give bond to the Corporation with sufficient sureties,
conditioned upon the faithful performance of the duties of their respective offices or
employments.
Section 6.03. Removal of Officers. Any officer elected or appointed by the Board of
Directors may be removed at any time, with or without cause, by the affirmative vote of a
majority of the directors then in office. Any vacancy occurring in any office of the Corporation
shall be filled by the Board of Directors. An office may be held by the same individual for two or
more consecutive terms.
Section 6.04. The Chair. The Chair shall have such duties and responsibilities and such
general and supervisory authority over the Executive Director and the affairs of the Corporation
and shall directly assist and counsel the Executive Director as the Board of Directors shall from
time to time. He or she shall have an ex officio seat on each committee of the Corporation that
permits Board member participation. He or she shall be an individual having demonstrated
effective leadership and having achieved significant stature in his or her career.
Section 6.05. The Vice-Chair(s). The Board may elect up to two Vice Chairs from
among the directors then in office. Such Vice Chair(s) shall assist and counsel the Chair and the
Executive Director and shall have such other duties and responsibilities as the Board of Directors
shall from time to time direct. He or she shall be an individual having demonstrated effective
leadership and having achieved significant stature in his or her career.
Section 6.06. The Executive Director. The Executive Director shall be the chief
executive officer of the Corporation; he or she shall have authority for the general and active
management of the affairs and property of the Corporation, shall see that all orders and
resolutions of the Board of Directors are carried into effect and shall report to the Board of
Directors and the Executive Committee as the Board of Directors shall from time to time direct
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or authorize. The Executive Director shall be responsible for all staff functions. The Executive
Director shall oversee the hiring and firing of all staff and the staff’s ethical and competent
implementation of the Board’s policies, guidance and strategic direction of the Corporation. The
Executive Director shall, either directly or by delegation, manage all staff functions; determine
the size and compensation of, hire and terminate the professional staff in accordance with the
Corporation’s compensation policies and guidelines (established by the Board); develop a
strategy for approval by the Board; be responsible for resource generation and allocation;
coordinate international activities; act as the Corporation’s spokesperson (with the Chair);
prepare and submit budgets to the Board; and perform all functions as usually pertain to the
office of chief executive officer.
(a)
The Executive Director shall be an ex-officio, non-voting member of the
Board of Directors and the Executive Committee. As an ex-officio, non-voting
member, he or she will not be counted in calculations of membership, meeting
attendance or votes associated with the Board of Directors or Executive
Committee.
(b)
The Executive Director shall serve as Secretary General of the Corporation
and in that capacity shall represent the Corporation in relations with the
International Federation for American Football (“IFAF”) recognized by the
International Olympic Committee and at international American football
functions and events.
Section 6.07. The Secretary. The Secretary shall keep the minutes of all meetings of the
Board of Directors and of the Executive Committee. He or she shall give, or cause to be given,
such notice of all meetings of the Board of Directors and of the Executive Committee as may be
required by these Bylaws and shall perform such other duties as shall be assigned to him or her
from time to time by the Board of Directors or by the Chair.
Section 6.08. The Treasurer. The Treasurer shall chair the Audit Committee, review the
Corporation’s financial statements, make periodic reports to the Board on the Corporation’s
financial condition, oversee the annual audit, and perform such other duties as shall be assigned
to him or her from time to time by the Board of Directors or the Chair.
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ARTICLE VII
Complaint Procedures
Section 7.01. Designation of Complaints. The following kinds of complaints may be
filed with USA Football:
(a)
Administrative Grievance. The Corporation or any member of the
Corporation may file a complaint pertaining to any matter within the
cognizance of the, including but not limited to any alleged violation of or
grievance concerning: (i) any Corporation rule or regulation, (ii) any
provision of the Corporation’s Bylaws, or (iii) any provision of the Ted
Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act.
(b)
Right to Compete. Any athlete, coach, trainer, manager, administrator or
official may file a complaint pertaining to any alleged denial, or alleged threat
to deny, of that individuals opportunity to compete in competition sanctioned
by the Corporation. .
Section 7.02. Manner of Filing. The complainant shall file the complaint with the
Judicial Committee. The complaint shall set forth in clear and concise language, preferably in
numbered paragraphs: (i) the alleged violation, grievance, denial or threat to deny, and (ii) the
remedy requested. The complainant shall sign the complainant.
Section 7.03. Filing Fee. A complaint filed by an individual shall be accompanied with a
$250.00 filing fee. A complaint filed by an organization shall be accompanied with a $500.00
filing fee, except that the Corporation is not required to pay a filing fee. The complainant may
request that the filing fee be reduced or waived for reasons of significant financial hardship. If
such request is made, the Judicial Committee shall determine whether or not to reduce or waive
the filing fee.
Section 7.04. Statute of Limitations. A complaint filed under these Bylaws shall be filed
within one hundred and eighty (180) days of the occurrence of the alleged violation, grievance,
denial or threat to deny.
Section 7.05. Field of Play Decisions. The final decision of a referee during a
competition regarding a field of play decision (a matter set forth in the rules of the competition to
be within the discretion of the referee) shall not be reviewable through the procedures for, or the
subject of, Administrative Grievances or Right to Compete Complaints unless the decision is:
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(i) outside the authority of the referee to make, or (ii) the product of fraud, corruption, partiality
or other misconduct of the referee. For purposes of this Section, the term “referee” shall include
any individual with discretion to make field of play decisions.
Section 7.06. Administration. The Judicial Committee shall generally administer and
oversee all administrative grievances and right to compete matters filed with the Corporation.
The Judicial Committee shall be responsible to ensure that all complaints are heard in a timely,
fair and impartial manner. The Judicial Committee may promulgate procedures in addition to
those set forth in these Bylaws for the effective administration of complaints filed with the
Corporation.
Section 7.07. Hearing Panel. Upon the filing of a complaint, the chair of the Judicial
Committee, after consultation with the other Committee members, shall appoint a hearing panel
consisting of three individuals to hear the complaint. The Judicial Committee shall also appoint a
chair of the hearing panel. Judicial Committee members may be appointed to and serve on the
hearing panel. Other disinterested individuals identified by the Judicial Committee may also be
appointed to and serve on the hearing panel. At least one member of the hearing panel shall be an
athlete. Members of the panel need not be members of the Corporation or involved in the sport of
American rules football.
Section 7.08. Conduct of the Proceeding. The Hearing Panel shall rule on all motions
and other matters raised in the proceeding. If the complaint is not dismissed, the hearing panel
shall hold a hearing on the complaint. The hearing panel shall set such timelines and other rules
regarding the proceeding and the conduct of the hearing as it deems necessary. The hearing shall
be informal, except that testimony shall be taken under oath.
The hearing may be conducted by teleconference, if necessary or convenient to the
parties. Each party shall have the right to appear personally or through a legal representative. All
parties shall be given a reasonable opportunity to present and examine evidence, cross-examine
witnesses and to present argument. Members of the hearing panel shall have the right to question
witnesses or the parties to the proceeding at any time.
Any party may have a record made of the hearing. A court reporter may be present at the
hearing at the request of a party. The court reporter shall be paid for by the party requesting the
court reporter, or if mutually agreed, the cost may be equally divided. Any transcript shall be
paid for by the party requesting the transcript.
17
Section 7.09. Expedited Procedures. Upon the request of a party, and provided that it is
necessary to expedite the proceeding in order to resolve a matter relating to a competition that is
so scheduled that compliance with regular procedures would not be likely to produce a
sufficiently early decision to do justice to the affected parties, the Judicial Committee is
authorized to order that the complaint be heard and decided within 48 hours of the filing of the
complaint. In such a case, the hearing panel is authorized to hear and decide the complaint
pursuant to such procedures as are necessary, but fair to the parties involved.
Section 7.10. Complaints Involving Selection to Participate in a Competition. Where
a complaint is filed involving selection of an individual to participate in a competition, the
complainant shall include with the complaint a list of all other individuals, together with their
contact information, that may be adversely affected by a decision rendered on the complaint. The
hearing panel shall determine which additional individuals must receive notice of the complaint.
The complainant shall then be responsible for providing appropriate notice to these individuals.
Any individual so notified then shall have the option to participate in the proceeding as a party. If
an individual is notified of the complaint, then that individual shall be bound by the decision of
the hearing panel even though the individual chose not to participate as a party.
Section 7.11. Decision. A decision shall be determined by a majority of the hearing
panel. The hearing panel’s decision shall be in writing and distributed to the parties.
Section 7.12. Arbitration. Any party may appeal a decision of the hearing panel to the
American Arbitration Association. The arbitrator appointed by the American Arbitration
Association shall have the authority to hear the matter anew or if requested by a party to render a
decision on a more limited review. Either party may submit the decision of the hearing panel to
the arbitrator for the arbitrator’s consideration. The arbitrator may give whatever weight or
authority to the hearing panel’s decision as the arbitrator deems appropriate.
ARTICLE VIII
Sanctioning Events
Section 8.01. Prompt Review of Request. The Corporation shall promptly review every
request submitted by an amateur sports organization or person for a sanction and make a
determination on such request: (i) to hold an international or national amateur athletic
competition in the United States, or (ii) to sponsor United States football athletes to compete in
an international athletic competition held outside the United States.
18
Section 8.02. Standard for Review. If Corporation, as a result of its review: (i) does not
determine by clear and convincing evidence that holding or sponsoring an international or
national amateur athletic competition would be detrimental to the best interest of United States
football, and (ii) confirms that the amateur sports organization or person meets the requirements
for obtaining a sanction as set forth in these Bylaws, then Corporation shall grant the sanction
requested by the amateur sports organization or person.
Section 8.03. Requirements for Holding an International or National Amateur
Athletic Competition in the United States. An amateur sports organization or person
requesting a sanction to hold an international or national amateur athletic competition in the
United States shall comply with the following requirements:
(a)
submits, in the form required by Corporation, an application to hold such
competition;
(b)
pays to Corporation the required sanctioning fee, provided that such fee shall
be reasonable and nondiscriminatory;
(c)
submits to Corporation an audited or notarized financial report of similar
events, if any, conducted by the organization or person; and
(d)
demonstrates that –
i.
appropriate measures have been taken to protect the amateur status of
athletes who will take part in the competition and to protect their
eligibility to compete in amateur competition;
ii.
appropriate provision has been made for validation of records which
may be established during the competition;
iii.
due regard has been given to any international amateur athletic
requirements specifically applicable to the competition;
iv.
the competition will be conducted by qualified officials;
v.
proper medical supervision will be provided for athletes who will
participate in the competition; and
vi.
proper safety precautions have been taken to protect the personal
welfare of the athletes and spectators at the competition.
Section 8.04. Requirements for Sponsoring United States Football Athletes to
Compete in an International Athletic Competition Held Outside the United States. An
19
amateur sports organization or person requesting a sanction to sponsor United States football
athletes to compete in an international athletic competition held outside the United States shall
comply with the following requirements:
(a)
submits, in the form required by the Corporation, an application to hold such
competition;
(b)
pays to the Corporation the required sanctioning fee, provided that such fee
shall be reasonable and nondiscriminatory;
(c)
submits a report of the most recent trip to a foreign country, if any, that the
amateur sports organization or person sponsored for the purpose of having
United States amateur athletes compete in international amateur athletic
competition, and
(d)
submits a letter from the appropriate entity that will hold the international
amateur athletic competition certifying that –
i.
appropriate measures have been taken to protect the amateur status of
athletes who will take part in the competition and to protect their
eligibility to compete in amateur competition;
ii.
appropriate provision has been made for validation of records which
may be established during the competition;
iii.
due regard has been given to any international amateur athletic
requirements specifically applicable to the competition;
iv.
the competition will be conducted by qualified officials;
v.
proper medical supervision will be provided for athletes who will
participate in the competition; and
vi.
proper safety precautions have been taken to protect the personal
welfare of the athletes and spectators at the competition.
ARTICLE IX
Records of the Corporation
Section 9.01. Minutes. The Corporation shall keep as permanent records minutes of all
meetings of the members and the Board of Directors, a record of all actions taken by the Board
of Directors without a meeting, and a record of all waivers of notices of meetings of the Board of
Directors.
20
Section 9.02. Accounting Records. The Corporation shall maintain appropriate
accounting records.
Section 9.03. Membership List. The Corporation shall maintain a record of the members
in a form that permits preparation of a list of the names and addresses of the members in
alphabetical order, by class.
Section 9.04. Records In Written Form. The Corporation shall maintain its records in
written form or in another form capable of conversion into written form within a reasonable time.
Section 9.05. Website. The Corporation shall maintain a website for the dissemination of
information to its members. The Corporation shall publish on its website (i) the Corporation’s
bylaws, rules, and regulations; (ii) a procedure for communicating with the Chair of the Audit
Committee regarding accounting, internal accounting controls, or audit-related matters; (iii) its
most recent annual financial statement; and (iv) its most recent 990 Form filed with the Internal
Revenue Service. So as to facilitate the ability of interested parties to communicate their
concerns or questions, the Corporation shall publish on its website a mailing address and an email address for communications directly with the Board.
Section 9.06. Records Maintained at Principal Office. The Corporation shall keep a
copy of each of the following records at its principal office:
(a)
the Articles of Incorporation;
(b)
these Bylaws shall govern the conduct of the Corporation, the Corporation’s
Board and Committees and the Corporation’s members ;
(c)
rules and regulations that govern the technical conduct of football’s events in
the United States as the Corporation Board and Chief Executive Officer
determine is appropriate in their sole discretion;
(d)
the minutes of all meetings of the Board of Directors, and records of all action
taken by the Board without a meeting, for the past three (3) years;
(e)
all written communications within the past three (3) years to the members
generally as the members;
(f)
a list of the names and business or home addresses of the current directors and
officers;
(g)
a copy of the most recent corporate report delivered to the Virginia secretary
of state;
21
(h)
all financial statements prepared for periods ending during the last three (3)
years;
(i)
The Corporation’s application for recognition of exemption and the taxexemption determination letter issued by the Internal Revenue Service; and
(j)
all other documents or records required to be maintained by the Corporation at
its principal office under applicable law or regulation.
Section 9.07. Inspection of Records by Members. The following rights and restrictions
shall apply to the inspection of records by members:
(a)
Records Maintained at Principal Office. A member shall be entitled to inspect
and copy, during regular business hours at the Corporation’s principal office,
any of the records of the Corporation described in Section 14.6, provided that
the member gives the Corporation written demand at least five (5) business
days before the date on which the member wishes to inspect and copy such
records.
(b)
Financial Statements. Upon the written request of any member, the
Corporation shall mail to such member its most recent annual financial
statements showing in reasonable detail its assets and liabilities and results of
its operations.
(c)
Scope of Members’ Inspection Rights.
i.
Agent or Attorney. The member’s duly authorized agent or attorney
has the same inspection and copying rights as the member.
ii.
Right to Copy. The right to copy records under these Bylaws includes,
if reasonable, the right to receive copies made by photographic,
xerographic, electronic or other means.
iii.
Reasonable Charge for Copies. The Corporation may impose a
reasonable charge, covering the costs of labor and material, for copies
of any documents provided to a member. The charge may not exceed
the estimated cost of production and reproduction of the records.
iv.
Litigation. Nothing in these Bylaws shall limit the right of a member
to inspect records to the same extent as any other litigant if the
22
member is in litigation with the Corporation, or the power of a court to
compel the production of corporate records for examination.
ARTICLE X
Compensation of Directors
Section 10.01. Compensation. The directors of the Corporation shall receive no
compensation for their service to the Corporation as directors but may be reimbursed for their
expenses, if any, incurred in carrying out the purposes of the Corporation, provided that such
reimbursement in no way adversely affects the Corporation’s qualification under section
501(c)(3) of the Code.
ARTICLE XI
Fiscal Year and Budget
Section 11.01. Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of the Corporation shall end on March 31 of
each calendar year.
Section 11.02. Budget. The Board of Directors shall be responsible for approving the
annual budget of the Corporation.
ARTICLE XII
Amendments
Section 12.01. Amendments. Except as otherwise provided herein, these Bylaws may be
altered, amended or repealed and new Bylaws may be adopted by the affirmative vote of a
majority of the directors then in office at any regular or special meeting upon 72 hours written
notice of any proposed changes to the Bylaws; provided that any such alteration, amendment,
repeal or adoption shall be consistent with the requirements of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal
Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”) and the Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act.
ARTICLE XIII
Indemnification
Section 13.01. Indemnification.
(a)
The Corporation shall indemnify each director, officer, employee or agent of
the Corporation who is a natural person, and/or his or her estate or personal
representatives, by reason of the fact that he or she is or was serving in such
capacity for the Corporation, to the fullest extent permitted by the Virginia
23
Nonstock Corporation Act, against all expenses (including attorneys’ and
other experts’ fees and disbursements), judgments, fines and amounts actually
and reasonably incurred by him or her in connection with any actual or
threatened action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or
investigative, or in connection with any appeal therein, or otherwise, arising
from, or in connection with, his or her serving the Corporation.
(b)
To the fullest extent permitted by the Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act, as it
now exists or may hereafter be amended, no director, officer, employee or
agent of the Corporation shall be liable for damages in any proceeding
brought by or in the right of the Corporation or by or on behalf of members of
the Corporation, or in connection with any claim, action, suit, or proceeding to
which he or she may be or is made a party by reason of being or having been a
director, officer, employee or agent of the Corporation.
(c)
The Corporation may extend funds, upon request of a director, officer,
employee or agent, to cover the anticipated reasonable costs of defending
against any actual or threatened action, suit, or proceeding to which he or she
would be entitled to indemnity hereunder.
(d)
Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, a director, officer, employee
or agent shall not be entitled to indemnity, extension of funds, or release from
liability in any instance when (i) such relief is inconsistent with any provision
of the Code applicable to corporations described in section 501(c)(3) of the
Code, (ii) such person breached his or her duty of loyalty to the Corporation,
(iii) such person’s acts or omissions involved intentional misconduct, (iv) in
the case of any criminal proceeding, he or she had reasonable cause to believe
that his or her conduct was unlawful, or (v) such person derived improper
personal benefit from the transaction.
(e)
Except with regard to the limits set forth in subsection (d) above, no provision
of these Bylaws is intended to be construed as limiting, prohibiting, denying
or abrogating any of the general or specific powers or rights conferred under
the Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act upon the Corporation to furnish, or
upon any court to award, such limitation of liability, indemnification, or
24
limitations or indemnifications as otherwise authorized pursuant to the
Virginia Nonstock Corporation Act or any other law now or hereafter in
effect.
Section 13.02. Non-exclusive right. The indemnification and advancement of expenses
provided herein shall not be deemed to be exclusive of any other rights to which persons seeking
indemnification or advancement of expenses may be entitled under any agreement with the
Corporation or otherwise, including rights under any insurance policy that may be purchased by
the Corporation.
Section 13.03. Insurance. The Corporation may, but shall not be obligated to, purchase
and maintain, to the fullest extent permitted by the laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia as
they presently exist or may hereafter be amended, insurance on behalf of any director, officer,
employee or agent of the Corporation and any person who is or was serving at the request of the
Corporation as a director, officer, partner, trustee, employee or agent of another corporation,
partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise against any liability asserted against him or
her or incurred by him or her in that capacity or status.
Section 13.04. Amendments. Any repeal, amendment, or alteration of this Article X that
reduces or limits the indemnification of the persons referred to herein shall apply prospectively
only and shall not be given retroactive effect.
ARTICLE XIV
Recognition as a National Governing Body
Section 14.01. Recognition as a National Governing Body. Corporation shall seek
recognition by the United States Olympic Committee (“USOC”) as the National Governing Body
(“NGB”) for the sport of football in the United States. If so recognized by the USOC as an NGB,
Corporation shall attempt to maintain such recognition. In furtherance of that purpose,
Corporation shall comply with the requirements for recognition as a National Governing Body as
set forth in the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act, 36 U.S.C. § 220501 et seq. and as
mandated by the United States Olympic Committee as such requirements are promulgated or
revised from time to time.
25
CONTENTS
5
Letter from the Executive
Director
Scott Hallenbeck
6-7 Heads Up Football
SM
14
Coaches
15
Commissioners
8 Educators / Community
16-17
National
Teams
18-19
10-11 Health and Safety
Flag
Football
20
Programs
and Events
12-13 Players and Parents
22
Board of
Directors
23
Financial
Report
© 2014. USA Football. Printed in the USA
FROM THE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Inspired by the commitment that high schools and youth leagues
across the nation continue to make for the good of their young athletes,
USA Football helped deliver exciting firsts to our game throughout 2013.
In the initial season of its national rollout, our Heads Up Football
program – supported by more than two dozen leaders in medicine, child
advocacy and sport – was embraced by more than 25 percent of the
country’s youth leagues. High schools across 10 states also proved that
Heads Up Football has an important role to play on that level.
Never before has a sport’s coaching education and player safety
program drawn as much support and adoption as
Heads Up Football. With more work to be done,
our nonprofit office has established important
standards rooted in education for the good of
young athletes, changing behavior for the better.
Also in 2013, groundbreaking research
commissioned by USA Football unearthed exciting
insights and gained national attention on how
youth football will continue to be made safer.
Our staff led a wide variety of coach and athlete
development events nationwide, focusing on the fun of the game and
how to improve football skills. The U.S. National Team program, Protection
Tour, FUNdamentals Clinics, NFL FLAG powered by USA Football and
other dynamic initiatives spread the enjoyment of America’s favorite sport
and its inherent fitness and social benefits to a record 500,000 children
in the past year.
We also established our Medical Advisory Committee, comprised of
some of the nation’s most credentialed doctors and experts to advance
player safety. Our grants program provided more than $1.4 million in new
equipment and field-building funds based on need and merit.
We are proud of our 2013 accomplishments, but we remain inspired
to continue raising the bar for the players, parents, high school and youth
league administrators who trust in USA Football’s programs and resources.
The following pages offer a comprehensive look back as we forge
ahead to ensure a better game – one that is smarter and safer with
standards vital to grassroots sports.
Scott Hallenbeck
USA Football Executive Director
HEADS UP FOOTBALL
SM
INFORMATION IS SPREADING. ATTITUDES ARE CHANGING.
Through USA Football’s Heads Up Football program, youth and high
school football coaches, parents and players across the United States are
learning important health and safety information and creating a better,
safer game in their communities.
Nearly 2,800 youth football organizations signed up for Heads Up
Football in 2013, representing 600,000 players and 90,000 coaches.
This includes more than a quarter of the entire youth football landscape.
Also in 2013, 35 high schools in 10 states – including the entire Fairfax
County school system in Virginia – piloted Heads Up Football on that level.
Rooted in education, Heads Up Football brings the entire football
community – coaches, parents and players – together in setting new
standards for coaching education, concussion recognition and response,
heat preparedness and hydration, equipment fitting and proper tackling
fundamentals.
Heads Up Football is creating change for the better, teaching the sport
correctly while instilling the game’s proper techniques at the grassroots level.
“It has been amazing to be able to advertise our relationship and
our partnership with USA Football,” City of Rogers (Ark.) Program
Development Director Cindy Glynn said. “It has helped with the parents’
ease of mind and ability to sign up their children with us knowing that all
of our coaches are certified and that we have coaches who are keeping
an eye on things, making sure kids are taught the fundamentals.”
With Heads Up Football open to all youth and high school programs in
2014, USA Football continues to improve its resources as it expands its reach.
“Parents love their kids, and they want the safest possible
environment for their kids to participate in,” Anderson (Ind.) Youth Football
Commissioner Stephon Blackwell said. “When they see you taking the
extra step that brings increased safety, they get it, and they appreciate it.”
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell joined USA Football and the Cleveland
Browns to teach Heads Up Football to Ohio Pop Warner teams.
6
QUICK KICKS
Heads Up Football was featured in
2013 on ESPN, ABC News and MSNBC
as well as in USA Today, the New York
Times, the Washington Post, SI.com
and more than 250 local outlets.
Two of the 35 High School Heads
Up Football pilot programs won a 2013
state championship – Philadelphia St.
Joseph’s Prep and Centreville High
School in Virginia.
Heads Up Football is supported by
leaders in medicine, child advocacy,
education and sport. See the list on
Page 9 for organizations that work
alongside USA Football in support of
the program.
Chris Masters @chrismasters1
Impressed by @usafootball and
the on-field/behind the scenes
commitment to improving player
safety for youth football.#headsup
#newstandard
USA Football and Riddell representatives brought proper helmet and shoulder pad fitting to nearly 2,800 leagues in
2013. The best equipment for any athlete is the equipment that fits best.
THE FOUNDATION OF HEADS UP FOOTBALL
Heads Up Football stands on six primary tenets:
COACHING EDUCATION
EQUIPMENT FITTING
CONCUSSION RECOGNITION
AND RESPONSE
Coaching education Coaches within a youth program are trained to teach the
game’s fundamentals by completing USA Football’s nationally accredited Level
1 Coaching Certification Course. High school coaches will gain training through
USA Football’s High School Coach Certification course, developed in partnership
with the National Federation of State High School Associations.
Coaches, parents and players are taught proper helmet and shoulder pad
fitting.
Coaches, parents and players learn Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
concussion recognition and response protocols.
HEAT AND HYDRATION
Coaches, parents and players are taught heat and hydration safety measures set
forth by the University of Connecticut’s Korey Stringer Institute.
PLAYER SAFETY COACH
Appointed by a participating Heads Up Football youth organization or high
school, this individual ensures compliance with Heads Up Football’s player safety
protocols, coach certification, and safety clinics for coaches and parents.
HEADS UP TACKLINGSM
USA Football’s Heads Up Tackling technique, endorsed by medical experts
and leaders in football, teaches to keep the head up for safer play and stronger
fundamentals.
7
EDUCATORS
QUICK KICKS
In 2013, USA Football identified and
trained 26 Master Trainers. Combined,
these men have won 28 high school
state championships.
Master Trainers led 76 Player Safety
Coach clinics throughout the United
States and also represented USA
Football at events with the NFL, Big Ten,
Pac-12, ACC and a number of state high
school coaching meetings.
Cleveland St. Ignatius High School head coach Chuck Kyle is one of USA Football’s Master Trainers. Kyle’s
program has won 11 Ohio championships.
DELIVERING HEADS UP FOOTBALL to youth organizations and high school programs across the country
was an important part of USA Football’s mission in 2013. Based in Indianapolis, USA Football reached players,
parents and coaches nationwide through a train-the-trainer model, creating the positions of Master Trainer and
Player Safety Coach to deliver the curriculum to leagues in all 50 states.
Master Trainers
serious sport, but if you can properly prepare a player
for that contact and teach the proper techniques
and principles that USA Football is helping us to
understand, and if coaches can accept that and teach
it and use it, then it will be a successful program.”
Selected and trained by USA Football, Master Trainers
include top high school coaches, current college coaches
and former NFL players. These individuals instruct youth
league and high school representatives in their regions on
Heads Up Football principles and represent USA Football
at clinics, demonstrating Heads Up Football curriculum
to coaches, parents, players and administrators.
“We will have the opportunity to grow with the
program and with USA Football, and as we grow as
a community, we can make a
difference in the game,” said
Master Trainer EZ Smith, a
former Concord (N.C.) High
School head football coach.
“We have to train Player
Safety Coaches to be like us:
passionate about the game
and about its rules. Football is a
Player Safety Coaches
Appointed by their youth leagues or high schools,
Player Safety Coaches oversee their programs’
implementation of the highest national coaching standards
for football. These standards make
sure all coaches are certified
through USA Football’s online
course. Player Safety Coaches also
conduct Heads Up Football clinics
for coaches and parents while
monitoring their organization’s
practices and games throughout
the season.
8
COMMUNITY
USA FOOTBALL WORKS ALONGSIDE LEADERS in medicine,
child advocacy, sport and education to unite multiple levels of the
sport throughout the United States. Through these partnerships,
young athletes can enjoy the fun and excitement that football offers
while coaches and parents are secure in the knowledge that they are
prepared to properly teach this game to their children.
With members in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., USA Football
works at the youth and high school levels to establish important
standards rooted in education for the good of our young athletes.
QUICK KICKS
In 2013, USA Football partnered
with the ACC, Big Ten, Pac-12 and
NCAA FCS to organize and execute
clinics during conference football
championship weeks, engaging more
than 3,000 children in non-contact
football drills.
USA Football worked with NCAA
and NFL coaches to produce Heads
Up Football promotional messages,
which were shown inside stadiums as
well as game telecasts.
USA Football’s digital community
continues to grow as well with about
160,000 followers on Facebook and
Twitter.
Official Pop Warner @Pop_Warner USA Football is supported by leaders in medicine, child advocacy
and sport, including the Big Ten and the University of Indiana,
which hosted a Heads Up Football instructional clinic in 2013.
@Pop_Warner very happy to
announce partnership with
@usafootball and its “Heads Up
Football” program. #safetyfirst!
Some of the medical and sport backers of USA Football’s Heads Up Football program include:
Amateur Athletic Union
American College of Sports Medicine
American Football Coaches Association
American Medical Society for Sports Medicine
Arizona Coaches Association
Atlantic Coast Conference
Boys and Girls Clubs of America
Big 12 Conference
Big Ten Conference
Indiana Football Coaches Association
Korey Stringer Institute
Michigan H.S. Football Coaches Association
Minnesota Football Coaches Association
National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association
National Athletic Trainers Association
NATA Research & Education Foundation
National Federation of State High School Associations
National Football League
National Parent Teacher Association
National Police Athletic League
NFL Alumni Association
NFL Head, Neck & Spine Committee
North Carolina Coaches Association
Northern Va. Football Coaches Association
Pac-12 Conference
Pop Warner Little Scholars
Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society
Sport Safety International
Sports & Fitness Industry Association
United Youth Football League
9
HEALTH AND SAFETY
THE WELL-BEING OF EVERY YOUNG ATHLETE is USA Football’s No. 1 priority. That mission is encapsulated in
Heads Up Football but extends throughout the company’s entire program lineup.
In 2013, USA Football and its partners worked with commissioners, coaches, players and parents through grassroots
efforts to deliver important health and safety information where they live.
Here are some of the programs that helped us accomplish that task:
Protection Tour
usafootball.com/protection-tour
USA Football hosted five stops on the 2013 Protection
Tour, bringing a series of one-day clinics to NFL stadiums
and training facilities for local youth football players and
their parents to learn Heads Up Football curriculum.
More than 2,200 young athletes, parents, coaches
and administrators learned about proper equipment fitting,
tackling fundamentals and concussion awareness from
USA Football and its partners, Riddell and AIG Insurance.
Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald served as
the spokesman, appearing on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,”
Sirius XM radio and Fox Sports radio.
Every youth player was properly fitted for a helmet
while parents gathered in classroom and on-field settings
to learn the latest information from leaders in medicine
and football.
10
The USA Football Protection Tour brought Heads
Up Football to more than 2,200 players, parents and
coaches in five NFL markets.
QUICK KICKS
By the end of 2013, 49 states and
Washington, D.C., had passed laws
protecting student-athletes from returning
to play too soon after suffering the effects
of a concussion.
Easy-to-download player safety
checklists are available at usafootball.com
and at USA Football free mobile app for
any coach or parent to take to the sideline.
Minnesota Vikings linebacker E.J. Henderson shows first-hand
how proper tackling skills are key to a player’s success.
Safety study
In 2013, USA Football released preliminary data from its two-year
study examining youth football player health and safety. USA Football
commissioned the study with Indianapolis-based Datalys Center for
Sports Injury Research and Prevention. The independent scientific
study monitors 12 youth football leagues in six states, examining more
than 2,000 players ages 5-14.
Preliminary results of the study showed:
• More than 90 percent of the players did not suffer an injury
that restricted participation.
• Fewer than 4 percent of youth players sustained a concussion
during the course of two seasons.
• Similar to other levels of football, youth football players were
more likely to be injured in games than practices.
USA Football anticipates commissioning ongoing research in
future years to help establish safer play and playing standards.
Medical Advisory Committee
usafootball.com/medical-advisory-committee
Composed of 10 medical experts with a diverse range of
backgrounds, the USA Football Medical Advisory Committee was
announced in September 2013. Chaired by Dr. Stanley Herring, a
neurologist from the University of Washington Harborview Medical
Center, the group includes authorities in orthopedics, sports medicine,
neurological injury, rehabilitation medicine, athletic training, sports
cardiology, hydration, environmental issues and exercise science.
The committee will guide the continued development of USA
Football’s educational resources and player safety initiatives, including
the Heads Up Football program. The group also will collaborate with
other USA Football committees, national governing bodies and medical
organizations to determine best practices and recommendations for
safer play.
11
Working with the U.S. Olympic Committee,
USA Football has adopted a SafeSport
policy that addresses misconduct,
mistreatment and proper social
management for all volunteer adults and
the children they oversee.
Grants
www2.usafootball.com/grants
Each year, USA Football
distributes $1 million in equipment
grants through a generous donation
from the NFL Foundation. All youth
leagues and elementary, middle and
high school programs are eligible to
receive a grant toward the purchase
of new football equipment, further
advancing player safety.
Starting in 2008, USA Football
has awarded more than $6 million
in grants.
For the third consecutive year,
USA Football also has partnered
with FieldTurf to award $50,000
field-building grants to school
districts and communities toward
the purchase of a FieldTurf synthetic
turf field.
PLAYERS AND PARENTS
YOUNG ATHLETES ENJOY playing football. Moms and dads
want the peace of mind that their children are being taught the
proper way. USA Football engages with parents and players through
Heads Up Football, Protection Tour events, USA Football’s website
and other opportunities, making them part of the education process.
Dedicated coaches lead young athletes at practices and
games, but it’s the parents who spend the most time with their
children. That’s why it is important for all adults to have access to
health and safety information and tools.
USA Football Player/Parent memberships are free and include
the most up-to-date information on concussion awareness, hydration
and heat emergency preparedness and equipment fitting.
QUICK KICKS
Football stands as the most popular
participatory sport among high school
boys with 1.12 million student-athletes
in 2012-13. Football is the only sport to
draw more than 1 million high school
players and has remained so since the
1998-99 school year.
All parents are invited to Heads Up
Football clinics conducted by their
league’s Player Safety Coach, where
they are taught the program’s principles
and learn important health and safety
information.
More than 2.7 million individuals
visited USA Football’s website
(usafootball.com) in 2013, reading
articles, watching videos and using
resources on a variety of topics and
interest to improve the youth football
experience in their communities.
12
Parents are a key part of creating a better, safer game on the youth level. Coaches spend a limited amount of time
with their players, but moms and dads can reinforce those lessons at home.
Dude Mom @thedudemom
People often ask me why I let my
kids play #football, this is what
I tell them. #bettersafergame @
usafootball
Christopher Roberts @coachrob99
We’re going to bring FieldTurf to
Poly thanks to a grant from
@usafootball. Project details to
come! #polypride #buildit
#thanksusafootball
13
COACHES
MEDICAL EXPERTS AGREE that developing proper mechanics
at a young age dramatically reduces the chances for injury for an
athlete.And it all begins with coaching.
USA Football’s Level 1 Youth Coach Certification Course is
designed to train coaches responsible for the on-field development
of children playing organized youth flag and tackle football. The
program is the only nationally accredited coaching education
course for football in the United States.
USA Football is committed to providing youth coaches,
whether beginner or advanced, with a program that enhances
their abilities to teach the most progressive skill and techniques
for their age groups. It sets standards for football and safety that
improve each coach’s ability to run effective practices, ensure
understanding and communicate with parents.
High school coaches can become certified as well. Like the
youth version, it centers on player skills along with health and
safety information and is available to every coach nationwide.
QUICK KICKS
More than 120,000 coaches since
2007 have successfully completed
USA Football’s Level 1 Youth Coach
Certification Course.
USA Football produced a series of
Two-Minute Drills in 2013 that
help coaches reinforce important
fundamental skills during their practices
in short, simple ways.
Whether new to the sport or a
seasoned veteran, USA Football’s
Playbooks can help any tackle and flag
coaching staff build an offense suitable
for its age group.
Coach Woody @myflcoach
USA Football coaching education is designed to offer something
for every coach – whether a rookie dad or a 20-year veteran.
14
@usafootball @HeadsUpFB We,
@MYFL_VA, have embraced &
become leaders in Virginia on safety.
#Youth #Football
COMMISSIONERS
WORKING ALONGSIDE YOUTH FOOTBALL LEADERS in
all 50 states, USA Football is shaping the way leagues educate
their coaches and train their players in fundamentals of the sport.
This is a vital piece commissioners seek when it comes to the
health and safety of their young athletes.
Football and youth sports in general provide meaningful
learning opportunities, and it is important that the right individuals
have the training necessary to teach our children these lessons.
Understanding there is more work to be done, USA Football
is encouraged that the youth football community is embracing
coaching standards such as those in our Heads Up Football
program. Together with support of experts in medicine, child
advocacy and multiple levels of the sport, we work with youth
leagues to adopt these standards that bring significant change
in how coaches are prepared, players are taught, parents are
informed and safety is addressed.
Change is never easy, but a top-down commitment to the
sport’s best practices is improving how the sport is taught at the
grassroots level.
“There are a lot of coaches hesitant to change and who maybe
don’t agree or understand what is safest for the players,” Pride of
Iowa Youth Football Commissioner Shane Bregar said. “But I have
had a lot of the mothers thanking me. They think it is great that we
are trying to make it safer for their children.”
QUICK KICKS
USA Football’s grants program awarded
more than $1.5 million in funds for
new football equipment, uniforms and
synthetic turf fields in 2013.
Through the NFL Foundation, USA
Football reconditioned and replaced
helmets for 40 leagues in underserved
markets.
USA Football’s partnership with Altus
Specialty Group allows leagues to obtain
insurance at industry-leading rates.
USA Football Regional Managers, including Ed Passino (left photo, at right) work every day with youth
football commissioners to provide the information and programs they need, whether it’s easing the
registration process or Heads Up Football drills.
15
NATIONAL TEAMS
AS THE NATIONAL GOVERNING BODY of the sport, USA
Football selects and manages U.S. National Teams for international
competition within the sport, including men’s, women’s and high
school – Under-19, Under-18, Under-17, Under-16 and Under-15 –
tackle teams along with men’s and women’s flag.
USA Football is the U.S. representative to the International
Federation of American Football, which
unites 64 nations on six continents that
possess a national federation dedicated
to American Football. In 2013, the
International Olympic Committee granted
IFAF provisional IOC recognition, meaning
a vote on the inclusion of football in the
Olympics could take place as early as 2017.
As part of the U.S. National Team
selection process, USA Football held 10
Regional Development Camps and three National Development
Weeks across the United States to identify potential players for the
high school divisions. At these camps, players age 13-19 can learn
from top high school coaches and former NFL players while being
evaluated by college scouts.
More than 3,000 athletes took part in national team events in 2013.
QUICK KICKS
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston,
a member of the 2012 U.S. Under-19 National
Team, was named the 2013 Heisman Trophy
winner then led the Seminoles to the BCS
National Championship.
Six U.S. National Team alumni were
selected in the 2013 NFL Draft: OL Oday
Aboushi (Virginia/Jets), WR Aaron Dobson
(Marshall/Patriots), DB Tyrann Mathieu
(LSU/Cardinals), DB Jordan Poyer (Oregon
State/Eagles), DB Shamarko Thomas
(Syracuse/Steelers) and OL Brian Winters
(Kent State/Jets).
Team USA recaptured the International Bowl title with a 42-10
win over Canada.
16
The U.S. Women’s National Team
defended its IFAF World Championship
with a gold-medal performance in Vantaa,
Finland. The U.S. Women defeated
Sweden, German and Canada for the title.
caption
caption
THE INTERNATIONAL BOWL
Fourth annual event is bigger and better than ever
Everything is bigger in Texas. For the U.S. National Teams in 2013, that
certainly was true.
The International Bowl in Austin, Texas, featured the fourth meeting between
the U.S. Under-19 National Team and the IFAF World Team. But the two-week
event encompassed much more, including:
• The USA Football National Signing Day Breakfast, where more than 50
college-bound members of Team USA and the IFAF World Team signed their
national letters of intent
• U.S. Under-18 and Under-16 games vs. Team Canada
• A U.S. National Team Regional Development Camp
• A USA Football FUNdamentals clinic presented by Shock Doctor
• The U.S. Women’s World Tackle Football Games
• The U.S. Under-19 team regained the International Bowl crown with a 42-10
victory, improving Team USA to 3-1 in the series.
17
FLAG FOOTBALL
ENJOYED BY MILLIONS OF INDIVIDUALS throughout
the United States, flag football offers children and adults the
chance to learn many of the game’s basic skills in a fun and
limited-contact environment.
More than 230,000 children ages 5-17 participated in
NFL FLAG powered by USA Football throughout 2013, a 10
percent increase over the year before and a record number for
the program. NFL FLAG coaches and parents receive free USA
Football memberships, including access to playbooks, practice
planners and a drills library all tailored to the flag game.
The sport also is growing at the high school level, where
USA Football works with school programs in 30 U.S. cities,
helping more than 32,000 girls participate in middle school
and high school flag football.
NFL FLAG powered by USA Football offers a
non-contact version of the game for children
ages 5-17.
Tyler Harrison @tylertypewriter
Very cool youth league event going on
right now through @usafootball. Really
makes me want to get some pick up
going!
18
QUICK KICKS
About 2.8 million Americans played
organized flag football in 2013,
including children and adults.
The 2013 NFL FLAG powered by USA
Football National Championships
were held at AT&T Stadium, home
of the Dallas Cowboys. More than
4,000 young athletes ages 9-14
competed at eight regionals hosted
by NFL teams for the chance to reach
the finals.
The 2013 NFL FLAG National
Championships were held at AT&T
Stadium, home of the Dallas Cowboys.
19
Alaska, Florida and Washington,
D.C., recognize flag football as a
varsity sport as do parts of California,
Michigan, Nevada, New York and
Ohio. More than 7,000 high school
girls earned letters in flag football
during the 2012-13 school year.
PROGRAMS AND EVENTS
FUNdamentals
www.usafootball.com/fun
Designed by USA Football as a non-contact, basic skills event for
children ages 6-14, FUNdamentals is a turn-key youth football clinic that
can be conducted at any facility or physical education class. Through
a series of drills to teach passing, catching and running, participants
also are introduced to the basics of USA Football’s Heads Up Tackling
techniques.
In 2013, 62 current NFL players and alumni hosted FUNdamentals
camps thanks to NFL Foundation grants. USA Football also hosted
FUNdamentals clinics at the Big Ten and ACC championship weekend
fan fests, bringing the program to more than 17,000 children across the
United States.
MattOverton @MattOverton_LS
Big thank u to @usafootball for the opportunity to
host this camp 4 the kids in my hometown!
20
The Buffalo Bills hosted a free USA
Football FUNdamentals clinic in 2013,
introducing Western New York children
to basic skills of the sport.
All-Fundamentals Team
www.usafootball.com/all-fundamentals-team
For the fifth consecutive year, USA Football honored 26 NFL
players who employ proper technique for youth players to emulate
on the 2013 All-Fundamentals Team. Medical experts agree that
employing proper fundamentals and techniques advances safety
and performance on the youth level.
Each player selected for the All-Fundamentals Team received
a $1,500 equipment grant to donate to the youth or high school
football program of his choice. Three captains selected by fan vote – Denver Broncos
quarterback Peyton Manning, Buffalo Bills defensive lineman Kyle Williams and Philadelphia
Eagles long snapper Jon Dornabos – were awarded $3,000 grants.
Punt, Pass & Kick
www.nflppk.com
USA Football managed the nation’s
largest grassroots sports skills competition,
bringing the NFL Punt, Pass & Kick to more
than 2,500 communities and nearly 200,000
children ages 6-15 in all 50 states and
Washington, D.C.
Champions in 10 age groups were saluted
in front of a national television audience at
Sports Authority Field at Mile High during
the AFC playoff game between the Denver
Broncos and San Diego Chargers.
USA Football Month
The NFL and its teams once again recognized USA
Football throughout the 2013 preseason as the sport’s leader
in youth player development and coaching education through
USA Football Month.
The initiative included Heads Up Football branded
stickers worn by every NFL player and youth players in all 50
states; USA Football messages promoting better and safer
play during telecasts and on in-stadium video screens; and
Heads Up Football-branded on-field stencils and end zone
banners in NFL stadiums.
21
BOARD MEMBERS
USA FOOTBALL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS include representatives from all levels of football – youth
to professional – to guide the organization’s initiatives and further strengthen the game.
The knowledge and experience of the Board are invaluable benefits for USA Football as it continues to
teach the game’s fundamentals and promote its values to benefit the football community.
DAWN APONTE
Executive Vice President
Miami Dolphins
JOE BROWNE
Senior Advisor to the Commissioner
National Football League
TOM COVE
President and CEO
Sports and Fitness Industry Association
ROGER GOODELL*
DR. GAIL L. ROSSEAU
Commissioner
National Football League
Neurosurgeon
NorthShore University HealthSystems
SCOTT HALLENBECK*
STEVE SPECHT
Executive Director
USA Football
Head Football Coach
Cincinnati St. Xavier High School
MERRIL HOGE
GRANT TEAFF
Retired NFL Player and ESPN NFL Analyst
Executive Director
American Football Coaches Association
LEROY HOLLINS II
JIM DELANY
MIKE WILCOX
Commissioner
Louisiana Youth Football
Commissioner
Big Ten Conference
Chairman and CEO
Wilcox Financial/Wilcox Sports Management
MARK MEANA
BOB GARDNER
Chairman Emeritus
Executive Director
Fairfax County (Va.) Youth Football League
National Federation of State High School
Associations
MARK MURPHY
President and CEO
Green Bay Packers
*-Ex-officio Board Member
NEW BOARD MEMBERS IN 2013
Dawn Aponte
Leroy Hollins II
Mark Murphy
Green Bay Packers @packers
#Packers President & CEO Mark Murphy named to
USA Football board of directors
22
Dr. Gail L. Rosseau
Steve Specht
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
FPO
YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2013
(unaudited, amounts in thousands)
Revenue
Expenses
Grants & Donations
$6,445
Youth & Member Programs
$6,689
Membership
$852
Events & Programs
$4,026
Sponsorship
& Sales
$2,466
Football Development,
Safety & Research
$2,110
Events &
Programs
$6,852
General & Administrative
$1,919
Equipment Grants
$1,146
Other
$308
Total Revenue: $16,923
Total Expenses: $15,890
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION
MARCH 31, 2012
(unaudited, amounts in thousands)
Assets
Liabilities and Net Assets
Cash $2,355 Accounts Receivable 1,937 Investments 1,419 Other Current Assets 412
Current Assets 6,123 Net Fixed Assets & Intangibles 842 Endowment Investments 3,000 Non-Current Assets 3,842 Accounts Payable
& Accrued Liabilities Deferred Revenue Current Liabilities Total Assets Total Liabilities & Net Assets Non-Current Liabilities Net Assets $9,965 23
$977
1,535
2,512
378
7,075
$9,965
USA FOOTBALL
45 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204
www.usafootball.com
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