Course Syllabus BA422W.001 STRATEGIC BUSINESS PLANNING

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Course Syllabus
BA422W.001 STRATEGIC BUSINESS PLANNING
with Marc Orlitzky, Ph.D.
Fall 2011
102 DT-SCEE
Tuesday & Thursday 4:05-5:20 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Marc Orlitzky, Associate Professor of Management
Office: 214 Hawthorn Building
Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday 12 noon – 1 p.m. and by appointment
Phone: (o) (814) 949-5772
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://marcorlitzky.webs.com/
COURSE OVERVIEW
This capstone course emphasizes strategic planning and implementation across a broad spectrum
of business contexts. It focuses on the managerial, multibusiness, multi-industry, multicultural,
and multinational complexities of achieving and sustaining competitive advantage. The highly
interactive, seminar-style course integrates content from foundational courses such as economics,
human resource management, marketing, supply chain/operations management, accounting, and
finance with the development of analytical, communication, and teamwork skills. The
overarching goal of the course is to have students demonstrate their capacity to develop and
execute organizational strategies in actual or simulated business situations.
COURSE GOALS
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To sharpen critical thinking skills and independent problem-solving techniques relevant
to the analysis of business problems and the generation of feasible strategic solutions.
To synthesize and apply management knowledge along with the skills that enable
managers to solve problems at work autonomously.
To experience strategy development, implementation, and organizational control through
group interaction.
To gain an understanding of the impact of internal factors on business.
To gain an understanding of the impact of external factors, both local and global, on
business.
To achieve these goals, the course will have the following components: cooperative group
learning, in-class discussions of organizational and strategic problems, and online learning tools
such as ANGEL and a strategy simulation game. In addition, you will apply some of the
technical skills that you learned in previous business courses (e.g., PowerPoint).
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
1
LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. generate effective solutions to problems of organizational performance;
2. independently assess and/or predict business performance based on the detailed analysis
of a specific problem, case, or company;
3. correctly apply concepts and theories in Strategic Management;
4. write a business plan;
5. evaluate organizational strategies, structures, and strategy implementation;
6. use correct grammar, spelling, and a professional style in all written assignments.
COURSE PREREQUISITES
This course requires that the student be of fifth-semester standing and that the student has
successfully completed FIN 301, MGMT 301, MKTG 301, SCM 301, and BA 421. Prerequisite
or concurrent: BA 495A, BA 495B, or BA 495C. Open only to students in the BSB program.
COURSE MATERIALS
1. Online Strategy Simulation: Marketplace-Live: http://www.marketplace-live.com
2. Grant, R. M. (2010). Contemporary strategy analysis: Text and cases (7th ed.). Edison,
NJ: Wiley. ISBN: 978-0-470-74709-4.
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•
•
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The print copy is available from the university bookstore and from any of the Amazon
links on http://marcorlitzky.webs.com/ .
The textbook is also available, at a 50% discount, as an eText from coursesmart.com.
The eText ISBN is 978-0-470-62119-6 (URL for eText:
http://www.coursesmart.com/9780470747094?__professorview=false&__instructor=214
3082 ). This less expensive version of the textbook is only recommended for students that
are computer-savvy. The instructor will not be able to help you with any IT problems
associated with the purchase of the eText.
The textbook is the most comprehensive and best-selling Strategy textbook in advanced
undergraduate and MBA courses worldwide and has basically achieved the status of the
"Strategy bible." In addition, Grant's book is one of the least expensive textbooks in
Strategic Management. Unlike many of your textbooks in previous classes, Grant's
textbook will not have to be read in its entirety front to back. Instead, you will mainly
use the chapters as references or guidelines (e.g., via the book's index) whenever you
need assistance in analyzing and/or solving organizational performance problems in the
Strategy cases or simulation.
Bringing the assigned cases and/or textbook to every class is very important. If you
purchase the eText, you can access it from a desktop PC, a laptop or mobile device, or
you can bring a printout of the case assigned for any particular day.
3. Occasional readings available on ANGEL
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
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Recommended:
• Regular reading of The Economist, Fortune, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg
BusinessWeek, Forbes, or other magazines (for discussions of current events and
organizational strategies). You can also watch CNBC, Fox Business News, Bloomberg,
and other business news channels or shows.
• American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication Manual of the American
Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
ASSIGNMENTS
ASSIGNMENT
1) Strategy simulation (CBS ranking)
2) Business Plan
3) Final Report to Stockholders
4) Assurance of Learning (online) tests
5) Team case analysis and discussion
6) Comprehensive case analysis
7) Class participation
TOTAL
WEIGHT DUE DATE
15%
15%
5%
10%
10%
25%
20%
100%
weeks 3-13
week 8
week 15
weeks 11 and 13
TBD (ANGEL sign-up)
week 14
throughout the semester
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
1, 2, 3, 5
All
3, 5
2, 3, 5
1, 2, 3, 5, 6
1, 2, 3, 5, 6
1, 2, 3, 5
This course will include a mix of case analyses, large and small group discussions, and student
presentations, but only very few lectures. Because most sessions feature a seminar-style format
in-depth preparation of the readings before each class is vital for passing the course. It is
expected that all students come to class having read the assigned case and are prepared to ask
questions as well as address issues raised by other students and the instructor.
Detailed instructions for the written assignments listed below can be found online—on the
course web site in ANGEL—in due course. In general, the course makes extensive use of
ANGEL ( http://www.cms.psu.edu ). In addition to material posted on it, ANGEL will be used
for submission of all written assignments. Students are responsible for learning how to gain
access and work with files in ANGEL and for ensuring that the intended assignment has been
received and that the system has their preferred e-mail address. Please check the ANGEL
website regularly.
Strategy Simulation
Each team of (about) four students will make strategic and tactical decisions in the MarketplaceLive simulation (web link: http://marketplace-live.com/ ). The award-winning simulation
Marketplace-Live lets you build an entrepreneurial firm, experiment with strategies, and compete
with other students in a virtual business world. Designed to mimic competition in an everchanging global marketplace, the simulation helps you gain experience in market analysis,
strategy formulation, and the management of a new business venture. You will start up and run
your own company, struggling with business fundamentals and the interplay between marketing,
distribution, manufacturing, human resources, finance, accounting, and team management.
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
3
Teams are required to have rotating leaders. Thus, whenever the new "quarterly" decisions are
due, another team member must take over as project leader, or President of the company.
All teams are self-managing teams and, thus, take responsibility for all aspects of their
performance. Self-management entails that team members can fire free riders or unprofessional
team members, who would then be assigned to a new company. In addition, at least twice over
the course of the simulation, team members will assess their teammates' contributions. These
peer ratings will be taken into account in the assignment of simulation scores to individuals.
Finally, the simulation website records all your individual activities online and, therefore, will
provide me with a lot of feedback on your individual contributions to the team (decisions and
analyses) throughout the semester. This feedback will also be considered in my assignment of
simulation scores to individual students.
The exact deadlines associated with the different components of the strategy simulation will be
available on the website of the simulation and on the ANGEL Calendar tool in due course.
Extensive help files (about the technology, content of the game, etc.) are also available on the
website. If you are ever "stuck," please do not hesitate to email me and/or the game developers,
who will be happy to answer your questions (especially if you cannot find the answers to your
questions in the simulation Help files). The simulation support staff can be sent email via the
"Help" button.
After the last decision round (Q6), all teams will be ranked in terms of their cumulative balanced
scorecard (CBS). More details are available in a separate handout in the Strategy Simulation
folder on ANGEL. This folder can be found in the Assignments section of the ANGEL website.
This handout and Grant's Strategy textbook (use the index!) provide an introduction of, and more
details about, the concept of the balanced scorecard.
Business Plan and Final Report to Stockholders
Each team will deliver, toward the middle of the semester, a written and oral presentation of their
Business Plan and, at semester end, an oral presentation of their Final Report to the Investors.
The team will be expected to make professional presentations using PowerPoint or an assortment
of other visual aids. More detailed guidelines for the preparation of the business plan and final
report are available in the Strategy Simulation folder on ANGEL. There is also an electronic
textbook reading on Business Plans on the Marketplace-Live website. The Business Plan should
be submitted, as a Word document, on turnitin.psu.edu (course ID: 4176034; enrollment
password: strategy). In addition, please submit all presentation materials (one per team for each
of the two assignments) in the appropriate Drop Box on ANGEL on the day of the presentation.
Assurance of Learning (Online) Tests
After the first half of the simulation, an individual Assurance of Learning (AoL) test will be
administered. The objective of this individual assessment is to determine how well you are using
the tools of management and to stimulate your thinking about the marketplace in which you
compete. The assessment should also provide some insights into how you and your team spend
your time. Most importantly, this test must be completed individually—collaborating on the AoL
test with one or more other students will be considered a violation of academic integrity (see last
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
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few pages of this syllabus). To give you a better sense of what the in-class test will look like, I
will give you a "take-home" practice test in Q5 of the simulation, which will count for 4% of
your course grade. The in-class AoL test (i.e., the test that counts for 6% of your course grade)
will be administered in week 13. Each AoL test should take approximately 30 to 45 minutes to
complete.
Team Case Analysis and Discussion
Each team will choose one textbook case, sign up for the relevant class session on ANGEL, and
facilitate the case discussion on their chosen day. The cases are introduced and summarized in
Grant's textbook on pages 481-487. No case can be covered by more than one team, which
implies that the sign-up will be completed on a "first-come, first-served" basis. When you sign
up for your team in the Discussion Forum in the Drop Boxes folder make sure to click on the "+"
to display the thread in expanded view. The team case discussion should be planned to last about
45 minutes and be more or less interactive, e.g., by asking the other students thoughtful questions
about the case, comparing the case to team members' own experience in organizations
(concerning strategy development or implementation, e.g., in internships), and/or implementing
any other creative workshop or seminar format that conveys the central themes and messages of
your case most effectively. To guide your preparation for the case analysis and discussion, I will
give you several questions about the case, which your team must answer during your case
facilitation. Regardless of your answers to these case questions, the team should always start
with a brief overview or summary of the case and wrap up with several key Strategy lessons that
you learned from analyzing your chosen case. Your PowerPoint slides should be submitted in
the Case Presentation ppt Drop Box on the day of your case facilitation. A grading rubric will be
posted on ANGEL (in the Assignments folder).
Instead of a case analysis and discussion, your team may also present an in-depth and original
book report on a Strategy book of your choice, published during the last three years and
approved, via email, by the instructor.
(Furthermore, if you prefer making an individual presentation rather than a team presentation,
this preference may be accommodated as well.)
Comprehensive Case Analysis
This individual assignment will serve as your opportunity to demonstrate your ability to apply a
variety of Strategic and General Management concepts to a specific case and organization. More
details will be available in a separate handout available in the Assignments folder on ANGEL.
Two readings posted on ANGEL will tell you more about the specific sections and analyses
required in your report. Up to 7 days before the due date, the instructor will be happy to give
you feedback on your draft during office hours. The case analysis should be submitted, as a
Word document, on turnitin.psu.edu (course ID: 4176034; enrollment password: strategy).
Class Participation
Most classes in this course use a seminar-style case discussion format. The completion of
reading assignments and participation in class discussions is critical to the learning process in
BA422W generally. Especially for those sessions in which cases are assigned, in-depth
preparation before class will be essential for your understanding of that class and receiving a
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
5
passing grade in Class Participation. In other words, pre-class preparation and regular class
attendance are prerequisites for contribution; they are not a substitute for it.
Throughout the course, I may gauge student preparation and participation in various ways:
individual or team exercises, case discussions, occasional homework assignments, occasional
unannounced quizzes, group discussions, attendance, and/or in-class responses to instructor
questions. Note that sometimes I may call on students whose hands are not raised. Before some
classes, I may randomly select three to five names and ask these students to define or give
examples of key concepts mentioned in the assigned chapter for that day or key facts from the
assigned readings. So even if you do not raise your hand, you will have an opportunity to
contribute. To use Lawrence Kohlberg’s typology and terminology, I will look for evidence of
cognitive and affective maturity. Mature, professional, and positive attitudes toward the course
material will be rewarded. The ability to listen attentively to the comments of other students will
also be rewarded all the time.
Given the importance of class participation, I will seek to learn your names as quickly as
possible. To facilitate this, I ask that you (a) use a name tent at all times and (b) introduce
yourself in class 1b (before and during the team selection process).
Please note that your course conduct will be considered in the assignment of Class Participation
grades, as outlined in the table below. For every hour of lecture, the University expects you to
spend about 3 hours out of class. This time estimate is a guide and you may need to budget
more. For example, if the material is new to you or difficult to comprehend, it will require more
of your time. You are responsible for all the readings, even if the material is not explicitly
covered in class. You should read the class materials prior to class and be prepared to discuss and
ask questions about the readings and assignments. You should also re-read the material after
class as not every topic will be covered during class time. Many passages in the text may need to
be read several times to gain clarity. Also, taking notes on the material you are reading and
reflecting on the reading and these notes will help you better understand the issues, concepts, and
techniques that are presented.
I will record my observations of your contributions at least once, and sometimes twice, a week.
At the end of the semester, I will rank-order all students in terms of my record of class
contributions and then assign grades by following this grading rubric as closely as possible:
Grade
A
Meaning
Outstanding
Contributor
B
Good
Contributor
Description
Contributions reflect exceptional preparation. Ideas offered are always substantive
and provide major insights as well as direction for the class. Arguments are well
supported and persuasively presented. Student is an excellent listener. Person had
a good, professional, and mature attitude throughout the course. If this person were
not a member of this class, the quality of our class discussions would clearly suffer.
Name tents were consistently used throughout the term.
Contributions reflect good preparation, with less attention to detail and less outside
reading (for example, of current business news) than an Outstanding Contributor.
At a minimum, I expect and hope that all students fall into this category. Ideas
offered are usually substantive and insightful and often provide direction for the
class. Arguments are generally well supported and persuasive. If this cognitively
and affectively mature student were not a member of the class, the quality of our
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
6
C
Adequate
Contributor
D
Unsatisfactory
Contributor
F
Non-Participant
discussions would be diminished to some extent. Name tents were used most of the
time.
Contributions reflect satisfactory preparation. Person is almost always present, but
clearly does not contribute as much as Outstanding or Good Contributors.
Student’s presence does not affect the class either positively or negatively. Person
shows maturity and professionalism when present. When called on, person
answers questions adequately, but does not demonstrate any higher-level
integrative, independent, or reflective thinking. Name tents were rarely used.
Contributions reflect inadequate preparation. Attendance record shows many
unexcused absences. Ideas generally do not provide important insights or
constructive direction for the class. Lack of maturity and professional judgment
by, on occasion, preventing other students’ learning. Student does little to further
the thinking and understanding of others. When called on, student is generally
incapable of answering the question(s). Student is inattentive, but not disruptive.
Name tents were never brought to and never used in class.
The person is so unprofessional and immature that class discussions and class
climate would actually be improved if this student were not a member of this class.
When called on, person is not only incapable of answering the question, but also is
inattentive and disruptive and exhibits a bad, disrespectful attitude toward other
students and/or the instructor. Disconcertingly low levels of emotional
intelligence. Too many unexcused absences. A grade of F could also be assigned
if your class participation indicates a violation of academic integrity (see sections
on Academic Integrity below).
Extra Credit: Business Case Competition
On November 3-5, the business school will hold a Business Case Competition (website URL is
http://www.altoona.psu.edu/BusinessCase/ ). Just like the team case discussions in class, this
team case competition will be an excellent practice opportunity for the individual comprehensive
case analysis. Applications are due by October 7 (email Deborah Kimmel Hommer at
[email protected] ). To double-check the due date and find out more details, please contact
Deborah Kimmel Hommer or Michelle Blevins.
GRADING CRITERIA
Your performance in this course will be evaluated on evidence of learning, depth of analysis,
maturity, and professionalism. In general, you should demonstrate that you understand the key
issues in the course and text and that you are thinking critically about strategic management.
Most importantly, by the end of the course you need to demonstrate the behaviors of a selfdirected learner and autonomous decision-maker.
The chart below shows the percentage equivalencies for a given letter grade. Unless there is a
compelling reason to do so, I will not deviate from these equivalencies:
A 94%-100%
A- 90-93
B+
B
B-
88%-89%
82-87
80-81
C+ 78%-79%
C 70-77
D
F
60%-69%
0-59
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
7
The general criteria for each letter grade are defined as follows:
A (EXCELLENT)
indicates exceptional achievement that was consistent throughout the
course. The student displayed outstanding grasp of the material,
frequently with evidence of intellectual insight and original thought.
Always comfortable with independent inquiry, student consistently
demonstrated the behaviors and problem-solving autonomy of a selfdirected learner.
B (GOOD)
indicates extensive achievement. Work demonstrated a thorough grasp
of the material with occasional errors and omissions. Assignments
were thoroughly and completely done, with careful attention to detail
and clarity and with evidence of intellectual insight. Student's
problem-solving behaviors were not as consistent and independent as
those of an "A" student.
C (SATISFACTORY)
indicates acceptable achievement. Meeting minimal course standards,
the quality of work was acceptable, but achievement was neither
exceptional nor extensive. Performance on examinations and other
assignments was satisfactory and demonstrated that the student was
keeping up with the material and attending to detail. However, student
also required or desired a considerable amount of "handholding" and
"spoon-feeding," demonstrating regimented thinking and a clear
dependence on, and inability to function effectively without, the
instructor.
D (POOR)
indicates only poor achievement. Assigned work was not always done
or when done was inadequate. Performance on assignments was
generally very weak with regard to understanding of subject, proper
formulation of ideas, thoroughness, and self-directed learning or
problem-solving.
F (FAILING)
indicates that the student failed the course. The quality or quantity of
work was not of college level. A failing grade may be assigned for a
variety of reasons such as failure to complete course requirements as
outlined in the syllabus, inability to comprehend course material or
follow in-class and online instructions, consistently unsatisfactory
performance, or excessive unexcused absences.
Late Submission Policy
Unless stated otherwise in the specific assignment instructions, late submissions will typically
not be accepted. Because the comprehensive case analysis will be discussed in class, late
submission would give you an unfair advantage over students that submitted on time. However,
if you provide a good reason (such as illness) for late submission, you will lose 15 points
regardless of the reason and regardless of the actual submission date. Any late assignment will
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
8
have to be submitted (via the ANGEL Dropbox) within 7 days of the due date. If your
assignment is more than a week late, it will not be accepted. Please note that any late submission
will not be graded or returned to the student until after the last day of class.
Missed Due Dates and Extra Credit Assignment
If you miss an individual assignment, you must contact the instructor before or on the due date to
qualify for a make-up assignment. Upon approval by the instructor, you can submit a make-up
assignment, for which no late assignments will be accepted under any circumstance. This makeup assignment will be due in week 15.
ANGEL
ANGEL is an integral element of this course; it will frequently be used to post links, documents,
PowerPoint slides, and various other materials and announcements. Please see ANGEL for
updates to our tentative schedule and the most current assignments. Access to, and use of,
ANGEL is essential for this course.
Email is the preferred method of communication for this class. It is the responsibility of each
individual student to check their PSU email account frequently for messages pertaining to the
class. If you contact me via e-mail and do not receive a response within 24 hours (Mon-Fri) or by
Monday (on a weekend), please re-send your message.
If you contact me via ANGEL’s “Send Course Mail” feature, make sure to check the “Send a
copy to each recipient's Internet e-mail” box in the lower right-hand corner.
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
9
COURSE SCHEDULE
Please complete the following readings in the order in which they are listed. Unless noted
otherwise, all assigned readings are in the textbook, abbreviated "Grant" below. Important:
Whenever a case is assigned, please bring a paper or electronic copy of that case to class. I
anticipate that we will follow the schedule outlined below, but changes are possible. Be sure to
check with a classmate after an absence to find out if any assignments have changed.
Week Date
Topic or Class Activity
Aug. 23 Introduction to Course
1
Course overview: Syllabus
2
Assigned Readings
Aug. 25 In-Class Team Draft
Résumé due: Please bring TWO (2)
paper copies of your résumé to class
Aug. 30 Introduction to the Online
Strategy Simulation
•
•
Sep. 1
3
4
The First Quiz
Introduction to Case Analysis
and Discussion
•
•
Case 1: Madonna (Grant pp. 489496).
ANGEL:
 Guide to Case Analysis
 How to Prepare and Present a
Case Analysis
Sep. 6
Case Facilitation Sign-Up
•
Review of Material So Far: Q&A
about course (incl. requests for
•
changes)
•
Sep. 8
First Board Meetings (Strategy
Simulation)
Quarter 1 decisions due (Fri)
Sep. 13
Starbucks case
•
•
•
5
Read Marketplace handout (on
ANGEL: Assignments > Strategy
Simulation)
Grant chapter 2 (only pp. 50-53)
Case Facilitation Sign-Up due in
class and online
Grant chapter 1
ANGEL: Porter, M. E. (1996). What
is strategy? Harvard Business
Review, 74(6), 61-78.
Case 2: Starbucks (Grant pp. 497516)
Grant chapter 2
Optional readings (on ANGEL)
Sep. 15
Board Meeting
Quarter 2 decisions due (Fri)
Sep. 20
Debrief of First Two Quarters of
Review performance of your company
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
10
Sep. 22
Online Strategy Simulation
in strategy simulation
Industry and Competitive
Analysis
Case TBA
•
•
6
Sep. 27
Internal Company Analysis:
Resources and Capabilities
Case TBA
•
•
7
8
9
Case: Either Wal-Mart (Grant pp.
551-571) or Eastman Kodak (Grant
pp. 591-612)
Grant chapters 5-6
Sep. 29
Board Meeting
Quarter 3 decisions due (Fri)
Oct. 4
Introduction to Business Plans
Marketplace strategy simulation
website: Read electronic textbook
chapter on business plans
Oct. 6
Work on the Business Plan
Start working on your company's
Business Plan
Oct. 11
Q&A about the Business Plan
Prepare your Business Plan presentation
for Thursday: Drafts of your Tactical
Plans and pro-forma statements are due
in Tuesday's class
Oct. 13
Business Plan Presentation
Business Plan presentation and
document due on Thursday
Oct. 18
Organization Structure: Procter
& Gamble case
•
•
10
Case: Either US Airline Industry
(Grant pp. 517-533) or Ford (Grant
pp. 534-550)
Grant chapters 3-4
Case 8: Procter & Gamble's
Organization 2005 Project (Grant
pp. 613-624)
Grant ch. 7
Oct. 20
Negotiate VC Equity Funding in
Board Meeting
Quarter 4 decisions due (Fri)
Oct. 25
Competitive Advantage (1):
Cost Advantage
Case TBA
•
Competitive Advantage (2):
Differentiation
Harley-Davidson case
•
Oct. 27
•
•
Case 9: AirAsia (Grant pp. 625-635)
or Nucor Steel case (ask instructor)
Grant chapters 8-9
Case 10: Harley Davidson (Grant
pp. 636-654)
Grant chapter 10
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
11
11
Nov. 1
Part IV Case: TBA
In-Class Discussion of
Comprehensive Case Analysis
•
•
•
Nov. 3
Board Meeting
•
•
12
Nov. 8
Google case
•
•
Nov. 10 Part V Case: TBA
Current Trends in Strategic
Management
13
•
Assurance of learning test (practice
test)
Quarter 5 decisions due (Fri)
Case 21: Google (Grant pp. 826847)
Grant chapters 12 and 16
Case 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, or 24
in Grant
Grant ch. 18 and TBA
Nov. 15 Final Board Meeting
Nov. 17 In-Class Assurance of Learning
Test
Nov. 21-25
Thanksgiving Holiday – No classes
Nov.
29
14
Case 11: Raisio Group and the
Benecol Launch
15
•
Case: Either Video Games (Grant
pp. 679-691) or DVD War (Grant
pp. 692-697)
Grant chapter 12
Draft of comprehensive case
analysis due: Bring hard copy to
class.
Dec. 1
Prepare Final Report to
Stockholders
Dec. 6
Course Review
Dec. 8
Present Final Report to
Stockholders
Awards
Quarter 6 decisions due (Fri)
Comprehensive Case Analysis due:
Case 11 in Grant (pp. 655-678)
•
•
Submission of ppt file of your Final
Report (Thurs)
Final Peer Ratings in MarketplaceLive due (Monday of final exam
week)
The schedule may be changed at any regularly scheduled class meeting depending on class requirements.
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
12
CLASS ATTENDANCE
This course follows the PSU Senate's policy on class attendance:
http://senate.psu.edu/policies/42-00.html#42-27
Consistent with http://www.psu.edu/oue/aappm/E-11.html , the Senate Policy (#42-27 Class
Attendance) recognizes that on occasion, students may miss a class meeting in order to
participate in a regularly scheduled university-approved curricular or extracurricular activity, or
due to unavoidable or other legitimate circumstances such as illness, injury, family emergency,
or religious observance. If you are ill, you do not have to provide a doctor's verification. In all
cases of illness, make reasonable decisions so that you minimize the risk of (1) your illness
getting worse by not taking a rest and (2) others getting infected.
SPECIAL FLU POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
In compliance with Pennsylvania Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control
recommendations, students should NOT attend class or any public gatherings while ill with
influenza. Students with flu symptoms will be asked to leave campus if possible and to return
home during recovery. The illness and self-isolation period will usually be about a week (or
longer if your symptoms are more severe). It is very important that individuals avoid spreading
the flu to others.
For health-related questions you can email Dr. Margaret Spear, director, University Health
Services, at [email protected]
CLASS CANCELLATION
In the event of snow or other inclement weather, please visit the following web site for
information about any delays or closings of the campus: http://altoona.psu.edu/now/cancel.asp .
NOTE TO STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Penn State welcomes students with disabilities into the University’s educational programs. If you
have a disability-related need for modifications or reasonable accommodations in this course,
contact Disability Services in the Sheetz Family Health and Wellness Center: 949-5540. For
further information regarding Disability Services please visit their web site. Instructors should be
notified as early in the semester as possible regarding the need for modifications or reasonable
accommodations.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Academic Integrity Definition and Expectations: Academic integrity is the pursuit of
scholarly activity in an open, honest, and responsible manner. Academic integrity is a basic
guiding principle for all academic activity at The Pennsylvania State University, and all members
of the University community are expected to act in accordance with this principle. Consistent
with this expectation, the University's Code of Conduct states that all students should act with
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
13
personal integrity, respect other students' dignity, rights, and property, and help create and
maintain an environment in which all can succeed through the fruits of their efforts.
Academic integrity includes a commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification,
misrepresentation or deception. Such acts of dishonesty violate the fundamental ethical
principles of the University community and compromise the worth of work completed by others
(Policies and Rules for Students, Section 49-20).
These ethical norms of academic integrity apply to all individual and team assignments,
including the Strategy simulation. That is, you cannot submit someone else's paper (or any other
assignment) as your own or use any website that explains how to beat or outwit the online
strategy simulation. All work must be your own; work by others must be referenced properly.
Consequences of academic dishonesty: Any infraction will be dealt with as per University
policy. Sanctioning guidelines are available here.
Full information on Penn State Altoona’s policies and viewpoints on academic integrity can be
found at http://www.altoona.psu.edu/academic/integrity.htm
Plagiarism: Plagiarism is not acceptable in any written work presented for assessment. The
work that a student submits for grading must be the student's own work, reflecting his or her
learning. Where work from other sources is used, all sources must be properly acknowledged
and referenced. This requirement also applies to sources on the worldwide web. If evidence
indicates that learning shortcuts or "cheat sheets" posted online about any of the assignments
were used (e.g., the strategy simulation), the outcome will not reflect your own learning. Any
work that does not reflect your own effort or learning is unlikely to get a passing score. In
addition, a student's assessed work may be reviewed against electronic source material using
computerized detection mechanisms, such as turnitin.psu.edu .
It is your responsibility to become familiar with the different definitions and examples of
plagiarism. This web site provides an excellent overview and introduction:
http://www.plagiarism.org/plag_article_what_is_plagiarism.html
Table of Contents: Course Overview p. 1 – Course Goals p. 1 – Learning Outcomes p. 2 – Course Prerequisites p. 2 – Course Materials
pp. 2-3 – Assignments pp. 3-7 – Grading Criteria pp. 7-9 – ANGEL p. 9 – Course Schedule pp. 10-12 – Class Attendance p. 13 – Special
Flu Policies and Procedures p. 13 – Class Cancellation p. 13 – Note to Students with Disabilities p. 13 – Academic Integrity pp. 13-14.
14
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