Page1 02/03/2016 4th WEDNESDAY 4

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A YOUNG COMIC
WHO TAKES ON
THE HARDEST
SUBJECTS
RICK OWENS
ENVISIONS THE
DARK DAYS OF
DESTRUCTION
WEEKEND
PAGE TWO
PAGE 11 | FASHION PARIS
PAUL KRUGMAN
ON REPUBLICAN
CON ARTISTS
A SEA URCHIN
FEAST ON THE
COSTA BRAVA
THE SECRET
ARCHIVES OF
BOB DYLAN
PAGE 8 | REVIEW
PAGE 24 | TRAVEL
PAGE 20 | WEEKEND ARTS
....
SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MARCH 5-6, 2016
Next stop
RICHARD PERRY/THE NEW YORK TIMES
Donald J. Trump at a campaign rally on Friday in Warren, Mich. The state holds its primary on Tuesday, and polls show Mr. Trump with a commanding lead.
ONLINE: THE PIVOTAL MIDWEST CONTESTS AHEAD
WOUNDED RUBIO FOCUSES ON WINNING FLORIDA PRIMARY
Some suggest that Senator Marco Rubio’s best hope
may lie in a convention battle, however unlikely. PAGE 7
Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton are circling each
other in Michigan as the race shifts in earnest. nytimes.com
ONLINE: THE WEEKEND PRIMARIES AND CAUCUSES
Voters in Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine,
Nebraska and Puerto Rico go to the polls. nytimes.com
Two crises converge in Greece
ATHENS
Migrants add to troubles
of economy but may also
give Athens new leverage
BY LIZ ALDERMAN
PANAYOTIS TZAMAROS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Migrants entering a subway station in Athens on their way to a hospitality center to spend
the night. Greece is facing a bottleneck of migrants as other countries close their borders.
When Greece’s debt crisis threatened to
sink the European Union’s single currency last summer, the rest of Europe,
led by Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, ganged up to deliver the Greek
government a stern message: Overcome your domestic political problems
and do what it is necessary to hold the
Continent together.
Eight months after Greece agreed to
do its part, it is the rest of Europe that is
now failing to muster the will to address
a threat to the bloc’s unity, this time the
continued influx of migrants from the
Middle East and beyond. And Greece,
the main entry point for asylum seekers,
is being largely left to fend for itself.
‘‘We are now in the situation where
Greece is essentially becoming a holding
pen for refugees and is being asked to
solve a problem created by other countries,’’ said Jens Bastian, an economics
consultant based in Athens and a former
member of the European Commission’s
task force on Greece. ‘‘You are basically
putting the management of Europe’s migrant crisis at the doorstep of Greece.’’
But if the situation is generating more
despair in an already battered nation, it
also holds the potential for Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to exert new leverage
over the rest of Europe — and with an
Brisk hiring continues in U.S.
China military budget growth slows
Zika found to kill fetal brain cells
The knife had been kept since the late
1990s by a retired officer who claimed it
had been found at the home where Mr.
Simpson lived at the time of the
murders. nytimes.com/us
The People’s Liberation Army’s budget
will increase by 7 percent to 8 percent
this year, a senior official said. Last
year it grew 10 percent. nytimes.com/asia
Knife linked to O.J. Simpson tested
A golden age for newspaper movies
Facebook to pay higher U.K. taxes
The tech giant said it would no longer
book its British sales through its
European headquarters in Ireland,
where the tax levy is lower. BUSINESS, 17
Sex, spies and human rights
TYLER HICKS/THE NEW YORK TIMES
A hospital in Maroua, Cameroon. Boko Haram is now suffering the effects of
a food crisis it created in Nigeria’s northeast and Cameroon’s border areas. WORLD NEWS, 4
COST OF TERROR
Shirin Ebadi writes about how Iranian
agents set a trap for her husband,
threatened him with death and then
forced him to denounce her. REVIEW, 8
Preparing to sail Rio’s dirty waters
14 killed at Yemeni nursing home
Two Olympic sailors, Helena Scutt and
Paris Henken, say they are not daunted
by the Zika virus or pollution. SPORTS, 14
Six nuns were among those who died in
the attack in the southern Yemeni city
of Aden on Friday. WORLD NEWS, 4
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IN THIS ISSUE
No. 41,359
Art 20
Books 24
Business 16
Crossword 15, 25
Review 8
Sports 14
s Euro
s Pound
t Yen
— S. Franc
NEW YORK, FRIDAY 12:30PM
€1=
£1=
$1=
$1=
PREVIOUS
$1.1020
$1.0950
$1.4230
$1.4180
¥113.870 ¥113.670
SF0.9920 SF0.9920
Fu l l c u r re n c y rat e s Pa g e 1 9
RIO DE JANEIRO
ISTANBUL
Da Silva seized at home
as a broadening scandal
adds to sense of crisis
Takeover by government
intensifies drive against
opposition and enemies
BY SIMON ROMERO
BY SAFAK TIMUR AND TIM ARANGO
Police officers in São Paulo on Friday
raided the home of Luiz Inácio Lula da
Silva, the former president of Brazil under investigation in a colossal graft
scheme involving the national oil company, and took him into custody.
In an operation that began at 6 a.m., officers from the Federal Police swarmed
Mr. da Silva’s home in São Paulo. He was
taken to a federal police station at Congonhas Airport for questioning, but he
has not been arrested or charged. He
was released after about three hours of
questioning and went to his party’s
headquarters, according to news reports.
Universally known as Lula, Mr. da
Silva, 70, remains a towering figure in
the governing Workers’ Party. He was
president from 2003 through 2010, and
he continues to exert considerable sway
as one of Brazil’s most powerful people.
More than any other politician, Mr. da
Silva was the face of Brazil at a time
when the country, Latin America’s
largest, emerged as a rising power in
the developing world, boasting huge offshore oil discoveries and thriving trade
with China.
The expanding criminal investigation
comes at a time of growing political and
economic turmoil in Brazil, with Mr. da
Silva and his successor, President Dilma
Rousseff, grappling with a downturn in
global commodity prices and with soaring discontent over reports of corruption
at nearly every level of government.
Ms. Rousseff is already facing impeachment proceedings over her use of
funds from state banks to cover budget
gaps. Beyond that, an array of politicians, including several from her party,
are in jail or on trial related to corruption at the national oil company, Petro-
Backed by a court order, the Turkish authorities moved on Friday to take over
Zaman, Turkey’s most widely circulated
newspaper, in the latest crackdown by
the government of President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan on freedom of the press.
The seizure of the newspaper highlighted the government’s longstanding
campaign against those it perceives to
be its two greatest enemies: opposition
journalists and the followers of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric affiliated
with the newspaper who lives in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania and was
once an ally of Mr. Erdogan but is now a
bitter enemy.
As news of the seizure became public
on Friday afternoon, supporters began
gathering in front of the newspaper’s offices in Istanbul, and employees locked a
door to the building. From a live stream
broadcast by the newspaper’s Web site,
supporters were seen chanting ‘‘free
press cannot be silenced,’’ while others
carried Turkish flags and banners emblazoned with ‘‘Do Not Touch My Newspaper.’’ Columnists from the paper were
also seen addressing the crowd.
‘‘We are going through the darkest
and gloomiest days in terms of freedom
of the press, which is a major benchmark for democracy and the rule of
law,’’ read a statement issued by the editors of Today’s Zaman, an English-language sister publication to Zaman. ‘‘Intellectuals, businesspeople, celebrities,
civil society organizations, media organizations and journalists are being silenced via threats and blackmail.’’
The move to seize Zaman and put it
under the administration of a court-appointed panel of trustees underscored
what critics say is a rapid deterioration
of free speech rights under the Islamist
government of Mr. Erdogan, who was
prime minister for more than a decade
before being elected president in 2014.
The crackdown on expression comes
amid a growing sense that Turkey, once
seen as a bastion of stability in a hostile
region, is being enveloped by instability.
A war with Kurdish separatists has
turned cities in the southeast into rubble.
The country is straining under the
weight of more than two million refugees
from Syria. And Islamic State militants,
who have used Turkey to transit fighters
and weapons to Syria and Iraq, have carried out deadly attacks on Turkish soil.
As Turkey faces its domestic demons,
critics say the government has been
BRAZIL, PAGE 6
E.U. DEAL EMERGES ON MIGRANT CRISIS
The bloc is aiming to push Turkey closer
to an agreement intended to create a
more orderly flow of people. PAGE 4
O N L I NE AT I N Y T.COM
A study’s finding may help explain how
the virus might cause microcephaly in
infants whose mothers are infected
during pregnancy. WORLD NEWS, 7
Turkey seizes
newspaper
in latest press
crackdown
GREECE, PAGE 4
I N S I DE TODAY ’S PAP E R
Employers added 242,000 jobs in
February, indicating that anxiety about
the economy that had been bubbling up
on Wall Street and at campaign rallies
might be exaggerated. BUSINESS, 16
Ex-leader
of Brazil
is swept up
in graft raid
In the 1930s reporters were the heroes,
but not exactly exemplars of the Fourth
Estate. nytimes.com/movies
Tragedy of a coach and a star recruit
Investigations found that a Dallas high
school improperly recruited Keith
Frazier, a basketball star, and that his
grades there were fraudulently altered
after pressure from Southern Methodist
University. nytimes.com/sports
STOCK INDEXES
FRIDAY
s The Dow 12:30pm 17,008.86
s FTSE 100 close
6,199.43
s Nikkei 225 close
17,014.78
OIL
+0.38%
+1.13%
+0.32%
NEW YORK, FRIDAY 12:30PM
s Light sweet crude
$35.82
+$1.24
DOUGLAS MAGNO/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was released by the
police after being held for about three hours.
TURKEY, PAGE 6
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