Office: 713.718.5599 1. Grube// Plato: Five Dialogues. Hackett

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SYLLABUS
SPRING 2012
Philosophy 1301—Introduction to Philosophy (84766 & 79299)
Professor Dan Flores
E-mail: [email protected]
Office: 713.718.5599
MW, 2:00-4:00pm, Spring Branch Campus, Room AD03 – MC 1379 and by appointment
Meeting Place and Times
 Section 84766
Alief Campus, Room C101, Monday and Wednesday – 5:30pm-700pm
 Section 79299
Katy Campus, Room 347, Tuesday and Thursday – 9:30am-11:00am
Required Texts
1. Grube//Plato: Five Dialogues. Hackett Publishing, 2nd Edition, 2002
ISBN 978-0-87220-633-5
2. Early Buddhist Discourses. Edited and Translated by John J. Holder//Hackett Publishing
1st Edition, 2006//ISBN #: 0-87220-792-7
3. Descartes, Rene //Discourse On Method and Meditations On First Philosophy//Hackett
Publishing. 4th Edition, 1999//ISBN 0-87220-420-0
4. Atherton, Katherine, ed.//Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period. Hackett
Publishing, 1994// ISBN 0-87220-259-3
5. Sartre, Jean-Paul // Existentialism and Human Emotions. Citadel Press-Kensington
Publishing, 1987
ISBN 0806509023
6. Weston, Anthony//A Rule Book for Arguments. Hackett Publishing, 5th Edition, 2010
ISBN: 0-87220-552-5
Course Description
A general introduction to critical and reflective thinking as applied to the basic problems of knowledge,
existence and the meaning of human life and institutions (HCCS Catalog). Treatment of these topics
focuses on, though is not restricted to, the history of western ideas, beginning with writings by ancient
Greek thinkers. Course topics explore the nature and abiding presence of philosophy in human discourse,
and its impact on current developments in science, religious understanding, and political thought.
Course Goals
Among its goals, this course stresses the core competencies of written and spoken discourse, critical
thinking, and computer literacy. Specifically, students will:
1. Participate in a dialectic analysis of philosophy, its historic origins, and its various perspectives
and impact on learning, including areas and topics of inquiry and their relation to human
understanding.
2. Develop critical and reflective habits of thought.
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3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Discover the relations between an open mind and sound judgment.
Master the basics of logic and concept formation in written and oral communication.
Develop an appreciation of philosophy‟s relation to community well-being.
Cultivate imagination and creativity in learning.
Grasp the idea of inter-dependence in a multi-cultural global environment.
Student Learning Outcomes
The Philosophy Program Committee at HCC has identified five student learning outcomes (SLOs) for
each course within the Philosophy Program. The intended outcomes for Philosophy 1301 are that students
will:
1. Recall and Identify the major thinkers, schools, core philosophical questions, terms and concepts
found in the history of ideas cross-culturally construed, from ancient times to the contemporary
world.
2. Interpret and Explain core philosophical questions and concepts in terms that illustrate a
comprehensive understanding of each.
3. Apply core philosophical questions and concepts to contemporary issues and personal
experience.
4. Compare and Contrast related core philosophical questions and concepts, and the correlative
thinkers and schools with which they are commonly associated.
5. Justify a sound philosophical position on a topic, or topics of contemporary human interest in the
areas of knowledge, ethics, or human condition that Integrates and Logically Demonstrates a
Synthesis in thought.
Students with Disabilities
Students with documented disabilities will be provided all reasonable accommodations. An
accommodations request from the campus HCCS ADA counselor is required for documentation.
Any student with a documented disability (e.g. physical, learning, psychiatric, vision, hearing, etc.) who
needs to arrange reasonable accommodations must contact the Disability Services Office at the
respective college at the beginning of each semester. Faculty is authorized to provide only the
accommodations requested by the Disability Support Services Office, and to do so in a reasonable
manner.
To visit the ADA Web site, log on to www.hccs.edu, click Future Students, then scroll down the page and
click on the words Disability Information.
For questions, please contact Donna Price at 713.718.5165 or the Disability Counselor at your college.
District ADA Coordinator - Donna Price - 713.718.5165
Northwest ADA Counselor - Mahnaz Kolaini - 713.718.5422
Academic Honesty
The HCCS Student Handbook lists acts of cheating, plagiarism, and collusion as scholastic dishonesty. It
defines plagiarism as “the appropriation of another‟s work and the unacknowledged incorporation of that
work in one‟s own written work offered for credit.” It defines collusion as “the unauthorized
collaboration with another person in preparing work for credit.” Possible punishments are “a grade of „0'
or „F‟ on the particular assignment, failure in the course, and/or recommendation for probation or
dismissal from the College System” See the Student Handbook.
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Attendance and Withdrawal Policies
HCC Students are expected to attend class regularly. A daily record of absences will be maintained
throughout the semester.
NOTE: IT IS THE RESPONSBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO DROP, OR
OFFICIALLY WITHDRAW FROM THIS COURSE IF, FOR ANY REASON, THAT STUDENT IS
NO LONGER ATTENDING. NEW RULES ARE IN EFFECT THAT GREATLY CHANGE HOW
AND WHEN THAT CAN BE DONE. YOU WILL NOT BE WITHDRAWN FROM THIS COURSE
BY YOUR PROFESSOR. FURTHERMORE, THERE ARE POSSIBLE PENALTIES OTHER THAN
LOSING ONE'S PAID TUITION THAT EVERY STUDENT MUST CONSIDER CAREFULLY
BEFORE WITHDRAWING. THESE INCLUDE:
(1) Students who repeat a course for a third, or more times, may face a significant tuition/fee increase
at HCC and other Texas public colleges and universities.
(2) The Texas Legislature passed a law limiting new students (those starting college in Fall 2007) to
no more than six total course withdrawals throughout their academic career in obtaining a
baccalaureate degree. There may be future penalties imposed.
(3) No student may withdraw from a course following the set "last date to withdraw", which for
Spring 2012 is Thursday, March 29, 2012 at 4:30 pm. After that date and time, a student can
only be given a grade earned, or an "I" for incomplete. Incompletes must be made up by the end
of the following long semester, after which they will automatically change to a grade of "F".
Your instructor will not withdraw you for non-attendance and will withdraw a student if and only
if provided a written request from that student.
Grading
 Examinations – 80points (1 x 20ponts; 3 x 30 points*). Exams will asses Learning Outcome 1. I
will hand out a review sheet a week before the exam for you to prepare for. On the day of the
exam, I will randomly choose two to three questions from the list for you to answer. Do not think
of these as short answer question. Rather, think of them as in-class essays. I expect clear writing,
presentation of ideas and I am looking to see that you have understood the material and can
represent it to me using your own language (and necessary jargon).

Major Essay – 30 % (300 points) Due on the scheduled Final Exam Date. Paper instructions will
be posted and/or handed out. Learning Outcomes 2, 3, and 5.
All grades will be figured according to a percentage of total points.
term is 100. The term grade legend and analysis are as follows:
The total number of points for this
Exam 1 ………………………….…20pts
Exam 2 …………………….………30pts
Exam 3 …………………………….30pts
Paper ………………………………20pts
Total Points ………………..……....100 possible points*
A = 100-90pts, B = 89-80pts, C = 79-70pts, D = 69-60pts, F = 59-0pts
* Note: I will drop the lowest Exam score and record only three.
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INSTRUCTOR POLICIES
THE FOLLOWING IS A TENTATIVE DESCRIPTION OF PROCEDURES AND SCHEDULE OF
READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS. ALL DATES, ASSIGNMENTS, AND PROCEDURES ARE
SUBJECT TO CHANGE DEPENDING ON CLASS NEED AND INSTRUCTOR DISCRESSION.
STUDENTS WILL BE DULY INFORMED OF ANY SUCH CHANGES.
GRADING:
There will be four in-class, written exams and a paper. I will hand out a list of study questions ahead of time.
On the day of the exam, I will choose randomly which questions for you to answer. Make-up assignments
are possible. See the ATTENDANCE AND ABSENCES section below for details. There is no extra credit.
Exam 1 ………………………….…20pts
Exam 2 …………………….………30pts
Exam 3 …………………………….30pts
Paper ………………………………20pts
Total Points ………………..……....100 possible points*
A = 100-90pts, B = 89-80pts, C = 79-70pts, D = 69-60pts, F = 59-0pts
* Note: I will drop the lowest Exam score and record only three.
ATTENDANCE AND ABSENCES:
You are expected to attend class on a regular basis and I will take attendance periodically. I will allow three
absences for whatever reason. After this, for every unexcused absence, I will deduct 1 point from your total
grade. I do not drop students for personal or academic reasons; for instance, if you are failing. If you wish to
drop due to personal or academic reasons, then this is your responsibility. I will drop you from a class if you
are disruptive, however. See below. You must keep up with your grades.
It is a popular idea that philosophy and ‘doing philosophy’ is simply a matter of one’s opinion
about or how one feels about some subject. This cannot be further from the truth. The material covered in
this course is generally difficult and requires your intellectual attention during and outside of class. You are
expected to come to class every day having read the assignment ahead of time. Lectures are intended to help
students understand the reading assignments and to begin clarifying and working out ideas and arguments.
Not spending time studying and attending class will only diminish the quality of your work. It is easy
to be lazy, watch TV, shop, do laundry, nap, not pay attention in class by sleeping, texting, talking, and so
on, or getting caught up in any number of activities rather than doing one’s schoolwork. I urge you to take
responsibility for yourselves and your work. This is college and you will be treated as a college student.
Make-up exams are allowed provided they meet the following criteria: 1) you have informed me
either ahead of time that you will miss an exam or immediately (within 24 hours) after that you have missed
and exam and, 2) the reason for your absence is excused, and 3) you take the exam a) the day that you return
to class for full credit, b) the second day after your return minus five points, or c) the third day after your
return minus ten points. In any case (depending on class meeting times), I will not allow a make-up exam
after one week of the date of the student’s return to class. Keep in mind that each successive day that you
miss also needs to be justified since those are the days that you would take the exam.
Excused absences include: a) any absence that I have approved, b) observance of religious holy
days, c) required court appearances, d) naturalization and oath ceremonies, e) emergency and other health
problems of student or student’s family that require treatment, hospitalization, or other types of care not
allowing a student to be in class, f) official school business such as team meeting, performances (where
student is a performer!), and other events where the student’s presence and participation is required for the
success of the event or by terms of agreement. ALL EXCUSED ABSENCES WILL REQUIRE
APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTATION such as a letter from a court magistrate requiring your court
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appearance on the day and time of exam; a letter from a doctor or other professional health care provider
explaining your absence on the day and time of the exam; a letter from a coach or director of an official
HCC or high school event explaining your absence on the day and time of the exam; and so on.
Unexcused absences include, but are not limited to, oversleeping/alarm failure, needing sleep or rest,
missing the bus/ride, car trouble, needed at home/babysitting, employment/job interview, shopping/errands,
personal grooming appointments (hair, nails, tanning, etc), driver's education (classroom or behind the
wheel), vacations, personal time, etc.
BEHAVIOR:
DO NOT CHEAT! The first time I catch you, you will simply fail the assignment, lose points, and receive a
warning. If you continue to cheat (in any form), I will become very involved in pursuing the proper
disciplinary action to the extent that HCC guidelines allow. See the following website for HCC’s stance on
academic misconduct. (opens as a .pdf file)
http://www.hccs.edu/hcc/images/home%20page%20images/0-2011-2012%20Student%20handbook.pdf
See the following for additional information on plagiarism:
http://www.plagiarism.org/learning_center/what_is_plagiarism.html
Please be respectful of me and others while class is in session. Please silence all phones, beepers, and other
noisy status symbols. Laptops/notebooks are welcome for note taking, but surfing the internet, watching
movies/videos, or any other disruptive behavior (this includes sleeping!!) during lecture is not. If you wish
to use a laptop or other device during class for note taking, recording, or other activity that is directly
relevant to the course work, then you must see me for approval. IF I HAVE TO ASK YOU MORE THAN
TWICE NOT TO TEXT, SURF, CHECK MESSAGES, OR ANYTHING ELSE, YOU WILL BE ASKED
TO LEAVE AND I WILL CONSIDER DROPPING YOU. HINT: if it distracts me or other students, it is
disruptive behavior. See HCC’s policy on prohibited behavior:
http://www.hccs.edu/hcc/images/home%20page%20images/0-2011-2012%20Student%20handbook.pdf
SCHEDULE OF READINGS:
WEEK ONE (Jan 16-Jan20)
1. Introductions, Syllabus, Rules & Behavior
WEEK TWO (Jan 23-Jan27)
1. Weston, sections I – VI.
WEEK THREE (Jan 30-Feb 3)
1. Weston, sections VII – Appendix I.
WEEK FOUR (Feb 6-Feb 10)
1. Review
2. Exam One
WEEK FIVE (Feb 13-Feb17)
1. Grube, Euthyphro
2. Grube, Apology
WEEK SIX (Feb 20-Feb 24)
1. Grube, Crito
2. Grube, Phaedo
WEEK SEVEN (Feb 27-Mar 2)
1. Review
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2. Exam Two
WEEK EIGHT (Mar 5-Mar 9)
1. Descartes, Meditations On First Philosophy, Meditation I
2. Descartes, Meditations On First Philosophy, Meditation II
WEEK NINE (Mar 12-Mar 16: No Classes: Spring Break Holiday)
WEEK TEN (Mar 19-Mar 23)
1. Short review or Descartes Meditations I & II
2. Atherton, Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, pp. 9-21.
WEEK ELEVEN (Mar 26-Mar 30)
1. Atherton, Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, pp. 21-45.
WEEK TWELVE (Apr 2-Apr 6)
1. Atherton, Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period, pp. 46-76.
WEEK THIRTEEN (Apr 9-Apr 13)
1. Review
2. Exam Three
WEEK FOURTEEN (Apr 16-Apr 20)
1. Sartre, Existentialism
WEEK FIFTEEN (Apr 23-Apr 27)
1. Sartre, Existentialism
WEEK SIXTEEN (Apr 30-May 4)
1. Existentialism
2. Review
FINALS WEEK (May 7-13)
1. Exam Four
2. Papers Due
See the calendar for important dates.
http://www.hccs.edu/hcc/System%20Home/Departments/Admissions_and_Registration/Calendars/20112012%20Calendars/Spring%202012-%20Regular%2016%20Week%20Semester.pdf (CALENDAR)
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