ASMCUE 2012 Final Program

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Nin
neteenth Annuaal Amerrican Soociety foor Microobiologyy
CON
NFEREN
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OR UND
DERGRA
ADUATTE EDU
UCATOR
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BLENDIN
NG SCIENCE AND EDUC
CATION
JUNE 14-17, 2
2012
SAN MATEO
A
MARRIOTT
A
T, SAN MATEO, CALIFO
ORNIA
FIINAL PROG
GRAM
IN CO
ONJUNCT
TION WITH
JUNE 16-19
9, 2012
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
Table of Contents
Program at a Glance ........................................................................... 2-3
Welcome .................................................................................................4
Conference Planning Committee ............................................................5
Conference Steering Committee .............................................................6
Local Organizing Committee ...................................................................7
General Information .................................................................................8
ASMCUE & asm2012 Transportation......................................................9
ASM Scavenger Hunt ..............................................................................9
Network and Contribute................................................................... 10-11
Travel Awardees .................................................................................. 12
Sponsors and Exhibitors ................................................................. 13-19
ASMCUE Program .......................................................................... 20-63
Thursday, June 14 ................................................................. 20
Friday, June 15 ...................................................................... 23
Saturday, June 16 ................................................................. 34
Sunday, June 17 ................................................................... 55
Invited Presenter Biographies ........................................................ 64-70
Staying Involved with ASM after ASMCUE ..................................... 71-72
Poster Abstract Author Content and Pedagogy Grid ........................... 73
Microbrew Abstract Author Content Grid ............................................. 74
Presenting Author Index ........................................................................75
Conference Note-taking Pages ....................................................... 76-78
Program at a Glance
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
Registration - pg. 20
2:00 – 8:00 pm
Welcome - pg. 20
4:00 – 4:15 pm
Registration - pg. 23
7:30 am – 7:30 pm
Networking Breakfast by Topical Areas - pg. 23
7:00 – 8:00 am
Opening Plenary Lecture - pg. 20
4:15 – 5:15 pm
Plenary Lecture - pg. 23
8:00 – 8:30 am
M. Snyder – Adventures in Personal Genomics and Whole Omics Profiling
ASM Glossary, Tools and What's New - pg. 20
5:15 – 5:45 pm
Dinner (Meet & Greet ASM Leadership and Travel Award Recognition) - pg. 20
5:45 – 7:30 pm
E. Emmert and C. Bressler – ASM Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines
Concurrent Pedagogy Sessions (I of III) - pg. 23-25
8:45 – 9:45 am
Concurrent Resource Sessions (I of II) - pg. 21-22
7:30 – 8:30 pm
 From the Few to the Many: Scaling up the Undergraduate Research Experience with
the HHMI SEA-PHAGES Course
 The NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Funding Opportunities
 MicrobeLibrary’s Newest Collection: The Multiple Choice Critical Thinking Question
Bank
 Tailoring Teaching for Demographically Diverse Learners
 Effective Online Microbiology Education: A Two-Session Progression
 Road Map to Academic Success
 What is New in Teaching Technology? PowerPoint Annotation Using Notebook
Computers or Tablets to Create Interactive Lectures Which are Captured Using
Lecture Capture Software
Welcome Reception - pg. 22
Sponsored by Pearson
8:30 – 9:30 pm
 MedMyst: Using Serious Games to Teach Microbiology
 Creating Videos and Public Service Announcements as a Means of Promoting
Student Engagement, Developing Critical Thinking Skills, and Creating Citizen
Scientists
 Transforming “Lecture” Halls into Student-Centered Classrooms
 Programs and Best Practices to Increase Retention and Graduation Rates of Students
from Underrepresented Groups in STEM
 Using the Scientific Literature to Teach Science Literacy
Concurrent Resource Sessions (II of II) - pg. 25-26
10:00 – 11:00 am
 From the Few to the Many: Scaling up the Undergraduate Research Experience with
the HHMI SEA-PHAGES Course
 The NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Funding Opportunities
 MicrobeLibrary’s Newest Collection: The Multiple Choice Critical Thinking Question
Bank
 Tailoring Teaching for Demographically Diverse Learners
 Effective Online Microbiology Education: A Two-Session Progression
 Road Map to Academic Success
 What is New in Teaching Technology? PowerPoint Annotation Using Notebook
Computers or Tablets to Create Interactive Lectures Which are Captured Using
Lecture Capture Software
Concurrent Scientific Sessions (I of II) - pg. 26-29
11:15 am – 12:15 pm
 Subversion of the Host Epithelial Barrier by Pseudomonas aeruginosa
 Emerging Pathogens: How Do We Detect and Track Them?
 Discoveries in Phylogenetically-Driven Genomic Sequencing Projects and its Potential
for Your Students
 American Academy of Microbiology Presents: E. coli: The Good, the Bad, and the
Ugly
 The Hosthogen Genome in 4D
 Resolving Community and Metabolic Dynamics in Colorado Plateau Biological Soil
Crusts
 Innate Immune Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria
 The Science of the Microbiome: A Renaissance for Microbiology
Pick up Boxed Lunch and Proceed to Breakout Sessions - pg. 29
12:15 – 12:45 pm
Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines Breakout Sessions - pg. 29
12:45 – 1:45 pm
Concurrent Scientific Sessions (II of II) - pg. 29-31
2:00 – 3:00 pm
 Subversion of the Host Epithelial Barrier by Pseudomonas aeruginosa
 Emerging Pathogens: How Do We Detect and Track Them?
 Discoveries in Phylogenetically-Driven Genomic Sequencing Projects and its Potential
for Your Students
 American Academy of Microbiology Presents: E. coli: Microbes and Oil Spills
 The Hosthogen Genome in 4D
 Resolving Community and Metabolic Dynamics in Colorado Plateau Biological Soil
Crusts
 Innate Immune Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria
 The Science of the Microbiome: A Renaissance for Microbiology
Exhibitor and Poster Setup - pg. 31
3:00 – 6:00 pm
Concurrent Pedagogy Sessions (II of III) - pg. 31-33
3:15 – 4:15 pm
 Understanding by Design: Using Intelligent Course Design to Build Learning
Environments
 Lab Design Based on Scientific Methods
 Transforming “Lecture” Halls into Student-Centered Classrooms
 Forming Effective Student Groups for Active Learning Pedagogies
 Programs and Best Practices to Increase Retention and Graduation Rates of Students
from Underrepresented Groups in STEM
Plenary Lecture - pg. 33
5:00 – 6:00 pm
S. Benson - Teaching Effectively – Better Learning with Less Time Preparing
Exhibit Hall Opening & Reception - pg. 33
6:00 – 8:00 pm
Streets of San Francisco
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Registration – pg. 34
7:00 am – 3:30 pm
Networking Breakfast by Location - pg. 34
7:00 – 8:00 am
Plenary Lecture - pg. 34
8:00 – 9:00 am
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
Networking Breakfast – Free for All! - pg. 55
7:00 – 8:00 am
Closing Plenary - pg. 55
8:00 – 9:00 am
K. Tanner - Beyond Assessing Knowledge – Card Sorting, Superheroes, and Moving
Towards Measuring Biological Expertise Among Undergraduates
M. Ott - Host-Virus Interactions: A New Focus on Fat
Exhibitor Showcase - pg. 34
9:00 am – 3:30 pm
ASM Faculty Programs Poster Session - pg. 34-36
9:00 am – 3:30 pm
Poster Session A - pg. 36-38
9:15 – 10:15 am
Author Corner - pg. 38
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
9:15 – 9:45 am
Product Corner - pg. 38-39
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
9:15 – 9:45 am
Product Corner - pg. 39
Pearson
9:15 – 9:45 am
Author Corner - pg. 39
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
9:45 – 10:15 am
Product Corner - pg. 39
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
9:45 – 10:15 am
Microbrew Session (I of III) - pg. 39-44
10:30 – 11:30 am
Conference Wrap-up - pg. 55
9:00 – 9:30 am
Concurrent Pedagogy Sessions (III of III) - pg. 55-57
9:45 – 10:45 am
 MedMyst: Using Serious Games to Teach Microbiology
 Lab Design Based on Scientific Methods
 Creating Videos and Public Service Announcements as a Means of Promoting
Student Engagement, Developing Critical Thinking Skills, and Creating Citizen
Scientists
 Forming Effective Student Groups for Active Learning Pedagogies
 Using the Scientific Literature to Teach Science Literacy
 Rock Stars, Deficit Models, and Stereotype Threats: Learning to See Inequity in
Science and Strategies for Addressing It
Microbrew Sessions (III of III) - pg. 57-63
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
SESSION E: 11:00 am - pg. 57-60
SESSION F: 11:30 am - pg. 60-63
End of Conference - pg. 63
12:00 pm
SESSION A: 10:30 am - pg.40-42
SESSION B: 11:00 am - pg. 42-44
Pick up Box Lunch and Proceed to Breakout Sessions - pg. 45
Sponsored by Pearson
11:30 am – 12:15 pm
MicrobeLibrary Protocol Review Breakout Sessions - pg. 45
12:15 – 1:15 pm
Carbohydrate Fermentation Protocol
Gelatin Hydrolysis Test Protocol
Starch Agar Protocol
Poster Session B - pg. 45-47
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Author Corner - pg. 47
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
1:30 – 2:00 pm
Product Corner - pg. 47
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
1:30 – 2:00 pm
Product Corner - pg. 48
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
1:30 – 2:00 pm
Refreshment Break - pg. 48
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
2:00 – 3:00 pm
Author Corner - pg. 48
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
2:00 – 2:30 pm
Product Corner - pg. 49
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
2:00 – 2:30 pm
Microbrew Sessions (II of III) - pg. 49-54
2:30 – 3:30 pm
SESSION C: 2:30 pm - 49-52
SESSION D: 3:00 pm - 52-54
Evening Free - pg. 54
3:30 pm
Buses loaded to asm2012 Field Trip - pg. 54
3:45 – 4:00 pm
asm2012 Keynote Session & Reception - pg. 54
5:00 – 8:30 pm
Buses loaded to San Mateo Marriott - pg. 54
8:45 – 9:15 pm
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Welcome
Welcome to beautiful San Mateo, California!
It is our pleasure to have you join us for the 2012 American Society for Microbiology Conference for
Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE). Our conference theme, “Blending Science and Education”
belies the desire of many of our attendees: to grow not only as biologists, but also as educators in order
to bring about much needed change in STEM education.
Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action published by AAAS in 2011 has
recognized the contributions of ASMCUE in making a positive impact on the advancement of
undergraduate education. The report states that ASMCUE serves “as a venue that advances the
scholarship of teaching and learning in biology.” This recognition is only possible because of wonderful
community of people like you who strive for excellence, share your best practices and are willing to work
together to reach a common goal. Keep up the great work!
We have a great line up of plenary speakers including:
✦ Spencer Benson, Teaching Effectively – Better Learning with Less Time Preparing
✦ Melanie Ott, Host-Virus Interactions: A New Focus on Fat
✦ Michael Snyder, Adventures in Personal Genomics and Whole Omics Profiling
✦ Kimberly Tanner, Beyond Assessing Knowledge – Card Sorting, Superheroes, and Moving
Towards Measuring Biological Expertise Among Undergraduates
We have worked hard to put together an outstanding conference program. We would like to sincerely
express our appreciation to local organizers, Drs. Brinda Govindan and Kimberly Tanner who were
invaluable in providing expertise to help us find talented local speakers for many of our sessions. As
always, the staff of ASM have been exceptional and gone above and beyond to help us make the
conference a success. Do take a moment to thank them!
Some program highlights for this year are:
✦ ASM Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines Lunch Discussion
✦ American Academy of Microbiology Report Series
✦ MicrobeLibrary’s Multiple Choice Critical Thinking Question Bank Resource Session
This year, ASMCUE is meeting in conjunction with the ASM General Meeting. Participants were given
the opportunity to register and attend the asm2012 opening keynote session and reception on Saturday.
In addition, attendees could also take advantage of a complimentary one-day registration pass to the
asm2012 sessions on Sunday.
This year’s conference promises to have something for everyone. We hope that you take advantage of all
the opportunities to network with fellow like minded colleagues, forge new friendships, and rekindle old
ones. Do volunteer! As you contribute, you can’t help but develop professionally while making a
difference in our community, conference and society.
We look forward to celebrating our 20th anniversary next year with you May 16-19 in Denver, Colorado!
Sincerely,
Chair,
Jacqueline Washington
Nyack College, Nyack,
New York
Vice Chair,
Todd Primm
Sam Houston State University,
Huntsville, Texas
Abstract Review Chair,
Min-Ken Liao
Furman University, Greenville,
South Carolina
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Conference Planning Committee
Blending Science and Education
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators
San Mateo Marriott
June 14-17, 2012
ASMCUE STEERING COMMITTEE
Jacqueline Washington, Chair
Nyack College, Nyack, NY
Todd Primm, Vice Chair
Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX
Min-Ken Liao, Abstract Review Chair
Furman University, Greenville, SC
Kimberly Tanner, Local Organizing Chair
San Francisco State University,
San Francisco, CA
Brinda Govindan, Local Organizing Chair
San Francisco State University,
San Francisco, CA
ABSTRACT REVIEWERS
Min-Ken Liao
Furman University, Greenville, SC
Samantha Elliott
Saint Mary's College of Maryland,
Saint Mary’s City, MD
Jean Huang
Olin College, Needham, MA
Billy Hung
Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
Phil Mixter
Washington State University, Pullman, WA
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR
MICROBIOLOGY EDUCATION BOARD
REPRESENTATIVES
Neil Baker
Chair, Education Board
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Marjorie Kelly Cowan
Chair, Committee on Undergraduate Education
Miami University, Middletown, OH
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR
MICROBIOLOGY EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES
Amy Chang
Director, Education Department
Kelly Gull
Manager, Faculty Programs
Kari Sherwood
Coordinator, Education Programs and
Resources
Michelle Slone
Coordinator, Faculty Programs
American Society for Microbiology
Education Department
1752 N Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
ph: 202-942-9317
fx: 202-942-9329
Email: [email protected]
Stephen Nold
University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI
Amy Siegesmund
Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Conference Steering Committee
Jacqueline Washington, Chair, is an associate professor and chair of the
Department of Biology and Chemistry at Nyack College, Nyack, NY. She received her
Bachelor’s Degree in mathematics from Adelphi University, Garden City, NY and her
Doctorate in microbiology from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey,
Newark, NJ where she studied the effect of context on origins of DNA replication in the
budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jackie is a 09-10 ASM Biology Scholar and
serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.
Currently, her primary area of research is focused on active learning in the classroom.
She is also involved in a community initiative to introduce girls to careers in science,
technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. She is married with four children.
Todd Primm, Vice Chair, is associate professor and chair in the Department of
Biological Sciences at Sam Houston State University, a comprehensive university in
Texas with 17,000 students. He was the 2010 Distinguished Alumnus of the Graduate
School of Biomedical Sciences of Baylor College of Medicine, where he earned a
Ph.D. in biochemistry studying protein folding. He came to microbiology during his
post-doc at NIH in the Tuberculosis Research Laboratory. His scientific research
focuses on early drug discovery, bacterial pathogenesis, and microbial biomes in
animals. His educational research is currently examining lecture effectiveness, inquirybased learning in exploratory labs, and effectiveness of online learning in science
courses. He is currently the President of the Texas ASM Branch. He is looking forward to participating in
the Biology Scholars Research Residency Program this year.
Min-Ken Liao, Abstract Review Chair, is a professor of biology at Furman
University. She received a Bachelor’s Degree in plant pathology from National Taiwan
University and a Master’s Degree and a Doctorate in microbiology from University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Liao used to use genetic approaches to study the
function and structure of proline permease in Salmonella but is currently using
molecular approaches to study the impacts of urbanization on freshwater bacteria.
She enjoys conducting research with student researchers immensely and has
presented more than 40 posters and papers with student authors in conferences. In
addition to keeping her research program productive and her classroom exciting, Liao is also interested in
the scholarship of teaching and learning. In 2008, she participated in the Biology Scholars Program,
during which she studied whether brief reflections enhance learning. Liao has been attending ASMCUE
for more than ten years and has served on numerous committees. She has not yet found a way to say no
to ASM.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Local Organizing Committee
Kimberly Tanner, Local Organizing Chair, Ph.D., is an associate professor of
biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Hired in January 2004 as a Biology
Education Researcher, Dr. Tanner trained as a sensory neurobiologist prior to
pursuing a career in science education through an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in
science education (PFSMETE) and senior staff positions at the UCSF Science and
Health Education Partnership (SEP). Since joining the SFSU faculty, Dr. Tanner has
established SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory,
her laboratory, which offers formal courses, partnership programs, and research
opportunities to undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, and local K-12
teachers interested in improving science education. Her research group addresses three main lines of
inquiry: 1) understanding the novice-to-expert transition among undergraduate biology majors, 2)
developing novel assessment approaches to revealing student conceptions in science, and 3) evaluating
the effectiveness of approaches to promoting equity in science. In addition, she collaborates with
research colleagues on conceptualizing and investigating Science Faculty with Education Specialties
(SFES) in the U.S. She is Principal Investigator on NSF-funded GK-12, TUES, and CAREER awards, as
well on an NIH Science Education Partnership award. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the Editorial
Board for CBE: A Journal of Life Sciences Education and has served on committees and panels for the
National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, and the American Society for Cell Biology, as
well as NSF and NIH. She was recently named the 2011-12 Outstanding Undergraduate Science
Teacher Award by the Society for College Science Teachers and recently elected a Fellow of the
California Academy of Sciences.
Brinda Govindan, Local Organizing Chair, is a lecturer in the Department of
Biology at San Francisco State University. Dr. Govindan earned her Ph.D. in Cell
Biology at Yale University. She pursued postdoctoral studies as a Damon-Runyon
Walter Winchell fellow at the University of California San Francisco where she was
also an active volunteer with the Science Education Partnership (SEP) program. For
the past ten years she has taught microbiology to both allied health students and
microbiology majors, as well as courses in cell biology and genetics. In addition, she
develops curriculum and coordinates several microbiology laboratory courses for
undergraduates. She is a Biology Scholars program alum from the 2009 Research
Residency cohort and continues to pursue research in science education.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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General Information
Conference Statistics
There are 337 participants, compared to 361 in 2011. Of those registered, there are:
•
•
•
•
297 conference attendees and 40 exhibitors
252 ASM Members and 45 nonmembers (among the faculty participants)
41% first-time attendees
16 international attendees representing 9 countries
Abstracts
Abstracts for the poster sessions are featured in Volume 13, Issue 1 of the Journal of Microbiology &
Biology Education: http://jmbe.asm.org/index.php/jmbe/article/view/412.
Badges
Badges, available at registration, are required to enter all sessions and the Exhibit Hall.
Internet Connection
Complimentary wireless service is provided in designated areas of the hotel.
Microbrew Sessions
These grassroots sessions, arranged by topics, provide a forum for sharing best practices and
interesting activities used in laboratory and classroom teaching. Presentations are simple "chalk
talks" (e.g., no PowerPoint) to facilitate informal discussion. Unlike the poster sessions, Microbrews
do not require assessments. Each presentation is 20 minutes and includes a 15-minute presentation
and 5 minutes for discussion.
Microbrew Session I: Saturday, June 16, 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
SESSION A: 10:30 AM
SESSION B: 11:00 AM
Microbrew Session II: Saturday, June 16, 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
SESSION C: 2:30 PM
SESSION D: 3:00 PM
Microbrew Session III: Sunday, June 17, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
SESSION E: 11:00 AM
SESSION F: 11:30 AM
Poster Sessions
Poster sessions will be held Saturday, June 16, from 9:15 AM to 3:00 PM in Inspire 1, 2, 3. Two sessions
are planned:
Session A: Author Presentations: Saturday, June 16, 9:15 AM – 10:15 AM
Session B: Author Presentations: Saturday, June 16, 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Presenters must set up and take down/remove their posters according to the following schedule:
Set up: Friday, June 15, 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Take down: Saturday, June 16, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Any posters left after Saturday’s take down period will be discarded. The poster must fit into a 4’ (height)
x 8’ (width) area.
Registration
Registration times and locations are listed below. Program books and badges are available at
registration.
Thursday, June 14
2:00 PM – 8:00 PM – Inspire Lobby
Friday, June 15
7:30 AM – 7:30 PM – Inspire Lobby
Saturday, June 16
7:00 AM – 3:30 PM – Inspire Lobby
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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ASMCUE & ASM2012 TRANSPORTATION
ASMCUE & asm2012 Locations
All ASMCUE sessions are held
approximately 10 miles south of the
San Francisco Airport and 20 miles
south of downtown San Francisco.
A - San Mateo Marriott
1770 South Amphlett Blvd
San Mateo, CA 94402
B - San Francisco International
Airport (SFO)
C - Moscone Convention Center
(site of asm2012)
Transportation for asm2012 Field Trip – Saturday, June 16
Attendees who registered in advance for the complimentary field trip Saturday evening to the asm2012
Opening Session and Reception will be provided with complimentary bus transportation to and from the
San Mateo Marriott and the Moscone Convention Center.
Buses to the Moscone Convention Center will load at 3:45 PM on Saturday and return to the San Mateo
Marriott around 9:30 PM. Bus tickets will be provided in attendee registration packets.
Transportation to asm2012 – Sunday, June 17
Attendees who registered in advance for the complimentary one-day registration pass to attend asm2012
sessions will have a specially marked badge. Participants need to arrange transportation to the Moscone
Convention Center on Sunday. Information regarding transportation options may be found at the hotel
front desk.
ASM Scavenger Hunt & Raffle
The ASMCUE organizers invite you to participate in a scavenger hunt! In this game the clues
you will gather will be other attendees. Check your attendee packet for a yellow handout
which will serve as your raffle entry. Read the instructions on the packet and below carefully
and you could win fabulous prizes donated by our generous sponsors!
Instructions: Find an ASMCUE participant who fits one of the criteria on the handout.
Place their name next to the appropriate item. Each participant’s name may only appear
ONCE on this sheet (yours included!). To be considered for the raffle, you must have at
least 20 names.
Form submission and raffle drawing: Forms must be placed in the raffle box Saturday by 12:15pm at
the ASM exhibit table. The raffle drawing will take place in the Exhibit Hall during Poster Session B. Be
certain to put your name and institution on the form so we can award your prize. Must be present to win!
The American Society for Microbiology thanks the following sponsors and exhibitors for their generosity in
donating raffle prizes.
Scavenger Raffle Prize Sponsors
ASM Press
bluedoor Publishing
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Jones and Bartlett
Learning
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Morton Publishing Company
Pearson
ScienceThrillers.com
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Network and Contribute
Networking Breakfasts
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
One of the top reasons attendees give for attending ASMCUE is the opportunity to network with fellow
educators. Meals at the Conference are intentionally served “family style” to allow a time and place for
this important networking to occur. This year, three breakfast meals have been organized to maximize
attendee interaction.
Friday, June 15 - Breakfast by Topical Areas
ASM facilitates the e-mail based discussion group, MICROEDU. Here, microbiology educators can learn
from each other by exchanging ideas and communicating issues and challenges. Many informative and
thoughtful conversations take place within this listserv community and we encourage attendees to revisit
the issues face-to-face. Several topics have been identified by the Steering Committee and they would
like to gauge your interest in these areas and ask for suggested topics. Topics already include: Bad Bugs
book club, bioinformatics in the classroom, online hybrid courses and more. A complete list of topics will
be available on-site.
Saturday, June 16 - Breakfast by Location
ASM supports thirty-five Branches organized by geographical territories that are defined by one or more
states and/or zip code areas. ASM Branches are individually chartered, elect their own officers, set their
own dues, and determine their own membership criteria. Participation in an ASM Branch enables
members to enhance their careers and professional lives in many ways. Branches provide interesting and
inclusive programming based upon the input of attendees, and often employ intimate meeting venues that
facilitate enhanced networking opportunities. On site, attendees will receive information about their local
branch and meet others in the same vicinity. International attendees will have an opportunity to meet as
well.
Sunday, June 17 – Free for All!
You are on your own! Take the opportunity to sit at a table where you recognize no one. Experienced
faculty: introduce yourself to a first-timer. First-timers: hobnob with a speaker or ASM leader. Go outside
your comfort zone! You never know, you may meet a collaborator or a friend for life. Many close
friendships have been formed and nurtured at an ASMCUE meeting.
Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines Plenary and Breakout Sessions
Plenary - Friday, June 15, 8:00 AM – 8:30 PM
Breakout Sessions - Friday, June 15, 12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
The ASM Task Committee on Laboratory Biosafety has put forth guidelines for safely handling
microorganisms in teaching laboratories. You have the opportunity to review the guidelines during
ASMCUE and provide feedback to the Committee. Two sets of guidelines – one for handling microbes at
biosafety level one and the other for handling microbes at biosafety level two are available. The
guidelines are brief by design for ease of use, but are accompanied by an extensive appendix that
provides information for implementation and sample documents. In preparation for the meeting, please
read the guidelines and appendix posted online at:
http://www.asmcue.org/documents/ASMBiosafetyGuidelines-v2.pdf, considering the following:
What suggestions do you have for improving the guidelines?
What barriers do you foresee for implementing the guidelines?
Many educators recognize the need for clear biosafety guidelines and appreciate the role ASM is playing
in developing these guidelines. With your help, we can provide educators the best suggestions for
keeping our students and ourselves safe in the lab!
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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MicrobeLibrary Protocol Review Breakout Sessions
Saturday, June 16, 12:15 PM – 1:15 PM
The MicrobeLibrary Laboratory Protocol Collection is a unique database offering peer-reviewed
information on standard microbiology protocols. Each project in the collection provides detailed historical,
theoretical, and procedural information for a standard protocol. Each protocol is coupled with a database
of images found in the Gallery Collection of the Library. The collections have been developed by
members of the ASM education community to facilitate classroom and laboratory instruction.
MicrobeLibrary currently boasts 38 protocols related to 946 images. Image submissions are collected
continuously and are reviewed by the Gallery Collection Editorial Board Committee for publication.
The MicrobeLibrary Protocol Editorial Committee seeks help in discovering how YOU incorporate the
three new protocols below into your teaching and what “tricks of the trade” or “tips and tools” you can
offer that will enhance usage of the protocol and provide advice to those who may be using the protocol
for the first time. These Protocols have already undergone a rigorous peer-reviewed process and are
ready for publication except for the Tips and Comments section. Attendees are asked to attend a session
on a protocol they are familiar with. Applications and tips for use of the protocols will be identified at the
beginning of the session. Attendees will then divide into groups to further develop these applications and
tips.
The final products created in each session will be reviewed and published under the Tips and Comments
section of the protocol. All participants in the session will be recognized as contributors in the final
publication. We encourage all of you to participate in the production of these resources by lending your
expertise and guidance to the many educators visiting MicrobeLibrary, particularly from overseas. Please
remember too that you can always rate and comment on already published resources in the library. We
will work hard this year to develop a community around these resources and providing your know-how in
the comments section will only enhance the experience for library users!
2012 MicrobeLibrary Protocols for Review:
Carbohydrate Fermentation Protocol
Gelatin Hydrolysis Test Protocol
Starch Agar Protocol
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Travel Awardees
Congratulations to all of the ASMCUE 2012 Travel Awardees!
Formal recognition of the recipients will take place during the Thursday dinner.
Announcing the 2012 ASMCUE Textbook Travel Award Winner!
Courtney Robinson, Howard University, Washington, DC is the 2012 ASMCUE
Textbook Travel Awardee. The award is targeted toward new microbiology faculty
members and provides an opportunity for educators to become familiar with
undergraduate education research and to learn new instructional pedagogies.
Because Robinson’s Early-Career Faculty Travel Award application was considered
particularly exceptional, the reviewers agreed that she should receive this year’s
Textbook Travel Award.
Funding for the Textbook Travel Award derives from a special endowment created in 2008 by several
textbook authors committed to faculty development and ASMCUE. The authors sponsoring this
endowment include Robert Bauman at Amarillo College, Texas; Barry Chess at Pasadena City College,
California; Marjorie Cowan at Miami University, Ohio; Jeffrey Pommerville at Glendale Community
College, Arizona; Kathleen Talaro at Pasadena City College, California; and Christopher Woolverton at
Kent State University, Ohio.
Faculty Enhancement Program Awardees
The Faculty Enhancement Program is sponsored by the ASM Committee on Minority Education and
supports the ASMCUE participation of non-ASM members who teach microbiology and biology at
institutions serving minority and underserved populations.
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Danielle Dusold, Bryant and Stratton College, Glendale, WI
Kristy Henscheid, Columbia Basin College, Pasco, WA
Norrenna Hubbard, Hondros College School of Nursing, West Chester, OH
Sheela Huddle, Harrisburg Area Community College, Lancaster, PA
Jeff Novack, Bellevue College, Bellevue, WA
Elizabeth Szymczak, Bunker Hill Community College, Boston, MA
Naomi Wernick, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA
Early-Career Travel Awardees
The Early-Career Travel Award supports the ASMCUE participation of early-career undergraduate faculty,
postdoctoral scientists, or senior-level graduate students interested in teaching careers.
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Blythe Janowiak, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO
Zachary Pratt, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Julia Schmitz, Piedmont College, Athens, GA
Priscilla Van Wynsberghe, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY
Sara Volk de Garcia, Our Lady of the Lake University, San Antonio, TX
Cuc Kim Vu, St. Catherine University, Minneapolis, MN
ASM-UNESCO Leadership Grant for International Educators
This program, sponsored jointly by ASM and UNESCO, has been developed to enable a select group of
educators from resource-limited countries to attend the ASMCUE and a pre-conference workshop to
provide leaders in education with the resources to build innovative teaching modules that engage
students and lead to enduring understandings in microbiology.
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Ketema Bedanie, Jimma University, Ethiopia
Joel Cornista, Miriam College, Philippines
Erika Nagle, Riga Stradins University, Latvia
Martha Vives, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Sponsors
The American Society for Microbiology thanks the following
sponsors and exhibitors for their generosity:
Clicker Sponsor
Turning Technologies
Conference Bag Sponsor
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Conference Bag Item Sponsor
Pearson
Thursday Reception Sponsor
Pearson
Saturday Refreshment Break Sponsor
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Saturday Lunch Sponsor
Pearson
Author & Product Corner Sponsors
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Pearson
Exhibitor Showcase
Friday, June 15, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM and Saturday, June 16, 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM
San Mateo Marriott Inspire 1, 2, 3
Exhibitors may set up on Friday 3:00 PM – 6:00 PM.
Exhibits must be dismantled 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM on Saturday.
Exhibitors
ASM Press
Washington, DC
estore.asm.org
The American Society for Microbiology Press will be exhibiting a selection of textbooks and educational
resources at the ASMCUE. Be sure to stop by the ASM Press booth to browse our available titles, and to
request an examination copy of our textbooks. ASM Press will be offering a 10%-50% discount for on all
purchases made at the meeting.
For a pre-meeting preview of our full catalog titles, including the newest ASM Press releases, please visit
estore.asm.org.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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bluedoor Publishing
Minnetonka, MN
www.bluedoorpublishing.com
www.facebook.com/bluedoorpublishing
http://twitter.com/#!/bluedoorpublish or @bluedoorpublish
“Small publishing done big”– Our motto and our philosophy.
Our goal is to provide our authors with all the benefits of a large publisher but with the personal touch and
feel of a small publisher. Our team of designers, consulting editors, and illustrators, along with access to
our high-quality and integrated database of content that can be customized or used as-is, allows us to
offer individualized publishing support to all of our authors. We offer a personal approach that lends itself
well to the development, publishing, and marketing of your educational materials.
Edvotek, INC.
Washington, DC
www.edvotek.com
www.facebook.com/edvotek
http://twitter.com/#!/edvotek or @edvotek
EDVOTEK was the world’s first company dedicated to demystifying biotechnology for students. Founded
in 1987, we help teachers inspire young people to choose a career in the emerging field of biotechnology.
We are committed to bringing together eminent scientists and educators to continue developing new and
exciting experiments for students. EDVOTEK develops, produces and supports innovative biotechnology
education experiment kits and equipment for safe, easy-to-use and engaging learning experiences of all
levels. Experiments span DNA science, electrophoresis, forensics, PCR, bacterial transformation,
immunology, environmental science, AP Biology and more. Contact us at 1-800-EDVOTEK or
www.edvotek.com to learn more.
Imagineering
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
www.imagineeringart.com
www.facebook.com/aicpublishing
http://twitter.com/#!/aicpublishing or @aicpublishing
Imagineering operates a creative studio dedicated to the development, rendering and utilization of very
high-end digital artwork, animations and simulations for the life and physical sciences community. We
began as a small art house creating custom illustrations for medical textbook publishers in 1996. Since
that date we have become known as the studio of choice for high quality, content intensive, life sciences
based digital artwork. With the advent of various applications for mobile technology products, we are
currently expanding our capabilities to enable us to deliver a full suite of composition, art and animation
products suitable for delivering complete textbooks to any current output medium.
Johns Hopkins University Center for Biotechnology Education
Baltimore, MD
biotechnology.jhu.edu
The Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences created the Center for
Biotechnology Education to engage diverse audiences in the world of biotechnology and to prepare the
leaders of today, tomorrow, and the next generation for the challenges of the 21st century. By expanding
the scope of biotechnology education, the Center for Biotechnology Education is building a pipeline of
students and professionals prepared to achieve success in K-12 education, graduate school, and the
work environment in the fields of biotechnology, bioinformatics, bioscience regulatory affairs, and
bioscience business and leadership.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Hoboken, NJ
www.wiley.com
Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is an independent, global publisher of print and electronic
products. Wiley Higher Education publishes for a broad range of post secondary education with leading
programs in the Sciences, Business, Technology and the Social Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell, the scientific,
technical, medical and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, publishes on behalf of more
societies and membership associations than anybody else and offers libraries and individuals 1250 online
journals, thousands of books in print and online, reviews, reference works, databases, and many other
innovative resources for teaching and learning, including across the social sciences and humanities.
For more information, visit www.wiley.com, www.wiley.com/wiley-blackwell, or our new online resource
onlinelibrary.wiley.com.
Sponsored Author Corner:
Featured Author: Jackie Black
Saturday, June 16, 9:15 AM, Wiley Exhibit Booth
th
Microbiology: Principles and Explorations, 8 edition
Jackie Black’s bestselling textbook delivers a student-friendly approach that provides readers with
a thorough and accessible introduction to the study of microbiology. This new edition amplifies
the core concepts, focuses on key details, and includes a more robust visual program to engage
students in an interactive experience.
Sponsored Product Corner:
Featured Product: WileyPLUS
Saturday, June 16, 9:45 AM, Connect 4
See first-hand how WileyPLUS for Microbiology can enhance your course. WileyPLUS is a
research-based, online environment for effective teaching and learning that integrates the digital
textbook with effective resources to fit every learning style.
Sponsored Author Corner:
Featured Author: David Wessner
Saturday, June 16, 1:30 PM, Wiley Exhibit Booth
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Microbiology, 1 edition
Wessner, Microbiology 1e helps to develop a meaningful connection with the material through the
incorporation of primary literature, applications and examples. The text offers an ideal balance
between comprehensive, in-depth coverage of core concepts, while employing a narrative style
that incorporates many relevant applications and a unique focus on current research and
experimentation. Rather than presenting material as discrete pieces, Wessner frames information
around the three pillars of physiology, ecology and genetics; which highlights their
interconnectedness and helps students see a bigger picture.
Wessner presents microbiology as a fascinating field of exploration and experimentationconnecting students with science.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Sponsored Product Corner:
Featured Product: Custom Select, Anderson, Microbiology Case Studies: A Personal Approach
Saturday, June 16, 2:00 PM, Connect 4
Looking to build your own case book for a Problem-Based Learning approach to Microbiology?
Wiley, along with Rod Anderson and Linda Young, have developed a collection of Microbiology
cases which are available for customization within Wiley Custom Select. Using Wiley Custom
Select, instructors can "build" customized higher education course materials that fit their exact
pedagogical needs, in a simple three-step process that takes just minutes to complete. The
custom publishing application enables users to easily find the content, personalize the material
and format, and submit the order.
At ASMCUE, you be able to preview some of our valuable materials, enjoy refreshments at our booth,
and go home with exciting resources. While you’re there, get to know your colleagues who share your
passion for science and education as you enjoy everything Wiley has to offer.
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
Washington, DC
jmbe.asm.org
The Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education (JMBE) is sponsored by the American Society for
Microbiology (ASM; www.asm.org) a professional life science society with more than 43,000 members in
the United States and abroad. JMBE publishes original, previously unpublished, peer-reviewed articles.
The scientific scope of the journal is rooted in microbiology while branching out to biology. The
educational scope of the journal is primarily undergraduate education; however, submissions that feature
good pedagogy and good design used in kindergarten through high school education or graduate and
professional (e.g., medical school) education will be considered for publication.
JMBE is referenced in Directory of Open Access Journals and CrossRef.
Sponsored Product Corner:
Featured Product: Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
Saturday, June 16, 9:15 AM, Connect 5
Saturday, June 16, 1:30 PM, Connect 5
In 2010, the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education (JMBE) moved to an open-access
platform, expanded its scope to include various types of scholarly articles, and doubled the
number of issues per year to two. Since making these changes, submissions to the journal have
increased nearly 500%. While inundated with submissions, editors and reviewers have
maintained rigorous standards, accepting nearly 37% of manuscripts.
JMBE accepts articles that promote good pedagogy and design, foster scholarly teaching, and
advance biology education research. The various sections of JMBE allow for the submission of
articles diverse in scope and focus. Attend this session to learn more about the Journal sections,
creating an account at the JMBE site, and the submission and review processes.
JMBE welcomes submissions for the upcoming issues. Articles are reviewed on a rolling basis,
and submissions are encouraged and accepted throughout the year. The final submission
deadline to be considered for publication in volume 13, issue 2 (December 2012) is 1 July 2012
and for volume 14, issue 1 (May 2013) is December 1, 2012. For more information, please visit
http://jmbe.asm.org.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Jones & Bartlett Learning
Burlington, MA
www.jblearning.com
www.facebook.com/pages/Jones-Bartlett-Learning/152717730058
http://twitter.com/#!/jblearning or @jblearning
Jones & Bartlett Learning, a division of Ascend Learning, is a world-leading provider of instructional,
assessment, and learning-performance management solutions for the secondary, post-secondary, and
professional markets. Our educational programs and services improve learning outcomes and enhance
student achievement by combining authoritative content with innovative and engaging technology
applications.
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
New York, NY
www.mhhe.com
www.facebook.com/MH.lifesciences
http://twitter.com/#!/mhhighered or @mhhighered
McGraw-Hill Higher Education continues to help your students Connect, Learn, and Succeed in their
microbiology courses. We are committed to helping students of all ages succeed with our proven
solutions, and to providing superior customer service and solutions to meet every teaching and learning
need.
MHHE is a leading innovator in the development of teaching and learning digital solutions for higher
education. Through a comprehensive range of content and tools focused on improving student learning
outcomes, MHHE empowers and prepares professionals and students to succeed in the global economy.
Sponsored Author Corner:
Featured Author: Denise Anderson
Saturday, June 16, 9:45 AM, McGraw-Hill Exhibit Booth
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Microbiology: A Human Perspective, 7 edition
Microbiology is one of the fastest moving fields, so it’s not enough to teach only the current hot
topics. Students must be armed with a strong enough foundation to understand next year’s –
even next decade’s – hot topics as well. The Nester author team works hard, both in their
textbook and in their classrooms, to teach students for the future, as well as for today.
Microbiology: A Human Perspective remains focused on providing an excellent foundation in
fundamental concepts for microbiology students of all backgrounds. It has always been on the
cutting edge of current concepts; it was the first introductory microbiology text to introduce new
concepts in immunology such as pattern recognition by toll-like receptors, and T-cell activation by
dendritic cells. The recently published seventh edition retains these well-known features in
addition to a completely new, dynamic, instructional art program, and an extensive revision of the
text for readability and student engagement – making this one of the best options for nonmajors
microbiology students. Join Denise as she discusses the new edition and find out why her
students and other instructors have been so enthusiastic about the changes.
Sponsored Product Corner:
Featured Product: Adaptive Learning Technologies
Saturday, June 16, 1:30 PM, Connect 3
McGraw-Hill LearnSmart™ has been chosen from leading educational software solutions as one
of the best in the industry in not one, but two categories!
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Best Postsecondary Instructional Solution AND Best Cross-Curricular Solution
Each year the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) CODiE Awards recognizes
excellence in the education technology industry. Seasoned educators reviewed all nominations in
each category to choose the finalists.
McGraw-Hill, together with Area9, is a leading innovator in adaptive learning. Modern, superadaptive learning technology is technology that tailors (adapts) the learning experience to the
needs of EVERY student. Adaptive learning technology is not new. However, modern superadaptive technologies adapt to the learner at a rate of dozens per minute versus the previous
system’s rate of dozens per day (a crucial difference). The new adaptive technologies have the
potential to completely revolutionize education by PRECISELY identifying and adapting to the
needs of every learner.
From the student’s perspective, there are two important aspects of the modern, super-adaptive
learning technologies: A) They make personalized learning available to students wherever they
are, at affordable prices. B) Students change (adapt) their study habits as the adaptive engine
guides them through a curriculum or course. From a teacher’s perspective, adaptive learning
technologies allow the educator to be an even more effective coach— to focus on the precise
needs of a particular student; to create a personalized learning plan and experience.
Join us to learn more about McGraw-Hill’s leading adaptive learning technologies (or stop by the
McGraw-Hill booth for a demonstration!).
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McGraw-Hill LearnSmart is an adaptive learning system designed to help students learn
faster, study more efficiently, and retain more knowledge for greater success. THE premier
learning system effectively assesses a student’s knowledge of course content through a
series of adaptive questions, intelligently pinpointing concepts the student does not
understand and mapping out a personalized study plan for success. LearnSmart is the only
system that is proven to improve student and faculty outcomes.
McGraw-Hill LabSmart™ is a personalized, adaptive, outcomes-based lab simulation unlike
any you have ever seen. Based on the same world-leading super-adaptive technology as
LearnSmart, a student’s knowledge is assessed and deficiencies adaptively corrected.
Whether your need is to overcome the logistical challenges of a traditional lab, provide better
lab prep, improve student performance, or make your online experience one that rivals the
real world, LabSmart accomplishes it all.
LabSmart - THE Virtual Lab Experience.
Sponsored Author Corner:
Featured Author: Kelly Cowan
Saturday, June 16, 2:00 PM, McGraw-Hill Exhibit Booth
st
Microbiology Fundamentals, A Clinical Approach, 1 edition
rd
Microbiology, A Systems Approach, 3 edition
Kelly Cowan has been a microbiologist at Miami University since 1993, where she teaches
microbiology for pre-nursing/allied health students at the university’s Middletown campus, a
regional commuter campus that accepts first-time college students with a high school diploma or
GED. She started life as a dental hygienist. She then went on to attain her PhD at the University
of Louisville, and later worked at the University of Maryland’s Center of Marine Biotechnology and
the University of Groningen in The Netherlands. Kelly has published (with her students) twentyfour research articles stemming from her work on bacterial adhesion mechanisms and plantderived antimicrobial compounds. But her first love is teaching—both doing it and studying how to
do it better. Join Kelly to find out more about her two introductory microbiology textbooks,
including the exciting, new Microbiology Fundamentals, A Clinical Approach, the first text to
successfully tackle the challenge of making a briefer, streamlined text that truly fits a onesemester micro course.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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Morton Publishing Company
Englewood, CO
www.morton-pub.com
www.facebook.com/MortonPub
http://twitter.com/#!/MortonPub or @MortonPub
Morton Publishing Company is a small, privately-owned college textbook company based in Englewood,
CO. Since 1977, we have been dedicated to publishing high-quality textbooks and laboratory materials
while keeping costs down so that our books are affordable for students. We do not want high prices to
dissuade students from investing in their education.
Pearson
Upper Saddle River, NJ
www.pearson.com
Pearson, the global leader in education and education technology, is committed to providing quality
content, assessment tools, and educational services, for millions of students and their instructors.
Pearson continues to transform education and change the way students learn by offering innovative
online resources and learning applications, such as Mastering Microbiology®.
Sponsored Product Corner:
™
Featured Product: MasteringMicrobiology : MicroLab Tutors
Saturday, June 16, 9:15 AM, Connect 3
Help your students to see what happens at the molecular level in both lecture and lab without
spending valuable lab time and materials! Using a combination of videos, animations,
assessment and visual feedback, MasteringMicrobiology's MicroLab Tutors are designed to make
sure that students come better prepared for the lab by introducing and assessing student
understanding of lab concepts and techniques outside of formal lecture and lab time. Come by
and check out Gram Staining in action - Seeing is believing.
Piazza
Palo Alto, CA
www.piazza.com
www.facebook.com/Piazzza
http://twitter.com/#!/piazza or @piazza
Piazza is a free online question and answer platform built from the ground up to replace much less
effective discussion boards usually adopted in classrooms. It was made popular by widespread use at
Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, and MIT. Today it is used by hundreds of thousands of students every term.
Stop by for a brief demo to learn how Piazza can save you time while improving your interactions with
students.
W.W. Norton, Inc.
New York, NY
www.wwnorton.com
The oldest and largest publishing house owned wholly by its employees, W. W. Norton, Inc. publishes
about 400 trade, college, and professional titles each year including Slonczewski and Foster’s
Microbiology: An Evolving Science Second Edition.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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ASMCUE Program
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
ASM GLOSSARY, TOOLS AND WHAT'S NEW
5:15 PM – 5:45 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
ASMCUE REGISTRATION CHECK-IN
2:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Inspire Lobby
Amy Chang, American Society for Microbiology
WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS
This session provides tips for navigating the ASMCUE
program and taking advantage of unique resources
and networks. During the latter half, participants will
hear about national initiatives and learn critical skills
and actions for improving biology education.
4:00 PM – 4:15 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
Conference Planning Committee
Jacqueline Washington, Nyack College
Todd Primm, Sam Houston State University
Min-Ken Liao, Furman University
DINNER (Meet & Greet ASM Leadership and
Travel Award Recognition)
Local Steering Committee Representatives
Kimberly Tanner, San Francisco State
University
Brinda Govindan, San Francisco State
University
MEET AND GREET ASM LEADERSHIP
OPENING PLENARY LECTURE
4:15 PM – 5:15 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
Adventures in Personal Genomics and Whole
Omics Profiling
Michael Snyder, Stanford University
Personalized medicine is expected to benefit from the
combination of genomic information with the global
monitoring of molecular components and
physiological states. To ascertain whether this can be
achieved, we determined the whole genome
sequence of an individual at high accuracy and
performed an integrated Personal Omics Profiling
(iPOP) analysis, combining genomic, transcriptomic,
proteomic, metabolomic, and autoantibodyomic
information, over a 21-month period that included
healthy and two virally infected states. Our iPOP
analysis of blood components revealed extensive,
dynamic and broad changes in diverse molecular
components and biological pathways across healthy
and disease conditions. Importantly, genomic
information was also used to estimate medical risks,
including Type 2 Diabetes, whose onset was
observed during the course of our study. Our study
demonstrates that longitudinal personal omics
profiling can relate genomic information to global
functional omics activity for physiological and medical
interpretation of healthy and disease states.
5:45 PM – 7:30 PM
Convene 1 & 2
Did you know that all ASM education initiatives are
governed by the ASM Education Board and managed
by six committees? During this time, members of the
Board and supporting committees will be introduced
and discuss the projects they oversee. Take time to
meet and greet these dedicated leaders and learn
more about opportunities to volunteer and participate
in ASM programs.
ASM Education Board
Chair, Neil Baker, Ohio State University
Committee on K-12 Outreach
Chair, Dave Westenberg, Missouri University of
Science and Technology
Committee on Graduate and Postdoctoral
Education
Chair, Shelley Payne, University of Texas, Austin
Committee on Minority Education
Chair, Mary Sanchez Lanier, Washington State
University
Committee on Undergraduate Education
Chair, Marjorie Kelly Cowan, Miami University
Middletown
MicrobeLibrary Editorial Committee
Chair, Erica Suchman, Colorado State University
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
(JMBE) Editorial Committee
Chair, Chris Woolverton, Kent State University
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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CONCURRENT RESOURCE SESSIONS
I of II
7:30 PM – 8:30 PM
(7 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to presenting topics
and information to enhance participant's professional
skill sets and scholarship. Presenters will provide
background information to tools, resources, and
references for advancing in the profession. These
sessions are presented twice during the conference.
1. From the Few to the Many: Scaling up the
Undergraduate Research Experience with the
HHMI SEA-PHAGES Course
Synergy 1
Lucia Barker, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
The Science Education Alliance (SEA) at the Howard
Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has developed a
course called “Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics
and Evolutionary Science,” or “PHAGES.” In the
SEA-PHAGES course, undergraduate student
researchers, primarily freshmen, isolate
bacteriophages from soil samples. Students then
characterize these isolates using tools and techniques
in microbiology, molecular biology and bioinformatics.
Students work together to generate fully annotated
phage genomes for GenBank submission. In the past
four years, HHMI has supported more than 3,000
students participating at more than 65 institutions
ranging from large research-intensive universities to
small liberal arts colleges. Further, SEA-PHAGES
students and their faculty mentors have archived
approximately 2,700 unique bacteriophages and have
submitted more than 120 phage genomes to
GenBank. In this session, we will discuss the
implementation of the course– including the faculty
time and resources required - and assessment data.
These data include measures of course effectiveness
retaining students in STEM majors and student
proficiencies in scientific skills and in other STEM
courses. There will also be a panel of SEA-PHAGES
faculty and staff that will include discussion on the
process of imbedding research into the curriculum,
the importance of students generating real data in an
authentic research project, some valuable lessons
learned, and recommendations for the implementation
of research-based courses at other institutions
2. The NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education
(DUE) Funding Opportunities.
Connect 4
V. Celeste Carter, National Science Foundation
Undergraduate education is central to the NSF's
mission in human resource development. The
Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) serves as
the focal point for agency-wide support for
undergraduate education. DUE program activities
strengthen and continuously improve the
undergraduate students' experiences in science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)
courses. This forum presents an overview of DUE
programs. Information about specific programs and
examples of successful funded projects will be
provided. Resources for faculty considering applying
for support will be shared.
3. MicrobeLibrary’s Newest Collection: The
Multiple Choice Critical Thinking Question Bank
Synergy 2
Gary Kaiser, The Community College of Baltimore
County, Catonsville Campus
The Critical Thinking Question Bank is a new
MicrobeLibrary collection of peer-reviewed multiple
choice questions that go beyond rote memory and
recall to requiring critical thought. The level of critical
thinking is designated minimally at level three
(application) in Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive
Levels with the questions categorized based on the
2011 ASM Recommended Curricular Guidelines.
Designed especially for interactive learning using
audience response systems, the questions are of
value for pre- and post-tests or traditional exams, and
may be used in the classroom or laboratory or on-line
in blended- and distance-learning experiences. This
workshop will explain the MicrobeLibrary Critical
Thinking Question Bank and the criteria required for
question submission, illustrate and discuss sample
questions, and enable participants to develop and
fine-tune their own questions for submission to
MicrobeLibrary. Participants are asked to bring an
electronic copy of two of their favorite critical thinking
questions to share with others at the workshop.
4. Tailoring Teaching for Demographically Diverse
Learners
Synergy 4
Min-Ken Liao, Furman University
Jeffrey Pommerville, Glendale Community College
Mary Mawn, Empire State College
Students are changing. In 2009, 33 percent of
undergraduate students are over 24 and 36 percent
are enrolled part time. Some students transfer to 4year institutions after 2 years of community college
education, while some enroll in certification programs
in community colleges after a bachelor degree. Some
prefer traditional college experience, while some opt
for online learning. For the 60-minute session, the
panelists will each spend 5-10 minutes on student
demographics, cultural/generational backgrounds,
learning styles, expectations of education, values and
concerns, and career aspiration, as well as on
advantages and challenges in teaching these
students. We will then have an open discussion with
the session attendees on how to reach and teach
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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THURSDAY, JUNE 14
demographically diverse students so to better serve
their educational needs. The collective tips and
insights will be compiled and sent to the session
attendees after the conference.
5. Effective Online Microbiology Education: A
Two-Session Progression
Synergy 5
Phil Mixter, Washington State University
Andrea Rediske, Valencia Community College
There will be two stand-alone sessions that will each
be offered one time only. Participants can enjoy any
combination of these sessions. Session II will be held
on Friday, June 15 for those with significant
experience in online Microbiology instruction.
SESSION I
This session is designed for those with little or no
experience using online teaching formats. Perhaps
instructors have been asked to develop these
resources, switch a face-to-face class to an online or
hybrid format, or are simply curious about online
options when designing new classes. Panelists will
start with some basics and convey experience during
the earliest stages of development of online courses.
Topics will include, but are not limited to, course
design, leveraging advantages of online learning,
learning styles, effective online communication, and
how to foster collaboration among online classmates.
As online formats vary, there will be less focus on
technology issues. Dialogue and discussion among
attendees is encouraged.
growth if you take advantage of opportunities and
avoid the landmines.
7. What is New in Teaching Technology?
PowerPoint Annotation Using Notebook
Computers or Tablets to Create Interactive
Lectures Which are Captured Using Lecture
Capture Software
Connect 3
Jennifer Taylor, Colorado State University
Erica Suchman, Colorado State University
Participants will be introduced to the use of tablets
and notebook computers to annotate PowerPoint
lectures allowing a more dynamic learning
experience. Speakers will demonstrate how they use
these in their teaching to increase active learning.
They will also be introduced to lecture capture
software (speakers have used 2 different programs,
pros and cons of each will be discussed). Tablets
and Notebook computers can be used to create
diagrams, write on existing diagrams, etc. right in
PowerPoint, lecture capture software will capture the
PowerPoint with these annotations with real time
Audio, thus allowing students to watch lectures later
in preparation for examinations. Participants will be
exposed to the differences between using a notebook
computer or tablet to create these annotations.
RECEPTION
8:30 PM – 9:30 PM
The Courtyard and Engage
Sponsored by Pearson
6. Road Map to Academic Success
Connect 1
Todd Primm, Sam Houston State University
This session will provide practical advice for a
successful and enjoyable career in academia. There
are many unwritten rules and conventions that will be
made plain. While this session is designed for new
(first four years) faculty, more experienced faculty
may find some perspective here as well. Your
institution does not have to be tenure-granting for this
to be relevant, although tenure and promotion will be
discussed. Topics will include: not finding the “best”
institution, but the right institution for you,
understanding your institutional environment and
putting it into context, efficient time management is
based on prioritization, guide to effective and
scholarly teaching, service without suffering,
preparing a potent promotion portfolio, and finding a
balance in your life. Academia is a wonderful
environment that can offer tremendous personal
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
22
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
ASMCUE REGISTRATION
7:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Inspire Lobby
NETWORKING BREAKFAST BY TOPICAL
AREAS
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM
Convene 1 & 2
ASM facilitates the e-mail based discussion group,
MICROEDU. Here, microbiology educators can learn
from each other by exchanging ideas and
communicating issues and challenges. Many
informative and thoughtful conversations take place
within this listserv community and we encourage
attendees to revisit the issues face-to-face. Several
topics have been identified by the Steering Committee
that include: Bad Bugs book club, bioinformatics in
the classroom, online hybrid courses and more.
PLENARY LECTURE
8:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Convene 1 & 2
ASM Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines
Elizabeth Emmert, Salisbury University
Cristina Bressler, Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
In spring 2011 the CDC reported a multi-state
outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium associated with
being in a clinical or teaching microbiology
laboratory. In response, in August 2011 the
Education Board of ASM developed a Task
Committee on Laboratory Biosafety to develop
guidelines for safely handling microorganisms in
teaching laboratories. The Task Committee is chaired
by Elizabeth Emmert, Salisbury University, Salisbury,
MD. Other Task Committee members include Jeffrey
Byrd, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, St. Mary’s City,
MD, Ruth Gyure, Western Connecticut State
University, Danbury, CT, Diane Hartman, Baylor
University, Waco TX, and Amy White, Virginia
Western Community College, Roanoke, VA. Ex
officio members include Ronald Atlas, co-chair, ASM
Committee on Biodefense, Public and Scientific
Affairs, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, Neil
Baker, chair, ASM Education Board, The Ohio State
University, Columbus, OH, and Amy Chang,
education director, ASM, Washington, DC.
The purpose of this session is four part: (i) overview
of the Salmonella typhimurium outbreak, (ii) summary
of the work of the Task Committee, (iii) feedback from
ASMCUE attendees in breakout sessions, and (iv)
steps to finalizing the ASM Guidelines on Laboratory
Biosafety.
The Task Committee developed two comprehensive
sets of guidelines – one for handling microbes at
biosafety level one and the other for handling
microbes at biosafety level two. Both sets of
guidelines are divided into six sections: personal
protection, laboratory physical space, stock cultures,
standard lab practices, training, and documents. The
guidelines are brief by design for ease of use, but are
accompanied by an extensive appendix that includes
explanatory notes, sample documents, and additional
resources.
The draft guidelines were reviewed by an ad hoc
panel in December 2011 and again through a survey
of microbiology educators in February 2012. The
guidelines were revised based on the feedback
received from the reviewers. The third review of the
guidelines will occur during ASMCUE and the ASM
General Meeting. Following these meetings, the
guidelines will be revised and finalized for an ASM
publication in early 2013.
After picking up a boxed lunch, participants will join a
breakout session (select one from four possibilities –
Personal Protection, Standard Lab Practices,
Laboratory Physical Space and Stock Cultures, or
Training and Documents) and provide feedback about
the guidelines and relevant portions of the appendix.
To view the guidelines and appendix, visit
http://www.asmcue.org/LabBiosafetyGuidelines.shtml
CONCURRENT PEDAGOGY SESSIONS I of III
8:45 AM – 9:45 AM
(5 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to presenting practices
and pedagogies that have been assessed for
classroom effectiveness. Presenters will provide
background information and their approach to the
strategy, leaving time for participants to practice and
reflect upon how they can implement the new practice
or approach into their classrooms. These sessions
are presented in two of three times slots during the
conference.
1. MedMyst: Using Serious Games to Teach
Microbiology
Synergy 2
Kristi Bowling, Rice University
MedMyst, a serious game with multiple independent
segments, was created through grants from the
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
and the National Center for Research Resources. The
underlying concept was to use game-based learning
to teach middle school students about infectious
diseases while reinforcing the scientific method and
encouraging STEM careers. In this session, an
overview of the seven MedMyst missions,
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
23
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
accompanying classroom activities, and teacher
support materials will be presented. The original
target audience was middle school students;
however, MedMyst has been used at many
educational levels and in multiple ways, some of
which will be discussed. This free web site allows
students to use inquiry and process skills to
investigate pathogens, the diseases they cause, and
the body’s immune response. In the games students
perform virtual experiments, such as case-control
studies, a Koch’s postulates simulation, necropsies,
and viral microarrays that engage students in the
scientific method and aspects of microbiology
careers. Results of recent research indicate the
efficacy of this methodology in achieving specific
learning objectives and the appeal of this type of
teaching tool. See http://medmyst.rice.edu/
2. Creating Videos and Public Service
Announcements as a Means of Promoting Student
Engagement, Developing Critical Thinking Skills,
and Creating Citizen Scientists
Synergy 4
Lisa Cuchara, Quinnipiac University
There is a recognized need for scientists/health
professionals to effectively communicate science to
the public. This presentation will describe taking this
“Citizen Scientist” goal from the passive world of
discussion boards to the public, interactive, dynamic
Web 2.0 arena. Student created vaccine ‘public
service announcements’ will be shown. These videos
are examples of higher order Bloom’s taxonomy
outcomes and yield more “citizen scientists.” The
students also learn about vaccines, vaccine
preventable diseases and myths related to vaccines
to a higher level through the creation process. A
wonderful side effect was mastery of technology and
enhanced learning of the topic itself, the latter falling
under the constructivism learning philosophy
(“humans can understand only what they have
themselves constructed”). Constructivism learning
involves avoiding the internalization of factoids only to
be regurgitated later on and emphasizes learning as
result of individual mental construction.
3. Transforming “Lecture” Halls into StudentCentered Classrooms
Synergy 5
own learning. Moreover, several of these techniques
have been demonstrated to improve student
achievement. In this session, you will learn how to
use think-pair-share in combination with conceptual,
multiple-choice questions to dramatically change the
learning environment in your classes. The workshop
will feature situated-apprenticeships in which
participants will apply what they’ve learned using their
peers in the role of students. This will give you the
confidence to try these techniques immediately with
your own students and to be successful quickly.
4. Programs and Best Practices to Increase
Retention and Graduation Rates of Students from
Underrepresented Groups in STEM: An Overview
of the California State University Louis Stokes
Alliance for Minority Participation Program
Engage
Enid Gonzalez, California State University,
Sacramento
Juanita Barrena, California State University,
Sacramento
Lilia De La Cerda, California State University, Fresno
Margaret Jefferson, California State University, Los
Angeles
The California State University Louis Stokes Alliance
for Minority Participation (CSU-LSAMP) is a CSU
system-wide effort that provides a strategic framework
for students who face social, educational, or
economic barriers to careers in STEM. For the last
eighteen years, CSU LSAMP, which currently
includes 22 campuses of the CSU, has served a total
19,387 students, 85% of these students are from
underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, and has
achieved the following outcomes: 1) 2.5 fold increase
in the number of STEM baccalaureate degrees
granted by the CSU; 2) Increased persistence and
graduation rates of LSAMP URM graduates; 3)
Increased participation of URM students in
undergraduate research experiences, both domestic
and international; and 4) increased progression of
URM students to doctoral level of study in STEM.
These objectives are achieved by providing students
an array of support activities ranging from “gatekeeper” course support to the design of unique
undergraduate research experiences. In this session
we will present an overview of CSU LSAMP as a
system-wide effort, examples of three campus-based
CSU-LSAMP programs, and a more detailed
description of 1-2 of the best practices developed by
each of the campuses.
Michael Dougherty, American Society of Human
Genetics
Large lecture halls do not have to be barriers to
student-centered instruction. With proper
implementation, as few as one or two interactive
teaching strategies can make any classroom more
interactive and students more responsible for their
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
24
5. Using the Scientific Literature to Teach Science
Literacy
Connect 1
Jodie Krontiris-Litowitz, Youngstown State
University
Science literacy demands that scientists be fluent in
the discipline, able to interpret numeric information,
and able to gather and integrate information from
primary sources to support positions and arguments.
Teaching science literacy presents a challenge for
faculty, many of whom support teaching literacy skills
but feel conflicted about teaching them at the expense
of content. In this session I will present a set of
science literacy skills aligned with Bloom’s taxonomy
and show how they were embedded into an
introductory biology course using journal article
assignments that paralleled course content.
Attendees will develop assignments that embed
science literacy skills and devise assessments to
evaluate them. Finally, we will talk about how this
skill set can be used in advanced courses to move
students toward expert science literacy.
CONCURRENT RESOURCE SESSIONS II of II
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
(7 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to enhancing
participant's knowledge of current topics in biology
and science education through lectures given by the
leaders in these areas. Presenters are encouraged to
actively engage participants in their presentations.
These sessions are presented twice during the
conference.
1. From the Few to the Many: Scaling up the
Undergraduate Research Experience with the
HHMI SEA-PHAGES Course
Synergy 1
Lucia Barker, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
The Science Education Alliance (SEA) at the Howard
Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has developed a
course called “Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics
and Evolutionary Science,” or “PHAGES.” In the
SEA-PHAGES course, undergraduate student
researchers, primarily freshmen, isolate
bacteriophages from soil samples. Students then
characterize these isolates using tools and techniques
in microbiology, molecular biology and bioinformatics.
Students work together to generate fully annotated
phage genomes for GenBank submission. In the past
four years, HHMI has supported more than 3,000
students participating at more than 65 institutions
ranging from large research-intensive universities to
small liberal arts colleges. Further, SEA-PHAGES
students and their faculty mentors have archived
approximately 2,700 unique bacteriophages and have
submitted more than 120 phage genomes to
GenBank. In this session, we will discuss the
implementation of the course– including the faculty
time and resources required - and assessment data.
These data include measures of course effectiveness
retaining students in STEM majors and student
proficiencies in scientific skills and in other STEM
courses. There will also be a panel of SEA-PHAGE
faculty and staff that will include discussion on the
process of imbedding research into the curriculum,
the importance of students generating real data in an
authentic research project, some valuable lessons
learned, and recommendations for the implementation
of research-based courses at other institutions
2. The NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education
(DUE) Funding Opportunities.
Connect 4
V. Celeste Carter, National Science Foundation
Undergraduate education is central to the NSF's
mission in human resource development. The
Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) serves as
the focal point for agency-wide support for
undergraduate education. DUE program activities
strengthen and continuously improve the
undergraduate students' experiences in science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)
courses. This forum presents an overview of DUE
programs. Information about specific programs and
examples of successful funded projects will be
provided. Resources for faculty considering applying
for support will be shared.
3. MicrobeLibrary’s Newest Collection: The
Multiple Choice Critical Thinking Question Bank
Synergy 2
Gary Kaiser, The Community College of Baltimore
County, Catonsville Campus
The Critical Thinking Question Bank is a new
MicrobeLibrary collection of peer-reviewed multiple
choice questions that go beyond rote memory and
recall to requiring critical thought. The level of critical
thinking is designated minimally at level three
(application) in Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive
Levels with the questions categorized based on the
2011 ASM Recommended Curricular Guidelines.
Designed especially for interactive learning using
audience response systems, the questions are of
value for pre- and post-tests or traditional exams, and
may be used in the classroom or laboratory or on-line
in blended- and distance-learning experiences. This
workshop will explain the MicrobeLibrary Critical
Thinking Question Bank and the criteria required for
question submission, illustrate and discuss sample
questions, and enable participants to develop and
fine-tune their own questions for submission to
MicrobeLibrary. Participants are asked to bring an
electronic copy of two of their favorite critical thinking
questions to share with others at the workshop.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
25
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
4. Tailoring Teaching for Demographically Diverse
Learners
Synergy 4
Min-Ken Liao, Furman University
Jeffrey Pommerville, Glendale Community College
Mary Mawn, Empire State College
Students are changing. In 2009, 33 percent of
undergraduate students are over 24 and 36 percent
are enrolled part time. Some students transfer to 4year institutions after 2 years of community college
education, while some enroll in certification programs
in community colleges after a bachelor degree. Some
prefer traditional college experience, while some opt
for online learning. For the 60-minute session, the
panelists will each spend 5-10 minutes on student
demographics, cultural/generational backgrounds,
learning styles, expectations of education, values and
concerns, and career aspiration, as well as on
advantages and challenges in teaching these
students. We will then have an open discussion with
the session attendees on how to reach and teach
demographically diverse students so to better serve
their educational needs. The collective tips and
insights will be compiled and sent to the session
attendees after the conference.
5. Effective Online Microbiology Education: A
Two-Session Progression
Synergy 5
Phil Mixter, Washington State University
Andrea Rediske, Valencia Community College
SESSION II
This session is designed for those with significant
experience in online Microbiology instruction looking
to enhance their course or add new features.
Panelists will share their experiences and instructional
progression. Dialogue among attendees to share
strengths and challenges will be encouraged. Topics
will include, but are not limited to, avoiding cheating
and plagiarism, assessment of learning, effective
online teaching strategies, and best practices in an
online or hybrid Microbiology course. Dialogue and
discussion among attendees is encouraged.
6. Road Map to Academic Success
Connect 1
Todd Primm, Sam Houston State University
This session will provide practical advice for a
successful and enjoyable career in academia. There
are many unwritten rules and conventions that will be
made plain. While this session is designed for new
(first four years) faculty, more experienced faculty
may find some perspective here as well. Your
institution does not have to be tenure-granting for this
to be relevant, although tenure and promotion will be
discussed. Topics will include: not finding the “best”
institution, but the right institution for you,
understanding your institutional environment and
putting it into context, efficient time management is
based on prioritization, guide to effective and
scholarly teaching, service without suffering,
preparing a potent promotion portfolio, and finding a
balance in your life. Academia is a wonderful
environment that can offer tremendous personal
growth if you take advantage of opportunities and
avoid the landmines.
7. What is New in Teaching Technology?
PowerPoint Annotation Using Notebook
Computers or Tablets to Create Interactive
Lectures Which are Captured Using Lecture
Capture Software
Connect 3
Jennifer Taylor, Colorado State University
Erica Suchman, Colorado State University
Participants will be introduced to the use of tablets
and notebook computers to annotate PowerPoint
lectures allowing a more dynamic learning
experience. Speakers will demonstrate how they use
these in their teaching to increase active learning.
They will also be introduced to lecture capture
software (speakers have used 2 different programs,
pros and cons of each will be discussed). Tablets
and Notebook computers can be used to create
diagrams, write on existing diagrams, etc. right in
PowerPoint, lecture capture software will capture the
PowerPoint with these annotations with real time
Audio, thus allowing students to watch lectures later
in preparation for examinations. Participants will be
exposed to the differences between using a notebook
computer or tablet to create these annotations.
CONCURRENT SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS I of II
11:15 AM – 12:15 PM
(8 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to enhancing
participant's knowledge of current topics in biology
and science education through lectures given by the
leaders in these areas. Presenters are encouraged to
actively engage participants in their presentations.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
26
These sessions are presented twice during the
conference.
sequence typing for understanding their
epidemiology.
1. Subversion of the Host Epithelial Barrier by
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Synergy 1
3. Discoveries in Phylogenetically-Driven
Genomic Sequencing Projects and its Potential
for Your Students
Synergy 4
Joanne Engel, University of California, San
Francisco
Dr. Joanne Engel will explore the dynamic
interactions between the important human
opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and
the host epithelial barrier. While normal hosts are
constantly exposed to this environmental pathogen, in
the setting of epithelial barrier damage and
immunocompromise, this bacteria unleashes its
armamentarium of virulence factors to cause
devastating infections that lead to it being the fourth
leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. While
we have learned about the interactions of pathogens
with host cells using in vitro cell culture systems, we
are increasingly recognizing the importance of
studying these interactions in the context of polarized
epithelial cells in 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional
contexts. In this talk, Dr. Engel will describe how
using cutting edge microscopy and cell biology
(including cool movies and micrographs), lab has
gained unexpected insights into how these systems
allow for the study of bacterial biofilms on the surface
of epithelial cells, how pathogens subvert and
manipulate host cell polarity, and how the host cell
utilize these cues to mount an innate immune
response.
2. Emerging Pathogens: How Do We Detect and
Track Them?
Synergy 2
Peter Gilligan, University of North Carolina
Over the past thirty years, dozens of new pathogens
have been discovered. One of them, HIV, has literally
changed the world. In this presentation, we will
discuss how new pathogens emerge, how we first
recognize them, and then how we track them so we
can learn how they move through a population. We
will use 3 specific examples of emerging pathogens,
Burkholderia cepacia complex, enterohaemorrhagic
Escherichia coli, and community associated
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus to
illustrate these issues. At the end of presentation, the
participant we have an enhanced understanding of:
1. How new pathogens emerge
2. The molecular tools that can be used to track
these organisms spread
3. How understanding these organisms spread
allow for interventions to control these
infection
Specific tools that will be discussed include PCR for
detection, nucleic acid sequencing for identification,
and pulse field gel electrophoresis and multi-locus
Cheryl Kerfeld, DOE Joint Genome Institute
The Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has undertaken a
large-scale, phylogenetically driven approach to
microbial genome sequencing. The results, the
Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea
(GEBA), are a treasure trove of new insights into
bacterial metabolism. For example, bacterial
microcompartments, which were only known from
transmission electron micrographs of a few microbial
species, are surprisingly widespread; the potential to
form microcompartments can be found in more than
20% of all bacterial genomes and in almost every
phyla. Likewise, deep sequencing within a phylum
also provides tremendous insight into the genetic
basis of ecophysiology. The cyanobacteria, arguably
one of the most diverse groups in terms of lifestyle
and morphology, were until GEBA-Cyano poorly
sampled in terms of sequencing. I’ll present results of
these comparative genomic analyses and describe
ways in which undergraduates and faculty can get
involved in analyzing this exciting data using the IMGACT system.
4. American Academy of Microbiology Presents:
E. coli: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Synergy 5
Stanley Maloy, San Diego State University
News headlines in the summer of 2011 painted E. coli
as vicious bacteria, capable of causing disease and
death. But this is only one small part of the story of E.
coli; its relationship to human health and the food we
eat is much more complex. Not all E. coli are bad - in
fact most are not - and some are even beneficial!
Despite last year’s outbreak, most experts agree that
food safety is better than ever, but we must remain
vigilant to protect our food. E. coli has not been
domesticated. There are still “wild” strains that have
the capacity to cause illness and death and we should
expect new strains to emerge that will continue to
threaten our health and the safety of our food. But it is
important to remember that these are not new
challenges - E. coli has accompanied humans and
larger animals for millennia. It has become an
important part of our gut and, much more recently, a
remarkable tool for scientific study. This session will
focus on the larger story of E. coli: its role in human
health, in food, and even in our understanding of our
own biology.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
27
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
5. The Hosthogen Genome in 4D
Connect 5
JJ Miranda, University of California, San Francisco
The idea that genomes intertwine in the threedimensional space of the nucleus is reshaping our
previously linear concepts of gene regulation.
Ubiquitous long-range interactions fold genomes into
defined conformations. The CCCTC-binding factor
(CTCF) has repeatedly emerged as a necessary
component for the formation of loops that bridge distal
DNA elements on the same and even different
chromosomes to regulate transcription. CTCF-binding
sites localize mostly to intergenic regions, but also to
introns, promoters, and exons. Indeed, these
sequences are enriched at chromatin loops genomewide. This dynamic and regulated genome
organization is one of the large-scale cellular
phenomena now becoming amenable to highresolution mechanistic understanding through the
concerted efforts of genetics, biochemistry, and
structural biology. I will describe our laboratory's
efforts at defining the structure and function of CTCF
when bound to human host and viral pathogen
genomes.
6. Resolving Community and Metabolic Dynamics
in Colorado Plateau Biological Soil Crusts
Connect 3
Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory
Desert biological soil crusts are simple cyanobacteriadominated surface soil microbial communities found
on all continents in areas with infrequent wetting,
often extreme temperatures, and low coverage of
vascular plants. They exist for extended periods in a
desiccated dormant state, yet rapidly re-boot
metabolism within minutes of wetting. They inhabit
“the fringe” of habitability with respect to aridity,
constituting the world’s largest biofilm. The scale and
potential sensitivity of these crusts to alterations in
temperature and precipitation frequency/duration
make them particularly relevant to understanding the
impact of climate change on soil microbial
communities and the pathways through which fixed
carbon flows. This talk will describe results from an
integrated biogeochemical, microbiological, genomic
and metabolomic analysis following a pulsed activity
event (precipitation). Here, crust samples from the
Colorado Plateau were re-wetted under controlled
conditions, maintained in a saturated state for 3 diel
cycles before a return to dormancy induced by
desiccation. During this process real-time monitoring
of CO2, O2, H2, CH4 and pH was performed with
periodic sampling for dissolved anions and cations.
Selected time points were analyzed for community
gene expression and metabolism to define the
synchronization of microbial physiology,
biogeochemistry and such pulsed activity events.
Integration of these results provides mechanistic
insights into the bioenergetics, stress responses, and
community adaptations that occur during a wetting
cycle with the eventual goal of predicting
environmental ‘tipping-points’ for the crust community.
7. Innate Immune Detection of Pathogenic
Bacteria
Connect 1
Victoria Stone, University of California, Santa Cruz
The mammalian innate immune system must
distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic
bacteria. Mutations in the innate immune receptors
that mediate this specific recognition cause
susceptibility to infectious diseases or inflammatory
disorders. Many bacterial pathogens use a
specialized apparatus called a type III secretion
system (T3SS) to attack mammalian host cells by
injecting them with toxins. Mammalian cells defend
themselves against this attack by recognizing the
T3SS and launching an inflammatory response aimed
at eliminating the T3SS-expressing pathogen. How
T3SS recognition is achieved remains incompletely
understood and is a very active area of research, both
in our lab and others. We will discuss what is currently
known about T3SS recognition, using the human
pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model
system. We will end with a discussion of how Y.
pseudotuberculosis T3SS components may have
evolved to maximize toxin delivery while limiting
inflammation.
8. The Science of the Microbiome: A Renaissance
for Microbiology
Engage
James Versalovic, Baylor College of Medicine
The NIH-supported Human Microbiome Project and
the International Human Microbiome Consortium
highlight the enormous potential of human and animal
microbiomes for advancing the life sciences. The
human microbiome provides many opportunities for
discoveries of nutrients, metabolites, diagnostic
targets, and new therapies that may have a major
impact collectively in medicine. Medical microbiology
is being transformed from an area focused on
infectious agents and diseases to the awareness of
the much broader roles of microbes in mammalian
development, physiology, pathophysiology, immunity
and metabolism. New discoveries and applications of
these findings by “mining” the microbiome are already
creating a renaissance of microbiology and how we
harness the functional capacities of microbes to refine
approaches to health maintenance, disease
prevention, and molecular medicine. We will review
major topics and questions in metagenomics and
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
28
microbiome research and some examples of how the
microbiome may shed light on mammalian
physiology.
LUNCH – Pick up Box Lunch and Proceed to
Breakout Sessions
12:15 PM – 12:45 PM
Convene 1 & 2
leaders in these areas. Presenters are encouraged to
actively engage participants in their presentations.
These sessions are presented twice during the
conference.
1. Subversion of the Host Epithelial Barrier by
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Synergy 1
Joanne Engel, University of California, San
Francisco
LABORATORY SAFETY GUIDELINES
BREAKOUT SESSIONS
12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
(6 sessions)
1A. Personal Protection
Synergy 4
Facilitator: Elizabeth Emmert, Salisbury University
1B. Personal Protection
Synergy 1
Facilitator: Neil Baker, The Ohio State University
2A. Standard Lab Practices
Engage
Facilitator: Amy White, Virginia Western Community
College
2B. Standard Lab Practices
Synergy 5
Facilitator: Ronald Atlas, University of Louisville
3. Lab Physical Space and Stock Cultures
Synergy 2
Facilitator: Jeffrey Byrd, St. Mary’s College of
Maryland
4. Training and Documents
Connect 1
Facilitator: Diane Hartman, Baylor University
CONCURRENT SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS II of II
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
(8 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to enhancing
participant's knowledge of current topics in biology
and science education through lectures given by the
Dr. Joanne Engel will explore the dynamic
interactions between the important human
opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and
the host epithelial barrier. While normal hosts are
constantly exposed to this environmental pathogen, in
the setting of epithelial barrier damage and
immunocompromise, this bacteria unleashes its
armamentarium of virulence factors to cause
devastating infections that lead to it being the fourth
leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. While
we have learned about the interactions of pathogens
with host cells using in vitro cell culture systems, we
are increasingly recognizing the importance of
studying these interactions in the context of polarized
epithelial cells in 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional
contexts. In this talk, Dr. Engel will describe how
using cutting edge microscopy and cell biology
(including cool movies and micrographs), has gained
unexpected insights into how these systems allow for
the study of bacterial biofilms on the surface of
epithelial cells, how pathogens subvert and
manipulate host cell polarity, and how the host cell
utilize these cues to mount an innate immune
response.
2. Emerging Pathogens: How Do We Detect and
Track Them?
Synergy 2
Peter Gilligan, University of North Carolina
Over the past thirty years, dozens of new pathogens
have been discovered. One of them, HIV, has literally
changed the world. In this presentation, we will
discuss how new pathogens emerge, how we first
recognize them, and then how we track them so we
can learn how they move through a population. We
will use 3 specific examples of emerging pathogens,
Burkholderia cepacia complex, enterohaemorrhagic
Escherichia coli, and community associated
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus to
illustrate these issues. At the end of presentation, the
participant we have an enhanced understanding of:
1. How new pathogens emerge
2. The molecular tools that can be used to track
these organisms spread
3. How understanding these organisms spread
allow for interventions to control these
infection
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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FRIDAY, JUNE 15
Specific tools that will be discussed include PCR for
detection, nucleic acid sequencing for identification,
and pulse field gel electrophoresis and multi-locus
sequence typing for understanding their
epidemiology.
opportunity to illustrate the diversity of microbial
metabolism and a chance to highlight microbes’
powerful impact on the environment.
5. The Hosthogen Genome in 4D
Connect 5
JJ Miranda, University of California, San Francisco
3. Discoveries in Phylogenetically-Driven
Genomic Sequencing Projects and its Potential
for Your Students
Synergy 4
Cheryl Kerfeld, DOE Joint Genome Institute
The Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has undertaken a
large-scale, phylogenetically driven approach to
microbial genome sequencing. The results, the
Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea
(GEBA), are a treasure trove of new insights into
bacterial metabolism. For example, bacterial
microcompartments, which were only known from
transmission electron micrographs of a few microbial
species, are surprisingly widespread; the potential to
form microcompartments can be found in more than
20% of all bacterial genomes and in almost every
phyla. Likewise, deep sequencing within a phylum
also provides tremendous insight into the genetic
basis of ecophysiology. The cyanobacteria, arguably
one of the most diverse groups in terms of lifestyle
and morphology, were until GEBA-Cyano poorly
sampled in terms of sequencing. I’ll present results of
these comparative genomic analyses and describe
ways in which undergraduates and faculty can get
involved in analyzing this exciting data using the IMGACT system.
4. American Academy of Microbiology Presents:
Microbes and Oil Spills
Synergy 5
Stanley Maloy, San Diego State University
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, while tragic, shoved
microbiology into the limelight. Speckled throughout
the media coverage of the spill was references to
microbes’ amazing ability to help “clean up” oil spills,
but with little to no explanation of exactly what this
meant. Can microbes really “eat” oil? How does this
work? And what are the possibilities for
microorganisms to be used for bioremediation? This
session examines the extreme ecosystem of an oil
spill and the oil-munching microorganisms that have
evolved the tools to degrade one of the most
environmentally pernicious compounds, crude oil. It
highlights how environmental factors can help, or
hinder, this natural microbial remediation process,
and describes how environmental microbiologists and
microbes can team up to limit the damage of oil spills
to the environment. The interactions between marine
microorganisms and oil spills offer a remarkable
The idea that genomes intertwine in the threedimensional space of the nucleus is reshaping our
previously linear concepts of gene regulation.
Ubiquitous long-range interactions fold genomes into
defined conformations. The CCCTC-binding factor
(CTCF) has repeatedly emerged as a necessary
component for the formation of loops that bridge distal
DNA elements on the same and even different
chromosomes to regulate transcription. CTCF-binding
sites localize mostly to intergenic regions, but also to
introns, promoters, and exons. Indeed, these
sequences are enriched at chromatin loops genomewide. This dynamic and regulated genome
organization is one of the large-scale cellular
phenomena now becoming amenable to highresolution mechanistic understanding through the
concerted efforts of genetics, biochemistry, and
structural biology. I will describe our laboratory's
efforts at defining the structure and function of CTCF
when bound to human host and viral pathogen
genomes.
6. Resolving Community and Metabolic Dynamics
in Colorado Plateau Biological Soil Crusts
Connect 3
Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory
Desert biological soil crusts are simple cyanobacteriadominated surface soil microbial communities found
on all continents in areas with infrequent wetting,
often extreme temperatures, and low coverage of
vascular plants. They exist for extended periods in a
desiccated dormant state, yet rapidly re-boot
metabolism within minutes of wetting. They inhabit
“the fringe” of habitability with respect to aridity,
constituting the world’s largest biofilm. The scale and
potential sensitivity of these crusts to alterations in
temperature and precipitation frequency/duration
make them particularly relevant to understanding the
impact of climate change on soil microbial
communities and the pathways through which fixed
carbon flows. This talk will describe results from an
integrated biogeochemical, microbiological, genomic
and metabolomic analysis following a pulsed activity
event (precipitation). Here, crust samples from the
Colorado Plateau were re-wetted under controlled
conditions, maintained in a saturated state for 3 diel
cycles before a return to dormancy induced by
desiccation. During this process real-time monitoring
of CO2, O2, H2, CH4 and pH was performed with
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
30
periodic sampling for dissolved anions and cations.
Selected time points were analyzed for community
gene expression and metabolism to define the
synchronization of microbial physiology,
biogeochemistry and such pulsed activity events.
Integration of these results provides mechanistic
insights into the bioenergetics, stress responses, and
community adaptations that occur during a wetting
cycle with the eventual goal of predicting
environmental ‘tipping-points’ for the crust community.
approaches to health maintenance, disease
prevention, and molecular medicine. We will review
major topics and questions in metagenomics and
microbiome research and some examples of how the
microbiome may shed light on mammalian
physiology.
7. Innate Immune Detection of Pathogenic
Bacteria
Connect 1
Only registered exhibitors and poster authors will be
allowed into the hall at this time.
Victoria Stone, University of California, Santa Cruz
The mammalian innate immune system must
distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic
bacteria. Mutations in the innate immune receptors
that mediate this specific recognition cause
susceptibility to infectious diseases or inflammatory
disorders. Many bacterial pathogens use a
specialized apparatus called a type III secretion
system (T3SS) to attack mammalian host cells by
injecting them with toxins. Mammalian cells defend
themselves against this attack by recognizing the
T3SS and launching an inflammatory response aimed
at eliminating the T3SS-expressing pathogen. How
T3SS recognition is achieved remains incompletely
understood and is a very active area of research, both
in our lab and others. We will discuss what is currently
known about T3SS recognition, using the human
pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model
system. We will end with a discussion of how Y.
pseudotuberculosis T3SS components may have
evolved to maximize toxin delivery while limiting
inflammation.
8. The Science of the Microbiome: A Renaissance
for Microbiology
Engage
James Versalovic, Baylor College of Medicine
The NIH-supported Human Microbiome Project and
the International Human Microbiome Consortium
highlight the enormous potential of human and animal
microbiomes for advancing the life sciences. The
human microbiome provides many opportunities for
discoveries of nutrients, metabolites, diagnostic
targets, and new therapies that may have a major
impact collectively in medicine. Medical microbiology
is being transformed from an area focused on
infectious agents and diseases to the awareness of
the much broader roles of microbes in mammalian
development, physiology, pathophysiology, immunity
and metabolism. New discoveries and applications of
these findings by “mining” the microbiome are already
creating a renaissance of microbiology and how we
harness the functional capacities of microbes to refine
EXHIBITOR AND POSTER SETUP
3:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
CONCURRENT PEDAGOGY SESSIONS
II of III
3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
(5 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to presenting practices
and pedagogies that have been assessed for
classroom effectiveness. Presenters will provide
background information and their approach to the
strategy, leaving time for participants to practice and
reflect upon how they can implement the new practice
or approach into their classrooms. These sessions
are presented in two of three times slots during the
conference.
1. Understanding by Design: Using Intelligent
Course Design to Build Learning Environments
Synergy 1
Spencer Benson, University of Maryland, College
Park and 2011 Carski Foundation Distinguished
Undergraduate Teaching Awardee
(Only presented once)
Understanding by Design (UbD) is also referred to as
Backward Design and is used by many Pre-K through
20 educators and instructional designers. This
session will use the work of Wiggins and McTighe as
a background to discuss a learning centered
approach to course and learning activity design. In
the session participants will work through a series of
exercises to define what is information/knowledge that
is central to their course, how to assess if students
are developing understanding of the materials and
how one selects content that support the desired
learning goals. Participants should attend with a
specific course in mind and bring a recent syllabus for
the course they are teaching, restructuring, or thinking
of developing.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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FRIDAY, JUNE 15
2. Lab Design Based on Scientific Methods
Synergy 2
Session A: Transforming Laboratory Activities to
Enhance the Undergraduate Research Experience
Madhusudan Choudhary, Sam Houston State
University
Undergraduate research experiences are necessary
for active learning and the development of higherorder critical thinking. Although traditional practices
help students to perform certain laboratory
experiments, students have only limited exposure and
interaction with the scientific process and
methodology. The objective of this proposal is to
organize a panel discussion to discuss the principles
and activities that would transform conventional
laboratory practices so that students can directly gain
research experience and learn about the process of
scientific investigation. The panel will consist of
educators who are committed to incorporating
research activities into the classroom and have firsthand transformed traditional laboratory activities by
introducing research-based activities into their own
courses. These activities include reading scientific
literature, developing hypotheses, designing
experiments, making reliable and logical inferences,
and preparing and reviewing manuscripts. Topics of
presentations will include information from a diverse
set of course offerings in microbiology, molecular
biology, genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. New
designed laboratory modules will be shared with
educators interested in adding this approach into their
courses.
Session B: Challenging Undergraduates through
a Discovery-Based Laboratory Course
Jorge L.M. Rodrigues, University of Texas
Microbiology undergraduate students take a number
of laboratory courses to fulfill program requirements.
Traditionally, laboratory courses are structured
around basic exercises, followed by a questionnaire
that will be answered at the end of the class period.
Students describe these exercises as easy, repetitive,
and tedious. More importantly, learned skills are lost
as students’ progress towards the degree. I
hypothesize that students will learn problem-solving
skills when properly challenged in class. In order to
develop skills in classical and molecular microbiology
methods, I developed an upper division laboratory
course, in which students are challenged to isolate
and characterize an unknown microorganism.
Samples come from the student’s interest in a
particular environment. In the first teaching module,
students receive general laboratory protocols and are
required to maintain laboratory notebook for the
experiments. The American Society for Microbiology
instructions to authors serves as a guide for a mid-
term and final laboratory reports. During the second
teaching module, students receive a number of tasks
for molecular characterization of the microorganism,
but no protocols are provided. Students are
challenged to identify research objectives through
searches and discussion the current literature. They
develop their own experimental protocols for
polymerase chain reaction, primer design, and
molecular taxonomy. Each student successfully
characterized its isolate. Students enhanced their
quantitative skills through growth curve analysis and
statistical significance of results, gained laboratory
skills for DNA amplification, cloning, and
transformation, and learned to write and evaluate
technical literature.
3. Transforming “Lecture” Halls into StudentCentered Classrooms
Synergy 5
Michael Dougherty, American Society of Human
Genetics
Large lecture halls do not have to be barriers to
student-centered instruction. With proper
implementation, as few as one or two interactive
teaching strategies can make any classroom more
interactive and students more responsible for their
own learning. Moreover, several of these techniques
have been demonstrated to improve student
achievement. In this session, you will learn how to
use think-pair-share in combination with conceptual,
multiple-choice questions to dramatically change the
learning environment in your classes. The workshop
will feature situated-apprenticeships in which
participants will apply what they’ve learned using their
peers in the role of students. This will give you the
confidence to try these techniques immediately with
your own students and to be successful quickly.
4. Forming Effective Student Groups for Active
Learning Pedagogies
Synergy 4
Samantha Elliott, St. Mary’s College of Maryland
Many models of student-centered learning
environments revolve around the use of group work.
How does one create these groups for maximum
effectiveness in the classroom? What does a
functional group look like? What factors must be
addressed to best create groups to fit the pedagogical
goal of the day? Should groups be changed
frequently or remain static throughout the semester?
We will review what the literature tells us about group
dynamics in the undergraduate classroom, and the
presenter will share data from her own experiences.
Then participants will break out into small groups to
discuss their individual pedagogies that require group
work and align what they have learned in the session
to their classroom needs.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
32
5. Programs and Best Practices to Increase
Retention and Graduation Rates of Students from
Underrepresented Groups in STEM: An Overview
of the California State University Louis Stokes
Alliance for Minority Participation Program
Engage
Enid Gonzalez, California State University,
Sacramento
Juanita Barrena, California State University,
Sacramento
Lilia De La Cerda, California State University, Fresno
Margaret Jefferson, California State University, Los
Angeles
The California State University Louis Stokes Alliance
for Minority Participation (CSU-LSAMP) is a CSU
system-wide effort that provides a strategic framework
for students who face social, educational, or
economic barriers to careers in STEM. For the last
eighteen years, CSU LSAMP, which currently
includes 22 campuses of the CSU, has served a total
19,387 students, 85% of these students are from
underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, and has
achieved the following outcomes: 1) 2.5 fold increase
in the number of STEM baccalaureate degrees
granted by the CSU; 2) Increased persistence and
graduation rates of LSAMP URM graduates; 3)
Increased participation of URM students in
undergraduate research experiences, both domestic
and international; and 4) increased progression of
URM students to doctoral level of study in STEM.
These objectives are achieved by providing students
an array of support activities ranging from “gatekeeper” course support to the design of unique
undergraduate research experiences. In this session
we will present an overview of CSU LSAMP as a
system-wide effort, examples of three campus-based
CSU-LSAMP programs, and a more detailed
description of 1-2 of the best practices developed by
each of the campuses.
management and delivery time while maintaining
rigor, content coverage and deep learning. The
session will model various approaches to teaching
that can be adapted to both small and large classes.
EXHIBIT HALL OPENING & STREETS OF
SAN FRANCISCO RECEPTION
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
Join us in welcoming our Exhibitors and Sponsors
while you wander through San Francisco without
needing to leave the building. Visit Fisherman’s
Wharf, Chinatown, North Beach and Ghirardelli
Square. Heavy hors d'oeuvres will be served. Two
complimentary drink tickets may be found in your
attendee registration packet.
PLENARY LECTURE
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Convene 1 & 2
Teaching Effectively – Better Learning with Less
Time Preparing
Spencer Benson, University of Maryland, College
Park and 2011 Carski Foundation Distinguished
Undergraduate Teaching Awardee
In this interactive session we will explore the adage
that often in teaching “Less is More” by focusing on
how faculty can work more effectively to promote
student learning in a variety of course types. Through
careful planning, intelligent course design and
integration of technology it is possible to achieve Less
is More. It is possible to reduce course preparation,
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
33
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
ASMCUE REGISTRATION
7:00 AM – 3:30 PM
Inspire Lobby
NETWORKING BREAKFAST BY LOCATION
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM
Convene 1 & 2
ASM supports thirty-five Branches organized by
geographical territories that are defined by one or
more states and/or zip code areas. ASM Branches
are individually chartered, elect their own officers, set
their own dues, and determine their own membership
criteria. Participation in an ASM Branch enables
members to enhance their careers and professional
lives in many ways. Branches provide interesting and
inclusive programming based upon the input of
attendees, and often employ intimate meeting venues
that facilitate enhanced networking opportunities.
Meet others in the same vicinity and international
attendees will have an opportunity to meet as well.
PLENARY LECTURE
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Convene 1 & 2
Host-Virus Interactions: A New Focus on Fat
Melanie Ott, University of California, San Francisco
Several RNA viruses use intracellular fat droplets to
support different steps of their life cycle. Some
intracellular bacteria and parasites usurp host lipid
droplets or encode their own lipid biosynthesis
machinery, thus allowing production of fat droplets
independently of their host. Although many
mechanistic details of host/pathogen lipid droplet
interactions are unknown, a picture emerges in which
the unique cellular architecture and energy stored in
lipid droplets are important in the replication of diverse
pathogens. I will discuss the close interaction of
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with intracellular
lipids. Two viral proteins, the nucleocapsid core and
the phosphoprotein NS5A, localize to the surface of
lipid droplets, a critical step in the viral life cycle. We
find that this step requires the activity of cellular
diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), one of two
triglyceride-synthesizing enzymes in the endoplasmic
reticulum. The molecular mechanisms and
therapeutic implications of these findings will be
discussed.
EXHIBITOR SHOWCASE
9:00 AM – 3:30 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
ASM FACULTY PROGRAMS POSTER
SESSION
9:00 AM – 3:30 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
The Visual Media Briefs: MicrobeLibrary 3.0
S. Bagley, Chair, Visual Media Brief Editorial
Committee, Michigan Technological University, P.
Cummings, Johns Hopkins University, G. Kaiser,
The Community College of Baltimore County,
Catonsville Campus, and R. Buxton, University of
Utah
The Visual Media Briefs (VMB) contain peer-reviewed
short communications with high quality images,
animations or videos along with sufficient information
to allow for effective use in lecture, lab or other types
of presentations. As compared to the previous Visual
Collection, the content requirements have been
stream-lined and the instructions revamped for clarity
and ease of submission. The main text components
are similar to those found in other short research
communications and articles, i.e., Title, Authors,
Summary, Introduction, Methods, Discussion, and
References. Additional information is provided to
allow for highly effective searching of the VMB
contents, including searches based on the revised
ASM core curriculum concepts. Detailed information
is now provided on the quality and format for the
images, animations, and videos. Each year Editor’s
Choice Awards are selected based on the
submissions in each category for the previous year.
Volunteers are needed to serve as ad hoc reviewers
for new submissions and for evaluation of older digital
submissions made under earlier versions of the
MicrobeLibrary.
A Year in Progress: 2011 ASM/NSF Biology
Scholars Program Growth and the Advancement
of Undergraduate Education Reform
A.L. Chang, American Society for Microbiology and
L. Brancaccio-Taras, Kingsborough Community
College
The National Science Foundation and the American
Society for Microbiology recognize the need for the
biology education community to (i) make significant
and sustained changes in the way educators teach at
the undergraduate level and (ii) serve as agents of
change in associated professional societies to further
effect educational reform. The Biology Scholars
Program strives to fulfill this need and as a result, has
grown from 2005’s small-scale faculty development
program to today’s core group of over 150 biology
educators who are committed to improving student
learning through ongoing self-evaluation of their
teaching practices. By focusing on the Program’s
strategic goals of empowering biologists, supporting a
community, and building networks among life science
professional societies, 2011 saw the completion of a
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
34
number of significant activities including the addition
of a new Residency, the overhaul of the BSP website,
and the establishment of two Alumni grants.
Multistate Investigation of Laboratory-Acquired
Salmonella Typhimurium Infections
7
1,2
3
C. Bressler , J. Gaines , T. Nguyen , M. Cameron4
5
5
5
Adams , L. Glenn , E. Harvey , E. Traphagen , J.
6
6
6
6
Halpin , J. Besser , P. Gerner-Smidt , P. Fields , C.
3 1
Barton Behravesh , Epidemic Intelligence Service,
2
Office of Workforce and Career Development,
Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, DFWED,
3
NCEZID, CDC, Outbreak Response and Prevention
4
Branch, DFWED, NCEZID, CDC, New Mexico
5
Department of Health, Massachusettes Department
6
of Public Health, Enteric Diseases Laboratory
7
Branch, DFWED, NCEZID, CDC, CDC
Approximately 41,000 laboratory-confirmed
Salmonella infections are reported annually;
Salmonella serotype Typhimurium (STm) accounts for
15%. Laboratory-acquired Salmonella infections are
rarely reported and typically identified as single cases.
In October 2010, CDC began investigating a
nationwide increase in STm infections with pulsedfield gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern JPXX01.0014
reported to PulseNet, the national molecular
subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance.
A case was defined as infection in a person with the
JPXX01.0014 strain of STm and illness onset
between 08/14/2010-04/28/2011. A case-control
study was conducted to identify sources of infection.
Salmonella strains used in microbiology laboratories
were subtyped. An electronic survey of microbiology
laboratory directors was conducted to better
understand laboratory safety practices.
Among 109 cases identified in 38 states, 12% were
hospitalized and one died. During initial interviews,
two case patients reported working with STm in two
different microbiology laboratories. Among 58 cases
interviewed, 60% reported exposure to a microbiology
laboratory. In the case control study, illness was
significantly associated with exposure to a
microbiology laboratory (matched Odds Ratio
[mOR]=63.2, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]=11.1-∞). The majority (65%) were in teaching laboratories.
Commercially available Salmonella isolates with the
same PFGE pattern were identified in teaching
laboratories associated with illnesses. Among 389
laboratory directors surveyed, ~10% were unfamiliar
with formal biosafety training materials and <40%
informed students/staff about signs and symptoms of
infection with the pathogens used in the laboratory.
Students and staff in microbiology laboratories are at
risk for Salmonella infection. Laboratory-acquired
infections may contribute to baseline numbers of
infections and go unrecognized in current surveillance
systems. Development of biosafety guidelines and
training materials specific to the teaching laboratory
setting is needed.
Faculty Development in Bioinformatics and
Genomics: A Needs Assessment
B. Goodner, Hiram College
How much do you use bioinformatics and genomics in
your courses? How prepared do you feel to teach the
role of various bioinformatics tools and how they
work? How much do you use genome-level data
and/or comparative genomics analyses in your
courses? For much of the past decade, ASM and
other groups have tried to help faculty upgrade their
concept and skill repertoire in bioinformatics,
genomics, and functional genomics. How have we
helped you? What are the current needs of
undergraduate faculty in this area? We would greatly
appreciate a little of your time to collect some
information that will determine future faculty
development efforts.
The New Critical Thinking Question Bank
Collection - MicrobeLibrary 3.0
G. Kaiser, Community College of Baltimore County,
Chair, Critical Thinking Question Bank Editorial
Committee
Would you like to have some new critical thinking
questions for use either with audience response
systems in your classroom or on your exams? Would
you like to increase interactive learning in your
microbiology class? Maybe you are interested in
submitting some of your tried and true critical thinking
questions for possible publication in MicrobeLibrary
so they may be used by others. The Critical Thinking
Question Bank (CTQB) is a new MicrobeLibrary
collection of peer-reviewed multiple choice questions
that go beyond rote memory and recall to requiring
critical thought. The level of critical thinking is
designated minimally at level three (application) in
Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Levels with the
questions categorized based on the 2011 ASM
Recommended Curricular Guidelines. Designed
especially for interactive learning using audience
response systems, the questions are of value for preand post-tests or traditional exams, and may be used
in the classroom or laboratory or on-line in blendedand distance-learning experiences.
Also visit our poster to sign up to become involved
with this exciting educational resource.
Building an Audiovisual Approach to
Microbiology – MicrobeLibrary-TV!
M.O. Martin, University of Puget Sound and J.
Herzog, Herkimer County Community College
Every educator interested in improving her or his craft
is searching for new and innovative ways of reaching
diverse student audiences. There has been recent
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
35
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
interest in using audiovisual resources in teaching,
ranging from accessory material in addition to
lectures, to conceptual demonstrations, and even as a
pathway to online instruction. From student-created
videos, humorous approaches to pedagogy, and
resources such as Khan Academy (and some
publishers), the use of audiovisual resources in
biological education is growing swiftly.
The MicrobeLibrary Committee believes that a
collection of short video clips showcasing innovative
and engaging pedagogical tools related to teaching
and learning microbiology could be a valuable
resource to instructors in a variety of institutional
environments. To that end, ML-TV is a proposed
channel of YouTube videos that are scientifically
accurate, pedagogically sound, and visually and
audibly clear — warranting “MicrobeLibrary Approval”
vetting and stature. A first set of YouTube videos is
intended to inform and demonstrate effective
approaches to teaching based on cutting edge
research about how people learn science.
During the next few months, we seek help from
microbiology educators in the following ways: what
kinds of classroom audiovisual resources have you
found useful in the past, what kinds of ML-TV videos
would be most useful to your teaching mission in the
future, and would you like to assist us in the launching
of this initiative? We are seeking ideas, collaborators
in constructing a “vetting” framework for video
resources, and possible sample videos. Please visit
our poster to share ideas and approaches and help
make ML-TV a reality!
The Gallery and Laboratory Protocols Collections
- MicrobeLibrary 3.0
Patricia Shields, University of Maryland, Interim
Chair, Protocol Editorial Committee and Jennifer
Herzog, Herkimer County Community College, Chair,
Gallery Editorial Committee
Are you interested in trying a new technique in your
lab course? Are you unfamiliar with the details of how
a particular protocol works? Do you want to show
your class images of results of a procedure you don’t
have the materials to perform? Maybe you are
interested in having one of your images published or
working on one of the new protocols. Check out the
free access MicrobeLibrary Gallery (formerly the
Atlas) and Laboratory Protocols collections. These
collections were established in 2005, but have been
updated and reorganized for 2012. The Laboratory
Protocols collection is a resource of peer-reviewed
standard microbiology protocols coupled with highresolution images of protocol results. Each project
includes detailed background information, theory
behind the procedure and best of all a “ready to go”
procedure that can be brought directly into the
teaching lab. The Gallery is a collection of images,
videos, and animations that can be used to enhance
lecture or lab presentations. There are now over 40
protocols and hundreds of images in the collection.
The newest editions for 2012 are Starch Agar, Gelatin
hydrolysis and Carbohydrate fermentation. Visit our
poster to sign up as a volunteer and become involved
with these exciting educational resources.
ASM's K-12 Outreach Community: Connecting
and Raising Awareness
Dave Westenberg, Missouri University of Science
and Technology
The Committee on K-12 Outreach is a standing
committee of the Education Board of the American
Society for Microbiology. The mission of the
Committee is to: 1) Engage the community of
microbiologists and educators in K-12 outreach, and
2) Promote microbiology in the K-12 community. The
committee provides professional development
programs, promotes interest in microbiology careers,
provides resources for K-12 outreach, identifies
financial and human resources for programs, supports
involvement of the microbiology community in K-12
education, and increases recognition of microbiology
as an integral part of scientific literacy. ASM
volunteers submit and review outreach activities,
books and websites targeted to the K-12 community
which are made available through the committee
website. ASM maintains a Science Education
Network (SEN) for ASM members to volunteer their
time and resources and make connections with
educators. The committee has significantly
contributed to the advancement and improvement of
science education through its collection of activities
and presenting scientific sessions at national
education conferences. We are seeking new
volunteers, new activities and new suggestions to
promote microbiology to the public.
POSTER SESSION A
9:15 AM – 10:15 AM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
Aligning ASMCUE Abstracts to Biological
Concepts
The 2012 abstracts are organized by both content
and pedagogy to help participants navigate more
easily through the poster session. The content
themes are organized by six core concepts. Five of
the concepts were put forth in the 2011 national
report, Vision and Change: Transforming
Undergraduate Biology Education and include
evolution, structure and function, pathways,
information flow and systems. A sixth concept specific
to microbiology, the impact of microorganisms, is also
used. The complete guidelines may be found at
www.asm.org/educators under Curriculum
Resources.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
36
The pedagogy themes are organized into five
categories: course design, hands-on projects, student
learning, teaching approaches, and teaching tools.
Each abstract is assigned to both content and
pedagogy themes. These assignments, designated by
the submitting author, are placed below the full
abstract. See page 73 for Poster Abstract Content
and Pedagogy Grid. Abstracts are found in the
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, Volume
13, Issue 1.
1-A
Perspectives in Microbiology: Using Video-Based
Assignments to Enhance Students’ Historical and
Global Understanding of Infectious Diseases
J.C. Baker and K.L.W. Walton. Missouri Western
State University, St. Joseph, MO.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
3-A
Active Learning and Advising Strategies in
Freshman Introductory Biology—If You Build It,
Some Will Come
S.B. Boomer, K.L. Latham, and M.J. Baltzley.
Western Oregon University, Monmouth, OR.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning,
Teaching approaches
5-A
Calibrated Peer Review Use Improved LowAchieving Student Performance on the California
Critical Thinking Skills Test Posttest
J.P. Caruso. Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton,
FL.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning
7-A
Role of Worksheets and Classroom Exercises in
Developing Higher Order Cognitive Skills (HOCS)
L. Chilukuri. University of California San Diego, San
Diego, CA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches,
Teaching tools
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Impact of microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design, Handson projects
11-A
Exploring Your Genome: Can an IntroductoryLevel, Online Course Increase Genomics
Knowledge and Literacy?
J.C. Drew, S. Galindo-Gonzalez, and E.W. Triplett.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
13-A
Evaluation of Cooperative Quizzes in a TeamBased Learning Course
S.L. Elliott. St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's
City, MD.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
15-A
Assessing the Impact of Metacognition and
Reading Lessons on Metacognitive Awareness
and Reading Comprehension in Introductory
Biology
K.M. Hill and G.A. Heiberger. South Dakota State
University, Brookings, SD.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
17-A
What Happens When Students Develop and
Answer Their Own Questions in Biology Instead
of Answering Our Questions?
J.J. Huang. F.W. Olin College of Engineering,
Needham, MA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
19-A
Using Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria as a Vehicle
for Increasing Student Biomedical/Environmental
Health Career Awareness and Appreciation for the
Adaptability of the Microbial World
C.H. Hunnes. Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
9-A
Research Based Metagenomic Soil Analysis
Laboratory
P.C. Cummings and K. M. Obom. Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, MD.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
37
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
21-A
Creation of a Scholars Program to Breathe Life
Back into the STEM Disciplines at a Small College
B.S. Mauck. College of Saint Mary, Omaha, NE.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
23-A
Does the Use of Interactive Exercises Using
Three-Dimensional Models of DNA in an
Undergraduate Microbiology Class Enhance
Learning of DNA Concepts?
A.H. McDonald. Concordia University Wisconsin,
Mequon, WI.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning,
Teaching tools
25-A
Murder in Cancun: Using an Interactive Case
Study Approach to Improve Introductory Biology
Students’ Understanding of Restriction Digests
and Molecular Biology Techniques
J.T. Olimpo and P.A. Shields. University of Maryland,
College Park, MD.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning
27-A
Enhanced Student Learning in Genetics via
Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique with
Daily Individual and Group Quizzes
R.A. Puffenbarger. Bridgewater College,
Bridgewater, VA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning
29-A
Integrating Outcomes-Based Assessment into a
Multidisciplinary Research-Oriented Laboratory
Curriculum
E.R. Sanders, C. Shapiro, C. Ayon, M. Ko, and M.
Levis-Fitzgerald. University of California Los Angeles,
Los Angeles, CA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning
31-A
Using Bioinformatics Tools in the K-8 Classroom:
Reinforcing and Extending Fundamental
Biological Concepts
1
1
2 1
M. Shuster , J. Sandry , and K. Glazewski . New
2
Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM; Indiana
University, Bloomington, IN.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
33-A
Self-Guided Peer Discussion is Equally as
Effective as Instructor-Guided Discussion Prior to
Answering Clicker Questions
N.L.B. Wernick. University of Massachusetts Lowell,
Lowell, MA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning,
Teaching approaches
AUTHOR CORNER
9:15 AM – 9:45 AM
Wiley Exhibit Booth
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Featured Author: Jackie Black
th
Microbiology: Principles and Explorations, 8 edition
Jackie Black’s bestselling textbook delivers a studentfriendly approach that provides readers with a
thorough and accessible introduction to the study of
microbiology. This new edition amplifies the core
concepts, focuses on key details, and includes a more
robust visual program to engage students in an
interactive experience.
PRODUCT CORNER
9:15 AM – 9:45 AM
Connect 5
Sponsored by Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education
Featured Product: Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education
In 2010, the Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education (JMBE) moved to an open-access platform,
expanded its scope to include various types of
scholarly articles, and doubled the number of issues
per year to two. Since making these changes,
submissions to the journal have increased nearly
500%. While inundated with submissions, editors and
reviewers have maintained rigorous standards,
accepting nearly 37% of manuscripts.
JMBE accepts articles that promote good pedagogy
and design, foster scholarly teaching, and advance
biology education research. The various sections of
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
38
JMBE allow for the submission of articles diverse in
scope and focus. Attend this session to learn more
about the Journal sections, creating an account at the
JMBE site, and the submission and review processes.
JMBE welcomes submissions for the upcoming
issues. Articles are reviewed on a rolling basis, and
submissions are encouraged and accepted
throughout the year. The final submission deadline to
be considered for publication in volume 13, issue 2
(December 2012) is 1 July 2012 and for volume 14,
issue 1 (May 2013) is December 1, 2012. For more
information, please visit http://jmbe.asm.org.
known features in addition to a completely new,
dynamic, instructional art program, and an extensive
revision of the text for readability and student
engagement – making this one of the best options for
nonmajors microbiology students. Join Denise as she
discusses the new edition and find out why her
students and other instructors have been so
enthusiastic about the changes.
PRODUCT CORNER
9:45 AM – 10:15 AM
Connect 4
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
PRODUCT CORNER
9:15 AM – 9:45 AM
Connect 3
Featured Product: WileyPLUS
Sponsored by Pearson
™
Featured Product: MasteringMicrobiology : MicroLab
Tutors
Help your students to see what happens at the
molecular level in both lecture and lab without
spending valuable lab time and materials! Using a
combination of videos, animations, assessment and
visual feedback, MasteringMicrobiology's MicroLab
Tutors are designed to make sure that students come
better prepared for the lab by introducing and
assessing student understanding of lab concepts and
techniques outside of formal lecture and lab time.
Come by and check out Gram Staining in action Seeing is believing.
AUTHOR CORNER
9:45 AM – 10:15 AM
McGraw-Hill Exhibit Booth
See first-hand how WileyPLUS for Microbiology can
enhance your course. WileyPLUS is a researchbased, online environment for effective teaching and
learning that integrates the digital textbook with
effective resources to fit every learning style.
MICROBREW SESSIONS I of III
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
(7 sessions)
These grassroots sessions, arranged by topics,
provide a forum for sharing best practices and
interesting activities used in laboratory and
classroom teaching. Presentations are simple
"chalk talks" (e.g., no PowerPoint) to facilitate
informal discussion. Unlike the poster sessions,
Microbrews do not require assessments. Each
presentation is 20 minutes and includes a 15minute presentation and 5 minutes for
discussion.
Session Room Facilitators:
Sponsored by McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Featured Author: Denise Anderson
th
Engage
Facilitator: Jeffrey Byrd, St. Mary’s College of
Maryland
Microbiology: A Human Perspective, 7 edition
Microbiology is one of the fastest moving fields, so it’s
not enough to teach only the current hot topics.
Students must be armed with a strong enough
foundation to understand next year’s – even next
decade’s – hot topics as well. The Nester author team
works hard, both in their textbook and in their
classrooms, to teach students for the future, as well
as for today. Microbiology: A Human Perspective
remains focused on providing an excellent foundation
in fundamental concepts for microbiology students of
all backgrounds. It has always been on the cutting
edge of current concepts; it was the first introductory
microbiology text to introduce new concepts in
immunology such as pattern recognition by toll-like
receptors, and T-cell activation by dendritic cells. The
recently published seventh edition retains these well-
Synergy 5
Facilitator: Diane Hartman, Baylor University
Synergy 1
Facilitator: Jennifer Herzog, Herkimer County
Community College
Synergy 4
Facilitator: Gary Kaiser, The Community College of
Baltimore County, Catonsville Campus
Synergy 2
Facilitator: Suzanne Long, Monroe Community
College
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
39
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Connect 1
Facilitator: Mark Martin, University of Puget Sound
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Connect 3
Facilitator: Julie Oliver, University of Wisconsin–
Milwaukee
2. Using Selective and Differential Media to
Distinguish Between Accurate Recordings of
Observations (Data Collection) and
Results/Conclusions (Data Interpretation)
Engage
MICROBREW SESSION A: 10:30 AM
M.J. Cloutier. St. Louis College of Pharmacy, Saint
Louis, MO.
1. Microbial Jeopardy™: Seven years Convincing
Medical Students Basic Microbiology Has Clinical
Relevance
Synergy 1
E.L. Blewett. Oklahoma State University – Center for
Health Sciences, Tulsa, OK.
Microbial Jeopardy was developed to compensate for
the removal of the Medical Microbiology wet
laboratory from the curriculum. The goal of Microbial
Jeopardy is to highlight the link between molecular
aspects of microbial agents with clinical diagnoses
and outcomes. Microbial Jeopardy is used in the
Medical Virology and Medical Bacteriology modules.
Students are allocated to groups and provided with
mini-cases and questions prior to the lecture session.
Each mini-case is approximately 100 words and
incorporates one basic microbiology fact about an
infectious agent. During the Microbial Jeopardy™
session, student names are randomly selected to
answer case questions from a Jeopardy™ style
(PowerPoint) board. To answer the Microbial
Jeopardy questions, students must be able to identify
the pathogen, and review the disease process for
prevention, treatment and prognosis. This activity
serves as a review session and also increases
interaction between instructors and students in large
(100+), lecture-style classes.
Student Response: While student response to this
activity has been favorable, a few issues have arisen.
For example, students prefer a non- competitive
format, complain about increased workload, wish to
appeal answers and think some group members do
all the work while others do none. Instructor and
student suggested changes have been incorporated
to address these issues with mixed success.
Microbrew Session: In this session I will discuss the
parts of Microbial Jeopardy™ that work well and
discuss the issues that have arisen over the years.
Fresh approaches to address student issues will be
welcomed.
This activity was adapted from a Microbe Library
article, “Microbial Jeopardy!™ Review and
Assessment" by J. Vigna that is no longer available.
Issue: Students frequently fail to distinguish between
"observations" and "results", in this lab we focus on
observation = "What do you see?" and
results/conclusions = "What does this visual
appearance tell you about the organism?"
For this exercise students work in pairs. Each pair is
assigned one G+ and one G- organism identified by
code # only, and one set of six plates of selective and
differential media. The plates are divided in half and
both organisms are inoculated onto each plate. After
incubation each student records detailed observations
of the appearance of their culture on each of the six
media. At the end of the lab, I collect the data sheets
and create a table of results including the genus and
species of each organism. For the quiz, students
compare their data sheet to my collated table and tell
me 1) the gram reaction, 2) genus and species and 3)
the differential results/conclusions of their assigned
organism.
Advantage: Since implementing this procedure, the
number of students who record their observations as
"I observed a typical positive reaction" has dropped
from nearly half the class to very few. This set up is
easily adapted to any class size; my classes vary
from 60 to 140.
Limitations: I use 3-10 G+ and 3-10 G- organisms, the
selective agents in the media are not 100% effective
so the G+ vs. G- determination is not always reliable.
We follow up with Gram stains to "confirm" their
conclusions and use this as an example to
demonstrate that data analysis is not always clear cut.
Also the number of criteria for differentiation is limited;
therefore, it is important to carefully select
representative G+ and G- organisms that can be
clearly differentiated with these media.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Pathways
3. Building Assessment Tools for the New ASM
Undergraduate Curriculum Guideline
Synergy 5
K.F. Hung. Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL.
The Task Force for the ASM Undergraduate
Curriculum Revision has published a set of updated
curriculum objectives aimed at making the use of
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
40
student-centered learning more easily adaptable by
faculty and instructors of introductory microbiology
courses. A successful implementation of these
guidelines, however, requires more than a restructuring of previous curriculum in terms of lecture
topics and sequence of lectures. The new guideline’s
focus on enduring concepts also means a re-thinking
of assessment for our students. How would student
success in acquiring these enduring concepts, i.e., a
success of the new curriculum, look like? What
methods of assessment are suitable for discovering
the impact of a new curriculum? This microbrew
session will be an opportunity for those interested in
implementing the new curriculum guidelines to start
some conversations on this topic.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
4. Fun and Challenging Approaches to Teaching
the Gram Stain Procedure to New Microbiology
Students
Connect 3
P.C. Mister. Johns Hopkins Hospital Clinical
Microbiology, Community Colleges of Baltimore
County and Stevenson University, Baltimore, MD.
Gram staining is a basic, essential skill for
microbiology students to acquire, but it can be a
tricky, difficult test to perform and interpret, even for
experienced microbiologists. This microbrew session
will outline innovative approaches to teaching gram
stains to beginners, including comparing subtle
variations in technique with a lab partner; reviewing,
practicing and fine tuning their technique with a
variety of known organisms; moving through a series
of "stations", as a team, with progressively
challenging organisms to see if their staining
technique works consistently; reflection, discussion,
learning and practicing the use of alternative
techniques in appropriate cases that enhance the
accuracy of the procedure and make interpretation
easier. These approaches allow students to
eventually master and develop confidence as they
perform this routine but critically important procedure
that is needed throughout any course in Microbiology.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow, Impact of microorganisms
5. Developing an Open Source On-Line
Microbiology Class for Colleges
Synergy 4
J.P. Novack, R. Forough and S. Jejurikar. Bellevue
College, Bellevue, WA.
Our group of Bellevue College microbiology
instructors has received a Washington State grant to
develop an on-line open source undergraduate
microbiology course that will be open to all college
students and instructors. We are looking for input into
content, organization and great teaching ideas in
microbiology. The intent is to assemble an open
source course that can replace expensive text books
and lab books (and be continually updated and
revised). The entire course or parts of the course can
be used by instructors and students. There will be a
separate instructors' portion for assessment
evaluation. What would you like to see in a
microbiology course that is oriented towards students
going into health care? What great pedagogical tools
can you share for the course? Do you have any open
source (creative commons) or other copyright
available images (microscopic, SEM or TEM) or texts
that you think should be included in the course?
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow, Impact of microorganisms
6. Creating a Cost Effective and Meaningful Lab
Experience
Connect 1
M.L. Schreiber and E.S. Ingram. Valencia College,
Orlando, FL.
These experiments are designed to help the allied
health student understand the diagnosis of infections
of the urinary and digestive tracts. Normally urine is
sterile, but infections can occur when the normal flora
of the urethra, other urogenital membranes, or
gastrointestinal tract are misplaced. Urinary tract
infections (UTIs) can affect the bladder, kidneys, or
urethra. Escherichia coli is the most common causal
agent but Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Proteus
mirabilis can cause infections as well, while
Staphylococcus epidermidis can be found as a
common contaminant. In this experiment, the student
will be provided with four unknown urine (simulated)
samples and will attempt to identify the causative
agent in each sample. In addition, the urine sample
will be spread on an agar plate (bacterial lawn) and
tested against a panel of antimicrobial-impregnated
disks. The resulting zone of inhibition of bacterial
growth represents the minimum inhibitory
concentration (MIC). Susceptibility or resistance of a
microorganism is determined by comparing the zone
diameter (in mm) with MIC values found in standard
tables.
The human intestinal tract is inhabited from birth by a
variety of microorganisms and later in life they can be
carried in by food and water or introduced by hands or
other objects placed in the mouth. The intestinal
organisms of pathogenic significance “also known as
the enteric pathogens” typically belong to the family
Enterobacteriaceae (Gram-negative, non-spore
forming bacilli). Salmonella, Shigella, Proteus,
Yersinia, and certain strains of Escherichia coli are
the medically important intestinal pathogens. In this
experiment, the student will be provided with four
unknown fecal (simulated) samples and will attempt to
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
41
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
identify the causative agent using a selective and
differential medium and biochemical tests.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
7. Trifecta in Microbiology
Synergy 2
R.V. Tameta. Schenectady County Community
College, Schenectady, NY.
The goal of teaching is to guide and encourage
students in whatever field they choose. Microbiology
as a course requires teaching methods that will
enable students to absorb, digest, and retain
substantial amounts of information. POGIL (ProcessOriented Group Inquiry Learning), Think, Pair and
Share Methods and Case Studies will enhance
student learning if utilized effectively during the
course. In modified POGIL activities, students are
grouped in fours for both lecture and lab, and
assignments are given to complete as group work.
This process promotes the exchange of ideas among
students, and creates the opportunity for group
presentation of information as well. Think, Pair, and
Share activities are used at mid-semester in the
microbiology course at SCCC. Students are put into
pairs, breaking up the original group of four. They
work together on a given assignment, which
reinforces teamwork. The use of Case Studies
provides the students an opportunity to build
awareness of concepts in Epidemiology. In this
assignment, each group is charged with finding a
scientific article regarding a food- or waterborne
disease outbreak. If the outbreak has occurred locally,
the group is encouraged to communicate with the
local health department and collaborate with the
members of the investigation team. The student pairs
then present the case by role playing as an
epidemiologist, a doctor, a laboratory technician and
an administrator. This activity promotes full
understanding of epidemiological concepts in action
and allows students to develop self-confidence and
presentation skills.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
MICROBREW SESSION B: 11:00 AM
1. Investigating Sulfa Drugs: A Cross Disciplinary
Laboratory Activity Using a Case Study
Engage
M.A. Furlong and C.E. Clower. Clayton State
University, Morrow, GA.
Students often have difficulty applying their
knowledge of basic concepts they learned in a lower
division course to a research topic that is introduced
in an upper-division course. This is especially a
problem when biology majors are asked to apply their
knowledge of chemistry to topics in a biology course.
We have created a problem-based laboratory activity
that requires biology majors taking microbiology lab to
apply their knowledge of organic chemistry (a
prerequisite course) and to collaborate with organic
chemistry lab students to study sulfonamide
derivatives (sulfa drugs). In this activity the organic
chemistry students synthesize and characterize an
array of sulfonamide derivatives, including
sulfanilamide, using an electrophilic aromatic
substitution reaction, a nucleophilic substitution
reaction, and an acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an acetyl
group. The organic chemistry students then present
the synthesis method, physical properties and
spectroscopic data of the synthesized drugs to the
microbiology students as a case study. The
microbiology students are required to use the physical
properties and spectroscopic data to identify the
structure of each sulfa drug, and then make
predictions on which compounds would be the most
effective at inhibiting specific microorganisms. The
microbiology students design and perform a biological
assay to test their predictions. Since the students
perform this laboratory activity after learning about the
Kirby Bauer/disk diffusion methods, most students
choose a disk diffusion method to perform their assay.
They are encouraged to consider additional methods,
however. After they collect and analyze their data
they must communicate their methods and results to
the organic chemistry students, who have not yet
taken a microbiology course. We have piloted this
activity during two semesters and have collected and
analyzed some assessment data on student
outcomes.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Pathways
2. Creating a Dynamic Laboratory Atlas with
Social Bookmarking
Synergy 1
M.J. Hanophy and V.M. Giordano. St. Joseph’s
College, NY.
Photomicrographs and diagrams are essential
learning aids for the biology and microbiology lab.
While students traditionally rely on photo atlases and
lab manuals, Internet resources like Google Images
have also become an important source for this
material. The abundance of digital images available
however can make it difficult for students to identify
good materials and organize them so they can be
used effectively. One possible method of organizing
images is through social bookmarking sites like
Delicious, Diigo, and Clipmarks which can allow users
to store, share, and manage bookmarks of online
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
42
images and other resources. The resulting “digital
atlases” can be constantly updated and improved. In
order to determine the effectiveness of an instructorcreated digital atlas, students taking General Biology
on both of our campuses were surveyed about the
resources they used and found helpful when dealing
with images.
Students on one of our campuses used the traditional
laboratory manual and photographic atlas while those
on the other campus used the social bookmarking site
Delicious.com, supplemented by the traditional
materials. Surveys showed that students on both
campuses already relied heavily on web resources
like Google Images. Students who were given access
to the social bookmarking site used this source more
often than any other and used printed materials much
less frequently. Images that students obtained
through social bookmarking were also rated very
helpful 60% more often than images obtained from
any of the other sources, including Google Images.
Our experience with these digital atlases has led to an
expansion of the program to include our microbiology
courses. In the future, students may use social
bookmarking to create personal image collections that
could be utilized to assess lab content knowledge.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
3. Designing Lab Exercises to Simulate Pathogen
Transmission
Connect 1
E.S. Ingram and M.L. Schreiber. Valencia College,
Orlando, FL.
Infectious disease can be transmitted by direct
contact between host by skin-to- skin contact, body
fluid contact, droplets, fecal-oral, fomites, ingestion,
vectors, reservoirs, or carriers. This exercise is
composed of three parts designed to provide students
with active learning experiences pertaining to sexual
transmission and food and water safety. The first
experiment is designed to demonstrate how quickly a
pathogen can be spread through contact with body
fluids. The results will have a real-life application,
especially if you associate it with the rapid increase in
the number of individuals infected with sexually
transmitted diseases each year. One “mystery” tube
has been inoculated with Micrococcus luteus. Which
very unlucky student will be the one to spread the
infection?
Food microbiology deals with the study of the role of
microbes in human enteric disease and food spoilage.
As we know, foods and drinks are common vehicles
by which bacterial diseases of the digestive system
are transmitted. During its processing and
preparation, food may be contaminated with microbes
from the soil, animals, food handlers and machinery.
Sanitary standards have been set by government
agencies to protect the public from food infections and
food intoxications. The second experiment involves
sampling of meat purchased from a local grocery
store for potential pathogens and the importance of
using safe handling practices when handling raw
meat.
In the third experiment, a scenario is provided that
investigates the effects of water contamination and
safety. A water main break has occurred with the
possibility of water contamination by Escherichia coli.
The emergency response team started working to
repair the water lines. Students will determine if water
has been contaminated at six locations and if the
levels of contamination warrant intervention by the
health department.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
4. Teaching Microbiology with Games and Songs
Synergy 2
K.A. Page. Southern Oregon University, Ashland,
OR.
Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences
posits that we learn using various modalities.
Learning modes categorized by Gardner include
linguistic, logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic,
musical, intrapersonal and naturalistic modes. Each
individual is unique regarding the utility of different
learning modes. Traditional lecture classes
emphasize linguistic and logical-mathematical modes
of learning and rarely include other modes. In my
presentation, I will demonstrate how Microbiology
instructors can incorporate bodily-kinesthetic, musical,
and intrapersonal modes of learning to improve
teaching effectiveness. Switching between different
teaching modes during a lecture class increases
student engagement and interest. Alternative teaching
modes are fun and can be based on playing games,
singing songs, and even dancing. Some examples I
will demonstrate are the appointment game, musical
sing-along, pin the structure on the function, and
question catch.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Impact of microorganisms
5. Electronic Learning Portfolios (ELPs): A
Feedback System for Enhancing Teaching and
Learning
Synergy 5
A.M. Siegesmund. Pacific Lutheran University,
Tacoma, WA.
One consistent challenge in teaching first-year biology
students is addressing poor study habits and attitudes
formed during high school science courses. Not only
do these issues challenge the instructor, but they can
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SATURDAY, JUNE 16
serve as a roadblock to student success. In an effort
to address these issues, an Electronic Learning
Portfolio (ELP) project was used to examine student
current practices and provide feedback. Although
designed as a feedback tool for students, the ELP
became a powerful tool for course design. The ELP is
a variation on Just-in-Time Teaching focusing on the
process of student learning rather than course
content. Each week, three to four questions were
posted to the online course management site.
Students completed the questions, uploaded their
answers, and individualized feedback was provided to
each student on the uploaded document. Throughout
the semester, a wide range of questions was used
focusing on topics such as the relationship between
preparation for class and learning group engagement,
study techniques and their effectiveness in completing
class tasks, effectiveness of class activities, and
successful exam responses. Students made insightful
comments that not only helped me guide their
learning, but also helped me design the course to
better meet their learning needs. For example, a
higher than usual number of students reported that
role playing was a useful activity. Comments such as
this made it possible to immediately incorporate more
of these activities into the course rather than waiting
for feedback from end of the semester evaluations.
On an end of the semester survey, 67% of students
indicated that the ELPs helped their learning and that
the ELPs were encouraging and motivating. For both
students and instructor the ELP provides an effective
mechanism for implementing changes immediately,
creating a learning environment better suited to the
learning modalities and approaches of a class.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Structure and function
6. Enhancing Student Communication Skills
through the Transformation of Laboratory Classes
into Public Engagement Activities
Synergy 4
J. Verran and J. Redfern. Manchester Metropolitan
University, Manchester, UK.
The ability to communicate scientific ideas and
information with confidence and enthusiasm is a skill
that students should develop throughout their period
of study. In addition, through project work, mentoring,
or voluntary activities, students can hone these skills
whilst gaining knowledge, experience - and
information for curriculum vitae. This presentation will
describe a range of public engagement events where
students have helped to transfer laboratory exercises
from the University classroom to the public domain.
The ‘Plaque attack!' activity was developed from our
research, via laboratory classes on oral microbiology.
The exercises, including disclosing plaque,
microscopic examination, building a biofilm, and
destroying a biofilm, were delivered to the public by
postgraduate and undergraduate students,
particularly those with an interest in a career in
dentistry. ‘The Good, the Bad and the Algae’ utilised a
series of laboratory activities developed for schools
(target group 14 – 16 years) by a research student.
The identification of algae (large, green, attractive and
safe) using microscopy proved exceptionally
successful for the families who attended.
Subsequently, in a national event, ‘The Big Bang,’
attended by over 25,000 schoolchildren over 2 days,
the microscopy activity was accompanied by 3-D
images of algae and an engaging modeling exercise
where more than 3,000 participants made models of
algae for suspending in a simulated and scaled-up
‘drop of pondwater.’ These activities gave startling
visual information on scale and number.
The session will describe the development and
evaluation of these activities and encourage
participants to consider their own practice. Feedback
has shown benefit to students and audiences alike.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure,
Impact of microorganisms
7. Baddest Bug
Connect 3
C.K. Vu. St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN.
Students often have difficulty understanding the very
first concept in Microbiology - Prokaryotic structure.
To make this topic more tangible, I have students use
the analogy of how as humans we have our clothing,
skin, and insides to show that bacteria have different
outer structures (just like we wear different clothing),
majority have cell wall/plasma membrane(skin), and
structures inside.
First there is a lecture on prokaryotic structure. Then
students are placed into groups of no more than 5.
Students are given the following:
1. Instruction sheet to 'assemble' a viable bacteria
that consist of chosen outer structures that they think
would be most beneficial (limit of 3) and what type of
cell wall. They need to determine what inside
structures are essential and get to pick one additional
structure. They will also need to justify their choices.
Students are given 20 minutes to design the baddest
bug.
2. Students are given a list of structures and a blank
piece of paper to draw on.
3. Wrap up: Students present as a group on their bug
and we discuss as a class if the bug is 1) viable (for
ex: pili but no plasmid would not work) and 2)
structures are defined and understood correctly. Then
the class votes on the baddest bug after the
discussion.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
44
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
LUNCH – Pick up Box Lunch and Proceed to
Breakout Sessions
11:30 AM – 12:15 PM
Convene 1& 2
community around these resources and providing
your know-how in the comments section will only
enhance the experience for library users!
1. Carbohydrate Fermentation
Synergy 4
Facilitator: Patricia Shields, University of Maryland
Sponsored by Pearson
MICROBELIBRARY PROTOCOL BREAKOUT
SESSIONS
2. Gelatin Hydrolysis Test
Synergy 2
12:15 PM – 1:15 PM
(3 sessions)
Facilitator: Archana Lal, Independence Community
College
ASM’s MicrobeLibrary Needs Your Input and
Advice: Contribute your Tips for using this year's
new Protocols
3. Starch Agar
Synergy 1
The MicrobeLibrary Laboratory Protocol Collection is
a unique database offering peer-reviewed information
on standard microbiology protocols. Each project in
the collection provides detailed historical, theoretical,
and procedural information for a standard protocol.
Each protocol is coupled with a database of images
found in the Gallery Collection of the Library. The
collections have been developed by members of the
ASM education community to facilitate classroom and
laboratory instruction. MicrobeLibrary currently
boasts 38 protocols related to 946 images. Image
submissions are collected continuously and are
reviewed by the Gallery Collection Editorial Board
Committee for publication.
The MicrobeLibrary Protocol Editorial
Committee seeks help in discovering how YOU
incorporate the three new protocols below into your
teaching and what “tricks of the trade” or “tips and
tools” you can offer that will enhance usage of the
protocol and provide advice to those who may be
using the protocol for the first time. These Protocols
have already undergone a rigorous peer-reviewed
process and are ready for publication except for the
Tips and Comments section. Attendees are asked to
attend a session on a protocol they are familiar with.
Applications and tips for use of the protocols will be
identified at the beginning of the session. Attendees
will then divide into groups to further develop these
applications and tips.
The final products created in each session will be
reviewed and published under the Tips and
Comments section of the protocol. All participants in
the session will be recognized as contributors in the
final publication. We encourage all of you to
participate in the production of these resources by
lending your expertise and guidance to the many
educators visiting MicrobeLibrary, particularly from
overseas. Please remember too that you can always
rate and comment on already published resources in
the library. We will work hard this year to develop a
Facilitator: Min-Ken Liao, Furman University
POSTER SESSION B
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Inspire 1, 2, 3
Aligning ASMCUE Abstracts to Biological
Concepts
The 2012 abstracts are organized by both content
and pedagogy to help participants navigate more
easily through the poster session. The content
themes are organized by six core concepts. Five of
the concepts were put forth in the 2011 national
report, Vision and Change: Transforming
Undergraduate Biology Education and include
evolution, structure and function, pathways,
information flow and systems. A sixth concept specific
to microbiology, the impact of microorganisms, is also
used. The complete guidelines may be found at
www.asm.org/educators under Curriculum
Resources.
The pedagogy themes are organized into five
categories: course design, hands-on projects, student
learning, teaching approaches, and teaching tools.
Each abstract is assigned to both content and
pedagogy themes. These assignments, designated by
the submitting author, are placed below the full
abstract. See page 73 for Poster Abstract Content
and Pedagogy Grid. Abstracts are found in the
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, Volume
13, Issue 1.
2-B
The Use of an Interactive In Classroom Tool to
Improve Student Performance on Knowledge
Acquisition and Application
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
45
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
1
1
2
E.L. Blewett , B.J Reddig , and J.L. Kisamore .
1
Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK and
2
University of Oklahoma – Tulsa, Tulsa, OK.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches,
Teaching tools
4-B
A Research-Based Introductory Biology
Laboratory Course Positively Impacts Student
Attitudes Towards Research: Results of a TwoYear Comparison Evaluation
S.E. Brownell, M.J. Kloser, T. Fukami, and R.
Shavelson. Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow, Systems
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
14-B
Individualized Active Learning: Use of the
Escherichia coli Model Organism Database
EcoCyc in an Undergraduate General
Microbiology Course
R.P. Gunsalus, E. McDonald, K. Straub, and I.
Schroeder. University of California, Los Angeles, CA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching tools
16-B
Case Studies + Instant Feedback: Targeting
Persistent Student Misconceptions in Biology
A.-M. Hoskinson. University of Colorado—Boulder,
Boulder, CO.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Systems
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design,
Teaching approaches
6-B
Increasing Students' Graphicacy Using In-Class
Exercises
L.F. Caslake. Lafayette College, Easton, PA.
18-B
Extreme Course Redesign: Applying Scientific
Teaching and the ASM 2011 Draft Curriculum
Guidelines to a General Microbiology Course
L.E. Hughes. University of North Texas, Denton, TX.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Impact of microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
8-B
Impact of a Student-Centered Curriculum on
Performance and Self-Assessment Accuracy
Across Different Levels of Cognition
L. Clement and M. F. Wong. City College of San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
20-B
Mining The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB): A
Novel Approach to Learn about Infectious
Diseases
H. Makhluf. National University, La Jolla, CA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow, Impact of microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning,
Teaching approaches
10-B
Using Primary Literature to Increase Scientific
Literacy in Community College Students
L. DiGirolamo. City College of San Francisco, San
Francisco, CA.
22-B
Learning “As” Scientists and “From” Scientists:
Exploring Scientific Concepts Through Distance
Learning
M.V. Mawn. SUNY Empire State College, Saratoga
Springs, NY.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution
Pedagogical Category(ies): Student learning,
Teaching tools
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Systems
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
12-B
Using Parvovirus B19 to Introduce Students to
Bioinformatics and to Reinforce Molecular
Biology Knowledge
K.E. Dye. Mount Saint Mary's University, Emmitsburg,
MD.
24-B
Adapting a National Model for Incorporating
Research Projects into Introductory Biology
Courses
K.M. Mogen and K.K. Klyczek. University of
Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, WI.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
46
26-B
Adaptive Evolution of Bacteria as a Hands-On
Method for Teaching Evolution to Introductory
Biology Students
1
2
2
Z.L. Pratt , G.R. Ruthig , C.L. Weilhoefer , and D.G.
3 1
Oldenburg . University of Wisconsin-Madison,
2
Madison, WI; North Central College, Naperville, IL;
3
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution
Pedagogical Category(ies): Hands-on projects,
Student learning
28-B
Intensive Service Learning: A Win-Win-Win
Scenario for Graduate Students, In-Service
Teachers, and High School Students
L.B. Regassa and M. Bennett. Georgia Southern
University, Statesboro, GA.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Impact of microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching approaches
30-B
Team-Based Learning Strategies Enhance
Student Success in a Hybrid Microbiology Course
H.M. Seitz. Johnson County Community College,
Overland Park, KS.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design
32-B
“Cow of the Future Project” Using a Case Study
to Challenge Student Misconceptions about
Antibiotic Resistance
A.C. Smith and J. Buchner. University of Maryland,
College Park, MD.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Impact of microorganisms
Pedagogical Category(ies): Teaching tools
34-B
Integrating Bioinformatics Across the
Undergraduate Biology Curriculum
L.J. Bergeron, J.M. Newcomb, D. Dunlop, and E.J.
Simon. New England College, Henniker NH.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Information flow
Pedagogical Category(ies): Course design,
Teaching approaches
AUTHOR CORNER
1:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Wiley Exhibit Booth
Featured Author: David Wessner
st
Microbiology, 1 edition
Wessner, Microbiology 1e helps to develop a
meaningful connection with the material through the
incorporation of primary literature, applications and
examples. The text offers an ideal balance between
comprehensive, in-depth coverage of core concepts,
while employing a narrative style that incorporates
many relevant applications and a unique focus on
current research and experimentation. Rather than
presenting material as discrete pieces, Wessner
frames information around the three pillars of
physiology, ecology and genetics; which highlights
their interconnectedness and helps students see a
bigger picture.
Wessner presents microbiology as a fascinating field
of exploration and experimentation-connecting
students with science.
PRODUCT CORNER
1:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Connect 5
Sponsored by Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education
Featured Product: Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education
In 2010, the Journal of Microbiology & Biology
Education (JMBE) moved to an open-access platform,
expanded its scope to include various types of
scholarly articles, and doubled the number of issues
per year to two. Since making these changes,
submissions to the journal have increased nearly
500%. While inundated with submissions, editors and
reviewers have maintained rigorous standards,
accepting nearly 37% of manuscripts.
JMBE accepts articles that promote good pedagogy
and design, foster scholarly teaching, and advance
biology education research. The various sections of
JMBE allow for the submission of articles diverse in
scope and focus. Attend this session to learn more
about the Journal sections, creating an account at the
JMBE site, and the submission and review processes.
JMBE welcomes submissions for the upcoming
issues. Articles are reviewed on a rolling basis, and
submissions are encouraged and accepted
throughout the year. The final submission deadline to
be considered for publication in volume 13, issue 2
(December 2012) is 1 July 2012 and for volume 14,
issue 1 (May 2013) is December 1, 2012. For more
information, please visit http://jmbe.asm.org.
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
47
SATURDAY, JUNE 16

PRODUCT CORNER
1:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Connect 3
Sponsored by McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Featured Product: Adaptive Learning Technologies
McGraw-Hill LearnSmart™ has been chosen from
leading educational software solutions as one of the
best in the industry in not one, but two categories!
Best Postsecondary Instructional Solution AND
Best Cross-Curricular Solution
Each year the Software & Information Industry
Association (SIIA) CODiE Awards recognizes
excellence in the education technology
industry. Seasoned educators reviewed all
nominations in each category to choose the finalists.
McGraw-Hill, together with Area9, is a leading
innovator in adaptive learning. Modern, superadaptive learning technology is technology that
tailors (adapts) the learning experience to the needs
of EVERY student. Adaptive learning technology is
not new. However, modern super-adaptive
technologies adapt to the learner at a rate of dozens
per minute versus the previous system’s rate of
dozens per day (a crucial difference). The new
adaptive technologies have the potential to
completely revolutionize education by PRECISELY
identifying and adapting to the needs of every learner.
From the student’s perspective, there are two
important aspects of the modern, super-adaptive
learning technologies: A) They make personalized
learning available to students wherever they are, at
affordable prices. B) Students change (adapt) their
study habits as the adaptive engine guides them
through a curriculum or course. From a teacher’s
perspective, adaptive learning technologies allow the
educator to be an even more effective coach— to
focus on the precise needs of a particular student; to
create a personalized learning plan and experience.
Join us to learn more about McGraw-Hill’s leading
adaptive learning technologies (or stop by the
McGraw-Hill booth for a demonstration!).

McGraw-Hill LearnSmart is an adaptive
learning system designed to help
students learn faster, study more
efficiently, and retain more knowledge
for greater success. THE premier
learning system effectively assesses a
student’s knowledge of course content
through a series of adaptive questions,
intelligently pinpointing concepts the
student does not understand and
mapping out a personalized study plan
for success. LearnSmart is the only
system that is proven to improve
student and faculty outcomes.
McGraw-Hill LabSmart™ is a
personalized, adaptive, outcomes-based
lab simulation unlike any you have ever
seen. Based on the same world-leading
super-adaptive technology as
LearnSmart, a student’s knowledge is
assessed and deficiencies adaptively
corrected. Whether your need is to
overcome the logistical challenges of a
traditional lab, provide better lab prep,
improve student performance, or make
your online experience one that rivals
the real world, LabSmart accomplishes
it all.
LabSmart - THE Virtual Lab Experience.
REFRESHMENT BREAK
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Inspire Lobby
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
AUTHOR CORNER
2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
McGraw-Hill Exhibit Booth
Sponsored by McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Featured Author: Kelly Cowan
Microbiology Fundamentals, A Clinical Approach,
st
1 edition
rd
Microbiology, A Systems Approach, 3 edition
Kelly Cowan has been a microbiologist at Miami
University since 1993, where she teaches
microbiology for pre-nursing/allied health students at
the university’s Middletown campus, a regional
commuter campus that accepts first-time college
students with a high school diploma or GED. She
started life as a dental hygienist. She then went on to
attain her PhD at the University of Louisville, and later
worked at the University of Maryland’s Center of
Marine Biotechnology and the University of Groningen
in The Netherlands. Kelly has published (with her
students) twenty-four research articles stemming from
her work on bacterial adhesion mechanisms and
plant-derived antimicrobial compounds. But her first
love is teaching—both doing it and studying how to do
it better. Join Kelly to find out more about her two
introductory microbiology textbooks, including the
exciting, new Microbiology Fundamentals, A Clinical
Approach, the first text to successfully tackle the
challenge of making a briefer, streamlined text that
truly fits a one-semester micro course.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
48
PRODUCT CORNER
2:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Connect 4
SESSION C: 2:30 PM
Sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
1. Student-Created Microbiology Lab Exercises
from Primary Source Literature – A Laboratory
Activity
Synergy 1
Featured Product: Custom Select, Anderson,
Microbiology Case Studies: A Personal Approach
Looking to build your own case book for a ProblemBased Learning approach to Microbiology? Wiley,
along with Rod Anderson and Linda Young, have
developed a collection of Microbiology cases which
are available for customization within Wiley Custom
Select. Using Wiley Custom Select, instructors can
"build" customized higher education course materials
that fit their exact pedagogical needs, in a simple
three-step process that takes just minutes to
complete. The custom publishing application enables
users to easily find the content, personalize the
material and format, and submit the order.
MICROBREW SESSIONS II of III
2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
(7 sessions)
These grassroots sessions, arranged by topics,
provide a forum for sharing best practices and
interesting activities used in laboratory and
classroom teaching. Presentations are simple
"chalk talks" (e.g., no PowerPoint) to facilitate
informal discussion. Unlike the poster sessions,
Microbrews do not require assessments. Each
presentation is 20 minutes and includes a 15minute presentation and 5 minutes for
discussion.
Session Room Facilitators:
Connect 1
Facilitator: Larry Aaronson, Utica College
Synergy 1
Facilitator: Rebecca Buxton, University of Utah
Connect 3
Facilitator: Michelle Furlong, Clayton State University
Synergy 4
Facilitator: Kai Hung, Eastern Illinois University
Synergy 5
Facilitator: Lucy Kluckhohn-Jones, Santa Monica
College
Engage
Facilitator: Andrea Rediske, Valencia Community
College
Synergy 2
Facilitator: Heidi Smith, Front Range Community
College
N.T. Barden. Massachusetts College of Pharmacy
and Health Sciences, Boston, MA.
In an upper division microbiology course (Advanced
Microbiology) students perform various laboratory
exercises beyond those typically found in introductory
microbiology level courses. The exercises for these
upper division students come from a variety of
sources ranging from commercial laboratory manuals,
the instructor’s research interests, ASM’s Microbe
Library, and primary literature sources. For the most
part, students perform the laboratory exercises as
directed, collect the data, and submit lab reports
without ever thinking about or questioning the origins
of the exercises. Prompted by a genuine question
from a student of “where do you get these
exercises?”, the class was challenged to create
suitable lab exercises using primary literature sources
from ASM journals. Students were assigned to work
in teams of 3 or 4 and were directed to select a
research article from the list provided or were given
the choice to find their own article of interest. The
activity had them prepare an appropriate lab exercise
based on the primary source article complete with an
introduction, a section of materials and methods, the
specific lab instructions that the class must follow,
data collection, and interpretation of the results. So
far, students have created and led successful lab
exercises for the isolation of Chromobacterium
species from soil and the characterization of their
violacein pigment, the isolation of Thermus aquaticus
from domestic and commercial hot water sources,
and the inhibition of swarming on various culture
media by Proteus vulgaris. Currently under
development by this year’s class are exercises on E.
coli chemotaxis, the use of a 96-well plate and plate
reader to perform an antibiotic assay, and the use of
cold shock to release periplasmic enzymes from
Gram-negative bacteria. Examples of the student
created lab exercises will be provided.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure,
Impact of microorganisms
2. The Use of Drawing as a Learning Tool in the
Undergraduate Microbiology Classroom
Synergy 4
C.K. Bieszczad. Colby-Sawyer College, New
London, NH.
Non-science majors often struggle in science class
and have difficulty remembering complex concepts
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
49
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
and structures. Higher education practices have
recently moved to student-centered learning. Drawing
can promote active learning but is not often used in
science classes. The kinesthetic action of drawing
may engage more senses to enhance retention of
information. Students in my microbiology classes
were asked to draw various prokaryotic and microbial
eukaryotic cellular structures for homework. They also
copied instructor-drawn structures from the board
during lectures, rather than simply viewing
PowerPoint illustrations. Furthermore, lab reports
required drawings of results. Students were given a
Likert-scaled survey consisting of nine questions
which asked if they value drawing as a learning tool.
The majority of students who responded to the survey
(90.4%) identified that “drawing pictures and
structures helps to learn class material” was either
somewhat or very true. Additionally, 74.15% said it
was either somewhat true or very true they “preferred
to draw structures rather than label pictures to help
learn new material.” An overwhelming 96.15% of
students surveyed said it was somewhat or very true
that “copying simplified structures drawn on the board
by the professor during lecture helps to understand
and retain information better.” The data from this
study show that students greatly value drawing as a
learning tool in science. They strongly believe that it
helps them to remember complicated biological
structures and information. This session will discuss
the use of various drawing activities as important
active learning tools to enhance observational skills
and information retention in the undergraduate
microbiology classroom. In addition, student
assessment of these activities will be discussed. In a
society where technology is at the forefront, the data
from this study suggest that going back to drawing
with paper and pencil may help students succeed in
the undergraduate microbiology classroom.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
3. Get Your Game On: Student-designed Games
Enhance Participation and Direct Learning of
Metabolic Pathways
Synergy 5
R.K. Hoffman. Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ.
This class activity was developed to charge students
of introductory microbiology or cell biology courses
with becoming active learners of concepts in
metabolism. Groups of two to five students were
given the assignment of designing a board game or
card game that would help them learn the steps in
metabolic pathways, the links between pathways, and
the outcomes of the processes. Students used lists of
learning objectives to help compose relevant
questions for their games and used their notes and
textbooks to confirm their answers. They composed
instructions and rules of play, and test-played their
own games. On class "game day" groups rotated
through playing games designed by the other groups
and filled out surveys rating the games on learning
value, ease of play, and fun value. Students reported
that achieving satisfaction with their own game design
was a motivating factor in completing the project.
They acknowledged that the experience of
successfully winning a game designed by another
group and receiving favorable ratings of their own
game enhanced their sense of accomplishment.
Students felt more comfortable with their knowledge
of the material after they played the games.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Information flow
4. Isolation of E. coli from Surface Waters Allows
Students to Learn Essential Microbiology
Techniques and Human Health Impact
Connect 1
C.H. Hunnes. Rocky Mountain College, Billings, MT.
E. coli is a ubiquitous bacterium that can be found in
many surface waters. In this four-week laboratory
project for an introductory microbiology course,
students characterize E. coli from water samples that
they collect from surface waters over their spring
break. The first part of the project involves isolating
the E. coli and confirming its identity. The bacterium is
easily isolated using the selective medium mColiBlue. This medium also allows total coliform
counts. The E. coli is then identified through
morphology, Gram staining, and various differential
testing media. Some useful media include
MacConkey, Eosin-Methylene Blue, Urea, Kliger’s
Iron, and Sulfur Indole Motility. Students prepare flow
charts and decide on tests that will confirm their
bacterium is E. coli. For the second part of the project,
students test their E. coli for antibiotic resistance
properties using traditional Kirby-Bauer susceptibility
testing. Antibiotic use is substantial in human health
and therapeutic or preventive use in animals.
Considerable quantities of antibiotics make it to
surface waters from feed-lot run-off, ranching
operations, and wastewater treatment plants where
they select for resistant bacteria. Resistance genes
can also be transferred from one bacterial species to
another. As such, it is not uncommon to find E. coli
that shows antibiotic resistance. For example, since
tetracycline is often used as a growth promoter in
livestock feed, tetracycline resistance can develop in
E. coli in the gut flora of livestock. Manure (and
bacteria within the manure) then makes its way to
surface waters. This project exposes students to
important microbiological techniques in the context of
a project. Having students work on E. coli that they
isolated from a river or pond leads to enthusiastic
student effort in the project. Adding the antibioticresistant studies allows an interesting element of the
human impact of the E. coli to be discussed.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
50
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Impact of microorganisms
5. Post-Exam Analysis as a Learning Tool for
Critical Thinking: Gain from Pain
Synergy 2
G.M. Marley. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater,
OK.
Those of us who are candid with ourselves must
admit that rigorous application of critical thinking skills
or analytical approaches when teaching
undergraduate biology courses often are omitted until
exams are prepared. Besides perplexing students,
this unfortunate practice frustrates instructors who are
frequently preoccupied with presenting all required
topics in content-laden courses. Our introductory
biology course is enrolled with approximately 2000
students (mixed science & non-science majors) per
year. Each instructor (in a non-honors section) may
have between 120 and 216 students per class
section. Common exams, all cumulative, are
administered 4 times per semester. Material is
presented in a scenario-based concepts format as
opposed to the didactic “building block” facts-based
traditional approach found in most text books.
We have noted that student preparation for exams is
normally facilitated by the most conscientious
instructors, but post-exam analyses of exam
performance is easily overlooked. We prepare postexam reviews that retrospectively analyze application
questions with text boxes containing newly devised
multiple choice questions; these consist of a series of
more objective questions that should have been
mastered as a prerequisite for the student to
successfully approach application (“thinking-outsidethe-box”) questions from the exam. Whenever
appropriate, illustrations are inserted into the text
boxes. With respect to learning styles, we perceive
that the majority of students preferred sequential (as
opposed to global) learning and visual (as opposed to
verbal) learning. It is our hope that students and tutors
will emulate these techniques in future exam
preparations.
A series of application exam questions most
frequently missed will be distributed with our text box
addenda. These shall focus upon metabolic pathways
and evolutionary principles taught in our course.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Pathways
6. Utilization of the Human Microbiome Project to
Incorporate Functional Genomics into an
Interdisciplinary Research-Integrated Course
Engage
J.A. Roecklein-Canfield and S. Walker. Simmons
College, Boston, MA.
Traditional undergraduate science laboratory courses
do not adequately prepare students for performing
research in graduate programs or industry. To
address this, Simmons College implemented a fully
research-integrated laboratory curriculum across the
undergraduate Chemistry and Biology majors.
Recently published reports have focused on the need
for increased interdisciplinary approaches to teaching
biology, including such fields as genomics,
proteomics, and bioinformatics. This, combined with
new advances in high-throughput technology and
open access to bioinformatics applications, has led to
the incorporation of these topics into an advanced
research integrated biochemistry course that includes
content from biochemistry, molecular biology and
microbiology. The Human Microbiome Project (HMP)
has generated data from hundreds of microbial
residents of the human body and with this, access to
primary genomic sequence data for analysis. We
have generated curriculum modules that include
utilization of open source bioinformatics tools to
provide undergraduates with opportunities to study
functional genomics and to ask biological questions to
further research on the microbiome. We present here
the course model and a sample student generated
project that examines lateral gene transfer and the
acquisition of new metabolic function in gut microbes.
We include formative assessments that specifically
address the acquisition of relevant skills needed to
enhance student learning outcomes in critical analysis
and research performance.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Systems,
Impact of microorganisms
7. Transforming Science Labs into Inquiry-Based
Exercises Using Web 2.0 and Mobile
Technologies
Connect 3
K.D. Weber. Raritan Valley Community College,
Somerville, NJ.
Inquiry-based labs enhance engagement by forcing
the student to develop procedures, to identify
variables, to formulate explanations based on
evidence, to collaborate with fellow students and to
communicate these explanations to a wider audience.
The current explosion in Web 2.0 and mobile
technologies has created an opportunity to use these
tools in order to reshape the lab into an engaging,
creative environment. Instead of utilizing the existing
lab manual for the course, the lab manual was hosted
on a course wiki, a collaborative space whose
members have authoring privileges. The instructor
provided a basic outline of the lab, including
instructions on writing the introduction, the scientific
question of interest and a list of available materials.
The students were then divided into pairs and given
pre-lab responsibilities, including writing the
introduction and designing the experiment or
experiments to answer the stated question. During the
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SATURDAY, JUNE 16
lab, students were provided their own iTouch devices
to document their procedures and results using the
image and video. After obtaining their results,
students were expected to present their work and
evidence-based conclusions using screencasting
technology.
The goal of this approach was to better engage
students and improve assessment. Instead of weekly
lab reports, each pair was expected to produce a 15minute recorded presentation walking though the
experiment in their own words. This mimicked a
weekly online lab meeting that provided assessment
opportunities not easily procured from a static lab
report. Assigning pre-lab responsibilities meant that
questions like “what are we doing today” were no
longer echoed in the hallway before lab and permitted
the instructor to address potential class-wide content
misconceptions. In summary, increasing the
opportunities for students to write and talk about
science utilizing various technologies provided more
chances to measure student learning.
Example:
http://tinyurl.com/asmcue2012
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Structure and function
SESSION D: 3:00 PM
1. Tracking Microbial Contamination of a River as
a Service Learning Project
Connect 3
K.M. Borges. University of Maine at Fort Kent, Fort
Kent, ME.
This laboratory activity engaged upper-level Biology
majors in authentic research and service learning.
The students partnered with a local water quality
agency to monitor an impaired river for evidence of
human fecal contamination. While several locations
along the river have shown frequently elevated E. coli
indicator bacteria levels, the sites where the pollution
originates have remained elusive. The students
analyzed DNA extracted from water samples using a
PCR-based microbial source tracking method to
detect a ribosomal gene sequence that is specific to
human-associated Bacteroidales. A positive PCR
result strongly suggests that the water sample
contains fecal contamination from a human source.
Each group of students developed a hypothesis,
created a work plan, and performed PCR reactions
and gel electrophoresis on a subset of river water
DNA samples during designated open lab periods.
Student teams compiled their results and put them in
the context of E. coli and land use data provided by
the water quality agency. The student groups
collaborated to present findings to the agency, and to
prepare a technical report. Students achieved course
objectives for lab techniques, research notebook
maintenance, project planning, and scientific
communication, while analyzing real research
samples and serving a need for a community partner.
This presentation will present laboratory methodology,
results of pre and post-project surveys, and reflective
comments by students and the community partner
regarding project effectiveness and lessons learned.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
2. Are Your Students Smarter Than a Fifth
Grader? Getting Them All on the Same
Playground
Synergy 4
G.D. Frederick. University of Mary Hardin-Baylor,
Belton, TX.
Whether you answered ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to the title
question, we all wish the answer was ‘yes.’ We also
wish that our collegiate students would spend more
time outside the classroom pondering microbiology
topics. Since 2005, I have been using a free, onlineresource which interlocks mystery and intrigue with
the study of microbiology, virology, epidemiology, and
epidemiology. The resource can be found at:
medmyst.rice.edu. This online quest-based science
learning-resource, “MedMyst” incorporates vintagestyle video games such as Frogger and Asteroids with
the acquisition of significant scientific information and
synthesis of solid scientific concepts.
Although MedMyst’s original target was fourth to
eighth grade students, I have used the MedMyst
missions to fast-track and main-stream over 700
college-level students. Through MedMyst, students
are, within minutes, presented with foundational
medical, microbial and scientific concepts which most
undergraduate textbooks do not present until the
latter chapters. One salient example is “Koch’s
Postulates.” Some undergraduate textbooks introduce
the general concepts included in the postulates
developed by Robert Koch in the 1880s in the first
chapter. However, most textbooks that I have
examined do not explain the full application,
significance, and ramifications of these postulates
until chapter 14 or beyond. Within minutes of
investigation through MedMyst, students begin to
apply Koch’s four postulates in real-life science-based
interactive applications.
The scientists at Rice University’s Center for
Technology in Teaching and Learning have already
conducted very significant research on the palatability
and effectiveness of MedMyst with their intended
target group. During this microbrew session, we will
discuss how you can become involved with an
ongoing research project assessing the use and
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
52
effectiveness of MedMyst at the collegiate level. The
intended outcome of this study is a collaborative
publication in the Journal of Biology and Microbiology
Education.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Impact of microorganisms
3. Getting Pre-Health Majors to Care about
Microbial Diversity: An Inquiry-Driven, Multi-week
Probiotics Lab Activity
Connect 1
G.E. Lim-Fong. Randolph-Macon College, Ashland,
VA.
More than two-thirds of the students enrolled in my
Microbiology class intend to enroll in health
professional programs such as nursing and physical
therapy. As such, their perception of, and interest in,
microbes lie primarily in disease-causing microbes
and their pathogenesis. I have developed a multiweek inquiry-driven lab activity with the objectives of:
1) cultivating an appreciation of microbial diversity
beyond human pathogens, 2) learning methods in
studying microbial diversity, and 3) applying concepts
of experimental design in a microbiological context.
In groups of four, students weighed mice, randomly
assigned mice to probiotics (over-the-counter
Culturelle) or control treatments, and administered
Culturelle to mice by mixing it in their drinking water
for one month. Each group was in charge of one
control mouse and one mouse receiving Culturelle.
After a month, students reweighed mice, conducted
viable plate counts of stool pellets in aerobic and
anaerobic conditions, and constructed a 16S rRNA
clone library from stool pellets. Students performed
statistical tests to determine if probiotics affected
mouse weight and viable counts. 16S rRNA clones
were sequenced and identified by BLAST searches.
The experiment was written up as a full scientific
paper, and at least 5 articles from peer-reviewed
primary literature were required in their paper.
This inquiry-driven study provided a meaningful
context for pre-health students to expand their view of
microbes. Because the pre-requisite introductory
biology classes at my institution emphasize skills such
as statistical analysis, experimental design, and
scientific writing (akin to the Skills described in ASM
Recommended Curriculum Guidelines for
Undergraduate Microbiology), my students were able
to directly apply their skills to this study without much
time devoted to skill learning. However, it is possible
to use this lab activity to introduce the scientific skill
set, and I will offer suggestions on how to incorporate
skill-teaching into this lab activity.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Systems,
Impact of microorganisms
4. Laboratory Exercise to Facilitate Active
Research Style Learning
Synergy 1
A.M. Lynne. Sam Houston State University,
Huntsville, TX.
Many educators wish to increase the amount of active
learning in both the lecture and laboratory setting.
Here, I describe a laboratory project designed to
teach students basic laboratory techniques as well as
have an active research project. A process of
controlled investigations is used to guide students
through an entire semester in which they experience
the unknown associated with research through a
‘Metaproject’, but in a controlled method allowing for
each student to progress through experimentation in
the same way and rate. This avoids the lack of real
world experience in research without sacrificing the
control of typical exercise based lab learning. While
this method can be applied to many lines of
investigation, this system uses commercial ground
meat as the source of bacterium investigated. No
direct control is maintained over the Metaproject
isolates by instructors, students take ownership of
their own unknown research organisms. The initial
isolation technique for the unknown produces an
enteric bacterium while the remainder of the lab is
designed to qualify metabolism, antimicrobial
resistance and virulence factors of the isolated
bacterium. The end of the semester culminates in a
final paper written as a manuscript on the unknown
bacterium. This design facilitates a more complete
undergraduate experience with an introduction into
laboratory research.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Impact of microorganisms
5. Exploring Microbial Metabolism Using the U of
M Biocatalysis and Biodegradation Database
Synergy 5
B.M. Martinez-Vaz. Hamline University, Saint Paul,
MN.
Microorganisms have the ability to metabolize a
variety of organic compounds, including common
components of crude oil like toluene and xylene. The
University of Minnesota Biocatalysis and
Biodegrdation Database (UMBBD) is a freely
available resource that allows exploration of microbial
degradation pathways for over 300 compounds
frequently found in chemical waste. A laboratory
activity was developed to help students understand
the series of biochemical reactions that allow the
degradation of common components of crude oil,
toluene and xylene, and the integration of their
biodegradation products into intermediate
metabolism. The activity consists of using the UMBBD
to analyze several biodegradation pathways that allow
bacteria to transform toluene and xylene into common
metabolic substances. The students compare the
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SATURDAY, JUNE 16
differences and similarities amongst several pathways
in terms of enzymes, intermediates and reaction
products. Upon completion of the bioinformatics
activity, the students design and experiment to
observe the biodegradation of toluene in the
laboratory. Several bacteria are grown on M9 minimal
medium containing toluene vapors as a sole carbon
source. The students them compare the
biodegradative capabilities of several organisms
(Pseudomonas putida, P. aeruginoasa and E.coli) and
determine which one would be the most effective at
cleaning up compounds commonly found in crude oil.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Impact of microorganisms
6. Take-Away DNA: Effective Molecular Modeling
Outside of the Classroom
Engage
K.E. Moody. Columbia College, Columbia, SC.
From our very first glimpses of the structure and
function of DNA, physical models have played an
important role in our understanding of molecular
genetics. But as science educators and students, we
have not been content to simply look at
representations of DNA; our goal has often been to
understand the molecule by building it. In response,
educational supply companies have offered models
and manipulatives, ranging in price from a few dollars
into the thousands; and creative teachers have made
use of everything from foam balls, to candy, to paper
clips in pursuit of the double helix. Unfortunately, most
of these efforts have resulted in representations that
may illustrate some aspects of structure, but have
little hope of clarifying molecular processes such as
replication, transcription, or repair. In this presentation
I will share a self-developed physical model that not
only provides an inexpensive, accurate, and dynamic
representation of DNA, but allows for the activity of
model construction to take place outside of the
classroom or lab. I will demonstrate the model,
highlight its' features, and discuss assessment data
that convey its' effectiveness, particularly with regard
to learning in take-home or on-line contexts.
As part of a new vision for implementing change in
the classroom, focus is shifting from instructorcentered to student-centered learning. Fostering peer
learning in the classroom improves overall conceptual
test scores as well as student attitudes about
learning. In particular, cooperative take-home exams
are well established as facilitating active learning in
the classroom. We therefore hypothesized that
incorporation of cooperative group take-home exams
into our student assessment schema would enhance
overall achievement of student learning outcomes.
During the Fall 2011 semester of our recombinant
DNA course, student learning was assessed by the
administration of two cooperative take-home exams,
followed immediately by standard individual, closedbook in-class exams on the same content. Student
teams on the take-home exam were instructor
assigned. We found that all teams performed well on
the take-home component, but a significant number of
the students underperformed on the individual exams.
Based on these findings, we hypothesized that lack of
individual student accountability may affect peerlearning. Many groups reported individuals who did
not fully participate on the group take-home exams,
further supporting this hypothesis. Therefore, in
Spring 2012 we altered our group take-home exams
to reflect individual efforts. During both the Fall 2011
and Spring 2012 semesters, students will have had
the same lecture material and similar exams. In the
Spring semester, students will be encouraged to
consult with peers on take-home exams, but will be
required to turn in their own individual test, followed
by the in-class exam. If students perform better on the
in-class exams in this model, compared to the
previous semester, it may suggest personal
accountability on take-home exams directly relates to
comprehension of the material. In this microbrew
session, I will discuss the advantages and
disadvantages of the testing schemas.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Information flow
EVENING FREE
3:30 PM
BUSES LOADED TO asm2012
3:45 PM – 4:00 PM
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function
7. Assessment of a Group-Centered Testing
Schema in a Core Molecular Biotechnology Lab
Course
Synergy 2
1
1
Bus tickets are required and have been provided in
attendee registration packets to those who preregistered.
asm2012 KEYNOTE SESSION & RECEPTION
5:00 PM – 8:30 PM
2
M.C. Srougi , H.B. Miller , D.S. Witherow , and S.
1 1
Carson . North Carolina State University, Raleigh,
2
NC and The University of Tampa, Tampa, FL.
BUSES LOADED TO SAN MATEO MARRIOTT
8:45 PM – 9:15 PM
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
54
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
NETWORKING BREAKFAST – FREE FOR
ALL!
strategy, leaving time for participants to practice and
reflect upon how they can implement the new practice
or approach into their classrooms. These sessions
are presented in two of three times slots during the
conference.
7:00 AM – 8:00 AM
Convene 1 & 2
You are on your own! Take the opportunity to sit at a
table where you recognize no one. Experienced
faculty: introduce yourself to a first-timer. First-timers:
hobnob with a speaker or ASM leader. Go outside
your comfort zone! You never know, you may meet a
collaborator or a friend for life. Many close
friendships have been formed and nurtured at an
ASMCUE meeting.
CLOSING PLENARY LECTURE
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Convene 1 & 2
Beyond Assessing Knowledge – Card Sorting,
Superheroes, and Moving Towards Measuring
Biological Expertise Among Undergraduates
Kimberly Tanner, San Francisco State University,
2010 National Science Foundation CAREER Grant
Awardee and 2011 Society for College Science
Teachers Outstanding Undergraduate Science
Teacher Awardee
How do biology experts structure their thinking about
the concepts in their discipline? How is this different
from the way those new to the field approach these
same ideas? In this interactive presentation, Dr.
Kimberly Tanner will engage the audience in thinking
about expert and novice thinking in biology by
drawing upon her own research that integrates
methodologies from science education and cognitive
psychology. Approaches to understanding and
measuring biological expertise are strongly tied to
ideas put forward by the American Association for the
Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the National
Science Foundation (NSF) in the recently published,
Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology
Education: A Call to Action.
CONFERENCE WRAP-UP
9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Convene 1 & 2
CONCURRENT PEDAGOGY SESSIONS
III of III
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
(5 sessions)
60-minute sessions dedicated to presenting practices
and pedagogies that have been assessed for
classroom effectiveness. Presenters will provide
background information and their approach to the
1. MedMyst: Using Serious Games to Teach
Microbiology
Synergy 2
Kristi Bowling, Rice University
MedMyst, a serious game with multiple independent
segments, was created through grants from the
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
and the National Center for Research Resources. The
underlying concept was to use game-based learning
to teach middle school students about infectious
diseases while reinforcing the scientific method and
encouraging STEM careers. In this session, an
overview of the seven MedMyst missions,
accompanying classroom activities, and teacher
support materials will be presented. The original
target audience was middle school students,
however, MedMyst has been used at many
educational levels and in multiple ways, some of
which will be discussed. This free web site allows
students to use inquiry and process skills to
investigate pathogens, the diseases they cause, and
the body’s immune response. In the games students
perform virtual experiments, such as case-control
studies, a Koch’s postulates simulation, necropsies,
and viral microarrays that engage students in the
scientific method and aspects of microbiology
careers. Results of recent research indicate the
efficacy of this methodology in achieving specific
learning objectives and the appeal of this type of
teaching tool. See http://medmyst.rice.edu/
2. Lab Design Based on Scientific Methods
Synergy 1
Session A: SETransforming Laboratory Activities
to Enhance the Undergraduate Research
Experience
Madhusudan Choudhary, Sam Houston State
University
Undergraduate research experiences are necessary
for active learning and the development of higherorder critical thinking. Although traditional practices
help students to perform certain laboratory
experiments, students have only limited exposure and
interaction with the scientific process and
methodology. The objective of this proposal is to
organize a panel discussion to discuss the principles
and activities that would transform conventional
laboratory practices so that students can directly gain
research experience and learn about the process of
scientific investigation. The panel will consist of
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SUNDAY, JUNE 17
educators who are committed to incorporating
research activities into the classroom and have firsthand transformed traditional laboratory activities by
introducing research-based activities into their own
courses. These activities include reading scientific
literature, developing hypotheses, designing
experiments, making reliable and logical inferences,
and preparing and reviewing manuscripts. Topics of
presentations will include information from a diverse
set of course offerings in microbiology, molecular
biology, genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. New
designed laboratory modules will be shared with
educators interested in adding this approach into their
courses.
Session B: Challenging undergraduates through a
discovery-based laboratory course
Jorge L.M. Rodrigues, University of Texas
Microbiology undergraduate students take a number
of laboratory courses to fulfill program requirements.
Traditionally, laboratory courses are structured
around basic exercises, followed by a questionnaire
that will be answered at the end of the class period.
Students describe these exercises as easy, repetitive,
and tedious. More importantly, learned skills are lost
as students’ progress towards the degree. I
hypothesize that students will learn problem-solving
skills when properly challenged in class. In order to
develop skills in classical and molecular microbiology
methods, I developed an upper division laboratory
course, in which students are challenged to isolate
and characterize an unknown microorganism.
Samples come from the student’s interest in a
particular environment. In the first teaching module,
students receive general laboratory protocols and are
required to maintain laboratory notebook for the
experiments. The American Society for Microbiology
instructions to authors serves as a guide for a midterm and final laboratory reports. During the second
teaching module, students receive a number of tasks
for molecular characterization of the microorganism,
but no protocols are provided. Students are
challenged to identify research objectives through
searches and discussion the current literature. They
develop their own experimental protocols for
polymerase chain reaction, primer design, and
molecular taxonomy. Each student successfully
characterized its isolate. Students enhanced their
quantitative skills through growth curve analysis and
statistical significance of results, gained laboratory
skills for DNA amplification, cloning, and
transformation, and learned to write and evaluate
technical literature.
3. Creating Videos and Public Service
Announcements as a Means of Promoting Student
Engagement, Developing Critical Thinking Skills,
and Creating Citizen Scientists
Synergy 4
Lisa Cuchara, Quinnipiac University
There is a recognized need for scientists/health
professionals to effectively communicate science to
the public. This presentation will describe taking this
“Citizen Scientist” goal from the passive world of
discussion boards to the public, interactive, dynamic
Web 2.0 arena. Student created vaccine ‘public
service announcements’ will be shown. These videos
are examples of higher order Bloom’s taxonomy
outcomes and yield more “citizen scientists.” The
students also learn about vaccines, vaccine
preventable diseases and myths related to vaccines
to a higher level through the creation process. A
wonderful side effect was mastery of technology and
enhanced learning of the topic itself, the latter falling
under the constructivism learning philosophy
(“humans can understand only what they have
themselves constructed”). Constructivism learning
involves avoiding the internalization of factoids only to
be regurgitated later on and emphasizes learning as
result of individual mental construction.
4. Forming Effective Student Groups for Active
Learning Pedagogies
Synergy 5
Samantha Elliott, St. Mary’s College of Maryland
Many models of student-centered learning
environments revolve around the use of group work.
How does one create these groups for maximum
effectiveness in the classroom? What does a
functional group look like? What factors must be
addressed to best create groups to fit the pedagogical
goal of the day? Should groups be changed
frequently or remain static throughout the semester?
We will review what the literature tells us about group
dynamics in the undergraduate classroom, and the
presenter will share data from her own experiences.
Then participants will break out into small groups to
discuss their individual pedagogies that require group
work and align what they have learned in the session
to their classroom needs.
5. Using the Scientific Literature to Teach Science
Literacy
Connect 1
Jodie Krontiris-Litowitz, Youngstown State
University
Science literacy demands that scientists be fluent in
the discipline, able to interpret numeric information,
and able to gather and integrate information from
primary sources to support positions and arguments.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
56
Teaching science literacy presents a challenge for
faculty, many of whom support teaching literacy skills
but feel conflicted about teaching them at the expense
of content. In this session I will present a set of
science literacy skills aligned with Bloom’s taxonomy
and show how they were embedded into an
introductory biology course using journal article
assignments that paralleled course content.
Attendees will develop assignments that embed
science literacy skills and devise assessments to
evaluate them. Finally, we will talk about how this
skill set can be used in advanced courses to move
students toward expert science literacy.
Synergy 4
Facilitator: Ned Barden, Massachusetts College of
Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Connect 1
Facilitator: Michael Hanophy, St. Joseph’s College
Synergy 2
Facilitator: Phil Mixter, Washington State University
Connect 3
Facilitator: Rita Moyes, Texas A&M University
Engage
Facilitator: Jackie Reynolds, Richland College
6. Rock Stars, Deficit Models, and Stereotype
Threats: Learning to See Inequity in Science and
Strategies for Addressing It
Engage
Kimberly Tanner, San Francisco State University,
2010 National Science Foundation CAREER Grant
Awardee and 2011 Society for College Science
Teachers Outstanding Undergraduate Science
Teacher Awardee
(Only presented once)
Interested in understanding issues that impede efforts
to diversify the biological sciences? Want strategies
that can promote equity, fairness, and diversity in all
your professional interactions as a biologist? While
attempts to diversify the sciences have been ongoing
for decades, progress has been modest at best.
Multiple lines of research from the social sciences
suggest that scientists’ efforts to diversify their ranks
may be misdirected or even counterproductive.
Findings from research on why talented individuals
leave the biological sciences, as well as examples of
both successful efforts and problematic attempts
towards diversifying the biological sciences will be
considered.
MICROBREW SESSIONS III of III
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
(7 sessions)
These grassroots sessions, arranged by topics,
provide a forum for sharing best practices and
interesting activities used in laboratory and
classroom teaching. Presentations are simple
"chalk talks" (e.g., no PowerPoint) to facilitate
informal discussion. Unlike the poster sessions,
Microbrews do not require assessments. Each
presentation is 20 minutes and includes a 15minute presentation and 5 minutes for
discussion.
Session Room Facilitators:
Synergy 1
Facilitator: Rod Anderson, Ohio Northern University
Synergy 5
Facilitator: Amy Siegesmund, Pacific Lutheran
University
SESSION E: 11:00 AM
1. Creating an Interactive & Student-Centered
Learning Experience Using Real World Problems
in a Large Enrollment Majors Microbiology Course
Synergy 2
W.A. Dustman and C.M. Phillips. University of
Georgia, Athens GA.
Numerous studies have shown that active learning
models of instruction lead to greater cognitive gains in
students. These methods have been successfully
implemented in small class settings, but there is
significant challenge to their implementation in larger
courses. By their nature, large enrollment courses
make it difficult to promote scientific inquiry through
student –led discussions. Students in large course
often perceive their instructors view them as
identification numbers rather than as individuals with
opinions and ideas, which can have negative impacts
on motivation and performance. To attack these
challenges, I re-designed my Introductory
Microbiology course (300 students, science majors) to
include in-class group activities which used real world
scenarios and challenged students to apply their
microbiology knowledge while promoting scientific
thinking. Peer groups (4 students) interacted in the
classroom (~20 min) to address questions posed in
each activity. While groups worked on the activity, my
teaching assistants and I engaged with groups
individually to provide immediate feedback and
direction. To reduce student apprehension, points
were awarded for participation (~14% of course
grade), regardless of answer validity.
One means of assessing changes in student
motivation and reaction to these activities was
through student submission of online reflective blogs
after each activity. Analysis of blogs indicates that the
majority of students found the activities to be
beneficial to their learning. They viewed group
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
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SUNDAY, JUNE 17
working on other ways to incorporate analogy building
in the biology classroom.
assignments as opportunities to collectively solve
problems and arrive at solutions which an individual
may not have been able to reach alone. They were
excited to apply their knowledge to real world
situations (i.e., diagnose a patient’s infection and
determine appropriate treatment options). Students
reported that the activities helped them learn
microbiological concepts presented in lecture, refresh
concepts learned in previous science courses, and
provided students with a tool for measuring their
understanding and identifying any misconceptions.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Information
flow
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
2. The Power of Analogies: Get Your Students
Thinking About Central Dogma!
Engage
D.L. Newman and L.K. Wright. Rochester Institute of
Technology, Rochester, NY.
The 2011 Vision and Change document specifically
calls for student-centered learning in undergraduate
biology courses, but many faculty struggle to
incorporate these types of activities in their courses.
Posing open-ended questions for students to work on
collaboratively is an effective way to get them to
grapple with difficult concepts. One of the core
concepts for biological literacy from Vision and
Change is Central Dogma, which falls under the
broader topic of “Information Flow, Exchange and
Storage”. Central Dogma is a deceptively simple
concept and students often find it difficult to
differentiate between genes, genomes, DNA, RNA,
proteins and traits. We developed an exercise to help
students clarify their understanding of information
storage and flow, which was implemented toward the
beginning of a sophomore-level Cell Biology class.
Students were divided into groups and given one of
the following items: sheet music, a recipe for
chocolate cake, the table of contents from an
instruction manual, a photograph of a set of
encyclopedias, and a photo mosaic of a baby. They
were instructed to decide whether their item
represented a genome, a gene, a chromosome or
DNA. Building off of this idea, they then had to decide
what would represent each of the other levels of
information within the same analogy. Finally students
expanded their analogy to include other features,
such as mutations, mRNA, proteins and traits. In the
end, students presented their models to the rest of the
class and thus compared their understanding of the
concepts. Students self-reported that this helped
clarify their thinking and when tested with different
analogies on a subsequent exam, most students were
successful at identifying the relationships between
codons and deoxyribonucleotides, genes and
genomes, and genomes of different people. We are
3. Using Blog-Based Discussions to Promote
Student Understanding of Peer Review Research
Articles
Synergy 1
1
1
2
S.M. Ní Chadhain , R.M. Gray and A.B. Morris .
1
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL
2
and Middle Tennessee State University,
Murfreesboro, TN.
Reading, analyzing, and understanding the scientific
literature is a skill that many students struggle to
master. In order to help students improve their
understanding of peer review research articles we
developed a class blog for an introductory
microbiology course. Articles linked to lecture topics
were posted in sections on the blog (e.g. 1:
introduction; 2: methods; 3: results; 4: discussion) and
students were provided directed commentary. For
example, when provided with the introduction,
students were asked to identify the primary objectives
of the proposed research. Students were required to
post a minimum of two comments on each section
and wrote a paper summary once the discussion
closed. We used the WordPress/CommentPress
platform which allows comments to be made in the
margins next to the passage being commented on so
that the comments are properly contextual. This
exercise forces students to take a more active
approach to their reading and to literally enter into a
dialogue with the text. They also have the opportunity
to follow the thought processes of their fellow
students by seeing other comments. This blogging
approach is particularly useful for students who are
uncomfortable in class discussions and allows fuller
participation than traditional classroom discussions.
We are using three approaches to analyze the blog
discussions. First, the level of discussion is being
analyzed to determine whether the discussion moves
from simpler to more complex integrative thinking
over the course of the semester. Second, the
dialogue on the blogs is being examined to explore
changes in how students use and explain key
concepts over time. Finally, we are surveying
students on whether they believe the blog is helping
them develop the tools they need to read the scientific
literature. Initial results indicate that students find the
blog improves their ability to read and analyze peer
review research articles.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Information flow
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
58
4. Use of Primary Literature Sources to Increase
Awareness in Nursing Students about Drug
Resistance in Bacteria
Synergy 4
L. Ramamoorthy. Marian University, Fond du Lac,
WI.
I teach Microbiology, one of core courses taken by
nursing students and mechanism of action of
antimicrobial agents is one of the key topics covered
in this course. Many students had a great difficulty in
understanding the concept of drug resistance in
bacteria and could not put it in perspective. In order to
address this issue, my initial approach was to have
the students review and discuss current articles, and
then submit a paper on drug resistance in bacteria.
However, this activity met with limited success. Most
students had very little experience in scientific writing
and as a result, their submissions lacked in substance
and were often scientifically inaccurate. Students
were unable to differentiate between anecdotal and
fact-based evidence or between a peer-reviewed
journal and popular magazine.
The following semester, I used a more structured
approach to teach this topic and made the following
modifications:
a. I spent more time on microbial genetics and
explained gene transfer in the context of antibiotic
resistance.
b. Used multi-media presentations / animations, case
studies to explain the concepts regarding the
mechanism of action of antimicrobial agents.
c. Students were provided two reviews on the topic of
drug resistance and in-class activity was used to
discuss the key points of the review and its relevance
to the scenarios they might face in their nursing
careers. This activity was more productive and
students were actively engaged in debating the
various practices used in the hospitals and their
impact on drug resistance.
d. Conducted a workshop on literature search, the
use of available database and library resources as
well as a class on writing scientific papers.
Having understood how to read and interpret a
scientific paper and put it in context of real-world
scenarios, students were then asked to conduct
literature search and submit a research paper.
These modifications had a positive impact. Students
were more actively engaged and had a better
understanding of the topic as determined by the
quality of the research paper as well as their
performance in the exam. I am currently in the
process of developing specific assessment tools to
analyze more objectively the impact of the different
instructional strategies that I have used on specific
outcomes, and student learning as a whole.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
5. The Use of Real-Life Consumer Food and Water
Microbiology Issues as Fodder for a Full Semester
of Undergraduate Applied Microbiology Research
Experience
Connect 1
E.A. Scott. Simmons College, Boston, MA.
When I wrote the syllabus for a new 300-level
undergraduate course on the Microbiology of Food
Water and Waste, I decided to throw away the lab
manuals and instead, created an open-ended lab
research experience, based upon real life consumer
issues and practices. To date, the course has run
twice and I have guided each class as they undertook
two different research topics: An Evaluation of Four
Different Consumer Practices for Decontaminating
Packaged Spinach Leaves and An Evaluation of the
Effectiveness of Consumer Water Filtration Units at
Removing E.coli from Contaminated Drinking Water.
Working in teams, the students were required to
develop a test protocol and a study design, pilot their
protocol and adjust their design as appropriate, and
then continue to collect data throughout the semester.
Students wrote a full lab report including a literature
survey, methods, results, discussion and
recommendations. Students presented their projects
at the end of the semester. Challenges encountered
have included: how to motivate all students to be
engaged in their project and take responsibility for the
integrity of their lab work, data collection and results
evaluation; being able to collect enough data for
analysis; inter-rata reliability between teams. Benefits
have included: growth in student participation as
teams became more cohesive, increased lab skills,
increased confidence and enjoyment in hands –on
applied microbiology research, increased personal
responsibility, quality of independent work, and
improved scientific writing and presentation skills.
This work was initially supported by a grant from the
WM Keck Foundation
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
6. Bioremediation Approaches in a Laboratory
Activity for an Industrial Biotechnology and
Applied Microbiology Course
Connect 3
1,2
1
1
D.L. Vullo , L. Raiger Iustman , N.I. Lopez , and
1 1
S.M. Ruzal . Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y
Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos
2
Aires, Argentina. Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad
Nacional General Sarmiento, Los Polvorines, Buenos
Aires, Argentina.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
59
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
Industrial Biotechnology and Applied Microbiology is a
semiannual optional course for Chemistry and Biology
students at the Faculty of Sciences of the University
of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This course is usually
attended by 25 students, working in teams of two. The
curriculum, composed by 8 lab exercises (8 h-week),
includes an oil bioremediation practice which covers a
global insight of bioremediation processes: the
influence of pollutants on autochthonous microbiota,
biodegrader isolation for potential bioaugmentation
techniques and biosurfactant production for
bioavailability understanding. The experimental steps
are the following: a) evaluation of microbial tolerance
to pollutants by constructing pristine soil microcosms
contaminated with 10%v/w diesel or 5%v/w xylene
and b) isolation of degraders and biosufactant
production analysis. To check microbial tolerance,
microcosms are incubated during one week at room
temperature. Samples are collected at 0 h, 4 h and
every 48 h for CFU/g soil testing. An initial decrease
of total CFU count related to toxicity is noticed, being
such pattern generally obtained in each compound. At
the end of the experiment, a recovery of the CFU
number is observed, evidencing enrichment in
biodegraders. Some colonies from the 7th day CFU
counting plates are streaked in mineral medium with
diesel as sole carbon source. After a week, isolates
are inoculated on mineral broth supplemented with
diesel to induce biosurfactant production. Surface
tension in culture supernatants is measured and an
emulsification activity test is carried out to visualize
tensioactive effect of bacterial products. Besides the
improvement in the good microbiological practices,
consequence of the manual work involved in this lab
exercise, the students show enthusiasm in different
aspects, depending on their own interests. While
biology students explore and learn new concepts on
solubility, emulsions and bioavailability, chemistry
students show curiosity in bacterial behavior and
manipulation of microorganisms for environmental
benefits.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Pathways,
Impact of microorganisms
7. Bringing Microbes into Better Focus; An
Investigative Approach
Synergy 5
S.C. Wagner and J. Taylor. Stephen F. Austin State
University, Nacogdoches, TX.
Undergraduate students in general microbiology
courses are typically trained to use compound
brightfield microscopes to carry out most of their
studies on microorganisms. They rarely are exposed
to other tools of microscopy, such as darkfield, phase
contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopes,
even though these instruments may be available to
other students at the same institution. They are
instead relegated to learning about these other
microscopes in lecture presentations that do not
involve hands-on investigations. In an effort to solve
this problem, we are developing and testing a new
approach that immerses undergraduates in inquirybased explorations that use light microscopes, as well
as scanning and transmission electron microscopes,
to study the microbial world. Students begin in
traditional labs that cover the components, care and
maintenance of brightfield microscopes and viewing
specimens such as plankton, yeasts and bacteria
using low-power, high-dry, and finally oil immersion
lenses. During subsequent lab periods, the students
are immersed in hands-on activities in our electron
microscopy center where they study preparing
specimens for viewing and how to operate both
scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The
students then work in teams to view and interpret
electron micrographs of specimens of bacteria and
fungi. Preliminary data has indicated that this
approach helps the students appreciate the array of
tools available to them to view and study the microbial
world. It also helps them understand which
microscope is most applicable to the type of microbe
that they would like to study and the data that they
need to collect. We are planning to further develop
these approaches and to incorporate investigations
that use phase contrast, darkfield, and fluorescence
microscopy in future lab exercises.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure,
Systems
SESSION F: 11:30 AM
1. Adventures in Teaching in a Technologically
Enhanced Classroom: Redesigning Lecture
Periods from Faculty-Centered to StudentCentered Active Learning Experiences
Synergy 2
D.M. Becker. Northern Michigan University,
Marquette, MI.
I am a participant in the National Science Foundation
TUES (Transforming Undergraduate Education in
Science) grant program that was recently awarded to
several faculty at Northern Michigan University
(NMU). The grant is entitled “Increasing adoption of
active learning in STEM disciplines by integrating a
faculty development program and a technologyfacilitated learning environment”. Part of the funding
from this grant supported the construction of a
classroom to facilitate active learning. This past
semester I taught BI 303 General Microbiology in this
classroom for the first time. The classroom was
specifically designed to move away from the
traditional ‘faculty-centered’ lecture format. The
seating plan consists of nine round tables seating
seven students each; each table has nearby large
display monitors with smart board capabilities as well
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
60
as document cameras that support projection, image
capture and video capability. Large white boards and
‘white walls’ are on every wall and there are two
ceiling-mounted projectors for displaying on two large
screens in the room. All NMU students have laptop
computers and they were routinely used in this
classroom. In the center of the room is the ‘teacher
station’ that also has a smart board and document
camera. In my microbrew session I will discuss the
variety of teaching strategies I experimented with
(e.g., mini-lectures, inquiry-driven learning, small
group discussions, student in-class research, case
studies), and assessment methods employed (e.g.,
‘two-minute papers’, immediate response systems,
assessment of learning styles using VARK). In
addition, I will give my perspective on the impact this
type of classroom had on my approach to teaching,
as well as the students’ attitude, engagement, and
comprehension of microbiology.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Pathways
2. Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning
(POGIL) Activity on Bioremediation
Connect 3
R. Kumar. Minnesota State College and University,
Minneapolis, MN.
POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) is
a method of instruction that aims to actively engage
students to learn scientific skills such as critical
thinking and problem solving. In an attempt to
increase student engagement, improve student
retention, and better prepare our students for
scientific careers, it is essential for the science faculty
to explore and evaluate new teaching pedagogies that
may more effectively foster student engagement and
the development of essential analytical and
communication skills required in the scientific setting.
POGIL pedagogy is based upon research that
suggests students learn best when they are actively
engaged in the classroom and laboratory. They learn
by drawing conclusions after analyzing data and
models. Working together in self-managed teams
helps them understand concepts and solve problems
more quickly and efficiently than they would on their
own. Giving the opportunity to students to reflect upon
what they have learned can also lead to improvement
in their performance.
The professor plays four simultaneous roles while
implementing POGIL activity in the class room;
namely, leader, facilitator, monitor and evaluator. As
the leader, the instructor creates the learning
environment by developing and explaining the lesson
with the objectives (both the content objectives and
the process skills objectives), by defining the
expectations and by establishing the organization (the
goal/reward structure, the team structure and the
timeline within the class period). By combining
monitoring, assessing, and facilitating, the instructor
assures that all team members are participating in
discussion and understand the assignment, and
provides feedback, and motivation as needed.
Evaluations are given to individuals and teams
regarding performance, achievement, and
effectiveness, and general points are shared with the
class.
I will present a POGIL activity that is designed to
teach the concept of BIOREMEDIATION.
Bioremediation is the solution of an environmental
problem by the use of biological organisms.
Bioremediation provides a technique for cleaning up
pollution by enhancing some biodegradation
processes that occur in nature. Depending on the site
and its contaminants, bioremediation may be safer
and less expensive than alternative solutions such as
incineration or land filling of the contaminated
materials. These POGIL activities enhance student’s
critical thinking skills and analytical abilities that help
them understand concepts better than traditional
teaching methods.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Impact of
microorganisms
3. Inquiry-Based Microbiology for Biology Majors
Synergy 4
B.J. May. College of St. Benedict/St. John's
University, Collegeville, MN.
Best practice pedagogy suggests that active learning
and hands on activities are an invaluable component
of a student’s learning experience. I have capitalized
on this concept and now teach microbiology with a
fused laboratory and lecture for upper level biology
majors. Meeting for two hours each time period,
subjects were introduced with primary literature, case
studies, or recent scientific questions. Discussions
helped to bridge important microbiology concepts with
these research themes and allowed for the design of
student-driven lab-based research projects. The
reason for this approach was several-fold. First, more
time in the laboratory was possible. Second,
laboratory experiments were conducted immediately
after discussion on a topic allowing a direct correlation
between discussion and lab. Third, it is believed that
this approach encouraged student engagement and
ownership over their learning and experiments.
Students were able to learn content in the context of a
real research question.
For example, after a discussion regarding a
microorganism’s impact on the environment and
where they might reside, students developed
hypotheses based on the lakes on campus (which
includes both a eutrophic and oligotrophic setting).
Student hypotheses were founded on identifying
different microorganisms in these environments.
Students performed sampling, microscopic analysis,
physiological analysis, and 16S identification on their
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
61
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
samples. Here they learned important laboratory
techniques and used microbiology content information
to design and assess their hypothesis. As another
example, students were asked to use bioinformatic
techniques to determine whether the bacterium
Cellulomonas flavigena was capable of a variety of
metabolic properties. In performing this experiment,
they were asked to identify the role of the metabolic
pathway, the genes required for this pathway and
learned valuable bioinformatic tools to predict C.
flavigena’s capabilities with help from the Joint
Genome Institute’s Undergraduate Genome
Annotation program.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure
and function, Impact of microorganisms
4. Designing Undergraduate Research
Experiences at Colleges and Universities without
Research Facilities
Synergy 5
1
1
1
A.H. McDonald , D.N. Burke , C.P. Evans , A.E.
1
2
2 1
Grulke , T. Hermann and M. Franzen . Concordia
2
University Wisconsin, Mequon, WI and Milwaukee
School of Engineering, Milwaukee, WI.
Providing undergraduate science majors with the
opportunity to participate in the process of science
can be challenging, even at large universities with
significant research faculty, facilities and funding. Put
simply, there just aren’t enough summer internships
and volunteer options for all of the students interested
in science careers. Small, private universities without
research facilities have an even greater challenge in
providing their students with research training. Yet, a
significant number of studies indicate that exposure to
research has the greatest impact in determining a
student’s career choice in basic science. Therefore, in
this session, I describe a course that provides
undergraduate science majors a research experience
without actually working in the research laboratory.
This course was designed in collaboration with the
CREST (Connecting Researchers, Educators and
Students) Project developed at the Center for
BioMolecular Modeling at MSOE. The CREST project
exposes students to current scientific literature and
research design through a modeling experience.
Students interact with the researcher and visit their
laboratory to understand how the studies were
performed but do not do any of the experiments
themselves. Instead, the students must design a
physical model of the protein studied and develop a
poster explaining the significance of the study and
how it was conducted. Students then work with their
faculty mentor to develop instructional materials
based on the protein model. Three of my students,
who recently completed this course, will describe their
model of class I major histocompatibility protein
(MHC) HLA-A2 complexed to US2, a herpes virus
protein that prevents class I MHC expression, and
present their poster explaining the significance of this
research. This method can be modified and used as a
senior research project involving additional faculty
members and researchers as mentors and could
culminate in a research day with students presenting
their posters. (Funded by the National Science
Foundation, CCLI/TUES #1022793)
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Structure,
Impact of microorganisms
5. Use of a C. elegans Bioassay to Study Bacterial
Virulence in an Undergraduate Microbiology
Course
Connect 1
S.S. Strand. The College of Wooster, Wooster, OH.
Many students taking upper-level courses in
microbiology are interested in microbial diseases, and
pathogenesis. Although we can use clinical cases,
and the scientific literature to discuss virulence
mechanisms, such concepts often remain abstract in
student’s minds. The use of an effective hand-on
experiment illustrating microbial virulence would likely
significantly increase student’s interest and
understanding of pathogenesis. Caenorhabditis
elegans has long been used as a host organism for
identifying and characterizing bacterial virulence
factors. Those characteristics that make C. elegans a
tractable and well-studied model organism, quick
generation time, ease of culture and visualization, an
array of genetic mutants, also offer a number of
advantages for studies of bacterial pathogenesis at
the undergraduate level. Students in my upper-level
microbiology course have been investigating the
virulence of several environmental strains of
Pseudomonas using a bioassay in which C. elegans
is the host organism. The bioassay is conducted in a
96-well plate and uses liquid cultures of both C.
elegans and the bacterial strain of interest. The
endpoint of the assay is a simple visual measurement
of worm survival using a dissecting microscope.
Students are overwhelmingly positive about this
particular set of laboratory experiments. This
microbrew session will discuss the use of the C.
elegans bioassay, students learning gains, and ways
in which the experimental design could be expanded
to address additional questions of interest.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Impact of microorganisms
6. Engaged Discussion of the “New Germ Theory”
in Light of the Human Microbiome
Synergy 1
D.M. Tobiason. Carthage College, Kenosha, WI.
Human microbiome studies are excellent examples of
interdisciplinary science. We used Buchen’s article
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
62
“Microbiology: The New Germ Theory”( Nature,
468:492-5, 2010) that highlights recent microbiome
studies, as a focal point for discussion to wrap up our
upper level Microbiology course. This excellent article
highlights the use of microbial ecology techniques to
investigate the human microbiome, which draws in
both students interested in health-related fields as
well as those interested in ecology. In addition, the
importance of the human microbiome is addressed
along with the effects of antibiotics on our normal
flora, which allows further discussion of development
of antibiotic resistance. Small group discussions
developed into classroom discussions, based on sets
of questions starting with “What is the old germ
theory?” Many of our students are pursuing careers in
health-related fields, and centering discussion on
Buchen’s article was crucial to opening their eyes to
the interdisciplinary nature of science and the
potential roles of natural flora on our health.
rhizogenes A4 genome. The second is an
investigation of the function and evolution of multicopy genes involved in proline biosynthesis in
Agrobacteria and the alpha-proteobacteria. These
projects have been implemented in high school
summer seminars and laboratory components of
microbiology, genetics, molecular biology and
biochemistry courses at multiple institutions
nationwide.
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Evolution,
Structure
END OF CONFERENCE
12:00 PM
ASM Curriculum Guideline Concept(s): Systems,
Impact of microorganisms
7. The Genomics Education National Initiative:
Integrating Original Microbial Genomics Research
in the Classroom
Engage
1,2
1,3
Get Social at ASMCUE and
Join the Conversation!
1
D. Wood , K. Houmiel , B. McFarland , B.
4
5
3 1
Goodner , J. Setubal and S.C. Slater . Seattle
2
Pacific University, Seattle, WA, University of
3
Washington, Seattle, WA, University of Wisconsin4
Madison, Madison, WI, Hiram College, Hiram, OH
5
and Institute of Chemistry, University of São Paulo,
São Paulo, SP Brazil.
The Genomics Education National Initiative is a
consortium of genomics researchers dedicated to the
incorporation of original research into high school,
community college and undergraduate classrooms.
Members develop hypothesis driven original research
questions and resources to facilitate implementation
of these projects in the classroom. The disseminated
nature of the program is coordinated through a virtual
laboratory website and database (http://www.geniscience.org) that tracks users and project data,
provides access to level appropriate protocols, lists
reagents, strains and materials and integrates
assessment modules. While projects currently focus
on microbial and functional genomics the system is
amenable to the support of research projects in any
discipline. I will discuss two projects that showcase
the outcomes of this approach. The first is the
sequencing and assembly of the Agrobacterium
ASMCUE 2012 Facebook Event Page
The ASMCUE Facebook Event page is another
place to post messages to attendees.
https://www.facebook.com/events/2140576019
80335/#!/events/214057601980335/
ASM on Twitter
Use the hashtag #asmcue to receive immediate
updates and see what others are talking about.
Follow the general ASM account @ASMicrobiology
for updates from ASM HQ and follow @ASMKelly
for education-specific tweets.
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
63
Invited Presenter Biographies
Lucia Barker is the program officer for the Science Education Alliance (SEA) at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute
(HHMI) Department of Science Education. She received her B.S. at the University of Minnesota and her Ph.D. in
molecular microbiology and immunology from the University of Missouri. Her postdoctoral work was in bacterial
pathogenesis at Stanford University and the NIH/NIAID Rocky Mountain Laboratory campus in Hamilton, Montana.
As a faculty member at the University of Minnesota Medical School, she continued her research in mycobacterial
pathogenesis, including studying gene expression in mycobacterial biofilms and the pathogenic mechanisms of
Mycobacterium leprae and M. marinum. Dr. Barker has long been interested in and committed to science education
and outreach. She has trained and mentored science interns at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan, developed
curricula for the PBS program Nature, and trained numerous graduate and undergraduate students in her laboratory.
Currently, she helps coordinate SEA-Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEAPHAGES), the first SEA course. This year, SEA-PHAGES involves more than 1,000 students, primarily freshmen, at
65 institutions. The students learn and experience science first-hand as they perform authentic research, isolating
and purifying bacteriophages, and performing both phenotypic and genotypic characterization on their isolates.
During her time at HHMI, Dr. Barker has written much of the SEA-PHAGES curriculum and trained more than 100
faculty and teaching assistants in the delivery of the wet lab portion of the course.
Juanita Barrena, Professor Emerita of Biological Sciences at California State University, Sacramento (CSUS),
began her 36 year tenure as a member of the faculty at CSUS in 1975. She earned the B.S. degree in biology in
1969 from Long Island University; and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in zoology from Iowa State University in 1972 and
1975, respectively. Dr. Barrena also earned the J.D. degree in 2001 from University of The Pacific, McGeorge
School of Law, and is a member of the California State Bar.
Dr. Barrena is the Lead Project Director for the California State University-Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority
Participation (CSU-LSAMP), an NSF supported project involving 22 campuses of the CSU system in efforts to
broaden participation in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Dr. Barrena has
been involved in CSU-LSAMP since its inception in 1993, serving as director of the campus-based program at CSUS
from 1993-2011 and assuming her current role as Lead Project Director for the system in 2003.
For most of her career, Dr. Barrena’s professional interests have been focused on the development, implementation,
and evaluation of programs to broaden participation in the sciences and health professions. In pursuit of these
interests, in 1986, she founded the Science Educational Equity Program (SEE) at CSUS, a comprehensive academic
support program for students who face barriers to careers in the sciences and health professions, and served as the
program’s Director from 1986-2011. Although the SEE Program was initially established primarily as a retention
program for 4-year college students, her successful efforts to secure grant funding also enabled the development of
outreach programs for community college and K-12 students. In addition, as Principal Investigator for CSU-LSAMP’s
Bridge to the Doctorate Activities, she is involved in diversity programs at the graduate level.
Spencer Benson is Director, Center for Teaching Excellence and Associate Professor in the Department of Cell
Biology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Maryland and interim chair of the ASM International Education
Committee. He is the 2002 US CASE-Carnegie Maryland Professor of the Year, recipient of the 2011 American
Society for Microbiology Carski Teaching Award, and in 2008-09 was a Fulbright Fellow to Hong Kong working on
general education. As Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence, Dr. Benson oversees more than 20 programs
for faculty and graduate students directed at enhancing teaching and student learning and Maryland. His research
interests include the development of pedagogies for teaching science for all students, assessment of student learning
and secondary science education and development of the new AP-Biology Curriculum. Dr. Benson has organized
local, national and international meetings on science education, E-learning, scholarship in teaching and learning
(SoTL) and faculty development. Each summer he teaches genetics and global diseases (HIVAIDS) at Yonsei’s
International Summer School in Seoul, South Korea.
Kristi Bowling is a science education project manager at Rice University Center for Technology in Teaching and
Learning (CTTL) in Houston, TX. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Kentucky where she
studied transgenic models of prion disease and then subsequently completed a post-doc at The University of Texas
Medical Branch in Galveston, TX studying protein-misfolding disorders. In 2008, Kristi transitioned into science
education and joined the CTTL to create fun, interactive science education materials to teach student and the general
public science content and inspire students to join the STEM field. She currently serves as the project manager for
Medical Mysteries (MedMyst) Web Adventures and the project manager and Co-Principal Investigator of a new Web
Adventure in development called Virtual Clinical Trials.
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V. Celeste Carter received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University School of Medicine in
1982 under the direction of Dr. Satvir S. Tevethia. She completed postdoctoral studies in the laboratory of Dr. G.
Steven Martin at the University of California at Berkeley. She joined the Division of Biological and Health Sciences at
Foothill College in 1994 to develop and head a Biotechnology Program. She served as a Program Director twice in
the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) as a rotator. Dr. Carter accepted a permanent Program Director
position in DUE in 2009; she is the Lead Program Director for the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Program
in DUE as well as working on other programs in the Division and across the Foundation.
Madhusudan Choudhary is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Sam Houston State
University. He received his Ph.D. in genetics and evolution from McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. His
research interests are evolution of multipartite genomes, duplicate genes, and regulation of bacterial cell cycle in a
model system, Rhodobacter sphaeroides. He teaches genetics, microbiology, and molecular evolution. He
professionally strives for a teacher-scholar, who believes that scientific education depends on both scientific teaching
and research. He was selected as a 2012 ASM Biology Scholar. He currently serves as secretary for the ASM-Texas
branch.
Lisa Cuchara is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT. Lisa
earned her Ph.D. in molecular immunology from Albany Medical College in 1996 and was a post-doctoral fellow at
the National Cancer Institute until 1999 when she accepted a position supervising the Histocompatibility Laboratory at
Yale University. Lisa has been teaching students at Quinnipiac (undergraduate students majoring in biomedical
science, microbiology, health sciences, entry level physician assistant, and biology, as well as non-science majors
and graduate students) since 2006. In 2010 Lisa became one of the first Quinnipiac University Scholars. The central
mission of the Scholars program being to build and support a community of faculty scholars interested in conducting
and engaging in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Courses that she has taught include: immunology, general
microbiology lab, the world of microbes, pathogenic microbiology, infections of leisure, biomedical photography,
transplantation immunology, hematology, clinical immunology, immunology of infectious diseases, vaccines and
vaccine preventable diseases.
She has several active research projects involving fomites, antibiotic resistance genes, virulence genes, MRSA
(methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Staphylococcus aureus colonization in normal healthy individuals and
Staphylococcus aureus and other potential pathogens transmission via fomites, antibiotic resistance genes in water,
soil, GMOs and commensals. She also leads a very active project on educating people about vaccines and vaccine
preventable diseases. Lisa incorporates the concept that "there is a recognized need for scientists and health
professionals to effectively communicate both their work and their understanding of science and health to the public"
into all of her classes and research projects. She typically has 12-30 students working on research projects in her lab,
mainly undergraduate students plus 2-6 graduate students working on their Master's thesis.
Lilia De La Cerda joined the California State University, Fresno (Fresno State) campus in 1996, where she has
served as coordinator and director for various academic student support and graduate education guidance programs.
Her past appointments at Fresno State include managing state and federal grant activities funded through the Health
Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP), Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and United States
Department of Agriculture. In 2005, Mrs. De La Cerda was designated to direct the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority
Participation (LSAMP) Program; dedicated to serving students who face or have faced social, cultural, educational or
economic barriers to careers in STEM. During her free time she enjoys assisting in her daughters’ Girl Scout
activities and spending quality time with her family.
Michael Dougherty is Director of Education for the American Society of Human Genetics, Visiting Professor in
Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Educational Liaison to the Linda Crnic Institute for
Down Syndrome. He joined ASHG in June 2008, and much of his work focuses on improving undergraduate and high
school science instruction. He conducts professional development workshops (Building Excellence in Genetics
Instruction- BEGIn) for college biology departments to help them implement student-centered teaching practices.
Prior to joining ASHG, he spent nine years on the biology faculty at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia, where he
taught introductory biology, genetics, molecular biology, and biochemistry and conducted research on the genetics of
yeast prions. Dougherty has 18 years of formal science education experience, which began when he joined the
Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) as a curriculum developer in 1993. During his time at BSCS, he coauthored several textbooks and full-year multimedia curricula for high school and college biology and helped direct
curriculum projects in behavioral genetics and the neurobiology of addiction. He also served as associate director of
BSCS. He earned his B.A. degree from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a Ph.D. from the University of
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Massachusetts, Amherst in molecular biology and biochemistry. He has been a Burroughs Wellcome Postdoctoral
Fellow in Alzheimer’s disease, a Visiting Senior Lecturer and Member of Eliot College, University of Kent, UK, and the
McGavacks of Loudoun Chair in Biochemistry at Hampden-Sydney College.
Samantha Elliott has been an assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at St. Mary’s College of Maryland
(SMCM), a public liberal arts college and Maryland’s designated honors college, since 2006. She graduated with a
+
Ph.D. in immunology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2004, where she studied murine CD8 T
cell activation requirements. She began studying C. elegans immune responses during postdoctoral studies at Duke
University, and continues this research with her students at SMCM. She also collaborates with colleagues to study
nematode-bacteria interactions that affect soil microbial ecology, and the use of catalytic azide compounds to label
sub-cellular structures. Her education research currently focuses on retention of under-represented groups in the
sciences, and the dynamics of group work (group quizzes, peer instruction, role-play) in the learning process. She
was a 2008-2009 Resident in the Biology Scholars Research Program, and currently works with the Faculty Institutes
for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST IV) as a reviewer, the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education as a
Curriculum Section Editor, and on the Committee of Examiners for the Graduate Record Examination in
Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology.
Joanne Engel is a professor of medicine and microbiology/immunology at the University of California, San
Francisco, where she is Chief of the Infectious Disease Division and Director of the Microbial Pathogenesis and Host
Defense Program. She received her B.S. from Yale and then completed an M.D.-Ph.D. program at Stanford.
Following her residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, she completed a clinical and
research fellowship in Infectious Diseases and Microbiology/Immunology at UCSF. Her lab focuses on the complex
interplay between bacterial pathogens and the host epithelial barrier and studies these critical questions in the
context of two important human pathogens, Chlamydia species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Over her career, she
has followed the paradigm of “pathogens as tutors” and has used a broad array of approaches and techniques to
understand how bugs continue to outsmart their human hosts. In addition to her research endeavors, she is actively
involved in graduate student education, mentoring of students, postdocs, fellows, and faculty, and attends on the
inpatient clinical Infectious Disease Consult service a few weeks per year.
Peter Gilligan is Director of the Clinical Microbiology-Immunology Laboratories at the University of North Carolina
Hospitals, and Professor of Pathology-Laboratory Medicine and Microbiology-Immunology at the University of North
Carolina School of Medicine. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Microbiology, Fellow the American
Academy of Microbiology and Editor for Mbio, Clinical Microbiology Review and Journal of Clinical Microbiology
where he developed and edits the popular Point-Counterpoint series.
Dr. Gilligan is involved in teaching at all levels at the University of North Carolina. He is the co-author of the ASM
th
title, Cases in Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease whose 4 edition is currently in preparation. He has given
over 325 invited presentations at regional, national, and international meetings.
Enid Gonzalez joined the faculty at California State University-Sacramento in the fall of 2008, where she teaches
general microbiology and diversity of microorganisms. After earning her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Gonzalez worked as a post-doctoral associate with the United States Department of
Agriculture in Davis, CA. In 2011, she was appointed to direct the Science Educational Equity (SEE) Program at
CSU-Sacramento; a comprehensive academic support program that is dedicated to broadening the participation of
students who face social, economic, and educational barriers in careers in health professions, science research, and
science teaching. Outside of the University, Dr. Gonzalez devotes her time to community service projects that enable
underserved youth to engage in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) experiences.
Margaret Jefferson joined the faculty at California State University-Los Angeles in the fall of 1977, where she
teaches general genetics, human genetics, and the Honors section of the Introduction to Higher Education course.
After earning her Ph.D. in genetics from the University of Arizona in Tucson, Dr. Jefferson worked as a part-time
instructor at Pima Community College in Tucson and as a visiting faculty in zoology at the University of Texas in
Austin, TX. Since 1993-1994, she has been the Campus Coordinator for the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority
Participation (LSAMP) Program at CSU-Los Angeles, a comprehensive academic support and graduate school
preparation program that is dedicated to broadening the participation of over 500 students annually who face social,
economic, and educational barriers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Outside of
the University, Dr. Jefferson is a registered National Bone Marrow donor and a significant contributor to the San
Diego Zoological Institute for Conservation Research, a multidisciplinary research effort devoted to the conservation
and restoration of endangered species.
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Gary Kaiser is professor of microbiology at the Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville Campus where
he has taught for the past forty years. He received his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Maryland, College
Park in 1975 and is the author of the popular microbiology website The Grapes of Staph
(http://student.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html). His primary areas of interest are innate and adaptive immune
responses, as well as constructing Flash animations, concept maps, and other teaching tools for use by microbiology
students and faculty. He is a section editor and reviewer for the “Tips and Tools” section of the ASM online Journal of
Microbiology & Biology Education and a member and section editor of ASM’s MicrobeLibrary Editorial Committee.
Cheryl Kerfeld holds Bachelor’s degrees in biology and english from the University of Minnesota, an M.A. in english
literature from the University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. in biology from UCLA. She is currently head of the Structural
Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Programs at the Joint Genome Institute. In addition to appointments with
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Genomics and Physical Biosciences Divisions, she is an Adjunct Associate
Professor in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology at UC Berkeley and a member of the Berkeley Synthetic
Biology Institute. Her research group combines methods in bioengineering, bioinformatics, cellular imaging (EM and
soft x-ray tomography) synthetic and structural biology (protein crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering) for
the engineering bacterial metabolism.
The Bioinformatics Education Program at the JGI, under Kerfeld’s direction, developed the IMG-ACT system to
facilitate incorporating genomics and bioinformatics in the undergraduate curriculum (PLoS Biol, Vol. 8, No. 8. (10
August 2010), e1000448, doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000448). Kerfeld is also the Academic Editor of the PLOS
Biology Education Series. In 2011 she received the award for Exemplary Contributions to Undergraduate Education
from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
Jodie Krontiris-Litowitz is a professor of biological sciences at Youngstown State University where she teaches
introductory biology, neurobiology, neuroanatomy and conducts classroom research. Her classroom research
interests include combining formative assessment with collaborative learning in the classroom, using Bloom’s
taxonomy to assess and teach discipline specific skills in the biology curriculum, and teaching students to use Web
2.0 social media technologies as professional tools. Dr. Krontiris-Litowitz is a Biology Scholar (2009), a recipient of
a Biology Scholars Alumni Fellowship (2012) and a YSU Distinguished Professor of Teaching Award. She earned a
B.S. in biology from Case Western Reserve University and a Ph.D. in regulatory biology from Cleveland State
University. Dr. Krontiris-Litowitz also maintains a research lab where she and her students investigate regulation of
collagen deposition in left ventricular hypertrophy.
Min-Ken Liao is a professor of biology at Furman University. She received a Bachelor’s Degree in plant pathology
from National Taiwan University and a Master’s Degree and a Doctorate in microbiology from University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign. Liao used to use genetic approaches to study the function and structure of proline permease in
Salmonella but is currently using molecular approaches to study the impacts of urbanization on freshwater bacteria.
She enjoys conducting research with student researchers immensely and has presented more than 40 posters and
papers with student authors in conferences. In addition to keeping her research program productive and her
classroom exciting, Liao is also interested in the scholarship of teaching and learning. In 2008, she participated in the
Biology Scholars Program, during which she studied whether brief reflections enhance learning. Liao has been
attending ASMCUE for more than ten years and has served on numerous committees. She has not yet found a way
to say no to ASM.
Stanley Maloy obtained his Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemistry from the University of California at Irvine.
After a postdoctoral fellowship in microbial genetics at the University of Utah, he joined the faculty at the University of
Illinois in Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He also served as Director of the University of Illinois Biotechnology Center. In
2002 he moved to San Diego State University as founding Director of the Center for Microbial Sciences, and in 2006
he became Dean of the College of Sciences. In addition to his experience in academia, he has worked with Biotech,
Pharmaceutical, and Agricultural companies.
Stanley is passionate about education, and has been honored by several awards for teaching. He is the author of
many books, developed a widely used website for teaching microbial genetics, and contributed to many other
teaching resources, including podcasts and videocasts. He has also organized numerous international courses and
conferences.
Stanley served as President of the American Society for Microbiology in 2005, and he currently chairs the ASM
Communications Committee. He has served on numerous grant review panels and federal advisory groups, and has
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testified before the House Appropriations Committee about the importance of federal investments in science and
education.
His research focuses on bacterial and phage genetics and physiology, the evolution of infectious diseases, and the
development of new antibiotics and vaccines.
Mary Mawn is an assistant professor and academic area coordinator in Science, Mathematics, and Technology at
the Center for Distance Learning, SUNY Empire State College, Saratoga Springs, NY, where she teaches courses in
microbiology, genetics, molecular and cellular biology, and science education. Dr. Mawn earned a B.S. in
biochemistry from the College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, NY, and an M.Ed. in Educational Technology and
Ph.D. in molecular and cellular biology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she studied ribosome
structure and function in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Her current research interests focus on
identifying ways to teach scientific process skills in online undergraduate science courses, and promoting the
professional development of science teachers through distance learning. She is a 2009-2010 ASM Biology Research
Scholar.
JJ Miranda is an assistant investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and an assistant professor at the University of
California, San Francisco. JJ graduated with a B.A. from Reed College, a small liberal arts school that instilled upon
him the importance of quality undergraduate teaching. He later obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard University and then
joined the UCSF Fellows program, which grants young scientists just finishing graduate school principal investigator
status with a small laboratory. The Miranda lab now studies the genome organization of human viruses implicated in
cancer. JJ teaches protein structure and function to first-year Ph.D. students and serves as co-chair of the Gladstone
student outreach committee.
Phil Mixter is an associate clinical research professor at Washington State University (WSU). He adapted an
introductory (lab+lecture) microbiology course for non-science majors to the hybrid online format in 2009, continuing
to hone this course. His other instructional duties include part of a junior level lecture course in microbiology for preprofessionals, an elective course in microbial ecology, a senior-level microbiology-virology laboratory for microbiology
majors, an immunology course for first year medical students and an immunology journal discussion course for
graduate students. He is completing his assessment residency year as a Biology Scholar for 2011-12. Phil is part of
the steering committee for his college’s Teaching Academy. Recently, Phil was named one of three Distinguished
Instructors for 2012 at WSU. In his spare time, Phil enjoys outdoor sports of the given season, do-it-yourself home
renovation, restoring trucks from the 1950’s and amateur quality control surveillance of WA’s burgeoning wine
industry.
Aindrila Mukhopadhyay is a staff scientist in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory. She has a Master’s degree in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology Powai, India, a Master’s
Degree and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago. In 2002 she joined as a post-doctoral researcher at
Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley. In 2004 she started as a scientist at Berkeley lab where she continues to conduct her
research. Dr. Mukhopadhyay’s work is focused on understanding microbial stress and signaling. She studies both
environmental and engineered microbes. She utilizes a wide variety microbiological, biochemical and systems biology
tools to examine stress response in environmentally important bacteria such as the sulfate reducing bacterium,
Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the soil crust cyanobacterium Micrococcus vaginatus, and in engineered fuel production
microbes such as E. coli and S. cerevisiae. Funding for her research comes from the LDRD program at Berkeley Lab,
the Ecosystems and genomes integrated with genes and molecular assemblies (ENIGMA) project and Joint
BioEnergy Institute of the US Department of Energy.
Melanie Ott is a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes and a professor at the University of California San
Francisco. She obtained an M.D. degree from the University of Frankfurt/M. in Germany and a Ph.D. from the
Picower Graduate School in New York. She came to microbiology through her Ph.D. work on the biology of the HIV
Tat protein. Her current scientific interests focus on the pathogenesis of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infections
with a focus on the transcriptional regulation by HIV Tat and the interaction of HCV with lipid droplets. Dr. Ott was
twice awarded the Young Researcher Award at the European Conference on Experimental AIDS Research and
received the Hellman Family Award for early career faculty at UCSF.
Jeffrey Pommerville is a professor of biology and microbiology at Glendale Community College (GCC) where he
teaches microbiology and introductory biology and serves as the Course Assessment Coordinator for the Biology
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Department. Previous to coming to GCC, he was on the biology faculty at Texas A&M University. Dr. Pommerville
received his B.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California-Santa Barbara. Since coming to GCC, Dr. Pommerville
has served as principal investigator on several NSF grants, including SyRIS that developed a strategy to reform and
integrate the introductory sciences. He is the author of more than 50 research and education research papers, and
currently is the Perspectives Editor for ASM’s Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education and the author of two
microbiology textbooks. He has received numerous professional honors, including the 2008 Carski Foundation
Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award from ASM, the Golden Microscope Award from the Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society, the Ohaus Award for Innovations in Science Teaching from the National Science Teachers
Association, and was one of the first recipients of a Faculty Distinguished Teaching Award from his home institution.
He is a member of AAAS, NSTA, NABT, and, of course ASM. Dr. Pommerville is a past co-chair of CUE as well as a
past chair of Division W of ASM.
Todd P. Primm is associate professor and chair in the Department of Biological Sciences at Sam Houston State
University, a comprehensive university in Texas with 17,000 students. He was the 2010 Distinguished Alumnus of
the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences of Baylor College of Medicine, where he earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry
studying protein folding. He came to microbiology during his post-doc at NIH in the Tuberculosis Research
Laboratory. His scientific research focuses on early drug discovery, bacterial pathogenesis, and microbial biomes in
animals. His educational research is currently examining lecture effectiveness, inquiry-based learning in exploratory
labs, and effectiveness of online learning in science courses. He is currently the President of the Texas ASM Branch.
He is looking forward to participating in the Biology Scholars Research Residency Program this year.
Andrea Rediske received her Master's degree in microbiology from Brigham Young University in 1998 and has been
an adjunct professor for 11 years at Valencia College in Orlando FL and Cosumnes River College in Sacramento,
CA. She has been teaching hybrid/online Microbiology for the past 5 years and has also been involved with writing,
researching, and editing for several Microbiology textbooks by McGraw-Hill publishers. When she is not
inspiring/terrorizing her students or chasing her three young sons, Andrea enjoys competing in triathlons and running
races.
Jorge L.M. Rodrigues is an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Texas – Arlington.
He received an Agronomical Engineering degree from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil and earned a dual Ph.D.
from Michigan State University. In 2010, he received the American Society for Microbiology International
Professorship award to teach metagenomics in Ecuador. Research in his laboratory lies at the interface of microbial
genomics and ecology. He has developed a laboratory course in molecular microbiology for undergraduates based
on real research experiences from his graduate students.
Michael Snyder is the Stanford Ascherman Professor and Chair of Genetics and the Director of the Center of
Genomics and Personalized Medicine. Dr. Snyder received his Ph.D. training at the California Institute of Technology
and carried out postdoctoral training at Stanford University. He is a leader in the field of functional genomics and
proteomics. His laboratory study was the first to perform a large-scale functional genomics project in any organism,
and has launched many technologies in genomics and proteomics. These including the development of proteome
chips, high resolution tiling arrays for the entire human genome, methods for global mapping of transcription factor
binding sites (ChIP-chip now replaced by ChIP-seq), paired end sequencing for mapping of structural variation in
eukaryotes, and RNA-Seq. These technologies have been used for characterizing genomes, proteomes and
regulatory networks. Seminal findings from the Snyder laboratory include the discovery that much more of the human
genome is transcribed and contains regulatory information than was previously appreciated, and a high diversity of
transcription factor binding occurs between and within species. He is a cofounder of several biotechnology
companies, including Protometrix (now part of Life Tehcnologies), Affomix (now part of Illumina), Excelix, and
Personalis, and he presently serves on the board of a number of companies.
Victoria Stone has been an assistant professor of Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology at UC Santa Cruz
since 2009. Dr. Stone’s research centers around the type III secretion system of Gram negative pathogens such as
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica. Her lab investigates how the T3SS contributes to Yersinia
virulence as well as how the mammalian innate immune system recognizes the T3SS. Dr. Stone mentors Ph.D.,
master’s, and undergraduate students performing independent research in her laboratory and teaches
undergraduate, upper division Microbiology as well as Advanced Microbiology.
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Erica Suchman is an associate professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, at
Colorado State University. She received her Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemistry at the University of
California, Irvine in 1997. She is a member of the Arboviral Infectious Disease Labs (AIDL) where she studies
densouncleosis viruses’ effects on Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and their potential as biological control agents. She
teaches general microbiology, molecular and medical virology, virology and cell culture lab, and service learning
capstone microbiology courses. She is currently the chair of the MicrobeLibrary Editorial Board, and a member of the
Education Board of the American Society for Microbiology. She also serves on the Service Learning Integration
Project Faculty Advisory board at CSU and was the recipient of the Exception Achievement in Service Learning
Innovation award in 2005.
Kimberly Tanner, Ph.D., is an associate professor of biology at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Hired in
January 2004 as a Biology Education Researcher, Dr. Tanner trained as a sensory neurobiologist prior to pursuing a
career in science education through an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in science education (PFSMETE) and senior
staff positions at the UCSF Science and Health Education Partnership (SEP). Since joining the SFSU faculty, Dr.
Tanner has established SEPAL: The Science Education Partnership and Assessment Laboratory, her laboratory,
which offers formal courses, partnership programs, and research opportunities to undergraduate students, graduate
students, faculty, and local K-12 teachers interested in improving science education. Her research group addresses
three main lines of inquiry: 1) understanding the novice-to-expert transition among undergraduate biology majors, 2)
developing novel assessment approaches to revealing student conceptions in science, and 3) evaluating the
effectiveness of approaches to promoting equity in science. In addition, she collaborates with research colleagues on
conceptualizing and investigating Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) in the U.S. She is Principal
Investigator on NSF-funded GK-12, TUES, and CAREER awards, as well on an NIH Science Education Partnership
award. Dr. Tanner is a founding member of the Editorial Board for CBE: A Journal of Life Sciences Education and
has served on committees and panels for the National Research Council, the Society for Neuroscience, and the
American Society for Cell Biology, as well as NSF and NIH. She was recently named the 2011-12 Outstanding
Undergraduate Science Teacher Award by the Society for College Science Teachers and recently elected a Fellow of
the California Academy of Sciences.
Jennifer Taylor is an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, at
Colorado State University. She received her Ph.D. in microbiology at Colorado State University in 2003. She is a
member of the Mycobacterial Research Laboratories where she studies vaccine development and immune correlates
of protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. She teaches freshman microbiology seminar, immunology and
general microbiology courses for majors and non-majors. She is currently a member of the ASM MicrobeLibrary
Gallery Collection Editorial Committee. In 2011, she was the recipient of the Provost’s N. Preston Davis Award for
Instructional Innovation at Colorado State University, as well as the Innovative Instructional Methodology Award in
Undergraduate Education from the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
James Versalovic received his M.D. with Honors at Baylor College of Medicine in 1995 and his Ph.D. in cellular and
molecular biology at Baylor College of Medicine in 1994. He pursued clinical pathology/microbiology residency
training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Versalovic joined the pathology staff
at the Massachusetts General Hospital and served as Assistant Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School in
1999. He is board-certified in clinical pathology and molecular genetic pathology.
Dr. Versalovic currently serves as Head of the Department of Pathology, Chief of the Pathology Service, and Director
of the Texas Children’s Microbiome Center. He serves as the Milton J. Finegold Professor of Pathology &
Immunology, and also Professor of Pediatrics, Molecular and Human Genetics, and Molecular Virology &
Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. He is Co-Director of the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) training program at
Baylor. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Manual of Clinical Microbiology and Editor of Therapeutic Microbiology: Probiotics
and Related Strategies. As a Principal Investigator, his primary research interests include the human microbiome,
probiotics, medical and molecular microbiology, innate immunity, digestive diseases, and gastrointestinal physiology.
His research program is supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (R01 and Roadmap funding). Dr.
Versalovic has authored 88 primary manuscripts, 30 book chapters, and 2 patents. He has received the Lansky
Award as a national leader in pathology under the age of 45 from the College of American Pathologists Foundation.
He has also received the BioGaia Ivan Casas Probiotics Research Award and the BCM Graduate School of
Biomedical Sciences Distinguished Alumnus Award.
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Staying Involved with ASM after ASMCUE
STAY IN TOUCH
 Sign up to be an ASM Division W member
 Sign up and regularly read messages on EduAlert
 Sign up and participate in the education listserv and discussions
www.asm.org/subscribe.asp
 Sign up for the Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education (JMBE) electronic table of contents
(eTOC)
 Sign up to be a JMBE reader
 Sign up to reach out to K-12 teachers, student and others at the Science Education Network
http://www.asm.org/?option=com_content&view=article&catid=157%3Aforms&id=90966
REVIEW
 Review and provide feedback about the ASM Proposed Laboratory Safety Guidelines – comment
period begins now. Send your comments to [email protected] with Laboratory Safety
Guidelines in the subject line
 Serve as a reviewer for:
o MicrobeLibrary.org’s Gallery, Protocol, and Visual Media Brief Collections
o Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
o Abstracts and/or travel grants, ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators
o Abstracts and/or travel grants, Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority
Students (ABRCMS)
o ASM undergraduate student fellowship program
SHARE YOUR WORK
 Submit abstracts and presentations to:
o ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators
o ASM Branch or ASM Regional Branch Meeting
o ASM General Meeting Division W Sessions
 Submit manuscripts to:
o Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
 Submit resources to the MicrobeLibrary.org:
o Gallery Collection
o Protocol Collection
o Visual Media Brief Collection
 Submit an educational feature or forum article to Microbe
 Submit a microbial activity to the Classroom and Outreach Collection for use with youth, parents, K12 teachers and community groups
 Submit an application to the Biology Scholars Program
 Submit an application to the ASM/JGI Functional Genomics Institute
MENTOR
 Mentor another faculty member at a 2 or 4-year institution in your area; share problems and ideas
 Mentor a new ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators attendee or pre-tenured faculty
 Mentor a graduate student or postdoctoral scholar interested in teaching
 Mentor a new Biology Scholar
 Mentor a student and submit an abstract for the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority
Students (ABRCMS); assist in judging the poster and oral competitions
 Mentor a student and submit an application for an ASM student fellowship
 Mentor a graduate student and submit an application for the
o ASM Kadner Institute in Preparation for Careers in Microbiology
o ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
71
LEAD
 Disseminate information about and encourage colleagues to participate in ASM Education Programs
www.asm.org/education
 Sponsor a session at:
o ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators
o General Meeting, Division W
o Branch Meeting or Regional Branch Meeting on a topic related to education
o National or regional meeting in another country
 Recruit a new member for:
o Membership in ASM’s Division W
o ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators
o ASM Faculty Development Program
o Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
o Biology Scholars Program
 Sponsor a brown bag lunch discussion on best practices in teaching on campus
 Sponsor a career day or research symposium for students on campus
 Sponsor a student chapter or become involved in an existing one
 Represent ASM at a biology teacher and/or student meeting (ASM staff will send you show and tell
materials to take along. Contact [email protected]).
SHOW APPRECIATION
Have coffee with your dean and tell him/her how much you appreciate his/her support of your
participation in ASM education programs. Be certain to tell him/her what you learned and how you will
lead colleagues and students!
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
72
Poster
Abstract Author Content and Pedagogy Grid
Aligning ASMCUE Abstracts to Biological Concepts
The 2012 abstracts are organized by both content and pedagogy to help participants navigate more easily through
the poster session. The content themes are organized by six core concepts. Five of the concepts were put forth in the
2011 national report, Vision and Change: Transforming Undergraduate Biology Education and include evolution,
structure and function, pathways, information flow and systems. A sixth concept specific to microbiology, the impact
of microorganisms, is also used. The complete guidelines may be found at www.asm.org/educators under Curriculum
Resources.
The pedagogy themes are organized into five categories: course design, hands-on projects, student learning,
teaching approaches, and teaching tools.
Each abstract is assigned to both content and pedagogy themes. These assignments, designated by the submitting
author, are placed below the full abstract.
Course
Design
Evolution
Impact of
Microorganisms
Information Flow
Pathways
Structure and
Function
Systems
Bergeron, Lori (47)
Cummings, Patrick (37)
Bergeron, Lori (47)
Cummings, Patrick (37)
Brownell, Sara (46)
Hughes, Lee (46)
Hunnes, Cristi (37)
Drew, Jennifer (37)
Hoskinson, Anne-Marie (46)
Mogen, Kim (46)
Seitz, Heather (47)
Mawn, Mary (46)
Hands-on
Projects
Pratt, Zachary (47)
Cummings, Patrick (37)
Cummings, Patrick (37)
Student
Learning
DiGirolamo, Lisa (46)
Caruso, Joseph (37)
Boomer, Sarah (37)
McDonald, Ann (38)
Pratt, Zachary (47)
Chilukuri, Lakshmi (37)
Clement, Laurence (46)
Olimpo, Jeffrey (38)
Clement, Laurence (46)
McDonald, Ann (38)
Wernick, Naomi (38)
Makhluf, Huda (46)
Puffenbarger, Robyn (38)
Sanders, Erin (38)
Teaching
Approaches
Teaching
Tools
Bergeron, Lori (47)
Baker, Jason (37)
Bergeron, Lori (47)
Boomer, Sarah (37)
Caslake, Laurie (46)
Regassa, Laura (47)
Blewett, Earl (45)
Boomer, Sarah (37)
Elliott, Samantha (37)
Dye, Kathryn (46)
Shuster, Michèle (38)
Chilukuri, Lakshmi (37)
Dye, Kathryn (46)
Hill, Kendra (37)
Makhluf, Huda (46)
Hill, Kendra (37)
Huang, Jean (37)
Mauck, Brena (38)
Huang, Jean (37)
Wernick, Naomi (38)
Regassa, Laura (47)
Shuster, Michèle (38)
DiGirolamo, Lisa (46)
Blewett, Earl (45)
Gunsalus, Robert (46)
Smith, Ann (47)
Chilukuri, Lakshmi (37)
McDonald, Ann (38)
Gunsalus, Robert (46)
Hoskinson, Anne-Marie (46)
McDonald, Ann (38)
Smith, Ann (47)
Poster Session A
Poster Session B
Author Name (page #)
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
73
Microbrew
Abstract Author Content Grid
Evolution
Impact of
Microorganisms
Information
Flow
Pathways
Structure and
Function
Systems
Saturday, June 16 – 10:30 AM -11:30 AM
Session A
10:30 AM
Blewett, Earl (40)
Hung, Billy (40)
Mister, Paula (41)
Mister, Paula (41)
Novack, Jeffrey (41)
Novack, Jeffrey (41)
Cloutier, Michel (40)
Cloutier, Michel (40)
Hung, Billy (40)
Schreiber, Melissa (41)
Tameta, Renato (42)
Session B
11:00 AM
Siegesmund, Amy (43)
Ingram, Elizabeth (43)
Siegesmund, Amy (43)
Page, Kathleen (43)
Furlong, Michelle (42)
Furlong, Michelle (42)
Siegesmund, Amy(43)
Hanophy, Michael (42)
Siegesmund, Amy (43)
Page, Kathleen (43)
Verran, Joanna (44)
Siegesmund, Amy (43)
Siegesmund, Amy (43)
Verran, Joanna (44)
Vu, Cuc (44)
Saturday, June 16 – 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Session C
2:30 PM
Session D
3:00 PM
Marley, Garry (51)
Barden, Ned (49)
Weber, K. Derek (51)
Lynne, Aaron (52)
Hoffman, Rebecca (50)
Barden, Ned (49)
Hunnes, Cristi (50)
Hunnes, Cristi (50)
Bieszczad, Christine (49)
Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer (51)
Marley, Garry (51)
Weber, K. Derek (51)
Frederick, Gregory (52)
Moody, Kirt (53)
Martinez-Vaz, Betsy (52)
Srougi, Melissa (53)
Borges, Kim (52)
Hoffman, Rebecca (50)
Srougi, Melissa (53)
Frederick, Gregory (52)
Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer (51)
Lim-Fong, Grace (52)
Lim-Fong, Grace (52)
Lynne, Aaron (52)
Martinez-Vaz, Betsy (52)
Sunday, June 17 – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Session E
11:00 AM
Dustman, Wendy (57)
Newman, Dina (58)
Ní Chadhain, Sinead (58)
Ramamoorthy, Lalitha (59)
Ní Chadhain, Sinead (58)
Vullo, Diana (59)
Wagner, Stephen (60)
Wagner, Stephen (60)
Tobiason, Deborah (62)
Scott, Elizabeth (59)
Vullo, Diana (59)
Session F
11:30 AM
Becker, Donna (60)
Kumar, Renu (61)
Becker, Donna (60)
May, Barbara (61)
Strand, Stephanie (62)
May, Barbara (61)
Wood, Derek (63)
McDonald, Ann (62)
Wood, Derek (63)
McDonald, Ann (62)
Wood, Derek (63)
Strand, Stephanie (62)
Tobiason, Deborah (62)
Author Name (page #)
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
74
Presenting Author Index
AUTHOR
Huang, Jean ................................ 37
Hughes, Lee ................................ 46
Hung, Kai .................................... 40
Hunnes, Cristi........................ 37, 50
PAGE #
B
Bagley, Susan ............................. 34
Baker, Jason ............................... 37
Barden, Ned ................................ 49
Barker, Lucia ................... 21, 25, 64
Barrena, Juanita ............. 24, 33, 64
Becker, Donna ............................ 60
Benson, Spencer ............ 31, 33, 64
Bergeron, Lori ............................. 47
Bieszczad, Christine ................... 49
Blewett, Earl .......................... 40, 45
Boomer, Sarah ............................ 37
Borges, Kim ................................ 52
Bowling, Kristi ................. 23, 55, 64
Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta .......... 34
Bressler, Cristina .................. 23, 35
Brownell, Sara ............................ 46
Buxton, Rebecca ........................ 34
C
I
Ingram, Elizabeth ........................ 43
J
Jefferson, Margaret ......... 24, 33, 66
K
T
Liao, Min-Ken .................. 21, 26, 67
Lim-Fong, Grace ......................... 52
Lynne, Aaron ............................... 52
V
M
Makhluf, Huda ............................. 46
Maloy, Stanley................. 27, 30, 67
Marley, Garry .............................. 51
Martinez-Vaz, Betsy .................... 52
Mauck, Brena .............................. 38
Mawn, Mary............... 21, 26, 46, 67
May, Barbara............................... 61
McDonald, Ann...................... 38, 62
Miranda, JJ...................... 27, 30, 68
Mister, Paula ............................... 41
Mixter, Phil ...................... 22, 26, 68
Mogen, Kim ................................. 46
Moody, Kirt .................................. 53
Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila .. 28, 30, 68
D
E
Kaiser, Gary ........ 21, 25, 34, 35, 67
Kerfeld, Cheryl ................ 27, 30, 67
Krontiris-Litowitz, Jodie ... 25, 56, 67
Kumar, Renu ............................... 61
Tameta, Renato .......................... 42
Tanner, Kimberly ............ 55, 57, 70
Taylor, Jennifer............... 22, 26, 70
Tobiason, Deborah ..................... 62
L
Carter, V. Celeste ........... 21, 25, 65
Caruso, Joseph ........................... 37
Caslake, Laurie ........................... 46
Chang, Amy .......................... 20, 34
Chilukuri, Lakshmi ...................... 37
Choudhary, Madhusudan 32, 55, 65
Clement, Laurence ..................... 46
Cloutier, Michel ........................... 40
Cuchara, Lisa .................. 24, 56, 65
Cummings, Patrick ................ 34, 37
De La Cerda, Lilia ........... 24, 33, 65
DiGirolamo, Lisa ......................... 46
Dougherty, Michael ......... 24, 32, 65
Drew, Jennifer ............................. 37
Dustman, Wendy ........................ 57
Dye, Kathryn ............................... 46
Schreiber, Melissa ...................... 41
Scott, Elizabeth .......................... 59
Seitz, Heather ............................. 47
Shields, Patricia.......................... 39
Shuster, Michèle......................... 38
Siegesmund, Amy ...................... 43
Smith, Ann. ................................. 47
Snyder, Michael .................... 20, 69
Srougi, Melissa ........................... 53
Stone, Victoria ................ 28, 31, 69
Strand, Stephanie ....................... 62
Suchman, Erica .............. 22, 26, 70
Verran, Joanna ........................... 44
Versalovic, James .......... 28, 31, 70
Vu, Cuc ....................................... 42
Vullo, Diana ................................ 59
W
Wagner, Stephen ....................... 60
Weber, K. Derek ......................... 51
Wernick, Naomi .......................... 38
Westenberg, Dave ...................... 36
Wood, Derek .............................. 63
N
Newman, Dina............................. 58
Ní Chadhain, Sinead ................... 58
Novack, Jeffrey ........................... 41
O
Elliott, Samantha ....... 32, 37, 56, 66
Emmert, Elizabeth ...................... 23
Engel, Joanne ................. 27, 29, 66
F
Olimpo, Jeffrey ............................ 38
Ott, Melanie ........................... 34, 68
P
Page, Kathleen............................ 43
Pommerville, Jeffrey........ 21, 26, 67
Pratt, Zachary.............................. 47
Primm, Todd.................... 22, 26, 69
Puffenbarger, Robyn ................... 38
Frederick, Gregory ..................... 52
Furlong, Michelle ........................ 42
G
Gilligan, Peter ................. 27, 29, 66
Gonzalez, Enid ............... 24, 33, 66
Goodner, Brad ............................ 35
Gunsalus, Robert ........................ 46
R
Hanophy, Michael ....................... 42
Herzog, Jennifer ................... 35, 36
Hill, Kendra ................................. 37
Hoffman, Rebecca ...................... 50
Hoskinson, Anne-Marie .............. 46
S
Ramamoorthy, Lalitha ................. 59
Rediske, Andrea.............. 22, 26, 69
Regassa, Laura ........................... 47
Rodrigues, Jorge L.M. ..... 32, 56, 69
Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer ....... 51
H
Sanders, Erin .............................. 38
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
75
Conference Notes
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
76
Conference Notes
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
77
Conference Notes
19th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, San Mateo, California
78
ASM Graduate & Postdoctoral Opportunities
ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute
March 21 – 24, 2013 • ASM Headquarters, Washington, DC
Intensive hands-on training in:
Q Writing and submitting manuscripts
Q Writing a great abstract and title
Q Selecting a journal for submission
Q Responding to reviewer comments
Q Learning how to be a good reviewer
Application Deadline: December 1, 2012
ASM Kadner Institute in Preparation
for Careers in Microbiology
July 27 – 31, 2013 • San Jose, CA
Intensive hands-on training in:
Q Grantsmanship position
Q Scientific presentation techniques
Q Teaching and mentoring strategies
Q Career planning Institute
Q Ethics training
Application Deadline: May 15, 2013
Questions?
URL: www.asmgap.org
E-mail: [email protected]
A N N U AL B I O M E D I C AL R E S E AR C H C O N F E R E N C E FOR M I N OR I T Y ST U D E N TS
ABRCMS2012
November 7 –10, 2012
San Jose Convention Center
San Jose, California
ABRCMS unites scientists
throughout the U.S.
WA
MT
ME
ID
ND
MN
OR
WI
T
he largest, professional conference for minority
students to pursue advanced training in the
biomedical and behavioral sciences, including STEM.
Professional development workshops, concurrent
scientific sessions, 1,500 poster and oral presentations,
and approximately 300 exhibit booths showcasing
summer research opportunities, graduate schools and
postdoctoral fellowships.
Call for Abstracts
Must be an undergraduate sophomore, junior, or senior;
a postbaccalaureate student; or a graduate student as of
November 7, 2012
Must have conducted research, used experimental
methods/methodology and developed results in one of the twelve ABRCMS scientific disciplines
•
•
ABRCMS TRAVEL AWARD
Available to undergraduate and postbaccalaureate
presenting students
Awards covers up to $1500 towards registration,
housing, and travel
•
•
VT NH
SD
WY
MI
CA
MA
NY
CT
NV
IA
NE
UT
IL
OH
IN
CO
NJ
MD
MO
KS
DE
WV
VA
DC
KY
AZ
NM
TX
OK
NC
AR
TN
MS
GA
AL
SC
Attendees
LA
FL
AK
HI
PR
VI
Important Deadlines
Abstract Submission: September 7, 2012
Travel Award Application: September 7, 2012
Judges’ Travel Subsidy Application: September 28, 2012
Discount Registration: October 22, 2012
CALL FOR REVIEWERS & JUDGES
Over 400 abstract reviewers and judges are needed
Postdoctoral scientists, faculty, and program directors
are eligible
Travel Subsidies and registration discounts available
•
•
•
Visit http://www.abrcms.org/reviewers_judges.asp
Visit http://www.abrcms.org/TravelGrantGuidelines.html
2011 ABRCMS Scientific Disciplines
Social & Behavioral Sciences
& Public Health 9.6%
Physiology 6.7%
Neuroscience
9.0%
Molecular &
Computational
Biology 6.9%
Microbiology 10.8%
Immunology 4.9%
RI
PA
Biochemistry 8.6%
Cancer Biology 9.0%
Cell Biology
7.4%
Chemistry
10.3%
Developmental Biology
& Genetics 8.8%
Engineering, Physics & Mathematics 8.0%
w w w. a b r c m s . o r g | a b r c m s @ a s m u s a . o r g
200 +
100 - 199
50 - 99
0 - 49
ANNUAL BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CONFERENCE FOR MINORITY STUDENTS
ABRCMS2012
REVIEWER & JUDGE RECRUITMENT PROGRAM
APPLY NOW!
VOLUNTEER NOW!
Judges’ Travel Subsidy
Reviewer & Judge Opportunity
www.abrcms.org/TravelSubsidy.html
www.abrcms.org/reviewers_judges.asp
NEW Enhancements in 2012 –
The ABRCMS Judges’ Travel Subsidy now provides
up to $1,500 to cover registration, housing and travel
(airfare and ground transportation).
Volunteer to serve as an abstract reviewer and/or onsite presentation judge. This is an excellent opportunity
to interact with outstanding undergraduate students
as they pursue their passion for research. Judges must
register and pay the appropriate fees to attend the
conference.
Applicants must satisfy the following
four criteria:
Reviewers and judges must be:
n Postdoctoral scientist or faculty member, and
n Postdoctoral scientist, faculty member, or program
director and
n Active researcher in one of the 12 scientific
disciplines represented at the conference, and
n Active researcher in one of the 12 scientific
disciplines represented at the conference.
n Available to judge all poster and oral sessions
scheduled throughout the conference,
November 7-10.
Doctoral-level graduate students are eligible to
volunteer on-site to serve as judges.
n First-time ABRCMS Judge, and
Abstract Reviewer Schedule
September 12 – 16, 2012
(Note: Reviews are conducted online only)
Application Deadline:
September 28, 2012
Poster or Oral Presentation Judge Schedule
November 7 – 10, 2012
(Note: On-site judges must attend conference)
Questions? (202) 942-9228 / [email protected]
F E L L O W S H I P S
Explore Opportunities
through Research
ASM/CDC
Postdoctoral Research
Fellowship
Two-year research
experience at a CDC
laboratory
Application Deadline:
January 15
ASM Robert D. Watkins
Graduate Research
Fellowship
Three-year research
experience at home
institution
Application Deadline:
May 1
ASM Undergraduate
Research Fellowship
(ASM-URF)
Ten to twelve week summer
research experience at home
institution
Application Deadline:
February 1
ASM Undergraduate
Research Capstone
Program (UR-Capstone)
Travel support to enhance
professional development
skills
Application Deadline:
December 15
E-mail: [email protected]
URL: www.asm.org/students and
www.asm.org/postdocs
ASM K-12 Classroom Activities Collection
The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) presents a collection of classroom activities for
K-12 teachers to facilitate the incorporation of microbiology within their science courses.
Each activity is prepared by school teachers and microbiologists for targeted learning groups
(K-4, 5-9 & 9-12 graders). Our tested curriculum resources are peer reviewed to ensure the
highest quality of scientific and educational content, pedagogical processes (including active
learning), safety, alignment with National Science Education Standards, clarity, completeness
of instructional materials and appropriate assessment.
All activities include:
teacher and student handouts
practical tips to complete the
activity
preparation and learning times
materials needed and sources to
obtain them
What Microbe Are You?
In this hands-on activity, students take an
online "personality quiz" where their
answers to a set of either/or statements
match them with the marine microbes that
most closely resemble their personalities.
The microbes are given fun code names
to circumvent the challenge of
pronouncing the microbes' scientific
names. Intended as a fun way to begin or
end a unit on life science, the students
learn about the vast diversity and critical
importance of marine microbes. Intended
Audience K-8.
safety requirements
assessment
SUBMIT AN ACTIVITY
TODAY!
Guidelines for submissions:
http://www.asm.org/asm/index.php/ed
ucation/call-for-materials.html
To download activities go to:
www.asm.org/educators
K-12 Teachers Section and click on CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
For more information about K-12 outreach and ASM, contact us: [email protected]
2012
Member Online
Package Rates
All-12 Package: $250
Basic Package: $212
Clinical Package: $212
Advantages
for ASM Member
Online Subscribers
• Publish Ahead of Print: access to
accepted research papers up to
12 weeks before final publication
• Alerts: Member subscribers are
able to sign up for the following
electronic alerts:
Enjoy the value of ASM Membership
ASM Journals: Edited by working scientists.
Basic Package
Applied and Environmental
Microbiology
Impact Factor: 3.778
Clinical Package
Antimicrobial Agents and
Chemotherapy
Impact Factor: 4.672
Clinical and Vaccine Immunology
Impact Factor: 2.471
Clinical Microbiology Reviews
Impact Factor: 13.5
Infection and Immunity
Impact Factor: 4.098
Eukaryotic Cell
Impact Factor: 3.395
Infection and Immunity
Impact Factor: 4.090
Journal of Bacteriology
Impact Factor: 3.726
Journal of Virology
Impact Factor: 5.189
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Impact Factor: 4.22
Microbiology and Molecular
Biology Reviews
Impact Factor: 12.22
Journal of Virology
Impact Factor: 5.189
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Impact Factor: 6.188
Also included: mBio®
ASM’s first open-access journal
Also included: mBio®
ASM’s first open-access journal
Impact Factors as reported in the 2010 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2011)
• R SS Feeds: Current Issue,
Accepted Articles, and
Section feeds
• CiteTrack
• eTOCs
• ASM Accepts
• Unlimited access to Minireviews
published in all 12 journals
• Access to the online journals
from any computer
• Discounted page charges,
reprint and color figure fees for
corresponding authors
• Access to supplemental material
To order your online package, or for
information on how to order individual
titles, please contact Member Services:
Phone: (202) 942-9319
Fax: (202) 942-9346
Email: [email protected]
For institutional rates, contact
[email protected]
1752 N Street, NW Washington, DC 20036
(202) 737-3600
2011_member_full_bw_8x10.indd 1
4/5/2012 9:03:34 PM
graduate fellowships
BIO1125_ASMCUEAd.indd 1
The Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Biotechnology
Education has partnered with carefully selected institutions
to create two unique graduate fellowships.
Molecular Targets and Drug Discovery Technologies Fellowship with
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
This is a two-year (five-semester) fellowship working at the NCI laboratories in Bethesda
or Frederick, Maryland. A stipend and full paid tuition are part of this fellowship. Earn an
MS in Biotechnology participate in important cancer research, work in CCR/NCI laboratories
and work with research project mentors.
Biodefense Fellowship with the U.S. Army Medical and Research Institute
of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID)
This is a two-year (five-semester) fellowship working at the USAMRIID laboratories in
Frederick, Maryland. A stipend and full paid tuition are part of this fellowship. Earn an
MS in Biotechnology and do basic and applied research on biological threats to develop
vaccines, drugs and tests to protect soldiers, as well as applying it to civilian medicine.
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NEW! Laboratory Experiments in
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© 2011 • 978-0-321-65133-4 • 0-321-65133-2
by Ted R. Johnson and Christine L. Case
© 2013 • 978-0-321-79438-3 • 0-321-79438-9
Techniques in Microbiology: A Student Handbook
by John M. Lammert
© 2007 • 978-0-13-224011-6 • 0-13-224011-4
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