MBA-820 - Tavana.us

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MBA-820
Information Technology for Decision Making
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS
MADJID TAVANA, PH.D.
Professor and Chair
Business Systems and Analytics Department
La Salle University ● Philadelphia, PA 19141 ● U.S.A.
Phone: (215) 951-1129 ● Fax: (267) 295-2854 ● Skype: madjidtavana
Email: [email protected] ● Web: http://tavana.us
Editor-in-Chief, Decision Analytics
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Applied Decision Sciences
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Management and Decision Making
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Knowledge Engineering and Data Mining
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Strategic Decision Sciences
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Enterprise Information Systems
1. COURSE DESCRIPTION
Managing Information Technology (IT) is no longer viewed as a back office, cost-dominated
function. In many industries, IT has become a strategic requirement that consists of two related
but competing activities: supporting the existing business and enabling new business. These two
activities share a set of functional requirements, typically organized within the information
systems (IS) department. But they also share a set of critical management issues, which transcend
the IS function. This course is about the manager's responsibilities for problem solving and
decision making, and those areas in which IT can be used to gain the insight needed to support
selection of decision alternatives. The course focuses on data, information, and knowledge by
utilizing a series of tools to develop Database Management Systems, Management Information
Systems, Decision Support Systems, and expert System in support of the decision making and
problem solving processes in a hands-on environment.
2. COURSE OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of prescribed work for this course, the student should be able to:
Understand the emerging technological issues facing managers.
Understand the value of data, information, and knowledge to organizations.
Distinguish among Database Management Systems, Management Information Systems,
Decision Support Systems, and expert System.
Utilize IT to design competitive and efficient organizations.
Describe the latest concepts, components, and applications of IT.
Utilize IT tools to design operational, managerial, and strategic systems.
Describe the leadership responsibilities and organizational impact of IT.
Utilize a series of tools to design and develop Database Management Systems,
Management Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, and expert System in support
of the decision making and problem solving processes.
Describe when and how Management Support Systems may be used to complement more
analytic decision making frameworks.
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3. COURSE OVERVIEW
Computers are data, information, and knowledge processing machines. Billions of dollars are
spent every year collecting, storing, processing, and retrieving data; whether it is for financial,
marketing, or operational analysis and decision making. Data is a collection of bits, bytes, and
characters. Raw data by itself has little or no use. No decision can be made without organizing
and synthesizing data. Information is derived from organizing data and knowledge is extracted
from synthesizing information. The evolution of data and its relationship with information and
knowledge can be visualized as a pyramid of interdependent layers on the top of each other with
data at the bottom, information in the middle, and knowledge on the top.
Computers are used to collect, store, and process (organize and synthesize) data, information, and
knowledge. Data is collected by a Transactional Processing System (TPS) and stored in a
Database Management System (DBMS). Data is organized into information by an Information
System (IS) and used in a Decision Support System (DSS) for decision making. Information is
organized, meaningful, and useful data. Information is synthesized into knowledge by a
Knowledge Based system (KBS) and used in an Expert Systems (ES) for problem solving.
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Consider the scenario depicted in the pyramid below where a retailer collects data on their
revenues and expenses every time a purchase is made or every time an expense is paid. That data
is then stored in the retailer’s DBMS. The accounting department can retrieve and organize this
data into meaningful information by way of a report such as income statement. The operations
department can use this information in a DSS to assess profitability. The finance department can
synthesize this information in a KBS and make expansion or contraction decisions.
This course focuses on data, information, and knowledge by utilizing a series of tools to develop
Database Management Systems, Management Information Systems, Decision Support Systems,
and expert System in support of the decision making and problem solving processes in a handson environment.
4. WEB RESOURCES
http://tavana.us/downloads/downloads.shtml
username: tavana
password: spacewalk
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5. COURSE TOPICS AND REQUIREMENTS
The World of Information Systems and Decision Sciences
Decision Making in the Information Age
Transactional Processing Systems and Database Management
Lecture Note: Database Management Systems (SA-DBM-H)
Lecture Note: Building DBMS with ACCESS (SA-ACC-H)
Video: http://tavana.us/ACC/ACC.mp4
Cases:
Happyville Casino
Explorer Helthcare
Great Times Summer Camp
Jimmy “the Body Bag” Biggs
Access Case Analysis (20% without exam/project or 12% with exam/project):
A PowerPoint Presentation with Problem Description, Initial Table, Split Tables,
Relationships, and Query (see sample case for more details).
SAMPLE ACCESS CASE & DATABASE.
Decision Support Systems and Spreadsheets
Lecture Note: Decision Support Systems and EXCEL (DS-EXL-H)
Video: http://tavana.us/XLS/XLS.mp4
Cases:
American Appliances
The Heinrich Company
Francois Stealth
Titanic Cruise Company
Planters Nut Company
Built-4-U
Golden Palace Casino
Impulse Shopping Network
Excel Case Analysis (20% without exam/project or 12% with exam/project):
A PowerPoint Presentation with Problem Description, Excel Spreadsheet, Solver
Formulation, and Optimal Solution (see sample case for more details).
SAMPLE EXCEL CASE & EXCEL FILE.
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Decision Support Systems and Natural Language Programming (Visit D-code.us)
Lecture Note: Natural Language Programming: D-code (DS-COL-H)
Lecture Note: Building DSS with D-code (DS-COP-H)
Video: http://tavana.us/NLP/NLP.mp4
Cases:
Keystone Corporation
The Prolog Corporation
Starship Technologies
Dr. Warped
Jungle Jim
D-code Case Analysis (20% without exam/project or 12% with exam/project):
A PowerPoint Presentation with Problem Description, Influence Diagram, Planners Lab
Model, and Spreadsheet Solution (see sample case for more details).
SAMPLE D-CODE CASE & D-code FILE.
Decision Support Systems and Influence Diagramming (Visit D-cide.us)
Lecture Note: Influence Diagramming and D-cide (DS-DCD-H)
Video: http://tavana.us/MOD/MOD.mp4
Cases:
The Procom Corporation
Thrills R Us
Parrot Club
Southwest Airline
Pick Your Own
Jungle Jim
D-cide Case Analysis (20% without exam/project or 12% with exam/project):
A PowerPoint Presentation with Problem Description, Influence Diagram Screenshot,
and Spreadsheet Solution (see sample case for more details).
SAMPLE D-cide CASE & D-cide FILE.
Knowledge-Based Systems (Visit B-wise.us)
Lecture Note: Knowledge Engineering with B-wise (DS-BWL-H)
Lecture Note: Building Expert Systems with B-wise (DS-BWP-H)
Video: http://tavana.us/KBS/KBS.mp4
Cases:
Check Cashing Problem
College Hill Tavern
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Police Academy
Corleone Family
La Boutique
Gateway Computers
B-wise Case Analysis (20% without exam/project or 12% with exam/project):
A PowerPoint Presentation with Problem Description, A listing of Factors and Choices,
and Decision Tree Screenshot (see sample case for more details).
SAMPLE B-wise CASE & B-wise FILE.
Optional Final Exam (40% of the Final Grade)
A hands-on exam focusing on the systems described throughout the course (Open Book
and Open Notes).
Optional Project (40% of the Final Grade)
An individual project using strategic assessment system. Project details are available at:
http://tavana.us/project/.
Professionalism
Professionalism: The majority of this class is engaged in full time employment or is seeking to
enhance their employment opportunities. I would like to help you enhance your career by asking
you to behave as you would in a professional setting. To do this, I suggest that you think of me as
your manager, and our class sessions as regularly scheduled meetings. Following are some of the
things that professionals would never do:
Miss a regularly scheduled meeting. People can’t always attend all meetings, but professional
courtesy dictates informing the manager ahead of time when a conflict has arisen. If you do
need to miss class due to a conflict, please send me an email or call me before class and leave
a message on my voice mail system.
Arrive late for a meeting without explaining the circumstances ahead of time. I expect you to
be on time for class, not saunter in five or ten minutes late.
Leave early from a meeting, without explaining the circumstances ahead of time. If you need
to leave early, let me know beforehand.
Sleeping or being inattentive during a meeting. Can you imagine someone sleeping during a
meeting with his/her manager? In my professional experience, such behavior is never
tolerated.
Being unprepared or being unwilling to participate in class and group discussions. I expect
you to come prepared for class and participate actively in class discussions and your group
project.
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To encourage development of professional habits, the following reductions will be applied to the
final grade: first missing class (4%), second missing class (6%), each additional missing class
(10%), each late Assignment (2%), each missing assignment (4%), and each late case report
(2%). Note: Attendance in all intersession and hybrid sections are mandatory!
6. GRADING POLICY
6.1. Assignments
All assignments and cases should be submitted through the following online submission system:
Assignments are not graded but there is a penalty associated with the late or missing assignments
(see professionalism section of the course syllabus for more details).
6.2. Case Reports
Case reports are problems created by you and solved by you. They could be interesting real-life
or hypothetical problems. All case reports are evaluated according to the following five criteria
(see sample cases):

Originality/creativity: How creative you are and how interesting your problem is?

Presentation: How clean and professional looking your PowerPoint slideshow is?

Problem description: How well you have descried your problem and how much detail is
provided?

Complexity: How complex your problem is? Is it a straight-forward problem or difficult
problem to solve?

Solution: Is your solutions correct and how well you are presenting your solution?
Grading Criteria
Originality/Creativity
Presentation
Problem Description
Complexity
Solution
Overall score
0
1
2
3
8
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
6.3. Grading Scale
The student earns points which will be calculated on a 100 point scale. There is no extra credit.
The following are the cutoff points for each grade:
A
AB+
B
BC
F
Indicates the demonstration of a superior level of competency
Indicates the demonstration of a very good level of competence
Indicates the demonstration of a good level of competency
Indicates the demonstration of an average, satisfactory level of competency
Indicates the demonstration of a less than average level of competency
Indicates a below average and marginally satisfactory level of competency
Indicates failure to demonstrate a satisfactory level of competency
93.0-100
90.0-92.9
87.0-89.9
83.0-86.9
80.0-82.9
70.0-79.9
00.0-69.9
6. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY:
La Salle University is a community of shared academic values, foremost of which is a strong
commitment to intellectual honesty, honorable conduct, and respect for others. In order to meet
these values, students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic integrity.
These standards are embodied in the La Salle University Academic Integrity Policy and are
available online at: http://tavana.us/AIP.pdf
7. STUDENT GUIDE:
The Student Guide to Rights and Responsibilities is posted at the mylasalle portal
(http://my.lasalle.edu) on the Academics tab.
Click here to open and fill out your data sheet. Please return or email your completed
data sheet to your instructor during the first week of classes.
Please refer to http://tavana.us for additional information about the course.
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