University of Kent at Canterbury

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MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE
1. The title of the module
English Medieval Art
2. The Department which will be responsible for management of the module
Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies
3. The Start Date of the Module
?
4. The cohort of students (onwards) to which the module will be applicable.
Students enrolled on CMEMS MA
5. The number of students expected to take the module
6 - 12
6. Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with
other relevant Departments and Faculties regarding the withdrawal
N/A
7. The level of the module (eg Certificate [C], Intermediate [I], Honours [H] or Postgraduate [M])
M
8. The number of credits which the module represents
30
Note: undergraduate full-time students take modules amounting to 120 credits per year and
postgraduate full-time students take modules amounting to 180 credits per year for a Masters
award
9. Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern)
Autumn or Spring
10. Prerequisite and co-requisite modules
Palaeography and Manuscripts
11. The programmes of study to which the module contributes
The CMEMS MA
12. The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to
programme learning outcomes

Students will improve their skills of ‘close reading’ and ‘close looking’, enabling them better
to analyse primary sources (CMEMS Learning Outcome C.10)

Students will develop working knowledge of medieval art history and the attendant
research resources (CMEMS Learning Outcomes B.4, B.5)

Students’ ability to engage critically with art history will be cultivated through understanding
of the primary sources. (CMEMS Learning Outcomes B.5, C.12)

Students will develop their ability to apply and interrogate critical and theoretical strategies
appropriate to the study of Medieval Art.
13. The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme
learning outcomes

Students will develop writing and presentational skills by delivering short talks on the
material covered in the course, and by producing an assessed essay of not more than
5,000 words (CMEMS Learning Outcomes B.6-9, C.12, D.14-19).

Students’ ability to articulate sophisticated, coherent and persuasive arguments will be
cultivated through structured in-class debates (CMEMS Learning Outcomes B.6, D.14-15)

Students’ research skills will be developed through preparation for seminars and the
assessed essay (CMEMS Learning Outcomes D.19)
14. A synopsis of the curriculum
This module offers a broad-ranging introduction to the study of the visual art produced or owned
in England in the Middle Ages, focusing on the period c. 1200-c. 1450. In our seminars we will
be discussing works of art as physical objects (considering, for example, artists, materials, and
techniques), looking critically at the secondary literature, and debating about interpretative
strategies for the 21st century (art) historian. Some of the themes that will be of particular interest
will be: the functions of storytelling images; art and medieval death culture; and the iconography
of monstrosity. The architecture, stained glass, and monumental sculpture of Canterbury Cathedral
will be a particular focus of the module.
15. Indicative Reading List
General
G. Zarnecki (ed.), English Romanesque Art (1984).
J. J. G. Alexander and P. Binski (ed.), The Age of Chivalry (1987).
R. Marks and P. Williamson (ed.), Gothic: Art for England 1400-1547 (2003)
P. Brieger, English Art 1216-1307 (1957).
P. Binski, Painters (1991).
N. Coldstream, The Decorated Style: Architecture and Ornament 1240-1360 (1994).
M. Rickert, Painting in Britain: The Middle Ages (1965).
L. Stone, Sculpture in Britain: The Middle Ages (1972).
J. Blair and N. Ramsay (ed.), English Medieval Industries (1991).
R. Marks, Image and Devotion in late Medieval England (2004).
P. Draper, The Formation of English Gothic: Architecture and Identity (2006)
P. Binski, Becket’s Crown: Art and Imagination in Gothic England (2004)
Manuscripts
General
J. J. G. Alexander, Medieval Illuminators and their Methods of Work (1992)
R. Marks and N. Morgan, The Golden Age of English Manuscript Painting 1200-1500
(1981)
C. De Hamel, A History of Illuminated Manuscripts (1994)
C. De Hamel, Scribes and Illuminators (1992)
Survey of Manuscripts Illuminated in the British Isles, ed. J.J.G. Alexander, esp:
C. M. Kauffmann, Romanesque Manuscripts (1975).
N. Morgan, Early Gothic Manuscripts (1982-8).
L. F. Sandler, Gothic Manuscripts (1986).
K. L. Scott, Later Gothic Manuscripts (1996).
16. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the
total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of
the intended learning outcomes
The course will be taught by 10 weekly 2 hour seminars. It is expected that students will spend
20 hours per
week in study preparing for seminars and undertaking research for their assessed essay.
Seminars and private
study will focus on a selection of primary sources and the attendant secondary literature; multidisciplinary,
and wherever possible inter-disciplinary, reading will be encouraged. In other words, students will
be required
to acquaint themselves with the art historical and literary sources and bibliography. Students will
be expected
to deliver a short presentation on their essay topic in the seminar, which will not be assessed.
Total study hours 300.
17. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended learning
outcomes
The course will be assessed by a 5,000 word assessed essay on a relevant topic of each
student’s choosing. This essay will test the learning outcomes by requiring students to make a
coherent, sophisticated, scholarly argument with an appropriate scholarly apparatus.
Both the learning and teaching and assessment methods relate closely to the intended learning
outcomes. They will encourage student-centred exploration and discussion of primary and
secondary materials in both their essays and their seminar contributions. Students will develop
their presentation skills (written and spoken) and their capacity for independent research.
18. Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space
Some books will have to be acquired for the Templeman Library.
19. A statement confirming that, as far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning
and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable
disadvantage to students with disabilities
As far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms
of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities
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