The Integrated Curriculum in ECE with Clinical

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Eastern Connecticut State University
Course Syllabus
Department:
Course Title:
Course
Number:
Credit Hours:
Catalog
Description:
Course
Prerequisites:
Course Corequisites:
Purpose of the
Course:
Texts:
Readings:
Education
Integrated Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (from a social studies
perspective)
ECE 335
3
Addresses theory and practice for teaching social studies to the young
learner. Integrates the planning and implementation of a developmentally
appropriate social studies theme-oriented curriculum within a project
approach. A special focus is placed upon the anti-bias curriculum and on
celebrating diversity. Multimedia applications are explored. Guided clinical
experience in the classroom, including interaction with young children
required.
Admission to the undergraduate early childhood education teacher
preparation program; HIS 120 or 121.
Taken as part of the Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (PACK), Social
Studies Cluster, along with Tier II LAC Cultural Perspectives, ECE 455, and
ECE 410.
To develop pre-service teachers’ competency in planning and teaching
developmentally appropriate social studies curriculum for the young child; to
help them appreciate and integrate global concepts and to develop curricula
that fosters individual thinking, and to understand the role of educational
technology within this framework.
Seefeldt, C., Castle, S. & Falconer, R. (2010). Social studies for the
preschool/primary child (8th ed.). Prentice Hall.
Bigelow, B. and Peterson, B. (1998). Rethinking Columbus: the next 500
years. Milwaukee: Rethinking Schools.
Professional articles and Standards posted at the Association of Supervision
and Curriculum Development website: www.ascd.org.
Professional articles and Standards posted at the National Council for the
Social Studies website at http://www.socialstudies.org.
Connecticut Social Studies Standards and Curriculum Framework at:
http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/curriculum/socialstudiesfrmwk_10-609.pdf and
http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/Curriculum/Curriculum_Root_Web_
Folder/frsocst.pdf.
Course Outcomes Aligned with the Education Department’s Performance Expectations,
NAEYC, CEC, Pre-Service Competencies and CCCT Standards, and with Related Key
Expectations
All course outcomes are interconnected with the Education Unit’s Conceptual Framework (CF),
Connecticut Pre-service Competencies (PSC), Connecticut Common Core of Teaching (CCCT),
the professional standards of NAEYC and CEC.
Eastern
Candidate
Proficiencies
(CF)
1: Content
Knowledge
(CNK)
2: Pedagogical
Knowledge
(PDK)
3: Integration of
Knowledge
(INT)
KEY:
National, State, and Unit Standards
Pre-service
Common Core
NAEYC
Teacher
of Teaching
Standards
Competencies
(CCCT)
(PSC)
1: Development
and
Characteristics of
Learners
2: Evidencebased/Standardsbased Instruction
3: Evidencebased Classroom
& Behavior
Management
4: Technology as
a Tool to Teach
(TTT)
Domain 1:
Content and
Essential Skills
Domain 2:
Classroom
Environment,
Student
Engagement, &
Commitment to
Learning
Domain 3:
Planning for
Active Learning
Domain 4:
Instruction for
Active Learning
5: Diversity
(DIV)
4: Assessment
Domain 5:
Assessment for
Learning
6: Professional-
5: Professional
Domain 6:
Standard 1:
Promoting Child
Development
and Learning
Standard 2:
Building family
and Community
Relationships
Standard 3:
Observing,
Documenting,
and Assessing to
Support Young
Children &
Families
Standard 4:
Using
Developmentally
Effective
Approaches to
Connect with
Children &
Families
Standard 5:
Using Content
Knowledge to
Build
Meaningful
Curriculum
Standard 6:
Council for
Exceptional
Children
Standards
(CEC)
Standard 1:
Foundations
Standard 2:
Development and
Characteristics of
Learners
Standard 3:
Individual
Learning
Differences
Standard 4:
Instructional
Strategies
Standard 5:
Learning
Environments
and Social
Interactions
Standard 6:
ism (PRF)
Behaviors &
Responsibilities
Professional
Responsibilities
& Teacher
Leadership
Becoming a
Professional
Language
Instructional
Planning
Standard 7:
Assessment
Standard 8:
Professional and
Ethical Practice
Standard 9:
Collaboration
Outcomes
By the end of the
course, the candidates
will:
1: Articulate a deep
understanding of the
curricular standards for
social studies for the
young child.
2: Develop an
integrated curriculum
that includes
exploration of topics
from social studies that
relate to individual
learning styles and
interests and the larger
needs of culture and
community.
3: Develop a
curriculum that
integrates literacy,
math, science, health,
safety, nutrition, social
studies, art, music,
drama, and movement.
4: Learn to celebrate
diversity in the
curriculum as well as in
teacher-parent-children
interactions.
Conceptual
Framework
(CF)
1,2,3,5
1,2,3,5
1,2,3
1,2,3,5
NAEYC/CCCT/
PSC/ CEC
Standards
NAEYC: 1,2,4,5
CCCT: 1,2,3
PSC: 1,3
CEC: 1,7
NAEYC: 1,2,4,5
CCCT: 1,2,3,4
PSC: 1,2,3
CEC: 4,5,7
CCSS-ELA
Key Experiences
(Read.Lit., Read.
Inst., Read.
Found.Skills,
Writing,
Speak/List., Lang.)
SL, L, RF
All
SL
All
R.L, R.I, W,
SL
SL
NAEYC:
1,2,4,5,6
CCCT: 1,2,3,4,6
PSC: 1,2,3
CEC: 4,5,7
All
NAEYC:
1,2,4,5,6
CCCT: 1,2,3,4,6
PSC: 1,2,3,5,6
CEC: 2,3,9,10
SL, W
SL
SL, L, RF
Social Studies Field
Analysis Chart
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Class Discussions
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Project Box
Class Discussions
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Class Discussions
Social Studies Field
Analysis Chart
R.I, L, R.L,
SL
Threaded
Discussions
Rethinking
Columbus
SL, W, R.L
SL, W, R.L
Oral History Refl.
Misconception Refl.
5: Demonstrate critical
thinking and civic
competence in viewing
historical and current
events.
6: Recognize the value
of parental and family
participation and input
in curriculum planning
and seek to foster a
comfortable
communication
between the home and
school.
7: Indentify and
understand multiple
ways of learning and
incorporate these into
varied teaching styles.
1,2,3,5,6
2,5
2,5
NAEYC:
1,2,4,5,6
CCCT: 1,2,3,4,6
PSC: 1,2,3
CEC: 4,5,7
NAEYC:
1,2,4,5,6
CCCT: 1,2,3,4,6
PSC: 1,2,3,5
CEC: 2,3,9,10
SL
NAEYC:
1,2,4,5,6
CCCT: 1,2,3,4,6
PSC: 1,2,3,5
CEC: 3,4,5,7
All
R.I., SL, L
SL, W, R.L,
R.F
All
R.L, R.I, W
SL, W, R.L
SL
R.L, R.I, W
R.I., SL, L
SL, W, R.L, L
8: Study technology’s
role as an integrated
component of the
curriculum.
9: Understand issues of
authenticity, quality
and safety as they relate
to educational
technology.
10: Recognize the value
of integrating
community resources
within the curriculum
and share these
resources with parents
and families.
11: Apply knowledge
of children with special
needs to adapting
environments and
activities in the
integrated curriculum.
12: Observe and
demonstrate
professional practice,
under the supervision
4,2,3
Class Discussions
Rethinking
Columbus
Misconception Refl.
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Project Box
Oral History Refl.
Class Discussions
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Project Box
Rethinking
Columbus
Misconception Refl.
NAEYC: 4,5
CCCT:3,4,
PSC: 2,3
CEC: 4, 7
NAEYC:4,5,6
CCCT: 3,4,6
PSC: 2,3,5
CEC: 1,9,10
SL
All
2,3,5,6
NAEYC:
1,2,3,4,6
CCCT:1,2,6
PSC: 1,3,6
CEC: 5,9,10
SL
R.L, R.I, W
Class Discussions
Project Box
1,2,5
NAEYC:
1,2,3,4,5
CCCT: 1,2,3,4
PSC: 1,2,3,4,5
CEC:
2,3,4,5,6,7,8
NAEYC: 4,5,6
CCCT: 4,5,6
PSC: 3,4,5
CEC: 9,10
All
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Project Box
Class Discussions
2,3,4,6
3,6
R.L, R.I, W
SL
All
R.L, R.I, W
SL
SL
SL, W, R.L,
R.F
Class Discussions
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Project Box
Class Discussions
Integrated
Curriculum Web
Class Discussions
Misconception Refl.
of a teacher and the
University professor,
within a primary grade
setting that serves
children of historically
under-represented
groups from urban
neighborhoods.
Course Outline
1) Social Studies pedagogy for the early childhood classroom:
a) Empowering children to appreciate self and others
b) Recognizing cultural diversity as an integral part of our social life
c) Rethinking history from diverse perspectives
2) Curriculum standards of NCSS and Connecticut Framework for Social Studies:
a) Content knowledge: US and World History; Economic Systems; Interdependence of
economies, Interactions among cultures, social systems, and institutions.
b) Literacy, inquiry, and research skills
c) Civic competence in addressing and understanding historical issues and current events.
3) The Project Approach:
a) Guiding and developing projects with young children
b) Anticipatory teacher planning
c) Involving families
d) Utilization of educational technology
e) Developing an integrated curriculum web:
i)
ii)
iii)
iv)
v)
vi)
vii)
Theory and educational implications
Applications for various topics and grade levels
Topic selection
Integrated web creation
Cross-referencing with curricular topics
Scheduling
Lesson plan
4) The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) as a reference for appreciating and understanding
diversity.
5) Using MI to create thematic lesson plans and to assess children.
6) The importance and development of differentiated instruction across subject disciplines.
7) Exploring community resources for educational experiences, such as field trips and
developing Jackdaws.
8) Understanding and fostering the link between families, teachers and children, within the
context of the social studies curricula.
Key Experiences
1: Curricular Project:
a). Integrated Curriculum Web: thematic units are a way of organizing learning experiences
that integrate the curriculum and thus allow children to make meaning of their world. Each
candidate will select a topic based on a social studies content area and develop an integrated
curriculum of study, complete with lesson plans and scheduling.
b). Project Box (Jackdaw): Parental involvement and community experiences are both
important elements of an integrated curriculum. This project will focus on exploring the
community and identifying a resource that can be developed into a learning experience for
children. Each candidate will prepare a one-page description of the resource. A project box
(collection of artifacts to reinforce learning about the resource) will be developed along with a
paper detailing teaching ideas for “pre-“ and “post” activities to build children’s background
knowledge and enhance a classroom-community connection.
2. Classroom Observations:
a) Misconception Reflection and Lesson Plan: The purpose of this project is to engage as
teacher-researchers to discern possible misconceptions that children might have. This activity
will give you the opportunity to learn for yourself how a child interprets some topic in the social
studies curriculum. Candidates will interview a student (from your clinical classroom) about an
area of social studies in which the student may have a misconception (a common one is about
Columbus and the Pilgrims, for example). Candidates will write a reflection about his interview,
outlining how teachers need to be aware of misconceptions and what they can do to avert them.
Candidates will also create a lesson plan which addresses the misconception(s) and will help
students make accommodations to modify their knowledge/thinking.
b) Social Studies Field Analysis Chart and Reflection: the focus of this assignment is to learn
students’ understanding of social studies concepts and will be based upon such classroom
features as : observation of a social studies lesson, interview with the teacher about social studies
curriculum in his/her classroom, and/or interviews with students. Reflective journal/chart must
outline the context and social studies content in the class that was observed, along with
descriptions of the lesson (if seen), the classroom environment, social studies content as it relates
to curriculum and standards, teaching and learning strategies, engagement of students, and
instructional implications.
c) Oral History Reflection: The purpose of this assignment is to use this ancient form of
passing on traditions of the culture so that students can begin to see history as a living thing and
that they are part of it. Learning about one’s family is often a child’s first introduction to history.
With society’s concern about dysfunctional families, the need for oral history is even greater
than in the past because of the connections it can build. As a result of this activity you will be
able to demonstrate the ability to use oral history as a vehicle for learning about the past in a
meaningful way.
Assignment of Grades:
Students will be assigned grades based on the quality of their work on all assignments. Grades
will be calculated using the following weighting:
Project:
Curricular Projects:
a) Integrated Curriculum Web
b) Project Box
Classroom Observations and Reflections:
a) Misconception Reflection & Lesson Plan
b) Social Studies Field Analysis Chart
c) Oral History Reflection
Total:
Instructor: Dr. Leslie Ricklin
Office Hours: Monday 11:00-1:00;
Tuesday 10:45-12:30; Wednesday 2:45-4:00
Percentage of Final Grade
35%
20%
20%
10%
15%
100%
Office: Webb Hall 154
Phone: 860.465.5229
e-mail: [email protected]
Course Schedule
Fall, 2013
Class Meets on Tuesdays/Thursdays from 8:00-9:15 except on Field Experience Days.
Then Class Meets on Tuesday from 8:00-10:30
DATE
TOPIC
INTEGRATION
from Seefeldt & Galper. (2006).
Active experiences for active
children. Pearson: Upper
Saddle River, N.J.
Aug. 29 R
Introduction to the Role of
Social Studies in the K-3
classroom
Sept. 3 T
Social Studies K-3 Scope and
Sequence; Standards; Lesson
Planning workshop
Integrating Curriculum with
social studies concepts;
brainstorm questions for Oral
History Reflection
Sept. 5 R
Sept. 10 T (1)
Sept. 12 R
Begin work on Integrated
Curriculum Web; Awareness
of Self and Others
ASSIGNMENTS
DUE
Brainstorm ideas for
integrating social
studies curriculum for
K-3: connect with other
CORE II classes.
Lesson planning in your
CORE II classes
Seefeldt: Ch. 1
How would you inform
parents about your
social studies
curriculum?
Brainstorm questions to
ask for the Oral History
Apply to Essentials:
health, safety, inclusion,
and beauty
Seefeldt: Ch. 2
FIELD WORK
Seefeldt: Ch. 1
Seefeldt: Ch. 5
Sept. 17 T
Sept. 19 R
(2)
Sept. 24 T
Planning, Resources, Assessment; Share Oral History
Reflection .
Work on Concepts for
Integrated Curriculum Web
using Field Work Classroom—what do you see that
reflects Social Studies?
Social Studies and Cultural
Diversity: Anti-Bias
curriculum; Connect discussion with Field Classrm
Sept. 26 R
Oct. 1 T
Update on Integrated
Curriculum Web Planning
Oct. 3 R
What’s wrong with using
Holidays as the Social Studies
Curriculum?
Oct. 8 T
Rethinking History from
Diverse Perspectives: views of
Culture through Art, Folktales
Oct. 10 R
Rethinking History from
Diverse Perspectives:
Rethinking Columbus
Oct. 15 T
Civic Education in the Primary
Grades: What are the “basics”
of Democracy? Point of
contention: the Pledge of
Allegiance
Oct. 24 R (4)
Seefeldt: Ch 3
Make connections betw/
Oral history and CFRT;
culture & OH; Diversity
& Anti-Bias curric.
through literature
Seefeldt: Ch. 6
Oral History Refl.
DUE
Seefeldt: Ch. 4
FIELD WORK
(3)
Oct. 17 R
Oct. 22 T
How can you integrate
the Oral History with
the language arts
curriculum and how can
you assess it?
List ways that your
social studies concept
integrates with other
curriculum disciplines.
How is your social
studies concept
integrating with other
curriculum disciplines,
activities, resources?
Evaluate use of
Holidays as the
curriculum
Bring in your Integrated Draft of Curriculum Web
Analyze culture through
African Art and
Folktales. Use of
Creative Drama as a
Strategy.
Jigsaw different
perspectives of
Columbus; analyze use
of literature on CC
Design a democratic
classroom—what do
children need to know
and be able to do?
Seefledt: Ch. 7
Read Rethinking
Columbus
Seefeldt: Ch. 10
FIELD WORK
Share Misconception
Reflection and Lesson Plan
Global Connections in the
Primary Grades: Everyone
Eats Bread; Everyone Eats
What were the reasons
for students’
misconceptions? How
can they be avoided?
Create a concept web of
your interdependencies
Misconception Reflection and Lesson
Plan DUE
Seefeldt: Ch. 11
Oct. 29 T
Rice; Update on Integrated
Curriculum
Share Social Studies Field
Analysis Chart and Reflection
What have you learned
about the role of social
studies in the
curriculum?
Field Analysis Chart
and Reflection DUE
Oct. 31 R
Bring in an example of
Children’s Literature to
demonstrate content area
reading through social studies
and language arts
Demonstrate integration
of curriculum through
pedagogical strategies
like graphic organizers,
vocabulary building,
timelines, etc.
In class activities
Nov. 5 T
Integrating Math, Science,
Social Studies, and Language
Arts: Big Book of Social
Studies
Hands on experience in
integrating all
disciplines
Make and Take
Projects Workshop
Nov. 7 R
(LR at AMLE)
Nov. 12 T
Nov. 14 R
Nov. 19 T
Nov. 21 R
FIELD WORK
Economics in the Primary
Grades
Project Box Shared
Global Connections in the
Primary Grades, cont.: Current
Events
Geography in the Primary
Grades: how do you make this
meaningful?
Nov. 26 T
(5)
Nov. 28
Conference on Integrated
Curriculum Web
Dec. 3 T
Present Integrated Curriculum
Web
Dec. 5 R
Creative Drama: Little
Red Hen case study
Identify the areas that
you’ve integrated with
this project.
Create a concept web
showing connections
through Current Events
Plan activity for 4
standards. Use of
Population Connection
Activities
Demonstrate
Curriculum Integration
Seefeldt: Ch. 9
Project Box DUE
Teams continue work
on Integrated Curric.
Seefeldt: Ch. 8
Peer feedback on
Integrated Curriculum
Thanksgiving
Demonstrate how you
have integrated a
curriculum
FIELD WORK
Integrated
Curriculum Project
DUE
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