AusAID Support to the Coastal Fisheries Programme

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Coastal Fisheries Programme
Secretariat of the Pacific Community
Final Progress Report — July to December 2002
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part I:
Introduction
1
Part II:
Comments on Progress July to December 2002
3
Part III:
Part IV:
Component 1 – Fisheries Development Section
Component 2 – Community Fisheries
Component 3 – Training
Component 4 – Information and Consultancies
3
8
13
19
Summary of Final Progress Report July to December 2002
21
Component 1 – Fisheries Development Section
Component 2 – Community Fisheries
Component 3 – Training
Component 4 – Information and Consultancies
21
24
28
33
Financial statement for the period January to December 2002
34
Fisheries Development Section
Community Fisheries
Training
Fisheries Information
Fisheries Consultancies
35
37
39
41
43
Coastal Fisheries Programme
Secretariat of the Pacific Community
Final Progress Report — July to December 2002
Part I: Introduction
This is the progress report for the second six months of 2002 on AusAID’s Support to several sections
of the Coastal Fisheries Programme of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community. This report looks at
progress from July to December 2002, and completes the current work for the three-year cycle 2000 to
2002. A separate document is being developed for the new funding period 2003 to 2005, with this
document focusing on the Coastal Fisheries Programme’s strategic plan.
Fisheries Development Section
The Section’s aim is to provide assistance to both the private and public fisheries sectors, to develop
economically viable, environmentally sustainable, fishing enterprises focusing on vessel operations,
harvesting activities and post-harvest practices. These activities are primarily based on harvesting and
using the region’s large tuna resource, and increasing the economic returns that Pacific countries and
territories receive through increased participation in tuna fishing in the region.
During the second half of 2002, most of the planned fieldwork activities and outputs for the period
were completed, although some work planned for the Marshall Islands was deferred to early 2003. The
three-year FAD research project funded under the New Zealand Pacific Initiative for the Environment
(PIE) is half way through its funding cycle, with the first loss of an experimental FAD reported due to
mooring failure. The 9 mm wire cable rusted/corroded through. Several other FADs are using this
material, so it is anticipated that the same fate could befall these FADs in the near future. A catch and
effort logbook system has been implemented with the commercial vessels in all three locations,
although there is reluctance on behalf of the fishermen to complete the logsheets. More work will be
needed to strengthen this part of the project.
The English version of the tuna longline manual is fully drafted including all diagrams. The draft text
has been through a period of technical editing, with comments incorporated. The text has now been
put in for editing within the SPC publication process. Also, the brochure on bycatch from tuna
longlining has been completed in both English and French, with the brochure printed and distributed
within the region.
Community Fisheries Section
The work of the Community Fisheries Section (CFS) is categorised into two areas namely the
Research and Assessment and Management and Development.
Research and Assessment covers baseline studies to analyse the role of men and women in subsistence
and artisanal fisheries, identifying development options and restrictions and providing guidelines for
support. In the past 6 months, there has been no request received by the section to conduct a baseline
study. This is most probably because most of the smaller island countries that were interested in this
type of work have been covered. Research and Assessment work also examines the options for
national fisheries authorities to consider when formulating national management programmes to
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
encourage the participation of communities in managing their inshore fisheries resources, with special
attention given to the involvement of women. The CFS advises national fisheries authorities through
the provision of a series of recommendations.
Management and Development targets all sectors of the community (men, women, youth, and senior
community residents) to work towards the management of their subsistence and artisanal fisheries. It
provides training and workshops for all sectors of the fishing communities and for national programme
staff on fisheries management and development related activities. It also provides follow up visits on
requested areas of training and technical inputs to enable national fisheries authorities to achieve target
outputs in their community fisheries management programmes.
Fisheries Training Section
The Fisheries Training Section focuses on the commercial fisheries sector of Pacific Island countries
and territories. This sector is interpreted in its broadest sense and includes small-scale fishing
operators as well as industrial fisheries enterprises. Assistance and training is provided in areas
including the transfer of fisheries-related skills; coordination of fisheries training opportunities;
promotion of the exchange of relevant information on fisheries training and education; assistance in
effective planning and implementing of human resource development and training programmes; and
the development and implementation of training programmes not readily available through established
training institutions, in particular, vocational and hands-on training in areas such as enterprise
management, safety at sea, seafood quality management and aquaculture. In addition to its activities
targeting the commercial sector, the Section also works closely with fisheries administrations and
national fisheries training institutions. The Section’s training activities may be implemented at
regional level (workshops, seminars or training courses) or in-country. Individual training attachments
also make a substantial part of the Section’s work programme.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
Component 1 – Fisheries Development Section
General Comments
The Fisheries Development Section continued with a busy schedule during the second half of 2002.
The three professional staff of the Section conducted 8 in-country assignments (Cook Islands, Niue,
Kavieng, PNG (completed), Palau, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati and 2 in Fiji). This equated to around
7 person-months of fieldwork in these countries and territories. In addition, one Fisheries
Development Officer attended the Standing Committee on Tuna and Billfish meeting in Hawaii as a
member of the Fishing Technology Working Group, one Fisheries Development Officer attended a
meeting in Samoa on predation by cetaceans on hooked fish on tuna longlines, and the Fisheries
Development Adviser attended a fishers forum in Hawaii on the bycatch of seabirds and sea turtles on
tuna longline gear and ways to reduce or avoid interactions.
The Section has completed and distributed an awareness-raising brochure on the bycatch from tuna
longlining issue, focusing on the mitigation of bycatch and ways to release unwanted bycatch with the
best chance of the animal surviving. The main focus of the brochure is on the incidental take of sea
turtles and their release alive. The bycatch brochure was developed collaboratively with other regional
organisations such as SPREP (South Pacific Regional Environment Programme) and FFA (Forum
Fisheries Agency), with strong support and the provision of information from the National Marine
Fisheries Service in the US. Partial funding is being provided by the Western Pacific Regional
Fisheries Management Council in Hawaii, and FFA and SPREP through their C-SPOD (Canada –
South Pacific Ocean Development) projects.
A Technical Support Officer has been recruited on a short-term basis to work on the Section’s
publications and reports. This person has completed all the diagrams for the draft tuna longline
manual. The manual itself is in a complete draft form and has gone for editing.
The new three-year FAD research project under New Zealand PIE funding is running on schedule, and
this is keeping all staff of the Section busy working on different components of the project. The FAD
research project activities are reported on under the objective for this project.
Output 1.1
Hands-on transfer of technical skills in:
 tuna catching methods (especially longlining);
 navigation and seamanship skills;
 vessel operating costs and procedures;
 maintenance of vessel machinery and fishing equipment; and
 on board handling, processing and icing of the catch to export standards through in-country expert
placements.
Progress during July to December 2002
The longlining projects scheduled for the Cook Islands and Palau were undertaken with around 30
participants trained in each location. The training Kavieng, PNG that was commenced in June was
completed with 20 participants trained in a range of fishing methods including tuna longlining. The
planned projects for the Marshall Islands was deferred at the request of the government as the project
vessel was being refitted for the project and the work had fallen behind schedule. The Memorandum
of Agreement for this project has been signed, although the start date will now be early 2003.
Advice on vessel parameters was provided to government staff and local fishermen the Cook Islands,
Niue and the Loyalty Islands in New Caledonia. In addition, one Fisheries Development Officer
travelled to Korea to inspect two tuna longline vessels being offered to Nauru. This followed a request
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
from the Nauru Government for assistance. Similar offers of second-hand vessels have been made by
Korea to other Pacific countries as aid to assist in developing Pacific fisheries.
Output 1.2
National workshops conducted on identified topics as part of expert placements.
Progress during July to December 2002
Several workshops were conducted in Palau and Kavieng in PNG, in mid-water fishing methods, with
training and fishing trials undertaken. The planned workshops for the Marshall Islands were deferred
until early 2003. Section staff attended several regional meetings on bycatch of seabirds and sea turtles
by tuna longliners, and the predation of hooked fish on longlines by cetaceans. The Heads of Fisheries
meeting was deferred to 2003.
Output 1.3
Reports published on in-country expert placements.
Progress during July to December 2002
Field Report was completed and distributed for Nauru. Draft Field Reports were produced for work in
Kavieng, PNG, the Cook Islands and Palau at the end of the assignment.
Output 1.4
Technical manuals on specific fishing equipment and techniques or fish handling practices.
Progress during July to December 2002
Good progress was made on the tuna longline manual with a complete draft text produced. All
diagrams were also drafted and the complete draft text has gone for editing.
The brochure on mitigation of bycatch from tuna longlining was completed in both English and
French and distributed through the region.
Output 1.5
Advice and information provided on priority development needs in:
 fish aggregating device (FAD) material suppliers;
 FAD construction and deployment procedures;
 appropriate fishing vessel parameters for different applications;
 alternative value-adding processes for tuna and associated species;
 deep-water snapper fishing gear and techniques; and
 sportfishing potential.
Progress during July to December 2002
The mid-water fishing methods work was completed in Kavieng, PNG. In addition, one staff member
attended short courses in Fiji to upgrade his skippers qualification as required by his employment with
SPC.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
Output 1.6
Studies on development options for domestic fishing operations as input to National Fishery Management Plans
and development initiatives by countries and territories.
Progress during July to December 2002
Projects were undertaken in Niue and Kiribati with reports written and advice provided to government
and the other collaborators who were working on the projects.
Output 1.7
Data collection and analysis for the FAD research project in:
 surveys of coastal communities;
 catch and effort catch;
 aggregator types and effectiveness;
 maintenance of FADs; and
 other data as deemed necessary.
Progress during July to December 2002
Work continued on the catch and effort logbooks system in all three project locations. Unfortunately
fishermen are reluctant to complete the forms, so only limited data has been collected to date. The
database for the catch and effort data has been developed and the initial data entered. The community
survey scheduled for Niue in December was deferred to early 2003.
Data summaries of the FAD designs and cost of materials were developed for each design. An
assessment of the aggregator designs has also commenced.
Output 1.8
New FAD design developed over the course of the FAD research project.
Progress during July to December 2002
The first FAD was lost off Niue after 10 months, with the 9 mm wire cable rusting or corroding
through. It would appear that this is a weak link in the design and there are several other FADs in the
water using this material. The spare or replacement materials held at each location were assessed and
additional materials purchased for each location.
Output 1.9
Reports, manuals, and the general dissemination of information on the FAD research project.
Progress during July to December 2002
Articles on the FAD research project have been placed in SPC Fisheries Newsletter Nos. 101 and 102.
Project data has been collected and compiled ready for the first analysis..
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
Component 2 - Community Fisheries
General Comments
The mission of the Coastal Fisheries Programme is: “to provide a regional support service that assists
Pacific Islanders in identifying the status, and optimising the long-term social and economic value, of
small-scale fisheries and aquatic resources in Pacific waters”. To support this mission, the
Community Fisheries Section (CFS) focuses on two work areas - Research and Assessment, and
Management and Development support. Research and Assessment covers baseline studies to find out
how men and women can better participate in subsistence and artisanal fisheries, and provision of
advice on how national community-based fisheries management programmes may be formulated to
manage inshore fisheries resources. Management and development support involves the follow up of
recommendations suggested in the earlier assessments and, in most cases, entails training of men and
women in small-scale fisheries activities, and training of national Fisheries programme staff in
community facilitation work and in the formulation of village management plans. It also covers the
provision of technical inputs as to how national programmes may be improved through six-monthly
programme reviews.
In the past, the CFS comprised of three staff namely the Community Fisheries Adviser (CFA), the
Community Fisheries Officer (CFO) and the Project Assistant. The Community Fisheries Officer’s
contract was completed at the end of 2001. With funding problems currently faced by the SPC, the
post has not been filled by the time of writing this report. For the same problem, the Project Assistant
has been transferred under the Aquaculture Section. The Community Fisheries Adviser has then been
operating alone for the first six months of 2002. Therefore attempting to achieve all outputs that were
targeted for the fist six months of 2002 was difficult. Despite this, most outputs have been achieved
except for those which were beyond the control of the CFS. A couple of outputs took more time to
achieve than would normally be expected. The recruitment of the Community Fisheries Officer is in
process, but only for a six-month contract. The continuation of the Community Fisheries Officer’s
position will be determined on allocations of funds by NZODA and AusAID, and by the priority
accorded by the SPC executive in the next financial year. The Project Assistant, although transferred
under the Aquaculture’s budget, continues to attend to all supporting services of the CFS.
The objective of the CFS is to:
Promote the participation of coastal fishing communities, particularly women, in the
management of subsistence and artisanal fisheries and to allow them to benefit from regional
and national fisheries assessment, management and development activities.
The thrust behind the objective is to encourage all community sectors including village leaders, men
and women to take responsibility in the management of their fisheries resources. Particular attention
is given to the involvement of women. The challenge is to convince the communities that since they
are the resource users, they, and not governments, have the primary responsibility to manage their
fisheries resources and marine environment.
Outputs and Activities: Research and Assessment
.
Key Outputs
2.1.
National reports identifying problems and potential opportunities for women and men
involved in subsistence and artisanal fisheries.
2.2.
National reports to advise government authorities on designs relevant for national
community management programmes.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
2.3.
Gender analysis studies of the tuna industry as the basis for National Tuna Management
Plans
Progress during July to December 2002
The Community Fisheries Adviser met with the Director of Fisheries for Tokelau and it appeared from
the discussion that there is either no need for a baseline study for Tokelau or it has been accorded low
priority. According to the Fisheries Director, Tokelau’s priority is to undertake the development and
management of its fisheries. The Director indicated his country’s support for Tokelau to be included
in the PIE funding proposal submitted to the Government of New Zealand.
The CFS completed the fieldwork it carried out on The reef-flat invertebrate fishery of Niue and the
draft report was submitted to Niue for comment and approval. The draft has since been approved and
finalised and will eventually feed into an overall fisheries management plan for Niue. The CFS’s
contribution to the Niue fisheries management plan has been completed.
A draft field report was produced following the work conducted by the CFS in the Marshall Islands in
August 2001 for the establishment of Marshall’s community fisheries programme. This report was
finalised in April 2002 and was submitted to the Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority
(MIMRA) for its implementation. The report contains the programme design for Marshall’s
community fisheries programme and major recommendations. One of the main recommendations was
to hire two new staff to specifically work on the proposed community-based programme. The
recommendation was quickly executed by MIMRA at the start of the programme.
The Fiji Fisheries wanted to engage the service of the Community Fisheries Adviser to help set up its
Community-based Fisheries Management Programme. However their request for the CFS’s assistance
was delayed because the endorsement from the Fiji Foreign Affairs was late. The Foreign Affairs
gave its endorsement in December 2001. Consequently, the Community Fisheries Adviser travelled to
Fiji for 3 weeks in May - June 2002 to study the situation there and to produce a draft report for the
Fiji Fisheries Department to consider. The draft report was presented to the Fisheries Department and
representatives of NGOs for their consideration. The report contains a proposed programme design
and 10 recommendations for the implementation of the proposed community programme.
The Tuvalu representative during the second Heads of Fisheries (HoF) Meeting in July 2001 reiterated
Tuvalu’s desire for the Community Fisheries Adviser to visit Tuvalu to establish its community
fisheries programme. However, it has been difficult to receive replies from the Fisheries Department
when contacts were made to follow up on Tuvalu’s interest as portrayed in the HoF meeting. At the
same time, the availability of funds and personnel has limited the work of the CFS to a few countries
and thus there was no real effort to encourage the work in Tuvalu. However, the Tuvalu High
Commissioner for New Zealand has endorsed the inclusion of Tuvalu as one of the countries in the
SPC funding proposal submitted for consideration under the PIE assistance.
The representative for Wallis and Futuna also made a request at the second HoF meeting for the CFS
to introduce a Community Fisheries Management Programme for Wallis and Futuna. It was the
intention of the CFS to visit Wallis and Futuna sometime during the first half of 2002 along with the
Development Section and the Director of the SPC Marine Resources Division, to determine the best
way to implement the community programme there given the language barrier. The change in the
Fisheries administration in Wallis and Futuna had caused communication difficulty and as the result,
the visit did not eventuate.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
The gender analysis study for the tuna industry in Fiji has been carried out and the draft report has
been finalised. The report has been sent to the Forum Secretariat for compilation into the main report.
The publication of the main report is the responsibility of the Forum Secretariat and the FFA.
The gender analysis study for either the Cook Islands or Kiribati was supposed to take place in the first
half of 2002 but did not eventuate. The arrangement for this exercise is the responsibility of the FFA
and the participating country. The CFS has not been advised of the reason why this exercise did not
go through. The latest information the CFS has received is that the Marshall Islands has now taken the
place of the Cook Islands and that Marshalls and Kiribati will be the next two countries to undertake
the exercise.
Key Outputs
2.4.
National and regional training and related activities implemented
2.5.
Technical inputs into national management programmes provided
2.6.
Village community fisheries management plans produced
2.7.
Resource materials (training manuals, special interest group bulletin, and videos) produced
Progress during July to December 2002
The funding proposal requesting assistance for the conduct of a regional workshop on the value of
communities in the management of inshore fisheries resources was completed in this half of 2002.
The proposal has been submitted to the Commonwealth Secretariat for consideration. The
Commonwealth has acknowledged receipt of the proposal and a decision is expected very soon.
The CFS was supposed to be involved in the planning of the fourth model for the Community
Education Training Centre (CETC) of the SPC in Suva, Fiji. However, the CETC had not contacted
the CFS concerning this. But even if it did, the absence of the Community Fisheries Officer for the
whole of the first half of 2002 would have made it difficult for the CFS to be fully involved.
From 25 February to 1 March 2002, the CFS carried out training of the staff of the Marshall Islands
Marine Resources Authority (MIMRA) who are involved with its community fisheries management
programme. The training also involved staff of other Government agencies such as the Environment
Protection Authority and the Ministry of Internal Affairs. As a result of the training, the three
Government agencies formed a Working Group called the MEI Working Group, which is tasked to
work together with communities in the development of their fisheries management plans. Other
important participants in the training were Local Government Mayors and representatives from NGOs.
In total, there were 24 participants that attended the training. Two experienced community facilitators
from Samoa and American Samoa were brought in to help conduct the training. At the end of the
training, most Local Government Mayors requested MIMRA to start community programmes in their
respective atolls. Because of the demanding nature of the requests, MIMRA requested the assistance
of the Community Fisheries Adviser to lead its first community exercise. So in April 2002, the
Community Fisheries Adviser travelled to the Marshall Islands to advice on the establishment of
Metjato’s (an island in Marshalls) Fisheries Management Plan and to help conduct a series of
community workshops.
The CFS carried out a review of American Samoa’s Community Fisheries Management Programme
from 15 to 25 January 2002. The CFS intends to review the work carried out by national community
programmes six months after their inception to quickly point out any area of the programmes that need
improvement. The American Samoa review suggests a new approach to improve the participation of
communities in the running of workshops. The review also contains 11 recommendations for the
Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources (DMWR). The draft recommendations were presented
to DMWR before the Community Fisheries Adviser departed American Samoa.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
The review of the Fisheries Extension Programme in Samoa (a community-based fisheries
management programme) was carried out from 28 January – 7 February 2002. The review sought to
find the direction for which the Extension Programme would proceed in the future given the
termination of the AusAID Fisheries Project. The review suggested a new strategy to be integrated in
the Extension Programme. This includes the establishment of a development component under the
programme, which is to be implemented by the Development Section. Four major recommendations
were presented to the Fisheries Division to consider before the departure of the Community Fisheries
Adviser.
American Samoa’s Community Fisheries Management Programme has worked with 4 villages since
its inception and has produced 4 Village Fisheries Management Plans. The programme is presently
working with its fifth village community. The Marshall Islands programme is working on its first
island community. From 16 – 22 April 2002, the Community Fisheries Adviser assisted in the series
of workshops for Marshall Islands’ first community. A suggested model for Village Management
Plans for Marshalls has already been developed by the CFS and has been put to use by the MIMRA
programme staff.
A funding proposal was prepared and submitted to the New Zealand Government under the PIE
category. The proposal is seeking funds to establish community-based fisheries management
programmes in Fiji, Cook Islands, Niue, Wallis and Futuna, Tokelau and Tuvalu. These are the main
countries that sought assistance from the CFS during the second HoF meeting held in Noumea, New
Caledonia in July 2001.
The “Women in Fisheries” information bulletins numbers 8 and 9 were published in February and
April 2002 respectively. The English version of the Bulletin number 10 has been completed and is
being translated into French. There has been a delay in the preparation of the bulletin number 10 due
mainly to the absence of the Community Fisheries Officer throughout the first six months of 2002.
The CFS had to seek assistance from the Publication Section of the SPC in the compilation of the
bulletin. With the proposed recruitment of the Community Fisheries Officer, timely preparation of
“Women in Fisheries” bulletins should be expected in the future. A series of community fisheries
training manuals were planned as a resource for the CETC fisheries module. Following special
interest in the use of sea plants around the region, the number of manuals to be produced is now 10.
These manuals are being jointly produced by the SPC's CFS and the University of the South Pacific.
The production of the last two manuals of the ten booklets has now been completed. All the ten
manuals are ready for distribution to Fisheries contacts and other relevant agencies.
Component 3 – Training
General Comments
Most of the Training Section’s objectives for the second semester have been met. In addition to its
ongoing activities in the area of training co-ordination (publication of SIG bulletin, maintenance of
website and databases), the Section has been very active in the area of seafood safety and quality, with
a series of in-country courses and workshops. At regional level, the Section has co-ordinated an
independent review of the popular SPC/Nelson Fisheries Officers course, with the review report being
distributed to course donors in December. The consultant’s recommendations will be presented to
member countries at the next Heads of Fisheries meeting, tentatively scheduled for July 2003. In the
area of resource material development, the Section has produced two videos, the first one promoting
seaweed farming activities in disadvantaged areas and the other demonstrating tuna loining
techniques. Section staff have also joined efforts with the Fisheries Development Section to increase
fishing industries’ awareness on by catch issues. Some guidelines on “Releasing Hooked Turtles” have
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
been developed and printed as posters, laminated cards and stickers. Other highlights include the
sponsoring of a major sea safety programme at Soltai Fishing and Processing Ltd (pole-and-line
fishing and tuna cannery in the Western Province, Solomon Islands) and the organisation of four
individual training attachments.
Despite the submission of several project proposals to aid donors, the implementation of a number of
training activities remains pending to the sourcing of funds.
Co-ordination of fisheries training/exchange of information
Key outputs
3.1 Maintenance of SPC database on training institutions and programmes and regular distribution of associated
Fisheries Training Directory
3.2 Maintenance of SPC database on Pacific Island fisheries personnel
3.3 Bi-annual information bulletin on fisheries education and training
Progress during July to December 2002
During the reporting period, planned activities under this objective have been implemented smoothly.
The Fisheries Training Directory lists training opportunities available to the fisheries sector of Pacific
Island countries and territories. The first version of the Directory, published in 1993, was mailed to
220 contacts in the region and, since then, several updated versions have been distributed. The
Directory is available in hard copy, on database and more recently, on the Section’s website. During
the reporting period, Helene Lecomte, Secretary to the Director of Marine Resources and ex-PA/FTS,
has continued to coordinate the management of the Directory database, simultaneously updating
institutions’ entries in the database and the Section’s website. The latest paper version of the
Directory was distributed in June 2001. It is envisaged to circulate an updated version in 2003.
The Fisheries Education and Training Information Bulletin # 18 was published in August (English
version) and subsequently placed on the Section’s website. At the end of the reporting period, articles
for the issue #19 had been gathered and distribution is scheduled for February 2003. The French
version of issue #18 has not been distributed yet, due to delays at the SPC Translation Section. The
Fisheries Education and Training Information Bulletin is part of the Special Interest Group (SIG)
concept, initiated by the SPC Fisheries Information Section in the early 90’s. The bulletin, for which
the Fisheries Training Section plays the editorial role, aims at making regional training institutions and
programmes known to the fisheries sector of the Pacific Islands. Because of its wide distribution (more
than 600 addresses), this SIG bulletin is also an ideal mechanism for promoting SPC's training
initiatives and those of national fisheries administrations. The most recent issues are available from the
Section’s website.
The Section’s Project Assistant (PA/FTS), Christine Briffa, has continued to manage the database on
fisheries personnel, which includes details on the participants to SPC fisheries courses and workshops.
During the reporting period, all applicants to the latest SPC courses have been entered in the database.
The database, which is set-up on the Microsoft Outlook software, assists the Section with course
selection procedures and provides a tool for the planning of new training initiatives.
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SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
The Section’s website is continuously developed, with the addition of the Section’s latest resource
materials – in both English and French - course advertisements, SIG articles and news of interest.
During the reporting period, the PowerPoint presentation of the Section has been updated and the eform previously designed to order the Section’s resource materials has been improved. Most of those
training materials can be downloaded directly from the website.
Planning of human resource development and training programmes
Key outputs
3.4 Assessments of training needs in the fisheries sector.
3.5 Strategies to meet the identified training needs.
Progress during July to December 2002
The planning of fisheries training activities, at regional level, has been constrained by the
postponement of the 3rd Heads of Fisheries meeting, initially programmed for October 2002. The
meeting, now scheduled in July 2003, will provide Section staff with an opportunity to meet the
Directors of national fisheries administrations, get an update an existing and emerging training issues,
and discuss future priorities.
During the reporting period, the training needs of Pacific Island Fisheries Officers have been
comprehensively assessed through a consultancy requested by the government of New Zealand. Ian
Cartwright, an Australian consultant with extensive Pacific and fisheries training experience, was
contracted in October to review the SPC/Nelson Fisheries Officers course which, since its inception in
1979, has trained approximately 275 fisheries personnel. The consultant travelled to a few countries
(Niue, Tonga, Fiji, Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea) and visited SPC and Nelson School of
Fisheries staff. Questionnaires were sent out to Heads of Fisheries and past trainees. The consultant’s
report and recommendations were sent to SPC, and subsequently to course donors, in December.
While the continuation of this unique regional course is strongly recommended, the needs of Pacific
Island Fisheries Officers have obviously changed in recent years. In order to keep in line with an
evolving fisheries sector, it is suggested the course should no longer be solely focussed on
‘development’ but rather be re-aligned towards ‘sustainable management and development’, while
maintaining key elements of practical training. The consultant also recommends that the current
practical fishing module continue to be run in New Caledonia but that topics offered be broadened
considerably in scope to make full use of SPC staff and programmes and other institutions and
operations available in New Caledonia. Using the consultant’s report as a guideline, Section staff will
develop a tentative course curriculum that will be presented at the 3rd Heads of Fisheries meeting. If
approved by member countries and territories, and provided course donors continue with their
financial support, the new Fisheries Officers course will be implemented early in 2004.
Still at regional level, and despite the lack of specific funding for that purpose, staff of the Training
and Development Sections have continued to promote a proactive approach to the bycatch issue in
pelagic longlining. A training strategy has been developed to raise awareness amongst fishing
operators and promote the use of mitigation and release techniques by vessel crew. As part of this
strategy, the production of resource materials has been initiated. In December, some illustrated
guidelines for “Releasing Hooked Turtles” were printed as posters, laminated cards and A-4 size
stickers. Distribution of the guidelines to fishing companies will be made early in 2003, together with
the turtle identification cards which are being developed. The cards –one sheet for each of the seven
marine turtle species - will be produced using a similar format (pocket-size) and water-proof material
11
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
to the recent SPC Live Reef Fish cards. The follow-up to the distribution of the above awareness
materials will be the development of a teaching module on bycatch issues for training providers in the
region.
At national level, no request was received for sectorial training needs assessment and strategy
development. However, the training strategies earlier developed for Palau, the Solomon Islands and
Nauru have been implemented with a number of training activities targeting those countries – see
output 3.7.
Future work in this area will depend on the requests made at national or regional level. A training
needs assessment mission to Tokelau may be organised in 2003.
Implementation of training activities
Key outputs
3.6 Funding proposals to implement training strategies.
3.7 Regional and national training activities, training attachments.
3.8 Resource materials developed.
Progress during July to December 2002
During the reporting period, five funding proposals have been submitted to aid donors. Targeted
projects include: a 5-week regional course on fishing-vessel specific engineering skills (NZAID and
Taiwan); a 2-week regional course for commercial fishing vessel skippers (Taiwan); the development
of a training package in relation with bycatch issues in pelagic longlining (NZAID – not approved); incountry seafood safety/HACCP training assistance (Taiwan). Earlier in 2002, the Training Section
had submitted two proposals to AusAID: a regional apprenticeship programme for fishing vessel
engineers and the continuation of the SPC/AFA Traineeship Programme for Pacific Island Fishers.
The response given by aid donors to the above proposals will determine, to a large extent, the
Section’s work programme for 2003 and possibly 2004.
In the absence of a dedicated Post-Harvest Fisheries Section at SPC, the Training Section is committed
to continue filling the region’s training gaps in the key area of seafood quality and safety. To that
effect, the Fisheries Training Section has recently provided post-harvest training assistance to a
number of member countries. Section staff have been directly involved in the running of workshops on
tuna handling (Cook Islands and Palau) and tuna grading (Samoa, Cook Islands and Palau) while
seafood experts have been contracted to deliver the seafood safety/HACCP courses (Fiji, Palau,
Solomon Islands and the Cook Islands).
In Samoa, the tuna grading workshop followed an initial training in December 2000 when a
professional grader from Fiji, trained staff of local tuna export companies. High staff turnovers have
resulted in the Samoa Fisheries Division requesting a second workshop, which was run by Section
staff in July. The workshop was two-fold with a classroom session followed by practical grading
demonstrations at the various companies. The lecture was attended by 24 trainees from the main
seafood exporters in Samoa as well as seven staff from the Samoa Fisheries Division. Approximately
35 additional persons have participated in the follow-up on-site grading sessions.
12
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
In the Cook Islands, three workshops were run back to back, in August. The first workshop targeted 12
outer islands trainees who had been brought down to Rarotonga by the Ministry of Marine Resources
to take part in a month-long training programme on tuna longlining conducted by SPC Fisheries
Development Officer. The tuna handling workshop was thus the first component of this training and
was aimed at making these prospective crew members proficient in tuna handling procedures. This
workshop had a positive impact on trainees, as SPC Fisheries Development Officer later reporting the
trainees’ good tuna handling skills during longline trips. The second workshop included tuna grading
as well as tuna handling. It was attended by 10 staff from existing and prospective fish export
companies. Grading practicals at the company Latitude 22 followed the morning classroom session. A
third workshop on tuna handling was attended by nine local fishers who were interested in targeting
large tunas around FADS, using fish export companies to sell their catch on the lucrative overseas
sashimi markets.
SPC Fisheries Training Adviser was in Palau in October. The workshops were, as in the Cooks, part of
a longer tuna longlining training programme implemented by the Fisheries Development Section. Two
one-day workshops were run, the first one on tuna handling (14 trainees from various States and some
tourist operators), the second on tuna grading for 10 trainees from various companies and government
departments.
The grant from Taiwan/ROC (USD 25,000) made possible the organisation of several in-country
USFDA/HACCP courses. Palau was the first country to receive assistance in August through the visit
by a seafood specialist from New Zealand. The course, based on the US AFDO/ Seafood Alliance
curriculum, was attended by six local seafood processors, four staff from the Department of Public
Health and two staff from the Bureau of Marine Resources. The course in Fiji was jointly organised by
the Training Section and USP’s Marine Studies Programme. The consultant hired by SPC and the USP
Post Harvest specialist taught HACCP principles to 30 members of the local fishing industry and two
staff from Fiji Fisheries Division. In September, another seafood expert travelled to the Solomon
Islands to run two HACCP courses, one in Honiara for 28 participants from the local industry and the
other in Noro (Western Province) for 10 staff of the cannery owned by Soltai Fishing and Processing
Ltd. Lastly, in November, a Canadian expert based in Tahiti, conducted one HACCP course in
Rarotonga (Cook Islands). Participants included staff from local fish export companies, the Health
Department and the Ministry of Marine Resources. As a follow-up to the course, the consultant has
provided advisory services to several exporters and reviewed the proposed Cook Island HACCP
legislation.
It is important to note that SPC’s training inputs in Palau, the Solomon Islands and the Cook Islands
follow earlier discussions between Section staff and fisheries administrations, and the subsequent
development of a training strategy to address identified needs. In the Solomon Islands, the needs also
included sea safety training for vessel crew of the company Soltai Fishing and Processing Ltd. Soltai,
by far the largest seafood company in the region, operates a fleet of 12 pole and line fishing vessels
catching skipjack and yellowfin tuna for processing in the cannery and arabushi factories at the
company’s shore-base in Noro, Western Province. The cannery supplies domestic and regional
markets with high-quality canned tuna whilst the arabushi is exported to Japanese markets. The
company is 100% Solomon Island owned and employs 99% of Solomon Islanders in the 800-strong
workforce. In addition to the HACC workshop at Noro, in September, the Section has facilitated a
large sea safety training programme for 363 vessel crew, in October and December. The courses,
delivered by tutors from the Solomon Islands School of Fisheries and Maritime Studies, have covered
First Aid, onboard safety, survival at sea and fire fighting. Further training assistance will be provided
to Soltai in 2003.
13
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part II: Comments on Progress July to December 2002
Still in the Solomon Islands, SPC Fisheries Training Specialist has participated in a national seaweed
farming workshop organised in November by the Aquaculture Section.
Four training attachments have been organised during the second semester of 2002. Two community
trainers from American Samoa and Samoa went to Fiji in August to take part in the delivery of a
community-based fisheries management workshop, one aquaculture technician from the private sector
in Fiji attended a two-month course on shrimp diseases at the Asian Institute of Technology in
Thailand and the skipper of the Nauru Fisheries and Marine Resources Authority went to Fiji in
October to sit the Class 6 master certificate required to man NFMRA’s latest tuna longliner.
Resource materials developed during the July-December period include the issue #18 (English
version) of the Special Interest Group bulletin on Fisheries Education and Training, a video promoting
seaweed farming activities (“Grow Seaweed, Grow Your Own Money”), a training video on tuna
loining techniques (“Tuna Loining”) and the first series of bycatch awareness materials (“Releasing
Hooked Turtles” posters, stickers and laminated cards). In 2003, the Training Section will produce
some turtle identification cards and, funding permitting, a bycatch teaching package for training
institutions.
Component 4 – Information & Consultancies
General Comments
The Fisheries Information Section continues with the printing and distribution of published materials,
using funds from other sources to overcome the loss of AusAID funding in 2002.
Output 4.1
Special Interest Group (SIG) Information Bulletins.
Progress during July to December 2002
No funding available in 2002 for this output.
Output 4.2
Production of information and technical documents in support of components 1, 2 and 3 above.
Progress during July to December 2002
No funding available in 2002 for this output.
Output 4.3
Consultancies and consultancy reports.
Progress during July to December 2002
No funding available in 2002 for this output.
14
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
1.1 Hands-on transfer of technical skills
Conduct training in medium-scale tuna
Longline training conducted in the Cook
in:
Component
–
1
Fisheries
Development Section
Objective (a)
Assist
countries
develop
and
territories
economically
environmentally
enterprises
viable,
sustainable,
focusing
to
on
fishing
vessel
operations, harvesting activities and
post-harvest practices.
Outputs

longlining in the Cook Islands, Marshall
Islands and Palau, with the tuna longlining
tuna catching methods (especially
Islands and Palau. Some longline training
training in Kavieng, PNG completed. Work
longlining);
conducted in PNG as well.
in the Marshall Islands deferred to 2003.

navigation and seamanship skills;

vessel

Advice on tuna longline vessels provided
Advice on tuna longline vessels provided to
procedures;
operating
costs
and
as needed (possibly Niue the Cook Islands
Niue, Cook Islands and the Loyalty Islands,
maintenance of vessel machinery
and New Caledonia).
although this is ongoing. Trip to Korea
and fishing equipment; and

undertaken to inspect two vessels for Nauru
on board handling, processing and
icing of the catch to export
Continue to try and work with Tokelau to
Limited progress — some input from
standards
progress their request for assistance.
Tokelau, which looks positive for a project
through in-country expert placements.
to commence in 2003.
1.2 National workshops conducted on
Conduct workshops in the Cook Islands, the
Workshops completed in the Cook Islands
identified topics as part of expert
Marshall Islands and Palau as part of the
and Palau. Marshall Islands project deferred
placements.
training provided to these countries.
to early 2003.
SPC staff to attend workshops on bycatch
Bycatch workshops attended in Samoa and
from tuna longlining to be held in Samoa
Hawaii.
and in Hawaii, plus attend the Heads of
deferred to 2003.
Heads
of
Fisheries
Meeting
Fisheries meeting to be held in Fiji.
15
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
1.3 Reports published on in-country
Complete and distribute the Nauru Field
Nauru Report completed and distributed.
expert placements.
Report.
.
Draft Field Reports for PNG, the Cook
Draft report produced for PNG, Cook
Islands, the Marshall Islands and Palau at
Islands
the end of each assignment.
deferred to early 2003.
1.4 Technical manuals on specific
English version of the tuna longline manual
Complete draft text produced for the tuna
fishing equipment and techniques or fish
to have remaining text drafted, text to go
longline manual, with all diagrams drafted.
handling practices.
through technical review, edited and the
Text put in for editing before laying out.
manual fully laid out and printed.
Bycatch brochure completed in English and
Bycatch brochure to be completed.
French and distributed.
1.5 Advice and information provided on
Complete training in Kavieng, PNG, on
PNG training completed.
priority development needs in:
small-scale boat operations.

fish aggregating device (FAD)
One staff member to undertake short
Short courses undertaken and completed
material suppliers;
courses to upgrade skippers ticket to STCW
with staff member’s qualification upgraded.
FAD construction and deployment
standards as required by the position.

and
Palau.
Marshalls
project
procedures;

appropriate fishing vessel
parameters for different
applications;

alternative value-adding processes
for tuna and associated species;

deep-water snapper fishing gear
and techniques; and

sportfishing potential.
1.6 Studies on development options for
Collaborative review to be undertaken in
Collaborative
review
completed
for
domestic fishing operations as input to
either the Marshall Islands or Kiribati.
Kiribati.
national fishery management plans and
Collaborative review of tuna longlining
Niue review of tuna longlining development
development initiatives by countries and
options undertaken in Niue with FFA, Niue
options completed.
territories.
Government and private consultant.
16
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
1.7 Data collection and analysis for the
Conduct second community survey in Niue.
Niue community survey deferred to 2003.
FAD research project in:
Develop a database for the catch and effort
Database completed for catch and effort

surveys of coastal communities;
data and do first 6-monthy analysis.
data, with initial data entered.

catch and effort data;
Summarise data on FAD mooring design
Data summarised on FAD designs and costs

aggregator types and effectiveness;
and maintenance, identifying weaknesses.
with the first FAD loss reported (18/12/02).

maintenance of FADs; and
Assess initial aggregator designs and adjust
Assessment started on aggregator designs.

other data as deemed necessary.
as needed.
Objective (b)
To effectively and efficiently manage
and implement the New Zealand funded
‘fish aggregation device (FAD) research
project’ in Niue and the Cook Islands, to
achieve its objectives within budget and
planned three-year time frame.
Outputs:
1.8 New FAD design developed over the
Assess each of the FAD designs and
FAD designs assessed with wire cable
course of the FAD research project.
implement any changes that are identified.
failure found as a problem on one design.
Assess the FAD materials held on hand and
Materials
order replacement materials as needed.
materials ordered.
Construct and deploy new FADs as and
No new deployments needed, although first
when needed.
loss reported.
1.9 Reports, manual and the general
Progress articles to be written and placed in
Progress articled written and placed in
dissemination of information on the
Fisheries Newsletter Nos. 101 and 102.
Newsletters 101 and 102.
FAD research project.
Produce other summary information on data
Project data collected and compiled ready
collected and provide to donor when
for first analysis.
assessed
and
replacement
requested or in next progress report.
17
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
identifying
Efforts will be made to ensure that this
Had a chance to meet with the Policy
Tentative arrangement has been made for the
problems and potential opportunities for
study is carried out in the first half of 2002
Adviser/Director of Fisheries in Majuro. It
Community Fisheries Adviser to visit Tokelau in the
men and women involved in subsistence
for Tokelau
appeared that the need for this assignment is
last half of 2002
Component 2 - Community Fisheries
Objective
Promote the participation of coastal
fishing
communities,
women,
in
the
particularly
management
of
subsistence and artisanal fisheries and to
allow them to benefit from regional and
national
fisheries
assessment,
management and development activities
Outputs
2.1.
National
reports
and artisanal fisheries
not urgent compared to the need to develop
and manage Tokelau fisheries.
2.2.
National
government
relevant
for
Further work on Niue's inshore fisheries
The CFS has completed its part for the
management plan awaits input from other
Niue’s fisheries management plan. So it
sections. Section facilitating follow up work
will not report on this in the future except if
on invertebrate poster and brochure.
the PIE funding proposal is approved.
reports
to
advise
Finalise the field report for Marshall
The field report on the establishment of
authorities
on
designs
Islands, produce and send copies to the
Marshall
Republic
Fisheries Management programme has been
national
management programmes
community
Islands
Community-based
finalised. The report was sent to MIMRA in
April 2002
18
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Effort shall be made so that Fiji’s
Fiji’s Foreign Affairs finally endorsed the
Finalise draft report for Fiji, produce and send copies
programme is set up in the first half of
Fisheries
request.
to the Government of Fiji.
2002.
Fisheries
Adviser
The
has
Community
produced
the
Programme design for Fiji to consider
Efforts will be made so that Foreign Affairs
Messages have been sent to Tuvalu
Continue to ascertain the position of Tuvalu Fisheries
does provide endorsement for Tuvalu
Fisheries to ascertain its position but with
regarding its earlier expression of interest for the
Fisheries’ request
no reply. Contrary to this, the Tuvalu High
establishment of a community fisheries programme for
Commissioner
Tuvalu
for
New
Zealand
has
endorsed the inclusion of Tuvalu in the PIE
funding proposal.
Plan is made to set up a community
It was not possible to pay a visit to Futuna
Attempt to visit Wallis and Futuna to find out how its
fisheries programme in Wallis and Futuna.
and Wallis because of communication
inshore problem can be addressed involving the
breakdown
community
2.3. Gender analysis studies of the tuna
Finalise draft and follow up publication of
Final draft report for Fiji has been
industry as the basis for National Tuna
stand alone gender study with Forum
submitted to the Forum Secretariat.
Management Plan
Secretariat.
Forum Secretariat is responsible for the
The
publication of the report
Undertake gender analysis study of tuna
The decision now is to undertake gender
Undertake gender analysis study of tuna management
management in either Cook Islands or
analysis study of Marshall Islands and
in either Marshall Islands or Kiribati depending on
Kiribati depending on when FFA and
Kiribati. Cook Islands is not on the list as
when FFA and countries concerned complete their
countries
originally scheduled
consultation
concerned
complete
their
consultation
2.4. National and regional training
Draw
up
activities implemented
consideration
Secretariat.
a
funding
of
the
proposal
for
Commonwealth
Funding
Proposal
has
already
been
submitted to the Commonwealth to fund a
regional
workshop
on
the
value
Follow
up
the
funding
proposal
with
the
Commonwealth Secretariat
of
communities in the management of fisheries
resources
19
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Plan fourth module for the second half of
No communication was received from the
2002
CETC regarding the development of the
fourth model
Training for the Fisheries Programme staff
Training for the Fisheries programme staff
of the Marshall Islands.
of MIMRA was carried out in April.
The training for programme staff of Fiji is scheduled
for the last week of July
2.5. Technical inputs into national
Review of American Samoa’s Community
Review of American Samoa’s Community
Report to be finalised, produced and copies sent to
management programmes provided
Fisheries Management Programme
Fisheries Management Programme was
American Samoa Government.
carried out in January. Report in draft form
and recommendations presented to the
Department
of
Marine
and
Wildlife
Resources.
Review of Samoa’s Fisheries Extension
Review was carried out in February and
Report to be finalised, produced and sent to Samoa
programme
recommendations were presented to the
Government
Fisheries Division. Field Report in its draft
form.
First six-monthly review of Marshall’s programme
Second six- monthly review of Am. Samoa’s
programme
2.6.
Village
community
management plans produced.
fisheries
Development of village management plans
Am. Samoa has produced 4 Village
for Marshall Islands
Fisheries Management plans with the 5th in
process.
Model
for
Marshall
Island
Fisheries
Management plan has been developed. The
20
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Community Fisheries Adviser participated
in Marshall’s first community exercise.
Funding
proposal
was
prepared
and
Follow up PIE funding proposal
submitted to PIE
Development of Village Fisheries Management plan
model for Fiji
2.7. Resource materials such as training
French publication of bulletins #8 and 9,
French publication of bulletins #8 and 9
English publication of #10 and translation into French.
manuals, special interest group bulletin,
preparation of bulletin #10 (English) for
were done in February and April 2002
Preparation of English version of bulletin #11
and videos produced and disseminated
March 2002 publication
respectively. # 10 has been done and is
being translated to French.
Final two books to be completed and all 10
All 10 manuals have been produced and
All 10 manuals to be distributed to all Fisheries
distributed
distribution is underway.
contacts and relevant agencies
21
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Component 3 – Training
Objective (a)
Enhance the transfer of fisheries-related
Increased
skills to Pacific Island nationals by co-
opportunities, (increased) awareness of
ordinating
fisheries
opportunities
fisheries
and
training
promoting
the
co-ordination
training
and
of
training
education
opportunities
exchange of relevant information on
fisheries training and education
Outputs:
3.1 Maintenance of SPC database on
Ongoing updating of database
Fisheries
Training
Directory
database
updated, available on the Section’s website
training institutions and programmes
and regular distribution of associated
Fisheries Training Directory
3.2 Maintenance of SPC database on
Ongoing updating of database
Pacific Island fisheries personnel
Database
updated,
applicants
and
participants to latest SPC courses entered
3.3 Bi-annual information bulletin on
Distribution of bulletin # 18 in English and
Bulletin # 18 distributed in August and
fisheries education and training
possibly in French
placed on the Section’s website. French
Preparation of bulletin # 19
version not distributed in December due to
delays at Translation Section.
Issue # 19 prepared in December, awaiting
printing, distribution and translation.
3.4 Maintenance of Fisheries Training
Ongoing development of the Section’s
Fisheries
Section’s website
website
updated. Latest materials added and online
Training
Section’s
website
order available.
22
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Objective (b)
Assist Pacific Island countries and
National
territories to more effectively plan
developed
human
resource
development
sectorial
training
strategies
and
training programmes in the fisheries
sector, and make the best use of
available training opportunities
Outputs
3.4 Assessments of training needs in the
fisheries sector.
Consultation with fisheries administrations
at
3rd
Heads of Fisheries meeting (Nadi,
Heads of Fisheries meeting postponed to
2003
October 2002)
Review of SPC/Nelson Fisheries Officers
Review
course, assessment of current technical
undertaken, report finalised and sent to
training needs of fisheries administrations
course donors in December
permitting,
development
of
the
SPC/Nelson
course
3.5 Strategies to meet the identified
Funding
of
Despite lack of specific funding, training
training needs
training strategy (and associated resource
strategy developed and initial series of
materials) on bycatch issues in pelagic
associated resource materials produced
longlining
(‘Releasing Hooked Turtles’ posters, cards
and stickers)
Training activities implemented as part of
training strategies for Palau fishing sector
and
Soltai
(fish
catching/processing
company, Solomon Islands)
23
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
3.6 Funding proposals to implement
Proposal
Submitted - approved
training strategies
assistance to the Fisheries Training Section
Objective (c)
Develop
and
conduct
training
programmes that are not available
through established training institutions,
in areas such as enterprise management,
safety at sea and aquaculture
Outputs:
to
AusAID
for
continued
of SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme
Proposal for a regional apprenticeship
Submitted – awaiting response
programme for fishing vessel engineers to
AusAID
Proposal for the continuation of the
Submitted – awaiting response
Traineeship programme for Pacific Island
fishers to AusAID
Proposal for a 5-week regional course for
Submitted
engineers of commercial fishing companies
NZAID and Taiwan (awaiting response)
Proposal
seafood
Submitted to Taiwan – awaiting response
Proposal for a 2-week regional course for
Submitted to Taiwan – awaiting response
for
in-country
to
France
(not
approved),
safety/HACCP training assistance
commercial fishing skippers
Proposal for the development of a package
Submitted to Japan and NZAID – not
of training materials in relation with
approved
bycatch issues in pelagic longlining
24
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
3.7 Regional and national training
Seafood quality/HACCP course in Fiji
Course completed
Seafood quality/HACCP course in Palau
Course completed
Seafood quality/HACCP courses in the
Two courses completed
activities, training attachments
Solomon Islands
Tuna handling/grading workshops in Palau
Two workshops completed
Tuna grading workshop in Samoa
Workshop completed
Tuna handling workshop in Cook Islands
Three workshops completed
Organisational management course in Palau
Course postponed to February 2003
Vessel crew safety training at Soltai Fishing
363 crew trained
Ltd (Solomon Islands)
Seafood quality/HACCP course completed
in the Cook Islands
Assistance to SPC Aquaculture Section in
arrangements for seaweed workshop in the
Solomon Islands
Two
or
attachments
three
individual
training
Community trainers from Samoa and
American Samoa attached to workshop in
Fiji
Aquaculture technician from Fiji to shrimp
course in Thailand (AIT)
Nauruan vessel skipper to Class6 course in
Fiji
25
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
3.8 Resource materials developed
Funding permitting, development of a
First
training
Hooked turtles’ posters, stickers, laminated
package
on
bycatch
Progress
issues
materials
produced
(‘Releasing
associated with pelagic longlining
cards)
Fact sheet on seaweed farming for regional
Production of fact sheet on seaweed
distribution
farming delayed
Seaweed promotion video produced and
Training
distributed
produced and distributed
video
on
seaweed
farming
Tuna loining video produced, ready for
regional distribution
26
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part III: Summary Progress Report July to December 2002
Objectives and Outputs
Planned Programme July to Dec.
Progress
Component 4 – Information and
Consultancies
Objective (a)
Produce
current
Flow of information to member countries &
fisheries information to Pacific Island
and
disseminate
territories, technical information network
countries and territories and maintain
maintained.
technical information networks.
Outputs
4.1
Special
Interest
Group
(SIG)
No funding available for this output in
Information Bulletins.
2002.
4.2 Production of information and
No funding available for this output in
technical documents in support of
2002.
components 1, 2, and 3 above.
Objective (b)
Provide facility for short-term technical
assistance to meet the objectives of
Components 1, 2, and 3, especially in
the area of post-harvest.
Outputs
4.3
Consultancies
reports.
and
consultancy
No funding available for this output in
2002.
27
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
Part IV: Financial statement for the period 1 January to 30 June 2002
The Coastal Fisheries Programme received funding of 34,737,779 CFP from AusAID plus 9,500,000
CFP in top-up funding from France XXB surplus for the Fisheries Training Section, giving a total of
44,237,779 CFP received for the year 2002. The table below gives a breakdown of the funding by
component of the programme, and the expenditure of this funding for the year 2002. Financial
statements for each component are provided in the following pages.
Component
Income
Fisheries Development Section
16,237,779
Community Fisheries Section
11,000,000
Fisheries Training Section
17,000,000
Expenditure
Balance
Fisheries Information Section
0
0
0
Fisheries consultancies
0
0
0
Total
44,237,779
Overall expenditure for 2002 is ……...
28
SPC Coastal Fisheries Programme, Final Progress Report 2002
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