Lab Safety Manual - Stanford Nano Shared Facilities

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STANFORD NANO PATTERNING
FACILITY MANUAL
The Stanford Nano Patterning Facility (SNP)
Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering Building
Rooms 004 through 006
Revised January, 2012
Stanford Nano Patterning Facility Manual
Table of Contents
1. Safety Objective ...................................................................................................................................................... 1
1.1 Staff Responsibility................................................................................................................................................ 1
1.2 Lab Member Responsibility ................................................................................................................................... 1
2. General Safety......................................................................................................................................................... 1
2.1 Lab Behavior.......................................................................................................................................................... 1
2.2 Appropriate Clothing and Shoes ............................................................................................................................ 1
2.3 Eye Protection ........................................................................................................................................................ 1
2.4 Personal Protective Equipment .............................................................................................................................. 2
2.5 Buddy System ........................................................................................................................................................ 2
2.6 Special Health Concerns ........................................................................................................................................ 2
2.6.1 Pregnancy: .......................................................................................................................................................... 2
2.6.2Chemical and Latex Allergies .............................................................................................................................. 2
3. Facility Hazards Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 2
3.1 Liquid Chemical Hazards ...................................................................................................................................... 2
3.2 Electrical Hazards .................................................................................................................................................. 2
3.3 Cryogenic Hazards ................................................................................................................................................. 3
4. Chemical Information .............................................................................................................................................. 3
4.1 Manufacture’s Chemical Labels ............................................................................................................................ 3
4.2 Secondary Use Labels. ........................................................................................................................................... 3
4.3 MSDS, Material Safety Data Sheets ...................................................................................................................... 3
5. Chemicals ................................................................................................................................................................ 3
5.1 Liquid Chemical Hazard categories ....................................................................................................................... 3
5.1.1 Solvents............................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.1.2 Corrosive ............................................................................................................................................................. 4
5.1.3 Oxidizer .............................................................................................................................................................. 4
5.1.4 Water Reactive .................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.1.5 Flammable .......................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.1.6 Toxic/Poison ....................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.1.7 Non-toxic ............................................................................................................................................................ 4
5.2 Resist Chemicals .................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.2.1 HSQ Resists ........................................................................................................................................................ 4
5.2.2 PMMA Resists .................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.3 Miscellaneous Materials ........................................................................................................................................ 5
5.3.1 Gallium Arsenide ................................................................................................................................................ 5
5.3.2 Compressed Gas ................................................................................................................................................. 5
5.3.3 Non Toxic Gases ................................................................................................................................................. 5
5.3.4 Cryogens ............................................................................................................................................................. 5
6. Chemical Storage ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
6.1 General Use Chemical Storage .............................................................................................................................. 5
6.2 Personal Chemical Storage .................................................................................................................................... 5
7. Chemical Handling .................................................................................................................................................. 6
7.1 Personal Protective Equipment .............................................................................................................................. 6
7.2 Transporting Chemicals in the Lab ........................................................................................................................ 6
7.2.1Procedures for Brining Chemicals in to the Facility ............................................................................................ 6
7.3 Chemical Waste Disposal ...................................................................................................................................... 7
7.3.1 Local Waste Collection ....................................................................................................................................... 7
7.3.2 Solvent Waste Disposal ...................................................................................................................................... 7
7.3.3 Solid Hazardous Waste Disposal ........................................................................................................................ 7
7.3.4 Chemical Spills ................................................................................................................................................... 7
8. Bringing in New Chemicals or Processes ................................................................................................................ 8
9. Working at Chemical Benches ................................................................................................................................. 8
10. How to Respond to an Emergency ......................................................................................................................... 9
10.1 Stanford Nano Patterning Facility (SNP) Response Procedures .......................................................................... 9
10.2 Building and Facility Evacuation ......................................................................................................................... 9
10.2.1 Building Evacuation.......................................................................................................................................... 9
10.2.2 Laboratory Evacuation .................................................................................................................................... 10
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10.2.3 Odors in the Lab ............................................................................................................................................. 10
10.2.4 Lab Fire ........................................................................................................................................................... 10
10.2.5 Electrical Power Outage ................................................................................................................................. 10
10.2.6 Major Earthquake............................................................................................................................................ 10
11. Life Threatening Medical Emergency ................................................................................................................. 10
11.1 Non-Health Threatening Emergency ................................................................................................................. 10
11.2 Chemical Exposure ............................................................................................................................................ 10
11.3 Reporting Accidents........................................................................................................................................... 11
11.3.1 Medical Providers or Work Related Injuries .................................................................................................. 11
12 Alarms................................................................................................................................................................... 11
12.1 Fire Alarms ........................................................................................................................................................ 11
13 Appendices ........................................................................................................................................................... 13
Appendix A: Transporting Chemicals in the Lab ...................................................................................................... 13
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1. Safety Objective
The primary goal of safety programs is the prevention of accidents through the education of the lab member
community. This is achievable through the understanding of safety hazards, the adherence to the safety policies and
the expectation of self policing between our lab members and the lab member community. The secondary goal of a
safety program is learning and applying the correct response in the case of a safety or emergency event.
1.1 Staff Responsibility
The responsibility of the Staff within the facility regarding safety is to:
1 identify and communicate to the lab member community, the relevant safety training provided by Stanford
University.
2 inform the lab member community of potential safety hazards within the facility
3 reaffirm the correct response to any safety situation within the facility
4 provide the appropriate personal protective equipment
5 maintain a current MSDS binder
6 verify the safe operation of all facility equipment.
1.2 Lab Member Responsibility
The responsibility of the lab member within the facility regarding safety is to:
1. follow the guidelines, including stated and the intended guidelines of the facility at all times
2. operate in a safe and professional manner at all times
3. take responsibility for yours and all lab members safety at all times
4. every lab member is responsible for monitoring unsafe practices of their fellow lab members
5. report any unsafe conditions, or unsafe practices of their fellow lab members to the facility staff
6. submit any suggestion for improving safety to the facility staff.
WARNING: Any lab member found behaving in an unsafe manner, either intentionally or unintentionally will be
denied access to the facility.
2. General Safety
2.1 Lab Behavior
The appropriate clean room gowns must be worn. This includes disposable shoe covers, hairnets, clean room hoods,
clean room overalls, clean room boots and gloves.
Eating, drinking and gum chewing are strictly prohibited within the clean room. Water bottles (water only) are
allowed in the change room only, not in the clean room. Absolutely no drinking is allowed within the clean room.
No storage is provided within the clean room or gowning room. All samples and associated materials must be stored
outside of the facility.
All materials brought in to the clean room must be clean room compatible. No paper, backpacks, etc are allowed.
Laptop computers are allowed, but must be wiped down prior to entering the clean room.
Your work area must be clean of clutter when you are finished.
WARNING: Any lab member not adhering to the General Lab Behavior, either intentionally or unintentionally will
be denied access to the facility.
2.2 Appropriate Clothing and Shoes
Fully enclosed shoes are mandatory for clean room access. No sandals, open toe, shoe with heal greater than 1.5
inches, clog type or sling-back shoes are allowed.
You are required to wear clean room gowns over your street cloths. To be most comfortable appropriate clothing is
light weight, comfortable and allows for free movement. Bare legs, shorts and dresses are not recommended.
2.3 Eye Protection
Safety glasses are required at all times in the facility. Safety glasses must be of type B, C, D, G, or H (with side
shields or offer side protection) and conform to ANSI standard (marked "Z87").
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Safety glasses must be worn over all prescription glasses which are not safety glasses.
Contact lenses are allowed, but not recommended when working around chemicals. Anyone wearing contact lenses
must wear standard safety glasses.
Standard safety glasses are designed to protect against flying fragments, but, not chemical splash hazards. Full face
shields must be worn in addition to the lab member’s safety glasses when handling chemicals or working at chemical
wet benches.
2.4 Personal Protective Equipment
Complete Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be worn while using any wet bench or during the transportation
of any chemical.
2.5 Buddy System
No lab member is allowed to work in the facility alone at any time. If you plan on working during a time when the lab
might be expected to be empty, please plan ahead and coordinate your work schedule with another lab member. This
way, you can be sure to have a buddy and can work safely.
2.6 Special Health Concerns
2.6.1 Pregnancy:
Although the level of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in correctly ventilated lab hoods is below OSHA-defined
limits, lab members who are pregnant or contemplating pregnancy should be aware of the use of these compounds in
the lab, and that certain classes of VOC's are thought to be linked to problems with pregnancy. Lab members who are
concerned should discuss concerns with their supervisors and the facility staff.
2.6.2Chemical and Latex Allergies
The trace presence of chemical compounds in the facility may trigger allergies in certain, sensitive individuals. A
common chemical sensitivity encountered is to latex, found in some clean room gloves. Vinyl clean room gloves are
provided and may be used in place of latex, by sensitive individuals. There may be other trace chemicals present in
the lab which may also trigger allergies. Learn to recognize the signs of contact allergic reaction (skin sensitivity,
hives, wheezing) and act to identify and avoid future contact.
3. Facility Hazards Overview
3.1 Liquid Chemical Hazards
The key to safe use of any chemical is the understanding the hazards presented by each specific chemical and
knowing and using the appropriate precautionary measures to minimize these hazards. You are required to know the
main hazards, handling requirements, and disposal methods for any chemical you use in the lab.
Chemicals primarily used in the facility are solvents. Prolonged exposure to solvents can cause tissue, and organ
damage. Exposure to heat or and ignition source can cause the solvent to ignite or explode. General information
regarding some of these solvents and their uses can be found in later sections of this document.
Knowing the general rules for how to safely transport, pour, use, and dispose of these chemicals is every lab
member's responsibility. Detailed hazard information is provided in the materials MSDS.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of the lab member to understand the chemicals and the chemical pathways which are
part of their projects.
3.2 Electrical Hazards
The danger of injury due to electrical shock is present in any electrical component. To prevent electrical exposure all
equipment is interlocked and must have the protective covers in place. If you feel the equipment is unsafe or
potential electrical hazard, stop using the tool and immediately notify the staff.
With the exception of personal electronics devices, any electrical equipment brought into the facility must have prior
approval by the facility staff.
WARNING: Never open any electrical enclosures or cabinets on equipment. Any lab member failing to follow this
rule, either intentionally or unintentionally will be denied access to the facility.
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3.3 Cryogenic Hazards
Cryogenic hazards are presented by liquid nitrogen ("LN2"), which may be used in isolated areas of the facility.
Liquid nitrogen is at 77 degrees K (196 degrees C below freezing) and can cause freezing burns and loss of the
exposed area. Do not handle liquid nitrogen unless you are trained. Always wear protective gear including items
such as thermally insulated gloves, safety glasses and a face shield when handling liquid nitrogen.
4. Chemical Information
4.1 Manufacture’s Chemical Labels
All chemical containers from the manufacture are required to have a label identifying the contents and containing the
following precautionary information:

A signal word to define the hazard potential. These words include one of the following: “Caution”,
“Warning” or “Danger”, in order of increasing potential hazard.

One or more Statements of Hazard, which describe in more detail the hazard presented.

Precautionary Measures.

First Aid or other information (this may not always be present on the label.)
4.2 Secondary Use Labels.
Only chemicals in their original containers will have these labels. Chemicals that have been dispensed for use or
divided into secondary containers must have an updated label listing the following information.
1. Common Chemical Name (not an abbreviation or chemical formula)
2. Chemical Composition
3. Hazard Potential or Potentials
4. Name of person creating the secondary container
5. Date when the secondary container was created
As a qualified lab member, it is your responsibility to have all the chemicals in use at your station properly labeled as
defined above.
4.3 MSDS, Material Safety Data Sheets
Chemical manufacturers and distributors are required by federal law to provide Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
for each product they sell. The Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) contains information on general composition,
physical and chemical properties, toxicology, and storage and handling recommendations.
The MSDS sheets for all the chemicals in the facility are located in a binder in the gowning room. Additional MSDS
information for many chemicals/chemical mixtures is available through the Stanford University Environmental
Health and Safety group (EH&S) website at: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/EHS.
You are required read the MSDS information for all the chemicals that you use in the lab. You are expected to know
the main hazards, handling requirements, and disposal methods for all chemicals used by you in the facility.
NOTE: No unauthorized chemicals are allowed the facility without the required EH&S documentation and the
approval of the facility staff.
5. Chemicals
5.1 Liquid Chemical Hazard categories
Liquid chemicals can be divided into six general hazard categories: corrosive, oxidizer, air/water reactive, flammable,
toxic/poison, and non-toxic with many chemicals fall into more than one hazardous class. It is your responsibility to
recognize the chemical hazards of all the chemicals you are using and understand the appropriate precautionary
measures required for safe use.
The following are typical safety measures for handling any liquid chemical:
1. Knowledge of the main hazards and disposal method.
2. Use of personal protective equipment.
3. Working only in an approved exhausted bench.
4. Knowledge of the approved disposal method.
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5.1.1 Solvents
Acetone, isopropanol, methanol and methyl iso butyl ketonemay (MIBK) are found at the benches. These chemicals
are flammable solvents with low flash points. At sufficiently high vapor concentrations, they can be easily ignited at
room temperature and pose a significant fire hazard. Great care is required when using solvents near ignitions
sources such as hot plates or any electrical systems. Solvents may ignite or explode when brought into contact with
chemical oxidizers, such as acids.
These and other solvents must be double contained and stored in the designated flammables cabinet. Solvents may
be used only in designated solvent hoods.
5.1.2 Corrosive
Corrosives in the facility include bases and acids. A corrosive (or "caustic") chemical destroys or permanently
damage living tissue such as skin and underlying tissues resulting from an exposure. Splashes in the eyes can cause
blindness and inhalation of vapors can destroy lung tissue.
In case of a localized external exposure, promptly flush the affected area with water, for at least 15 minutes. For
larger area external exposure, use a safety shower. Remove your clothing while under the shower and flush for at
least 15 minutes. Exposure of corrosives to the eyes is extremely serious; flush immediately, either with the water
spray gun at the wet bench or preferably the eyewash station. Eyes should be rolled up and down, and side to side,
continuously, to allow clean water to flush behind the eyeball. For any exposure to corrosives, you should be taken to
the emergency center for evaluation and treatment.
5.1.3 Oxidizer
An oxidizer is any substance which will react chemically either by supplying oxygen or removing electrons.
Oxidizers must not be stored near flammable or reactive materials. Oxidizers should not be stored or mixed with
solvents. When oxidizers are mixed with compounds that can act as reducing agents, the result is often a violent
reaction and possibly an explosion.
5.1.4 Water Reactive
A water reactive substance spontaneously undergoes a chemical reaction when in contact with water, very quickly
generating heat and/or gas upon mixing. Water reactive mixtures should never be poured directly into a sink drain.
5.1.5 Flammable
Vapors from a flammable liquid can ignite and explode above a critical concentration called the flash point and in the
presence of ignition source. Flammable liquids include most solvents, such as acetone, isopropanol, methanol and
MIKB. To minimize hazards, always work well within the exhausted area of the appropriate bench and minimize the
quantities of flammables in use.
5.1.6 Toxic/Poison
A toxic material is one which has poisonous or harmful effects. All materials can be toxic depending on the level of
exposure. There are formal, quantifiable definitions as to what comprises a toxic material and to what degree it is
toxic based on lethal dosages for lab animals when administered orally or through inhalation. Materials with
moderate to extreme toxicity are not allowed in the facility
5.1.7 Non-toxic
A non-toxic material is one that is not likely to result in harmful effects with normal use.
5.2 Resist Chemicals
5.2.1 HSQ Resists
HSQ e-beam resists are comprised of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resin in a carrier solvent of
methylisobutylketone (MIBK). HSQ functions as a negative tone electron-beam resist. The HSQ monomer
formula is H8Si8O12 and is cross-linked by exposure to e-beam radiation.
5.2.2 PMMA Resists
PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) is a popular e-beam resist. The PMMA polymer is dissolved the solvent Anisole.
Exposure causes scission of the polymer chains acting as a positive tone resist.
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5.3 Miscellaneous Materials
5.3.1 Gallium Arsenide
Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and its by-products are extremely toxic. Anyone working with GaAs must be constantly
aware of how arsenic might be generated during processing. Physical contact with GaAs and anything that comes
into direct contact with GaAs must be avoided. Scribing and cleaving GaAs samples must be done in an exhausted
hood. All work surfaces must be wiped down afterwards to prevent the spreading of GaAs dust.
All GaAs waste, no matter how small, is considered hazardous. This includes GaAs-contaminated lab wipes. Place
all of the GaAs waste in an sealed zip-lock plastic bag and place it in the Solid GaAs Waste can.
5.3.2 Compressed Gas
There are extreme hazards presented in working with pressurized gas cylinders. Only trained and qualified staff may
install, disconnect, or change out gas cylinders.
5.3.3 Non Toxic Gases
Non-toxic gases do not generally pose an immediate risk to health and safety. However, they can be asphyxiants and
may pose health risks at high concentrations or with long-term exposure. House nitrogen (N2) is plumbed
throughout the lab for the equipment and for general use. The nitrogen supply is at high pressure which can pose a
hazard.
5.3.4 Cryogens
Liquid nitrogen (LN2) may be present in the lab. LN2 should not be used in an enclosed space because of the risk of
asphyxiation. LN2 can also burn tissue on contact, so protective gear must be worn whenever handling.
6. Chemical Storage
To prevent the accidental reaction between incompatible materials, every chemical in the facility must be stored in
the correct hazard classification storage area. Each storage area is designed for safe storage of chemicals and is
appropriately ventilated, chemically resistant, and built to protect against the main physical hazards chemicals stored
there. No chemicals may be kept outside of the appropriate storage area.
The designated chemical storage areas in the lab are:
Location
General Hazard Class
Chemical Type
Processing Use
Flammables cabinet
Flammables
Solvents, bases,
organics
Resists, developers, solvents
Refrigerator
Flammables
Solvents, organics
Temperature sensitive resists
6.1 General Use Chemical Storage
The facility keeps general use chemicals stocked in the areas listed in the table above. You must abide by the
following safety procedures when using these chemicals:
1) Follow appropriate procedures for handling and transporting chemicals in the lab.
2) You must be trained and qualified in use of wet benches before working with chemicals.
3) The chemicals must be appropriately labeled while in use.
4) The chemicals must be appropriately disposed of when your processing is complete.
5) The work surface must be clean and dry when you have completed your work.
6) When you return chemicals, the bottles must be clean and dry.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of the lab member community to notify the facility staff when chemicals are running
low.
6.2 Personal Chemical Storage
Storage of containers of personal chemicals or materials must be arranged through the facility staff. The following
restrictions will apply:
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
The material must be safe to use and not pose a health hazard.
The chemical must be approved by the facility staff for use in the lab.
It must be acceptable for the process for which you plan to use it.
It must be stored in the appropriate hazard class storage area.
Personal containers, even if they have the original manufacturer’s label, must be signed and dated by the
facility staff. The facility staff must have the following information on file for all chemicals brought in to
the facility:

Your contact info.

The main hazard group (corrosive, flammable, oxidizer, reactive, toxic/poison, nontoxic).

Chemical Storage Group identifier (see the Stanford Chemical Safety Database and the SNF website) is
denoted by a single letter.

Exact name(s) of the chemical.

Date chemical was received.
You are responsible for removing or disposing of the chemical when it is no longer in use.
WARNING: Any lab member not adhering to these rules, either intentionally or unintentionally will be denied
access to the facility.
7. Chemical Handling
7.1 Personal Protective Equipment
Protective gear is required whenever handling or transporting chemicals within the facility. The degree of protective
gear depends on the usage of the chemical. The table below is a guideline as to the level of personal protective
equipment required for various chemical types.
Chemical Type
Recommended personal protective equipment
Corrosives or oxidizers
face shield, apron, chemically-resistant gloves
Solvents
face shield, chemically-resistant gloves
Photoresist or developer
vinyl gloves over latex or vinyl gloves
7.2 Transporting Chemicals in the Lab
All chemicals must be correctly labeled. Chemicals must be double contained when being transported in the facility.
No chemicals are allowed in the change room. All chemicals are brought in to the facility through the support chase
and not through the change room. Any solution, whether it is water or chemicals, being transported anywhere in the
facility and in the support area for the facility must be labeled, in a sealed container and double contained. The
appropriate Personal Protective Equipment must be worn whenever handling chemicals.
NOTE: No chemicals are allowed in the gowning room. All chemicals must be brought in through the support
chase.
7.2.1Procedures for Brining Chemicals in to the Facility
Before entering the facility:

Verify your chemicals have the appropriate labels

Place your materials in a double containment container.

Place your materials in the appropriate storage cabinet.
Moving Chemicals from the Pass-Through or the storage cabinet to the Bench:

Verify your chemicals have the appropriate labels

Place your materials in a double containment container.

Move your chemicals to the appropriate storage area of the appropriate bench.
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Procedures for Removing Waste:

Procedure for Disposing of Empty Containers

Verify the bottle lid is on tight.

Verify the outside of the bottle is clean and dry.

Place the empty bottle in the storage tray in the support chase.
7.3 Chemical Waste Disposal
Disposing of chemical waste in a safe manner is everyone’s responsibility. Improper disposal of waste could result
in explosion and injury. Violations of proper waste disposal laws may even result in shutdown of the facility.
7.3.1 Local Waste Collection
All waste is collected locally. It is your responsibility to verify there is sufficient volume in the collection carboy for
your waste. You must verify, re-verify and continue to verify that you are disposing of your waste properly.
Detailed procedures on how to dispose of chemical waste are found in the operating procedures for the specific
chemical processing wet benches. If you have any questions or doubts about how to dispose of your waste contact a
facility staff member.
How to Change Local Waste Containers

Obtain a clean, empty waste container. Do not use an empty chemical container.

Fill out and adhere the Hazardous Waste Tag to the container.

Cap the old, filled container, making sure that the outside of the container is clean and dry and
make sure the hazardous waste label is legible and securely attached.

Place the old waste container with the new waste container.
Transport the old, filled waste container to the double confinement box for removal by EH&S.
WARNING: Any lab member failing to strictly adhering to the waste disposal rules, either intentionally or
unintentionally will be denied access to the facility.
7.3.2 Solvent Waste Disposal
Non-halogenated solvent waste is collected in carboys at the solvent benches. The standard solvents are: methanol,
isopropanol, MIKB and acetone. Any waste, such as lift-off residue containing metals or toxics must NOT be
disposed of through the city drain but must be collected locally in the appropriate carboy.
WARNING: Any lab member failing to strictly adhering to the waste disposal rules, either intentionally or
unintentionally will be denied access to the facility.
7.3.3 Solid Hazardous Waste Disposal
Chemically contaminated objects are considered solid hazardous waste. These include gloves, lab wipes, swabs,
plastic syringes and syringe filters. Hazardous waste items must be placed in the hazardous waste cans and not in the
standard garbage cans. At times these items can give off gas vapors. If any items are emitting an odor, they must be
placed in a fully sealed zip-lock bag before being placed in the Hazardous waste can.
Objects which can cut or puncture the skin are also considered hazardous. These “sharps” include items such as
broken wafers, razor blades, broken glass, razor blades/exacto knives/scalpels, or hypodermic needles. Sharps must
be disposed of in the large, blue and white cardboard box sharps collection box. The sharps box should never contain
hazardous chemicals. If you have a sharp object contaminated with chemicals, place the object into a box, such as an
empty wafer box, tape it shut, and double-bag and place in a hazardous waste can.
WARNING: Any lab member failing to strictly adhering to the waste disposal rules, either intentionally or
unintentionally will be denied access to the facility.
7.3.4 Chemical Spills
Chemical spills that occur outside the ventilated area of a chemical wet bench can pose inhalation and contact
hazards. Unless you are trained and specifically instructed by a staff member who has evaluated the situation, DO
NOT attempts to clean up the spill yourself.
For non-vapor-generating, non-reactive chemical spills, the hazard is confined to the immediate area. The priority is
clear the immediate area and ensure that others do not enter the area.
1. Clear the area.
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2.
3.
4.
5.
Block off the area using yellow “Hazard” tape.
During normal weekday, working hours, call a facility staff member.
After hours and on weekends, call EH&S at X5-999 and a facility staff member.
Provide as much information you can about the incident to the persons responding.
For chemical spills which generate vapors or heat, there is a risk to the others in the lab and a laboratory evacuation
must be performed.
1. Clear the area.
2. Announce that there is a chemical spill. Evacuate the lab immediately.
3. During normal weekday, working hours, call a facility staff member.
4. After hours and on weekends, call EH&S at X5-999 and a facility staff member.
5. Provide as much information you can about the incident to the persons responding.
8. Bringing in New Chemicals or Processes
By law, we are required to maintain an up-to-date list and amounts of all hazardous chemicals and materials in the
entire facility. Violations and inaccurate chemical inventory control can result in the closure of the facility.
All process chemicals and materials used in the lab must be approved by the facility staff before being brought into
the facility. In addition, with every new chemical/material brought into the lab, we need to ensure there is:

a safe way and place to store it

a safe way to use it

a safe method of disposing of it and its byproducts

a way to prevent cross-contamination
New chemicals and materials are approved for a given process, on a case-by-case basis. To register a new chemical,
material, or process, please prepare the following information:

Your name and full contact info

Your PI (Advisor) or Company

The name of the new Chemical or Chemicals (give all names including scientific and commonly
used):

If there are secondary new chemicals that must be used with this material (such as a developer for
a new resist)

The MSDS for each chemical or material.

Complete manufacturer/vendor info, including contact info

A description of your plans for this new chemical/material/process, including application notes,
when available
9. Working at Chemical Benches
Chemical benches are designed for the safe use for a family or class of chemicals, such as solvents or acids. Only the
designated family or classes of chemicals may be used at a specific chemical bench.
WARNING: No chemicals (with the exception of isopropanol squeeze bottles) are allowed at any other location
within the facility.
The chemical benches are used only for standard processes and chemicals, as described in the operating procedures.
Although very limited, non-standard processing may be accommodated at these benches, any non-standard chemical
or procedure requires advance authorization from the facility staff.
Any chemicals used at the polypropylene bench must be used in the appropriate amounts. Each bench has dedicated
lab ware, in order to avoid cross-contamination (do not use lab ware from one bench at another bench.)
The polypropylene benches are manual stations and are used for a broader range of development chemicals. Beakers
and other chemical containers used at these stations must be appropriately labeled. The information required is:

Date

Your contact info (name, phone, Coral login)

Name of the chemical (no acronyms or abbreviations)

Hazard Category
WARNING: Chemical labeling is strictly enforced. Any lab member not adhering to these rules, either intentionally
or unintentionally will be denied access to the facility
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10. How to Respond to an Emergency
10.1 Stanford Nano Patterning Facility (SNP) Response Procedures
Emergency response procedures and emergency contact information for the Nano Patterning facility is posted
throughout the facility.
Nano Patterning Response Procedures
Type of Emergency
Response
Health-threatening Emergency
Requiring Evacuation (fire,
toxic spills, etc.)
• Pull fire alarm.
• Evacuate immediately to the Assembly Point.
• Do not re-enter the building until cleared to do so.
Major Earthquake
• Take cover.
• After shaking stops, check nearby co-workers
• Evacuate to the Assembly Point.
• Do not pull the fire alarm.
Life-threatening Medical
Emergency (when in doubt, treat
as an emergency)
• Dial 9-911 immediately.
• Do not hang up until told to do so.
• Do not move victim unless necessary.
Non-health Threatening
Emergency (building and
facilities)
• Call a facility staff member.
• If unavailable, call building Facilities.
• After hours, call Stanford Work Control (X3-2281).
Electrical Power Outage
• Remain calm.
• Emergency backup lights should come on within 15 seconds.
• When emergency lights come on, leave the building through the nearest
exit.
• Notify a facility staff member.
Spill Cleanup Assistance
• During normal working hours a facility staff member.
• After hours, call EH&S (X5-999) and notify a SNP staff member.
10.2 Building and Facility Evacuation
In the case of an emergency, the priority is to ensure that everyone is safely away from the hazard. Depending on the
extent and seriousness of the situation, an evacuation may be invoked just for the lab or for the entire building.
10.2.1 Building Evacuation
The building fire alarm system will sound when an emergency requires the evacuation of the building. The fire
alarm is automatically activated by smoke and fire detectors located throughout the facility and the building. The
fire alarm can be activated manually as well, by pulling the handle at any one of the pull stations located throughout
the building.
When the fire alarm is activated, the alarm strobe will flash and a very loud klaxon horn will sound. When a fire
alarm sounds, leave immediately. Do not take time to finish your tasks in the lab. Do not take time to remove your
clean room gown or pick up your belongings. Leave the lab and the building through the nearest exit and go to the
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Evacuation Assembly Point (EAP). Only after the Fire or Police Departments declare the scene safe are you allowed
to re-enter the building.
Anyone in the building may call for an evacuation. This is an appropriate response to "an unforeseen event that calls
for immediate action to protect individuals, the environment, or property. Examples of such situations include: fire,
smoke, strong chemical vapors, or large chemical spill. To call an evacuation, pull the fire alarm. This will
immediately notify the Palo Alto Fire Department and the appropriate Stanford University Emergency Response
teams.
All lab members must know with the building exits, the Evacuation Assembly Point, fire alarm pull stations, and fire
extinguishers.
10.2.2 Laboratory Evacuation
Some situations may warrant evacuation of the facility, rather than the whole building. A facility evacuation will be
invoked in situations which are isolated to the facility and do not pose a health or safety risk to building occupants
outside the facility. Such situations may include:

Chemical spill

Unusual odor

Any other situation in which the health or safety of facility occupants may be of concern.
Immediately leave the facility through the change room. Do not take time to finish your tasks in the facility, remove
your clean room gown and meet in the office area for further instructions.
10.2.3 Odors in the Lab
The laboratory should be free of odors with proper use of the benches and disposal procedures. If you smell
something there is either an equipment malfunction or someone has neglected to follow the appropriate procedures.
If you smell something in the lab, notify a staff member. Provide as much information as you can about the location
and possibly identity of the smell.
10.2.4 Lab Fire
Fires in the facility may result from the ignition of a flammable chemical. Ignition of chemical solutions on hot
plates is a major concern of facility fires. If a fire does start, immediately pull the fire alarm and follow the building
evacuation protocol. Report your actions to the Emergency Personnel at the Emergency Gather Point.
10.2.5 Electrical Power Outage



Remain calm. Emergency backup lights should come on within 15 seconds.
When emergency lights come on, immediately leave the building from the nearest exit.
Notify the facility staff
10.2.6 Major Earthquake
In a major earthquake, the greatest hazard you face while in the lab is falling objects. In the event of an earthquake,
take cover in a doorway or under a solid table. After the earthquake, leave the lab and go to the designated assembly
point.
11. Life Threatening Medical Emergency
If a lab member is experiencing a medical difficulty and cannot be easily escorted to the nearby medical service
providers, you should call for emergency medical services. Dial 9-911 to contact the Palo Alto Fire Department.
Follow any instructions the dispatcher gives. Stay on the line until told otherwise.
Do not move the victim unless necessary. Moving an injured person can result in further, more serious injury. Do
not touch the victim, if you suspect electric shock.
11.1 Non-Health Threatening Emergency
A Non-Health Threatening Emergency is "an emergency in which there is not a clear potential for serious injury to
any person. This might include building and facilities problems such as large water leak. If you are unsure whether
an emergency is health-threatening or non health-threatening, assume it is health-threatening.
11.2 Chemical Exposure
In case of exposure to chemicals, promptly flush the affected area with plenty of water. For non-HF containing
solutions, flush for at least 15 minutes.
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If the area of contact is small and on an extremity (i.e., hand), a DI spray gun or sink goose neck at a bench, may serve
as the closest water source. If the area of contact is large or on the body, you must immediately go to the nearest
safety shower. Activate the shower and then remove all your clothing under the shower. Continue flushing the
affected areas with water for at least 15 minutes.
A chemical exposure to the eyes is very serious and may work its way around the eye to damage the optic nerve. If
a chemical is splashed into an eye, immediately begin flushing both eyes with wafer for at least 15 minutes. Both
eyes should be held open with the thumb and forefinger. Continuously roll your eyes up and down, and side to side,
to allow clean water to wash away any chemical that may have gotten behind the eyeball.
All chemical exposures must be reported to the staff. For any significant exposure the lab member should be taken to
the emergency center for evaluation and treatment.
11.3 Reporting Accidents
All injuries must be reported to the Department of Risk Management. Accident forms are available from the facility
staff. See Stanford Environmental Health and Safety Guidelines (Memo 25.6) for information on reporting injuries.
In summary:
An Accident/Incident/Exposure Form SU-17 form must be submitted in the event of injury of any personnel,
Stanford or non-Stanford. This form must be submitted to Risk Management within 24 hours of injury and signed by
the injured party and a facility staff manager.
An Employee’s Claim for Worker’s Compensation Benefits DWC Form-1 form must be submitted in the case of injury of
Stanford personnel. This form must be signed by a University representative/supervisor/administrator and then given or mailed to
the employee within 24 hours of the accident, incident or exposure. The DWC Form-1 and a detailed instruction sheet are
available from Risk Management.
An Employer’s Report of Industrial Injury, Cal-OSHA Form 5020 must be submitted within 24 hours of occurrence
when an industrial injury or occupational disease suffered by a Stanford employee results in:

lost time beyond the day of injury, or

medical treatment by a physician in a clinic, hospital, emergency room, or medical office.
A Worker’s Compensation Lost Time Report, Form SU-16 must be submitted when a Stanford employee has lost
one full day or more following the day of an accident or the first day of a work related illness.
11.3.1 Medical Providers or Work Related Injuries
Non-Life Threatening Work-Related Injuries
Sequoia Occupational Health Hours: Monday – Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm, Saturday 9:00am – 1:00pm.633 Veterans
Blvd. After hours care is available at the Sequoia Hospital Emergency Room, Redwood City, CA 94063 phone (650)
369-5811.
Directions from Stanford: Head North on EL Camino, past Woodside Road, turn right on Brewster Avenue, and then
left on Veterans Blvd.
Life Threatening Emergency Care
For immediate life threatening injuries go to the nearest Emergency facility (eg. Stanford Hospital Emergency room,
phone (650) 723-5111).
12 Alarms
12.1 Fire Alarms
Appearance and location of the alarm beacons:
Fire alarm beacons are located in the lab and throughout (both inside and outside) the building. The beacon is a small,
rectangular, white light, mounted in a bright red frame.
Alarm conditions:
In an alarm situation, the beacon flashes and a very loud klaxon sound. In an alarm condition, all the alarms in the
building should go off.
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Action to be taken under alarm conditions:
Immediately evacuate the facility and the building, going to the designated evacuation point.
For any fire alarm all the building and facility inhabitants must immediately evacuate and go straight to
the designated emergency assembly point.
When evacuating, leave immediately; do not stop to remove your clean room gown or pickup your
belongings. Leave through the nearest "EXIT" door. Do not stop to save your work as any delay
jeopardizes not only your personal safety. On leaving the lab, continue out the building to the
designated assembly point. You must report and remain at the EAP there for further instructions or to
be released.
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13 Appendices
Appendix A: Transporting Chemicals in the Lab
Any solution, whether it is water or chemicals, being transported anywhere in the facility and in the support area for
the facility must be labeled, in a sealed container and double contained. The appropriate Personal Protective
Equipment must be worn whenever handling chemicals.
WARNING: Any lab member failing to strictly adhering to the waste disposal rules, either intentionally or
unintentionally will be denied access to the facility.
Procedures for Brining Chemicals in to the Facility
NOTE: No chemicals are allowed in the gowning room. All chemicals must be brought in through the support
chase.
Before entering the facility:

Verify your chemicals have the appropriate labels

Place your materials in a double containment container.

Place your materials in the appropriate storage cabinet.
Moving Chemicals from the Pass-Through to the Bench:

Verify your chemicals have the appropriate labels

Place your materials in a double containment container.

Move your chemicals to the appropriate storage area of the appropriate bench.
Procedures for Removing Waste:

Procedure for Disposing of Empty Containers

Verify the bottle lid is on tight.

Verify the outside of the bottle is clean and dry.

Place the empty bottle in the storage tray in the support chase.
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