Introduction to Culinary Techniques

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INTRODUCTION TO CULINARY TECHNIQUES
Course Outline
Course Number: 1150100
Winter Semester, 2001
Program: Culinary Management, Semester 1
Sir Sandford Fleming College
Management & Business Studies
Course Format: Lecture / Lab
Hours: 30/45
Faculty: Casey van den Heuvel, Office 642
E-mail address: [email protected]
Approved by:
Office Hours: as posted
Date:
Casey van den Heuvel
Program Co-ordinator
Date:
Derek Scott
Academic Team Leader
Course Description:
In this course students learn basic cooking terminology and basic techniques applied to stocks,
sauces, dressings, farinaceous products and baking. They will be able to undertake safe, sanitary and
correct methods of preparation, cooking and storage of food products in a structured lab setting.
Corequisites: N/A
Prerequisites: N/A
This course contributes to the following learning outcomes or essential knowledge and skills
required by learners as defined by Ministry of Education and Training program standards,
employers, industry and professional organizations.
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Vocational Outcomes:
Provide fundamental culinary planning, preparation, and presentation to a variety of food service
environments.
1.
Apply basic food and bake theories and other related theories to all aspects of food
preparation.
2.
Contribute to the provision of a healthy, safe and well-maintained kitchen environment and
to the service of the food and beverage products that are free from harmful bacteria or other
contaminates.
3.
Apply fundamental nutritional principles to all aspects of food production.
4.
Apply self-management and interpersonal skills to enhance performance as an employee and
team member and to contribute to the success of a food-service operation.
Generic Skills Outcomes:
1.
Locate and select the current, relevant and useful information required to complete the task.
2.
Manage the use of time and other resources to complete the task.
3.
Solve problems, using a variety of strategies.
4.
Interact with others in groups or teams in ways that contribute to effective working
relationships.
5.
Take responsibility for her or his own actions and decisions.
General Education Goal Area:
1. To understand beauty, form, taste and the role of the arts in society.
2. To gain greater self-awareness, intellectual growth, well-being and understanding of others.
Aim:
1. To provide the student with a basic scope of types and means of preparation.
2. To provide a hands-on food preparation experience by applying basic culinary knowledge and
skill to the production process.
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Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate principles of safety, sanitation and hygiene in food preparation
and service areas.
2. List, identify, use, clean and maintain a variety of kitchen equipment.
3. Plan, organize and evaluate food preparation.
4. Develop and demonstrate cooking skills using a variety of cooking methods.
5. Apply basic food theories and other related theories to basic aspects of food preparation
to a variety of food service environments.
Learning Sequence:
Hrs/Wk.
Units/Dates
Topic, resources, learning activities
Week 1
Jan 11
Lab orientation, measurements,
equipment.
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Week 2
Jan 18
Precision cuts
Stocks - chicken & veal
Chapter 3 pgs. 24 - 43
Chapter 8 pgs. 108 - 149
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Thickening agents & Sauces
Chapter 4 pgs. 46 - 61
1 to 5
Week 3
Jan 25
Learning
Outcome
Assessment
Study Guide Assignment
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 4
Feb 1
Sauces & Mother Sauces
& Chapter 7 pgs. 90 - 105
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 5
Feb 8
Soups - Clear
Chapter 9 pgs. 150 - 164
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
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Hrs/Wk.
Units/Dates
Topic, resources, learning activities
Week 6
Feb 15
Soups - Thick
Chapter 5 & 6 pgs. 62 - 89
Learning
Outcome
1 to 5
Assessment
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 7
Feb 22
Vegetables,
Identification & preparation
Chapter 16 pgs. 404 - 425
Chapter 17 pgs. 426 – 495
(Food & Beverage Show
-Tuesday Feb 20 – OPTIONAL)
Week 8
Mar 1
Independent Study Week
Week 9
Mar 8
Potatoes and Starches
Chapters 18 pgs. 460 - 484
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Test # 1
Week 10
Mar 15
FUNCTION - TBA
Chapter 23 pgs. 628 - 668
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 11
Mar 22
Short Order & Sandwich preparation
Chapter 20 pgs. 556 - 565
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 12
Mar 29
Week 13
Apr 5
Breakfast cookery
Chapter 21 pgs. 584 – 599
THE GREAT CREPE RACE
--SPRING SLIZZLE Tues. Feb. 27--
1 to 5
Salads & Salad Dressings
Chapter 19 pgs. 506 - 557
1 to 5
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
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Hrs/Wk.
Units/Dates
Week 14
Apr 12
Topic, resources, learning activities
Pasta & Dumplings
Chapter 1 pgs. 1 - 11
Learning
Outcome
1 to 5
Assessment
Participation &
Lab performance
Study Guide Assignment
Week 15
Apr 19
Test # 2
Test # 2
Learning Resources:
Required:
Professional Cooking, 4th Edition, Gisslen
Professional Cooking, 4th Edition, Gisslen - Study Guide
Professional Cooking, 4th Edition, Gisslen - CD ROM
Canadian Cooking Companion, Wiley
Calculator
Full Chefs uniform – see attached
Knives/Small wares
Pocket Thermometers
References:
Internet/ World Wide Web
ServSafe Workbook - Serving Safe Food, NRA
Food Retail and Foodservice Regulations - CFISIG
Basic Food Preparation, Demo and Labs Manual, O.H.I.
Basic Large Quantity Food Preparation Manual, O.H.I.
New Professional Chef, 5th Edition, Institute of America.
On Cooking, Labensky/Hause
Periodicals
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Assessment Plan:
ITEM
Sous Chef Report &
Presentation 2 @ 5%
Participation
Weekly Assignments
each at 2.5 %
Function
Test # 1 (Mid Term)
Test # 2 (Final)
VALUE IN %
10
20
30
10
15
15
DATE
Ongoing
Ongoing
Weeks 2 to 7
& 9 to14
Week 10
Week 9
Week 15
A student monitor/sous chef will be assigned each week to give 50% of the Lab Performance Grade
of your peers. The instructor will grade the remainder of the mark.
The student monitor/sous chef will also be required to create a one (1) page computer/typed
generated report/summary listing in detail the lab activities for the lab that you were responsible for.
A complete cost card as determined by chef to be presented formally to class the following week.
The report must be E-Mailed to your lab instructor within seven (7) days.
For Lab Performance Evaluation - see Daily Evaluation Form attached.
Prior Learning Assessment:
PLA uses tools to help learners reflect on, identify, articulate and demonstrate past learning which
has been acquired through study, work and other life experiences and which is not recognized
through formal transfer of credit mechanisms.
PLA Assessment Options:
These include authentic assessment activities designed by faculty. Learners may also be encouraged
and supported to design an individual documentation package that would meet the learning
requirements of the course.
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PLA options and contact for this course:
Program Co-ordinator: Casey van den Heuvel, Office 642, ext 1484
E-Mail: [email protected]
Academic Responsibilities:
Mutually, professors and learners will support and adhere to College academic regulations and
student rights and responsibilities. In addition, the following guidelines have been developed to
support the learning process:
Consultation with Course Instructor
Students are encouraged to discuss their professional learning objectives, course content and delivery
with the instructors. They should also feel free to seek clarification or request sources of additional
resource material related to any aspect of the course throughout the sessions. Individual daytime or
office hour appointments can also be made.
Mandatory Requirements
Students must adhere to proper dress code as outlined in the Dress Code Standards - attached. Any
student not properly dressed will not be admitted to class & will be marked absent.
Course Policies
1. A high level of effort and achievement will be required for success in this course. As well,
regular attendance, being on time, participation, mutual support and goodwill are important
ingredients for successful learning. Your successful application of these skills will determine
in part your Performance Evaluation Mark in the course ( 30%)
2. The student is responsible to take all tests, participate in all class activities and hand in all
assignments.
3. Late assignments and missed tests that have not been previously negotiated with the instructor
will be given a grade of zero. Please discuss any deviation from due dates and test date with the
instructor so that arrangements can be made for alternative considerations.
4. All reports must be typed or word-processed unless otherwise stated. In addition, they must be
stapled and clearly labeled with your name(s), the course name and number, the professor’s name
the due date, and the assignment title.
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5. You are expected to do quality work. We are under no obligation to read, assess, or grade poor
quality work. Poor quality work may be returned to students unmarked, or with marks deducted.
(sloppiness, grammatical and spelling errors, incomplete work).
6. Late assignments that have not been previously negotiated with the professor, will be deducted
20% per day (including Saturday and Sunday) up to a maximum of 60%, after which they
will receive a grade of zero. Only a medical certificate or legal document received by the
professor and discussed by the teaching team may allow for other considerations. The teaching
team will make the final decision.
7. Handouts will be distributed during class time. Since students are expected to be present, it
becomes the student’s responsibility to obtain such handouts.
8. The student is responsible for keeping a copy of all submitted work and records of all
marked work. Students should keep returned marked work in case of a dispute. All disputes
will be taken to the teaching team for the final decision.
9. Exemption from the final test ( test #2 ) can be earned by:
*
achieving a minimum 80% on the Performance Evaluation AS WELL AS
*
a minimum overall mark of 75% on all evaluation components to date
The exemption is based on your academic performance up to and including week 12.
The teaching team will handle any discrepancies/disputes.
10. Any student later than ten (10) minutes will be marked absent.
If a student is late due to unforeseen circumstance, you are required to call your instructor at
749-5520 ext. 1484
11. All students are required to stay till the end of class and participate in the clean up process.
12. The lab operates on a clean as you work system. Students are responsible to wash and return
equipment to PROPER storage throughout the lab period.
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CULINARY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Name
Dress
Punctuality
Presentation
Final
/10
/20
Quality
Taste,
Herbs,
etc.
/30
Sanitation
Hygiene
Workmanship
Participation
Total
/20
/20
/100
Comments
Evaluation of practical food lab work is based upon the following:
1.
Ability to dress professionally (cleanliness of uniform and grooming) and punctuality (10%)
2.
The presentation of finished product (20%)
3.
Quality of prepared food is evaluated as follows: (30%)






Taste
Use of herbs and spices
Consistency of prepared foods
Color
Temperature
Yield
4.
Food sanitation and hygiene (20%)
5.
Ability to work independently in an organized fashion. Attitude towards work and fellow
students (20%)
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Dress Code and General Rules for Practical Labs and Demos
In order for our Culinary programs to Maintain the high standards it has become noted for
throughout the region, each student is required to adhere to the following Rules and Regulations.
While on program you will comport yourself in the following fashion:
Hair:
Must be clean, neat and generally well groomed and properly restrained,
all students will wear Chef's hat while in the labs. Men should shave daily; beards
must be neat and trim.
Uniform:
A full, clean chef's uniform will be worn at all times in the lab. Students failing to
comply will be refused admittance to the lab, and a mark of zero will be assigned.
Full Chef's Uniform:
 Pill box style Chef's hat (White with no markings)
 Chefs jacket (White with no coloured buttons, cuffs or
collars. No Logo’s other then a Fleming Logo and your
name must be on left breast panel of jacket)
 Chef's pants (checkered)
 White necktie
 Apron
 Side towels (three)
 Pocket Thermometer
 Appropriate Footwear (see Footwear)
Footwear:
Safe, comfortable leather (leather type) shoes with approved non-slip rubber soles
must be worn. Street shoes (shoes worn outside of the college or work place) sandals
or clogs are not allowed in any lab situation.
Jewelry
No hair ornaments, earrings or facial jewelry to be worn in labs. No rings (except
wedding band), chains, bracelets, etc. are allowed.
Hands and nails:
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Hands must be washed; nails must be trimmed, clean and free of polish while
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working with food.
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