Sample General Education Student Learning Objectives:

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Sample General Education Student Learning Objectives:
Wright State University
General Education Learning Objectives
(Approved: Faculty Senate May1, 2000)
Program Learning Objectives
The General Education Program is broadly based in order to promote intellectual growth, cultivate
critical examination and informed understanding, encourage breadth and flexibility of perspective,
and provide students an opportunity to develop skills and knowledge that will form the basis for
their life-long learning. Accordingly, the General Education program at Wright State University is a
planned and coherent program that is designed to help students:



sharpen critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills;
learn about the aesthetic, ethical, moral, social, and cultural dimensions of
human experience needed for participation in the human community;
increase knowledge and understanding of the past, of the world in which we live,
and of how both past and present have an impact on the future.
The General Education Program is required of all students and serves as a foundation upon
which all baccalaureate programs are built.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the Wright State University General Education
Program a student will be able to do the following:
Area Learning Objectives
Area
I. Communication and
Mathematical Skills
Learning Objectives
a. use writing processes to explore, think, and
learn, and to write appropriately for various
tasks and audiences
English Composition
Mathematics
b. develop logical and fair arguments, and
observe appropriate writing conventions
c. show ability to identify main ideas and
evaluate, analyze and synthesize primary and
secondary sources
d. use, formulate and interpret mathematical
models
II. Cultural-Social Foundations
e. summarize and justify analyses of
mathematical models or problems using
appropriate words, symbols, tables and/or
graphs
a. describe and analyze historical-social
elements of western culture
History
The Non-Western World
b. describe and analyze historical-social
elements of nonwestern culture
III. Human Behavior
Economics
c. describe and analyze the global
interdependence of groups and of individuals
a. use multiple approaches/perspectives to
systematically analyze complex individual and
institutional behavior culturally, subculturally,
and/or crossculturally
Political Science
Psychology
b. recognize appropriate ethical uses of social
scientific knowledge
Sociology
IV. Human Expression
Great Books
a. recognize and critically discuss significant
creative, philosophical and religious works
Fine and Performing Arts
V. Natural Science
b. understand the complex blend of personal
vision, social-cultural background, ethical values
and aesthetic judgement in such works
c. discuss the diverse means of communication
in such works
a. understand the experimental basis of
scientific inquiry
Biology
Chemistry
Geology
b. understand the importance of model building
for understanding the natural world
c. understand the theoretical, practical, creative
and cultural dimensions of scientific inquiry
Physics
d. discuss some of the fundamental theories
underlying modern science
e. understand the dynamic interaction between
society and the scientific enterprise
f. recognize appropriate ethical uses of
knowledge in the natural sciences
VI. College Component
a. communicate with individuals who are in the
student’s major, in allied fields, and nonspecialists
b. understand important relationships and
interdependencies between the student’s major
and other academic disciplines, world events or
life endeavors
Or
c. additionally meet the objectives of Area I, II,
III, IV, or V.
California Maritime Academy (check goals and breadth requirements)
Goals:
The General Studies Department has two goals:
1. to provide students with a foundation of skills that will be applied in their major
fields;
2. to provide instructional depth and breadth to ensure that graduates will have a
well-rounded knowledge in the liberal arts (math, science, the social sciences, and
the humanities).
Overview of Mission:
The General Studies program lays the basic foundation for advanced studies in the major
fields. In General Studies courses, students develop skills in oral and written communication, computation and measurement, critical thinking, aesthetic analysis, scientific
reasoning, and information competence. In addition, students gain the background
knowledge necessary for them to become effective thinkers and leaders.
The focus of the General Studies program is intellectual learning: i.e., the acquisition of
basic knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge in new situations. One who has
mastered such learning will have progressed beyond a mere absorption of facts and be
able to analyze data, identify key issues, evaluate alternatives, solve problems, and apply
old solutions to new scenarios. Ultimately, such a thinker will have internalized the
conceptual framework of a field and be able to construct new meaning within that field.
CSU General Education Breadth Requirements, as Quoted:
"The purpose of the breadth requirements is to provide means whereby graduates:
(a) will have achieved the ability to think clearly and logically, to find and critically
examine information, to communicate orally and in writing, and to perform quantitative
functions;
(b) will have acquired appreciable knowledge about their own bodies and minds, about
how human society has developed and how it now functions, about the physical world in
which they live, about the other forms of life with which they share the world, and about
the cultural endeavors and legacies of their civilizations;
(c) will have come to an understanding and appreciation of the principles, methodologies,
value systems, and thought processes employed in human inquiries."
Information Competence as defined by the CSU
"In order to be able to find, evaluate, use, communicate, and appreciate information in all
its various forms, students must be able to demonstrate the following skills:
1. Formulate and state a research question, problem, or issue. ...
2. Determine the information requirements for a research question, problem or issue in
order to formulate a search strategy that will use a variety of resources.
3. Locate and retrieve relevant information, in all its various formats, using, when
appropriate, technological tools.
4. Organize information in a manner that permits analysis, evaluation, synthesis and
understanding.
5. Create and communicate information effectively using various media.
6. Understand the ethical, legal, and socio-political issues surrounding information.
7. Understand the techniques, points of view and practices employed in the presentation
0£ information from all sources."
Seminole State College (interesting embedded system)
Challenge One: Seminole State College needs to identify goals, objectives and
learning outcomes that are measurable and publicly stated for all of its courses and
academic programs.
Response: Challenge One
This section of the report discusses how goals, objectives, and learning outcomes
were identified by SSC and incorporated into comprehensive and thorough revisions of
all course syllabi. Each revised syllabus reflected the inclusion of a course-embedded
process of assessment. Course-embedded assessment is a direct assessment measure of
student learning that the College supplements with the Educational Testing Service
Academic Profile Test and Transfer Data Performance Indicator Reports. Through the
syllabi and other campus documents, such as course and division assessment reports, the
directly-measured goals, objectives, and learning outcomes are publicly stated and widely
dispersed across the campus community.
The College now maintains eight general education student expectations. Each supports
the mission of the College. Each department/division has a set of two to twelve
departmental learner outcomes that support the general
education student expectations. Each course has a list of specific expected learner
outcomes and with enabling objectives to assist students in achieving those outcomes;
both reflect the departmental learner outcomes as well as the general education student
expectations. Each level of publicly-stated goals, objectives, and learning outcomes
specific to a course are directly measured through the course-embedded assessment
process (Appendices C, D, E, and F).
Evolution of Assessment of Student Learning at Seminole State College
SSC’s use of course-embedded assessment evolved from the College's 1991
Assessment Plan, cited by HLC/NCA as “exemplary.” At that time, the College
established a committee to write a formal assessment plan for the institution. The
committee chose the course-embedded assessment approach after a series of
conversations with faculty members and administrators, and after obtaining further
information at various conferences. Two major factors in that decision were: 1)
recognition that each course includes foundational knowledge which consists of
sequential knowledge and/or skills, and 2) the importance of faculty ownership of the
assessment process. To ensure faculty ownership, the committee asked faculty members
to base their course-embedded assessment tools on this foundational knowledge. Courseembedded assessment enables faculty members to affix and measure direct learning
objectives at every course, department/discipline, general education, and program level.
In addition, this approach guarantees findings and outcomes that are mission related and
academic oriented. Subsequently, faculty-written course-embedded assessment became a
part of the College's overall 1991 Assessment Plan, adopted in 1992.
Revitalization of the College’s original assessment plan of 1991 began with the
creation of a new Assessment of Student Learning Committee in 1999. The committee’s
initial duties included meeting the HLC/NCA challenges to the College’s assessment of
student learning outcomes by encouraging faculty members to identify goals, objectives,
and learning outcomes that are measurable and publicly stated for all of their courses and
the College’s academic programs.
The Assessment of Student Learning Committee represents the entire college
community. The faculty members of this committee serve on a two-year rotation basis
and represent all six divisions. Other committee positions include standing positions for
the president of the Faculty Senate; two student government representatives; the Vice
President for Student Affairs; SSC's HLC/NCA Consultant Evaluator faculty member;
and a member of the professional staff. The Assessment of Student Learning Coordinator
and the Vice President for Academic Affairs are chair and co-chair, respectively. All
meetings are public and open to faculty members, students, and staff. The College's
budget is supportive of the work of this body. Through the leadership of these committee
members, faculty members began the revitalized college-wide Course-Embedded
Assessment Program (Appendix G).
Faculty members have worked continuously to develop course-embedded
assessment instructments that offer several options to accommodate various educational
goals and learning approaches. Assessment options include: pre- and post-tests; pre- and
post-writing assignments; pre- and post-performance tests; reading assignments; creative
assignments; and testing and writing assignments. The vast majority of faculty members
typically administer test options at the beginning of a course to gauge entering
knowledge, as well as later in the semester to measure learning progress, while others
intersperse assessment measurements as they introduce new concepts throughout the
semester.
To further refine the process and to respond to HLC/NCA's concerns, the
Assessment of Student Learning Committee recommended the College undertake a series
of steps to aid faculty members in further development and refinement of workable
course-embedded assessment tools. To aid faculty members in implementing an effective
college-wide assessment plan, the College invited experts in student assessment to the
campus for faculty in-service workshops. Dr. Jim Fulcher, Chair of the Humanities
Division of Lincoln College, Lincoln, IL, and Consultant for HLC/NCA, held a workshop
in August of 2000 on the importance and uses of assessment. Upon the recommendation
of Dr. Cecilia Lopez, NCA liaison to SSC, in February 2001, the College invited Sally
Wallace and Mary Emmons from Parkland Community College, to visit the campus for a
workshop on ways to implement effective assessment. The visiting colleagues identified
avenues for making changes based on assessment and reviewed the intricacies of writing
enabling objectives for student learning. To further broaden the experience and
knowledge of the faculty concerning assessment, the administration sent several faculty
members to HLC/NCA meetings. These steps helped the College redesign and implement
improvements to the College’s assessment plan as recommended by the 2000 HLC/NCA
site visit team.
During ensuing faculty-driven assessment workshops, faculty members realized
the importance of linking the College’s Mission Statement to general education student
expectations, departmental learner outcomes, expected learner outcomes, enabling
objectives. Faculty members then embarked upon the demanding yet rewarding task of
rewriting their Course and Common Student Syllabi in a college-wide standardized
format
that
included
these essential linkages
(Resource 1 and 2 as
listed in Appendix A).
In this intensive,
year-long process, the
faculty also undertook
the development of the
various
measurable
levels of assessment of
student learning which they integrated into the course-embedded assessment process and
publicly stated in their syllabi. First, they developed measurable departmental learner
outcomes based on SSC’s Mission Statement. From the departmental learner outcomes,
faculty next developed for each course a set of measurable expected learner outcomes
and a set of measurable enabling objectives. These three levels of measurable objectives
tie to measurable campus-wide general education student expectations. The course
syllabi and the General Education Program Outcomes Course Matrix of all courses note
these relationships. The matrix comprehensively demonstrates how each course is linked
to each of the College’s eight general education student expectations, all of which are tied
to the College’s Mission Statement. This closes the loop from the College Mission
Statement to the department learner outcomes, the expected learner outcomes, the
enabling objectives, and the general education student expectations. The benefits of these
exercises rejuvenated the campus assessment program and strengthened the culture of
assessing student learning (Resource 3 as listed in Appendix A).
The revitalized assessment process is both fluid and dynamic. As the foundation of the
College’s assessment program, course-embedded assessment provides the consistent
basis by which faculty members assess not only their course, but also the academic
programs in which they teach as well as their general education classes. Other measures,
both direct and indirect, round out and help triangulate the assessment process, yet
course-embedded assessment is the critical measurable building block for the entire
process. Furthermore, faculty members continue to make improvements to their courseembedded evaluation options by refining these tools to better evaluate objectives and
outcomes.
For instance, during fall 2002, faculty members in the College's six academic
divisions evaluated student learning of thousands of students as part of the institution's
Course-Embedded Assessment Program. In reporting results of teaching effectiveness,
faculty members reported evidence of increases in student learning. Faculty members
also included examples of a variety of ways they intended to utilize the information
gathered to further improve student learning. The Math, Science and Engineering
Division, for example, inaugurated new teaching methods such as adopting computerized
tutorials and internet sites to facilitate learning of difficult math concepts. Faulty
members also spent more time reviewing previously introduced math topics. Faculty
members in the Language Arts and Humanities Division, campus leaders in developing
rubrics for evaluation purposes, made two essential changes based on what they learned-a series of rubrics to evaluate students in Art Studio courses and a unified curriculum in
the Principles of English Composition I and II classes.
The entire assessment process also provides an opportunity for faculty members
to discuss ideas and report needs revealed by the assessment process. A rich informal
communication network has developed across campus. Division Chair Council and
Administrative Council meetings, memos, and conversations among members of the
campus community facilitate discussion of the College’s ongoing, open and public
process of student learning assessment. Faculty members often include their cumulative
ideas in Division Goals and Objectives reports. This dynamic process has made the
information from the Course-Embedded Assessment Program more meaningful and has
led to more faculty ownership of the process.
Response One: Conclusion
Based on a strong foundation of a fully developed Course-Embedded Assessment
Program, the College's assessment approach is a dynamic one that is flexible enough to
be useful yet standardized enough to encompass the mission of the College. CourseEmbedded Assessment also gives faculty members a feedback mechanism to fine-tune
both the curriculum and the assesment process itself on a semester-by-semester basis.
The College’s Course-Embedded Assessment Program, which now contains measurable
and publicly stated goals, objectives, and learning outcomes for all of the College’s
courses and academic programs, is used as a basis for measuring learning outcomes not
only in courses but also across all academic programs.
Mesa Community College
What
are
the
student
learning
outcomes
for
general
education?
Communication
1. Write a clear, well-organized paper using documentation and quantitative
tools when appropriate.
2. Construct and deliver a clear, well-organized, verbal presentation.
Numeracy
1. Identify and extract relevant data from given mathematical situations.
2. Select known models or develop appropriate models that organize the
data into tables or spreadsheets, graphical representations, symbolic/
equation format.
3. Obtain correct mathematical results and state those results with the
qualifiers.
4. Use the results.
Problem Solving/Critical Thinking
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Identify a problem or argument.
Isolate facts related to the problem.
Differentiate facts from opinions or emotional responses.
Ascertain the author's conclusion.
Generate multiple solutions to the problem.
Predict consequences.
Use evidence or sound reasoning to justify a position.
Scientific
Inquiry
Demonstrate scientific inquiry skills related to:
1. Hypothesis: Distinguish between possible and improbable or impossible
reasons for a problem.
2. Prediction: Distinguish between predictions that are logical or not logical
based upon a problem presented.
3. Assumption: Recognize justifiable and necessary assumptions based on
information presented.
4. Interpretation: Weigh evidence and decide if generalizations or
conclusions based upon given data are warranted.
5. Evaluation: Distinguish between probable and improbable causes,
possible and impossible reasons, and effective and ineffective action
based on information presented.
Arts and Humanities
1. Demonstrate knowledge of human creations.
2. Demonstrate an awareness that different contexts and/or world views
produce different human creations.
3. Demonstrate an understanding and awareness of the impact that a piece
(artifact) has on the relationship and perspective of the audience.
4. Demonstrate an ability to evaluate human creations.
Information Literacy
1. Given a problem, define specific information needed to solve the problem
or answer the question.
2. Locate appropriate and relevant information to match informational needs.
3. Identify and use appropriate print and/or electronic information sources.
4. Evaluate information for currency, relevancy, and reliability.
5. Use information effectively.
Cultural Diversity
1. Identify and explain diverse cultural customs, beliefs, traditions, and
lifestyles.
2. Identify and explain major cultural, historical and geographical issues that
shape our perceptions.
3. Identify and explain social forces that can effect cultural change.
4. Identify biases, assumptions, and prejudices in multicultural interactions.
5. Identify ideologies, practices, and contributions that persons of diverse
backgrounds bring to our multicultural world.
Arizona Western College
AWC General Education Outcomes
The Assessment Committee has chosen the four outcomes areas below
as the initial focus for assessment of student learning outcomes in
general education.
General Education: Communication
Intended Student Learning Outcomes
1. Learners provide writing that provides a clear, specific thesis and
awareness of audience; fully develops examples to support thesis
in logical, coherent manner; demonstrates original thinking, depth
of analysis, and comprehension of material used; and that shows
high proficiency in standard English grammar, spelling, and
punctuation.
General Education: Critical Thinking
Intended Student Learning Outcomes
1. Learners will demonstrate the ability to take charge of their own
thinking.
2. Learners will demonstrate an intellectually disciplined process of
actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing,
synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or
generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or
communication, as a guide to belief and action.
General Education: Quantitative Analysis
Intended Student Learning Outcomes
1. Identify and extract relevant data from given mathematical or
contextual situations.
2. Select known models or develop appropriate models that organize
the data into:
a. tables or spreadsheets (with or without technology); or
b. graphical representations (with or without technology); or
c. symbolic/equation format.
3. Obtain correct mathematical results and state those results with
the qualifiers.
4. Use the results to:
a. determine whether they are realistic in terms of the original
situation;
or
b. determine whether the mathematical model/representation
of data was
appropriate; or
c. describe a trend in a table, graph, or formula and make
predications
based on trends; or
d. draw qualitative conclusions in written form.
General Education: Technology Applications
Intended Student Learning Outcomes
1. Learners will demonstrate a working knowledge of computer
basics by opening and closing a program; by creating, saving,
printing, finding, renaming, copying, moving and deleting files.
2. Learners will perform basic word processing operations including
document creation, editing, formatting, printing, saving and
retrieving a document.
3. Learners will perform basic spreadsheet operations including
creating, editing, formatting, printing, saving and retrieving a
worksheet including the use of formulas, simple functions, and the
copy command.
4. Learners will demonstrate the ability to use the Internet in order to
access information resources, evaluate their credibility, and apply
them.
5. Learners will demonstrate the ability to send and receive E-mail
including attachments.
The assessment of student performance in general education courses helps us determine
what our students already know, don.t yet know, and need to know in order to succeed
here, at institutions of transfer, and in their careers.
The assessment reports that AWC generates not only help us identify what is being
learned but also enable us to make recommendations for improvements to our general
education curriculum and to programs which will, in turn, increase the level of student
performance in general education.
Responsibility for assessing the learning outcomes for general education belongs
to the assessment committee. Initial areas to be assessed include
communication, quantitative, critical thinking, and technology applications
literacy. Competencies to be assessed and/or assessment instruments may be
expanded or modified for subsequent cycles as the committee sees fit. Both
direct and indirect indicators are used. Results and analysis of evaluations will be
posted on the assessment website and distributed by email attachments.
Buffalo State University (also note assessment plan for gen ed)
General Education Assessment
The purpose of student outcomes assessment is to
provide useful and timely information about student
achievement as it relates to the institution’s academic
goals. Buffalo State aspires to excellence in teaching
and learning and scholarship, cultural enrichment and
service and therefore has established the following
priorities which reflect our values:
o
To promote success in teaching and
learning both within and beyond the
classroom
o
To
maintain
a
nurturing
intellectually vital environment
o
To recruit and retain a diverse
population of students, faculty and
staff
and
Information obtained through assessment activities is
used to determine how well we are achieving out goals
and to identify areas that we can improve.
BSC seeks to provide an outstanding general education
program that has clearly defined learning goals and
objectives.
The
following
assessment
plan
incorporates student learning in twelve areas:
o
Mathematics
o
Natural Sciences
o
Social Sciences
o
American History
o
Western Civilization
o
Other World Civilizations
o
Humanities
o
The Arts
o
Foreign Language
o
Basic Communication
o
Critical Thinking
o
Information Management
BSC graduates will demonstrate competency in these
areas through assessment of the following learning
outcomes:

Mathematics: quantitative reasoning skills:
arithmetic, algebra; geometry; data analysis;
and quantitative reasoning

Natural Sciences: understanding the methods
scientists use to explore natural phenomena,
including
observation,
hypothesis
development,
measurement
and
data
collection, experimentation, evaluation of
evidence and employment of mathematical
analysis and application of scientific data,
concepts and models in one of the natural
sciences

Social Sciences: understanding of the methods
social scientists use to explore social
phenomena, including observation, hypothesis
development, measurement and data

American History: knowledge of a basic
narrative of American history: political,
economic, social and cultural, including
knowledge of unity and diversity in American
society; knowledge of common institutions in
American society and how they have affected
different groups; and understanding of
America’s evolving relationship with the rest of
the world.

Western Civilization:
knowledge of the
development of the distinctive features of the
history,
institutions,
economy,
society,
cultural, etc., of Western civilization and
relating the development of Western
civilization to that of other regions of the
world

Other World Civilizations: knowledge of either
a broad outline of world history or the
distinctive features of the history, institutions,
economy, society, culture, etc., of one nonWestern civilization

Humanities: knowledge of the conventions and
methods of at least one of the humanities in
addition to those encompassed by other
knowledge areas required by the General
Education program

The Arts: understanding of at least one
principal form of artistic expression and the
creative process inherent therein

Foreign Language: basic proficiency in the
understanding and use of a foreign language
and knowledge of the distinctive features of
culture(s) associated with the language they
are studying

Basic Communication: producing coherent
tests within common college-level written
forms, revising and improving such texts,
researching a topic, developing an argument
and organizing supporting details; developing
proficiency in oral discourse and evaluating an
oral presentation according to established
criteria

Critical Thinking: identify, analyze and
evaluate arguments as they occur in their own
or other’s work and develop well-reasoned
arguments

Information Management: perform the basic
operations of personal computer use,
understand and use basic research techniques
and
locate,
evaluate
and
synthesize
information from a variety of sources
A complete cycle of assessment will occur every three
years according to the following schedule:
2002-2003: Mathematics, Basic
Foreign Language, American History
Communication,
2003-2004: Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Critical
Thinking, Information Management
2004-2005:
Western Civilization,
Civilizations, Humanities, Arts
Overall, general
assessment:
education
Other
learning
World
outcomes
1. will take place within general education
courses. This approach was adopted for
several reasons:
2. The expected student response rate will be
significantly higher when assessment occurs
naturally within the context of a course.
3. It eliminates the problem of determining which
students are transfers who may not have taken
their general education coursework at Buffalo
State ( and therefore should be assessed at the
school where they did complete general
education) and which are natives.
4. This assessment plan targets only students
completing general education coursework at
Buffalo State.
5. It eliminates the problem of time away from
the subject affecting the results. If the
assessments were given at one set time for all
students, some would have taken the subject
matter recently and some would have taken it
years before. It can be reasonably anticipated
that this would yield inconsistent results.
6. will take place at different times in students’
progress to graduation. Buffalo State students
tend to weave general education courses
throughout their time here so there is no one
point to effectively measure learning outcomes
for everyone. Embedding assessment in
general education courses as they are taken is
much more effective.
7. will reflect the distribution requirements in
the areas identified. Therefore, one size does
not fit all. Some courses have enrollments of
90 and above and some have enrollments of 25
– 35; some courses are 100 level and some are
300 level. Flexibility is necessary. For
example, it may be desirable and necessary to
assess using different methods within one of
these areas.
Courses vary greatly by
enrollment, so multiple choice instruments
may be necessitated in large classes and
written instruments may be used in smaller
classes. In 100 level courses there may be
more reliance on objective testing than there
is in 300 level courses, etc.
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
General Education Student Learning Outcomes
All UW-Green Bay graduates should know and . . .
1. Have the ability to communicate effectively through listening, speaking,
reading, writing, and the use of computers.
2. Have the ability to think critically.
3. Have the ability to exercise problem-solving skills - such as problem
identification and analysis, and solution formulation, implementation, and
assessment - using an integrated, interdisciplinary approach.
4. Have a fundamental understanding of the Humanities including the
significance and chronology of major events and movements in Western
civilization.
5. Have a fundamental understanding of the Humanities, including a range of
literature, representative of different literary forms and historical contexts.
6. Have a fundamental understanding of the Humanities, including the role of
the humanities in identifying and clarifying individual and social values in a
culture and understanding the implications of decisions made on the basis
of those values.
7. Have a fundamental understanding of the Natural Sciences, including
major concepts, principles, and theories of the biological and physical
environment.
8. Have a fundamental understanding of the Natural Sciences, including the
impact of scientific and technological activities and products on
individuals, society, and the environment.
9. Have a fundamental understanding of the Social Sciences, including major
concepts of social, political, geographic, and economic structures.
10. Have a fundamental understanding of the Social Sciences, including the
impact that social institutions and values have on individuals and groups in
a culture.
11. Have a fundamental understanding of one or more of the fine arts,
including an understanding of the nature and functions of art and ways of
evaluating art.
12. Have a fundamental understanding of contemporary global issues and
problems related to multiculturalism and ethnocentrism, through the study
of beliefs, values, and ways of life in a country other than the United
States.
13. Have a fundamental understanding of the causes and effects of
stereotyping and racism, and an appreciation of cultural diversity within
the United States.
Oakland University (note categorization)
C. General Education Learning Outcomes
The description of the learning outcomes below provides detail for the titles given in the matrix above.
These learning outcomes are not the same as course objectives. No doubt, courses or modules would
have many other objectives in addition. Nor are these learning outcomes specific to an individual
course.
Skills
1. CRITICAL THINKING
o Problem-solving
o Quantitative skills
o Qualitative skills
o Planning skills
o Assessment/Evaluation skills
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to effectively engage in skills necessary for:
o
Problem-solving including: define terms precisely, generate and organize ideas and
hypotheses, develop and evaluate evidence and arguments, detect errors, biases and
fallacies in their own arguments and in those of others, apply knowledge to new
situations, use conceptual information specific to the subject area to propose solutions
to theoretical and actual real life problems in the home, family, and workplace
o Quantitative reasoning: perform basic analytic functions such as categorizing
information, distinguish between relevant and irrelevant data, predict outcomes of
situations from analysis of information
o Qualitative reasoning: explore issues from multiple perspectives, identify and question
assumptions, synthesize knowledge from divergent sources and viewpoints
o Planning: Formulate long and short term goals, prioritize tasks in completion of a
project, and create strategies for achieving goals
o Assessment/evaluation skills: formulate an opinion and defend it, identify essential
attributes for conducting formative and summative evaluations, evaluate the credibility
of information sources including the Internet
2. TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
o Retrieving/Creating Information
o Organizing/Analyzing Information
o Disseminating/Communicating Information
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to effectively:
o
Retrieve/Create Information: Demonstrate ability to access, evaluate the quality of, and
use electronic information resources such as library databases, use technology to
access and retrieve information from numerous sources including the Internet, exhibit
functional mastery of at least one computer operating system, exhibit ability to use
document preparation programs (word processing) to prepare, edit, and manipulate
text
o Organize/Analyze Information: Represent and manipulate data in tabular and various
visual forms such as graphs, exhibit proficiency in using spread sheets and statistical
software
o Disseminate/Communicate Information: Communicate electronically using various
media and multimedia tools (such as audio, video, local and wide area networks, and
Internet), demonstrate ability to contribute to the electronic information environment
(e.g., create a homepage and website), demonstrate mastery of presentation software
3. COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Conveying Information: Writing and Speaking Skills
Receiving Information: Active Listening and Critical Reading Skills
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to demonstrate effective:
o
Writing Skills: Compose a variety of types of writing for different purposes and
audiences; demonstrate the ability to adopt the appropriate tone, voice, and level of
formality for each audience/genre; organize select, and relate ideas in written form;
integrate the knowledge acquired in writing for general education purposes into writing
skills in the student’s chosen major and demonstrate discipline-specific writing skills;
illustrate ability to quote, paraphrase, summarize accurately, and cite sources
appropriately; demonstrate control of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling;
writing should include not only papers but a wide variety of everyday writing examples
including development of an effective resume
o Speaking Skills: Advocate and defend a position orally; select speaking topics
appropriate to an audience, determine the appropriate general and specific purpose of
an oral presentation; organize, arrange, rehearse, and deliver an effective
presentation, be able to communicate effectively with respect, compassion, and
understanding with those who have different opinions and life experiences, and with
those who do not speak English well; understand how differences in race, ethnicity,
and gender, and context can present communication challenges; develop capacity to
respond and extend information in response to controversy; familiarity using a wide
range of media to communicate effectively; exhibit speaking skills in a number of
settings including everyday examples such as a job interview
o Active Listening Skills: Ability to differentiate between hearing and listening (actively
decoding and interpreting a message), recall factual information and draw accurate
conclusions and inferences from a verbal message and its context; ability to identify
personal listening style (e.g., people with results style need to hear the bottom line,
reasons style listeners want to know the rationale, process style listeners like to
discuss issues in detail and learn background); practice the principles of active
listening and receiving speaker’s message
o Critical Reading Skills: Identify both stated and implied main ideas; define the
relationships between main ideas and supporting ideas; recognize the organizational
structure of written material; paraphrase ideas fairly; distinguish between fact and
opinion; make appropriate inferences; accurately describe the author’s purpose and
tone; value reading as a source of lifelong learning and recreational enjoyment;
successfully apply critical reading skills to a wide range of materials; comprehend,
apply, synthesize, evaluate, form opinions, and make appropriate decisions based on
written text
4. TEAMWORK
o Team Leadership
o Interdependence
o Setting and Achieving Common Goals
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to demonstrate effective:
o
Team Leadership: exhibit the shift from directing to facilitating team process; recognize
the stages of team development ; define team member roles, identify personal
leadership style; demonstrate effective conflict management and ability to assess
project process and outcomes
o
o
o
Interdependence: exhibit the skills of collaboration, negotiation, effective interaction
and conflict management; respect contributions of all team members; understand the
importance of interconnected responsibilities, recognize barriers to team effectiveness,
be cognizant and respectful of the role of race, gender, and ethnicity in team
situations, be able to draw upon advantages of diverse membership in working toward
common goals; experience team-work on projects where members are separated by
time and/or distance; demonstrate ability to effectively select and evaluate team
membership/personnel for a project
Setting and Achieving Common Goals: Exhibit skills of group project planning, team
process assessment, team decision-making and problem-solving
Task Completion Discrimination: Appropriately determine whether a team-based or
individual approach to work is most effective based on the task; recognize the
contribution of independent work to team accomplishment
Values
1. INDIVIDUAL VALUES
o Personal Values
o Academic Values
Learning Outcomes
General Education fosters a willingness to confront and reflect upon one’s values. After
completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will
demonstrate the attitudes and values that encourage the overall personal and intellectual
development of an educated individual including:
o
Personal Values :
 Identify personal values, their origins, development, and differences from the
value systems of others
 Reflect on and describe the impact of one’s personal values on others
 Practice high standards of ethical conduct
 Demonstrate an understanding of professional and work ethics
 Make thoughtful choices in personal lifestyle and evaluate the consequences
of those choices
o Academic Values:
 Practice and uphold standards of academic integrity and intellectual honesty
 Approach learning as a lifelong process
 Demonstrate an open outlook, intellectual curiosity, and receptivity to new
knowledge
 Demonstrate the capacity to reflect on and appreciate diverse disciplinary and
interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches to knowledge
2. COMMUNITY VALUES
o Civic Values
o Interpersonal Values
Learning Outcomes
Community values demonstrate an awareness of needs that transcend the interests of the
individual and family, and demonstrate an understanding of how the needs of larger groups
relate to those of the individual. After completing the General Education requirements at
Oakland University, a student will demonstrate community values including:
o
Civic Values:
 Identify the responsibilities of citizens in a democratic society
 Participate in the democratic process
 Demonstrate sensitivity to the inequities in American society
 Demonstrate awareness of current issues and challenges in American society
o Interpersonal Values
 Appreciate ethnic diversity
 Develop a sense of community and belonging
 Practice and appreciate civility
 Challenge assumptions and connect with others different from oneself in an
atmosphere of positive engagement
 Demonstrate respect for and ability to work with individuals who have values
and beliefs that differ from one’s own
 Develop empathy toward the situations of others
3. GLOBAL VALUES
o Cross-cultural Values
o Environmental Values
Learning Outcomes
General Education at Oakland University fosters respect for human difference and for
ecological harmony in our global environment. After completing the General Education
requirements, a student will demonstrate global values including:
o
o
Cross-cultural Values:
 Appreciate multiculturalism
 Demonstrate a heightened awareness of and sensitivity to the cultural, social,
ethnic, and spiritual backgrounds of persons from other countries
 Identify and respect positive aspects of political, economic, social and cultural
systems in other countries
 Demonstrate an attitude of compassion toward people affected by events
occurring in other parts of the world
Environmental Values:
 Recognize the impact of local practices on the global environment and value
efforts to minimize the negative effects of local actions on the world’s natural
environment
 Appreciate the importance of preserving our ecological environment through
self-sustaining and self-renewing practices
 Appreciate the importance of balancing human needs with the limitations of
world resources
Knowledge
1. FOUNDATION
Module 1: Fundamentals of Written Expression Learning Outcomes:
Before completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
Identify the best methods for generating and organizing ideas in written form
Know the elements of effective expository prose
Demonstrate how the writing process is applied effectively in multiple contexts
2. GLOBALIZATION AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIETY
Module 2: Impact of the Past and Its Relation to the Present
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
Discuss how historical cultural developments influence the present-day world and
shape relations between nation-states on a global basis
Describe how world civilizations evolved
Identify how the differing world views of modern political entities have been shaped by
the past
Module 3: International Perspective and US Issues of Gender, Race and Ethnicity
Global perspective
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
o
Discuss global perspective as an emerging confluence of social, political, economic,
technological, and intellectual thinking
Describe the role of the individual in shaping globalization
Discuss how global awareness can provide a richness of opportunity and experience
Explain the intellectual and economic value of personal international experience
Explain the impact of globalization on one’s profession and academic major
Impact of gender race and ethnicity on modern society
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Appreciate the diversity of politics, language, and culture across the globe
Explain how diversity shapes different value systems and societal structures
Demonstrate geographic knowledge of major nations, world regions, and the
distribution of ethno-linguistic and racial groups
Identify major civilizations associated with different world areas
Correlate national and regional areas with major environmental zones and natural
resources
Identify contributions to global society of non-American cultures
Discuss the power of patriarchal patterns in world societies and the impact on
women’s status
Identify the origins of ideas on racial and social inequality
Demonstrate knowledge of major US racial, ethnic, and religious groups and their
contributions to American society
Identify major challenges and issues of race, gender and ethnicity in the United States
and potential solutions
Module 4: Language and Culture
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
Describe the nature of human language and its importance to cultural development
Contrast the sounds, structure, vocabulary, history, and cultural underpinnings of two
or more different languages
3. THE SELF IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
Module 5: The Relationship of the Individual to Society and Culture
Society and the individual
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
Describe elements of human social organization
Identify current theories pertaining to modern society and the individual
Understanding one’s self in a cultural context
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
Recognize the self as a product of a particular cultural context and civilization
Describe how major intellectual, political, economic, spiritual, artistic and technological
influences have shaped our modern world and have influenced the relationship
between the individual and his/her culture
Identify the relationship between one’s culture and the development of personal belief
systems
Discuss the role of the media in shaping and reflecting culture
Module 6: Politics, Economics and Responsibility in a Democracy
Political systems and economic environments
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
Describe the basic features of political systems
Discuss the roles of major international economic and political organizations
o
o
o
Describe the system of government in the US
Demonstrate knowledge of political institutions and traditions that differ from the US
Demonstrate knowledge of the U.S. economy and markets, and how its traditions differ
from other economies.
Individual responsibility in a democracy
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
Demonstrate civic responsibility toward one’s local community and society at large
Explain the individual’s role in the democratic process
Identify the fundamental elements of citizenship within the US political system
Contrast how citizenship within the US political system differs from other political
systems
o Demonstrate the nature of civilized discourse/debate and how to develop arguments
from a variety of perspectives
o Appreciate the importance of a personal code of ethics to the development of a civil
society
4. INQUIRY: THE CREATION OF KNOWLEDGE AND MEANING
o
o
o
o
Module 7: Inquiry and the Creation of Meaning
Disciplinary methods of inquiry
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
Compare methods of inquiry in the social sciences, humanities, sciences, and
professional fields
Discuss the philosophical underpinnings of methods of inquiry
Compare quantitative and qualitative methods and their appropriate use
Identify ethical issues in research
The nature of interdisciplinary inquiry
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
Describe the importance of intellectual curiosity, openness, and skepticism in the
development of new knowledge
Identify interconnections and interdependencies among areas of intellectual inquiry
Describe how disciplines are interwoven to obtain new perspectives and solutions
Creating meaning
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
Describe how philosophy, religion and spirituality are used to create the meanings in
one’s world
o Identify and compare major traditions in philosophy, religion and spirituality
5. EXPLORING THE NATURAL WORLD
Module 8: Scientific Literary and Method
Scientific Literacy
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
Identify the fundamental concepts of the physical and life sciences from an
interdisciplinary perspective
Evaluate scientific, government, and lay articles in science
Discuss the impact of science on daily life, the welfare of citizens, and our global
environment
Access sources of information concerning scientific issues
Scientific Method
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
Create hypotheses and test them through hands-on laboratory, field, and computer
based experiments
Draw conclusions from experimental evidence
Present experimental evidence and logical conclusions in oral, written, numerical, and
graphical form
Module 9: Technology and Invention
Technology and Our World
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
Describe the world-wide spread of technology, its advantages and challenges
Identify great technological discoveries and their impact on society
Discuss ethical implications of major technological discoveries
Demonstrate familiarity with the computer and other technologies used in the search
o
o
for and acquisition of knowledge
Explain the concepts behind simple physical laws and principles such as Ohm's Law,
Newton's Second Law, and the Conservation of Energy
Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of physical concepts and phenomena such
as energy, heat, resonance, waves, and light
The Role of Innovation
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
Demonstrate awareness of major creative inventions in world civilization
Discuss the importance of creativity in human discovery
Identify creative thinking as an integral part of managing change, growth and
development in human intellectual endeavors
Module 10: Well Being
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
o
Recognize and describe the relationship between physical, mental, and emotional
well-being of the individual, significant others, the community, and society
Describe personal, community, and societal wellness
Describe how individual decision making and behavior impact personal lifestyle
Recognize the influence of gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and age on health
Describe the relationship of health care to longevity and the human and financial
implications for society
Module 11: Mathematical Language of the Universe
Learning Outcomes
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
Recognize the role of mathematics as a language for understanding our physical world
Demonstrate a knowledge of quantitative computations and appropriate mathematical
methods
o Effectively select and apply appropriate formulas for solving mathematical problems
o Discuss the evolutions/revolutions in mathematics and physics and their implications
for society
6. EXPLORING HUMAN CREATIVITY
Module 12: Literary and Humanistic Heritage
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
o
o
o
Discuss how literature is an expression of culture
Recognize and appreciate a wide variety of literary forms
Compare major Western and non-Western world traditions in the humanities
Demonstrate a knowledge of and appreciation for the broad range of human
achievement
Module 13: Art as Interpretation of Life
Learning Outcomes:
After completing the General Education requirements at Oakland University, a student will be
able to:
o
Identify major artistic traditions in visual, auditory, movement, and theatrical art across
cultures and over time
o Recognize and discuss the role of art as critical commentary on society
o Recognize art as an expression of experience
o Describe and appreciate the beauty of an art-full life
7. INTEGRATION
Module 14: Capstone
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of modules 1-13 Oakland University students will be able to:
o
o
Demonstrate an understanding of how the knowledge, skills, and values learned in
general education are interwoven and interrelated
Demonstrate the relevance that this learning has for her/his current and future life and
career
SUNY Cortland (interesting gen ed assessment)
http://www.cortland.edu/gear/supportdocs.html
This page contains downloadable documentation relevant to the assessment of student
learning outcomes, particularly in reference to SUNY's general education program.
Resources are added as they become available so check back again often to see what's new.
Most of these items are in PDF format, requiring the free shareware application of Adobe
Acrobat. To view or download a document, click on the graphic next to the document
description.
University System of Georgia (system-wide learner outcomes)
Common Student Learning Outcomes for the Core
Curriculum
University System of Georgia
General Education in the University System of Georgia
From the origins of intellectual study to the present, general education has been a key
to a fulfilling life of self-knowledge, self-reflection, critical awareness, and lifelong
learning. General education has traditionally focused on oral and written communication,
quantitative reasoning and mathematics, studies in culture and society, scientific
reasoning, and aesthetic appreciation. Today, general education also assists students in
their understanding of technology, information literacy, diversity, and global awareness.
In meeting all of these needs, general education provides college students with their
best opportunity to experience the breadth of human knowledge and the ways that
knowledge in various disciplines is interrelated.
In the University System of Georgia, general education programs consist of a group of
courses known as the Core Curriculum as well as other courses and co-curricular
experiences specific to each institution. The attainment of general education learning
outcomes prepares responsible, reflective citizens who adapt constructively to change.
General education programs impart knowledge, values, skills, and behaviors related to
critical thinking and logical problem-solving. General education includes opportunities for
interdisciplinary learning and experiences that increase intellectual curiosity, providing
the basis for advanced study in the variety of fields offered by today's colleges and
universities.
Approved by the Council on General Education, October, 2004
Approved by the Chief Academic Officers, December, 2004
At the request of the Regents' Advisory Committee on Institutional Effectiveness (RACIE), the
Council on General Education developed the following set of student learning outcomes. They
are derived from the sets of student learning outcomes submitted by institutions of the
University System at the time they undertook conversion from the quarter calendar to the
semester calendar. RACIE intends to use the common set of outcomes to develop materials
that it will use to assist groups of institutions in assessing their Core Curricula as a part of the
accreditation process.
The Council decided not set out separate learning outcomes for critical thinking and
technology skills even though those outcomes were deemed important. Instead, the Council
treated them as components of each learning outcome, where appropriate.
The Council on General Education believes that this set of learning outcomes captures the
common elements of the institutional learning outcomes. There are, however, distinct learning
outcomes at most institutions, often associated with Area B of the Core Curriculum. These are
not represented in the set of learning outcomes presented below. When the set of common
learning outcomes was complete, the Council speculated that it corresponded to approximately
eighty per cent of any given institution's learning outcomes.
I.
Communications: Oral and written communication will be characterized by
clarity, critical analysis, logic, coherence, persuasion, precision, and rhetorical
awareness.
Competence within the context of collegiate general education is defined by the
following outcomes:
o
Ability to assimilate, analyze, and present in oral and written forms, a body of
information;
o
Ability to analyze arguments;
o
Ability to adapt communication to circumstances and audience;
o
Ability to consider and accommodate opposing points of view;
o
Ability to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various
disciplines;
o
Ability to communicate in various modes and media, including the proper use
of appropriate technology;
o
Ability to produce communication that is stylistically appropriate and mature;
o
Ability to communicate in standard English for academic and professional
contexts;
o
Ability to interpret inferences and develop subtleties of symbolic and indirect
discourse;
o
Ability to sustain a consistent purpose and point of view;
o
Ability to compose effective written materials for various academic and
professional contexts.
II.
Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematics: quantitative reasoning and
mathematics will be characterized by logic, critical evaluation, analysis,
synthesis generalization, modeling, and verbal, numeric, graphical, and
symbolic problem solving.
Competence within the context of collegiate general education objectives is defined by
the following outcomes:
o
Ability to model situations from a variety of settings in generalized
mathematical forms;
o
Ability to express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and
thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical and symbolic form while solving a variety
of problems;
o
Ability to solve multiple-step problems through different (inductive, deductive
and symbolic) modes of reasoning;
o
Ability to properly use appropriate technology in the evaluation, analysis, and
synthesis of information in problem-solving situations;
o
Ability to shift among the verbal, numeric, graphical and symbolic modes of
considering relationships;
o
Ability to extract quantitative data from a given situation, translate the data
into information in various modes, evaluate the information, abstract essential
information, make logical deductions, and arrive at reasonable conclusions;
o
Ability to employ quantitative reasoning appropriately while applying scientific
methodology to explore nature and the universe;
o
Ability to discern the impact of quantitative reasoning and mathematics on the
sciences, society, and one's personal life.
III.
Cultural and Social Perspectives: Cultural and social perspective will be
characterized by cultural awareness and an understanding of the complexity
and dynamic nature of social/political/economic systems; human and
institutional behavior, values, and belief systems; historical and spatial
relationship; and, flexibility, open-mindedness, and tolerance.
Competence within the context of collegiate general education objectives is defined by
the following outcomes:
o
Ability to relate local, national, and global social policy;
o
Ability to describe how historical, economic, political, social, and spatial
relationships develop, persist, and change;
o
Ability to articulate the complexity of human behavior as functions of the
commonality and diversity within groups;
o
Ability to appreciate and respect diversity among people and recognize the
roles various peoples played in their culture;
o
Ability to identify and analyze both contemporary and historical perspectives
on contemporary issues;
o
Ability to relate the contributions of groups and individuals to the history of
ideas and belief systems;
o
IV.
Ability to critically analyze one's own culture.
Scientific Reasoning: Scientific reasoning will be characterized by
understanding and applying scientific method, laboratory techniques,
mathematical principles, and experimental design to natural phenomena.
Competence within the context of collegiate general education objectives is defined by
the following outcomes:
o
Ability to understand basic scientific principles, theories, laws as they apply to
all scientific disciplines;
o
Ability to demonstrate knowledge in at least one area of science;
o
Ability to discern the role in and impact on science on society;
o
Ability to identify and properly use appropriate technologies for scientific
inquiry and communication including collecting and analyzing scientific data;
o
Ability to understand the physical universe and science's relationship to it;
o
Ability to understand the changing nature of science;
o
Ability to understand the scope and limits on the appropriateness of scientific
inquiry to physical phenomena;
o
Ability to demonstrate critical observation and analysis;
o
Ability to apply mathematical principles to scientific inquiry, including the use
of statistics and formulae to understand quantitative data.
V.
Aesthetic Perspective: Aesthetic perspective will be characterized by critical
appreciation of and ability to make informed aesthetic judgments about the
arts of various cultures as media for human expression:
Competence within the context of collegiate general education is defined by the
following outcomes:
o
Ability to make informed judgments about art forms from various cultures
including one's own culture;
o
Ability to recognize the fine, literary, and performing arts as expressions of
human experience;
o
Ability to discern the impact and role of artistic and literary achievement in
society and one's personal life.
« Core Curriculum | return to top
California State-San Bernardino (NOTE—This is LONG! Basic skills and breadth
areas are included)
General Education
Outcomes Assessment:

General Education
Assessment Issues

GE Basic Skills Goals
& Objectives

GE Breadth Areas
Goals & Objectives

Alignment Between
the University General
Education Policy and
Student Learning
Goals and Objectives
California State University, San Bernardio
Outcomes Assessment Goals and Objectives
for the
General Education Basic Skills Areas:
Written Communication, Oral Communication,
Critical Thinking and Mathematics
The following outcomes assessment goals and objectives
for the four General Education Basic Skills areas (Written
Communication, Oral Communication, Mathematics, and
Critical Thinking) have been developed by the University
General Education Outcomes Assessment Committee based
on university-wide input from faculty, department chairs,
and university, college and department GE, curriculum and
outcomes assessment representatives over a two-year
period.
University General Education Outcomes Assessment
Committee (June 2000-present):
Salaam Yousif, Arts & Letters
John Chaney, Business & Public Administration
Michael Weiss, Social & Behavioral Sciences
Kerstin Voigt, Natural Sciences

Resources for GE
Classes
Outcomes Assessment Home
Grad Studies Home
Joe Chavez, Chair of the Univ. General Education
Committee
Milton Clark, Dean of Undergraduate Studies
Sandra Kamusikiri, AVP for Assessment and planning
Jerrold Pritchard, Assoc. Provost for Academic Programs
Ross Moran, Dir. of Institutional Research
General Education: The Basic Skills Category
General education is central to a university education, and
its goal is to enhance students’ awareness of themselves in a
complex universe, drawing upon multiple points of view.
As a result of general education experience, students will
acquire knowledge of diverse disciplinary and cultural
perspectives and skill in comparing, contrasting, applying,
and communicating effectively these perspectives in tasks
considered appropriate to particular courses.
Basic skills in composition, oral communication, critical
thinking, and mathematics are needed to express ideas
easily and effectively, to understand and utilize quantitative
data, and to think clearly in everyday settings. All basic
skills courses have mutually reinforcing objectives to
ensure that these skills are practiced and refined in many
different contexts.
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES
Upon graduation from CSUSB, students will be able to:
Goal 1: Communicate effectively in writing to various
audiences.
Objectives:
1. Discover and then develop a controlling idea for
each writing project.
2. Select, organize, and relate ideas and develop them
coherently.
3. Effectively use the basic structures and techniques
of writing:
o
at the word level, display control of diction,
using language that is precise and varied and
that demonstrates sensitivity to diversity
(gender, culture, ethnicity, religion,
disability, etc.)
o
at the sentence level, display syntactic
variety and control of language and
mechanics.
o
at the paragraph and essay levels, arrange
ideas coherently, using a variety of rhetorical
strategies such as narration, description,
definition, illustration, summary, process
analysis, division/classification,
comparison/contrast, cause/effect, and
argument/persuasion; also, use transitional
devices to create a smooth flow between
idea
4. Employ typical rhetorical techniques, such as
openings, effective paragraphing, transitions, and
closings.
5. Develop the judgment and flexibility to choose the
rhetorical strategies, style, and level of language
most appropriate to the audience, purpose, and
genre of their writing.
6. Produce writing, including written work in their
major discipline, that is focused on a clear thesis,
that is well-reasoned, and that is supported with
adequate details and appropriate evidence (when
evidence is called for).
7. Produce writing, including written work in their
major discipline, that is well organized and
appropriately formatted, that is free of serious errors
in grammar, mechanics, and usage, and that follows
the conventions of standard written English.
8. Recognize that writing is an on-going process of
evaluation and revision. In other words, accept
feedback from others, learn to give constructive
critiques, engage seriously in substantive revisions,
and edit their own and others’ writing for global
organization, style, and sentence-level accuracy.
Goal 2: Read and comprehend a variety of written
materials, including material at the entry level of
professional work in their major discipline; extract
ideas from written material; and value the printed word
as a source of information and/or enjoyment.
Objectives:
1. Comprehend a writer’s message literally,
inferentially, and analytically
2. Identify both stated and implied main ideas
3. Differentiate between main ideas and supporting
details
4. Evaluate the persuasiveness/effectiveness of the
supporting details
5. Distinguish between fact and opinion
6. Recognize the organizational structure of written
material
7. Discern the style and tone of a writer
8. Abstract thoughts and ideas from reading material
9. Appreciate the value of reading as a source of
lifelong learning, recreation, and intellectual
enjoyment
Goal 3: Conduct meaningful research, including
gathering information from primary and secondary
sources and incorporating and documenting source
material in their writing.
Objectives:
1. Find, evaluate, and make suitable use of written
sources, in particular by gaining familiarity with the
library and with electronic resources
2. Evaluate the quality of materials that they have
found for relevance to the topic, and coordinate
these materials within the framework of their
writing project.
3.
4. Use the standard conventions for incorporating
sources (including quotation, paraphrase, and
summary) and appropriately citing research in their
own writing.
5. Use writing as a medium for critical thinking, that
is, for formulating thoughtful responses to reading
material and for exploring their own ideas
ORAL COMMUNICATION
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES
Upon graduation from CSUSB, students will be able to
Goal 1: Evaluate and organize ideas for original oral
presentations.
Objectives:
1. Understand the basic rhetorical elements of oral
communication, particularly audience analysis
2. Find and use effective supporting evidence for
informative, persuasive, and argumentative
presentations
3. Generate material for a public speech by identifying
and researching main points of a presentation
4. Locate, retrieve, evaluate, and incorporate material
appropriate to a presentation
5. Organize main and subordinate ideas in original oral
messages
6. Evaluate with care and accuracy the relative merits
of alternative or opposing arguments,
interpretations, assumptions, and cultural values
7. Take into account the cultural contexts of oral
communication, including differences in cultural
styles and the ethics of communication
Goal 2: Communicate through public speaking by
delivering effective speeches which inform, persuade, or
commemorate others.
Objectives:
1. Deliver oral presentations clearly, confidently, and
effectively in a variety of public communication
settings
2. Speak effectively to the chosen purpose of the
speaking engagement, whether it be to argue,
inspire, generate emotion, or inform the listeners
3. Present ideas concisely
4. Use language that demonstrates sensitivity to
diversity (gender, culture, ethnicity, religion,
disability, etc.)
5. Use effective verbal and nonverbal delivery
techniques; that is, employ language, voice,
inflection, facial expression, gesture, and body
language appropriate to the presentation and the
audience
6. Effectively construct and incorporate visual aids
(e.g., handouts, charts, technologies, etc.) to support
ideas in presentations
Goal 3: Listen and interact effectively.
Objectives:
1. Anticipate listeners’ needs, analyze their responses,
and adapt communications accordingly (including
specific adaptations that make communication
accessible for disabled members of any audience)
2. Listen critically to the oral communications and
speeches of others and summarize and evaluate their
salient ideas
3. Understand and value differences in communication
styles
CRITICAL THINKING
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES
Upon graduation, CSUSB students will understand the key
notions of validity and soundness as they apply to deductive
and inductive reasoning and be able to:
Goal 1: Recognize multiple discourse strategies.
Objectives:
1. Recognize argumentative discourse
2. Identify whether an argument appeals to reasoning
or emotion.
3. Distinguish arguments from counterfeit modes of
persuasion and propaganda.
Goal 2: Identify explicit and implicit components of
arugments.
Objectives:
1. Identify explicitly stated premises and assumptions
in an argument
2. Identify unstated implications in an argument
Goal 3: Distinguish different kinds of arguments.
Objectives:
1. Recognize inductive arguments.
2. Recognize deductive arguments.
Goal 4: Evaluate the quality of reasoning.
Objectives:
1. Choose the appropriate criteria for evaluating
arguments.
2. Use appropriate methods to identify valid
argumentation (e.g., direct application of
definitions, formal methods, informal argument
forms).
3. Use appropriate methods to identify invalid
reasoning (e.g., counterexamples, informal and/or
formal fallacies).
4. Determine validity of arguments and be able to
distinguish when evidence provides strong support
for a conclusion and when it does not.
Goal 5: Evaluate the soundness of reasoning.
Objectives:
1. Identify good sources of information.
2. Distinguish fact from judgement, belief from
knowledge.
3. Apply evaluations of sources to the evaluation of
soundness.
Goal 6: Construct valid and sound written and oral
arguments.
Objectives:
1. Develop a clear thesis statement of appropriate
scope.
2. Provide reasons from a variety of sources that
support the thesis.
3. Organize the materials so that they adequately
support the thesis.
MATHEMATICS
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES
Upon graduation from CSUSB, students will or will be able
to:
Goal 1: Understand basic mathematical concepts and
quantitative reasoning.
Objectives:
1. Solve problems by applying algebraic, geometric, or
analytic concepts appropriate to the mathematics
basic skills course completed.
2. Translate verbal statements to and from
mathematical expressions.
Goal 2: Demonstrate a critical understanding of
mathematics.
Objectives:
1. Critically evaluate quantitative information, and
identify deceptive or erroneous information.
Goal 3: Apply mathematics.
Objectives:
1. Effectively organize, summarize, and present
information in quantitative forms such as tables,
graphs, and formulas.
2. Use numerical, graphical, and symbolic information
to support or criticize arguments and draw valid
conclusions.
Goal 4: Make connections between mathematics and
other disciplines through the use of mathematical
models.
Objectives:
1. Identify examples of mathematical models from a
variety of quantitative and non-quantitative
disciplines.
2. Demonstrate ability to construct mathematical
models in the context of other disciplines.
General Education
Outcomes Assessment:

General Education
Assessment Issues

GE Basic Skills Goals
& Objectives

GE Breadth Areas
Goals & Objectives
California State University, San Bernardio
Outcomes Assessment Goals and Objectives
for the
General Education Breadth Areas:
Natural Sciences, Humanities and Social &
Behavioral Sciences
The outcomes assessment goals and objectives for the
three General Education Breadth areas (Natural Sciences,
Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences) have been
developed based on university-wide input from faculty,
department chairs, and university, college and department
GE, curriculum and outcomes assessment representatives
over a two-year period under the guidance of three General

Alignment Between the
University General
Education Policy and
Student Learning Goals
and Objectives
Education Breadth Area Outcomes Assessment
Committees.
General Education: The Breadth Areas

Resources for GE
Classes
Outcomes Assessment Home
Grad Studies Home
General education is central to a university education, and
its goal is to enhance students’ awareness of themselves in
a complex universe, drawing upon multiple points of view.
As a result of general education experience, students will
acquire knowledge of diverse disciplinary and cultural
perspectives and skill in comparing, contrasting, applying,
and communicating effectively these perspectives in tasks
considered appropriate to particular courses.
In the last three centuries, and especially over the last 100
years, there has been an explosive expansion within the
scientific and technological areas of human knowledge.
These areas have grown to become an integral and
essential part of our modern culture. The overall goal of
General Education within the Natural Sciences is to assist
the student in understanding the tools and methodologies
of the natural sciences, in learning some of the most
important results of scientific inquiry, and in becoming
conversant with the major consequences of scientific and
technological developments were.
The principal of objectives of the Humanities courses are
to expand students’ understanding and appreciation of the
arts, literature, and philosophical inquiry as well as to
cultivate imagination and nurture empathy.
The Social and Behavioral Sciences embrace a wide
variety of disciplines. Collectively, therefore, the courses
included in this area embrace a broad number of principal
and secondary goals. The inter-wovenness of these fields
and their uniquenesses are essential concerns that students
need to understand as well as the relative usefulness of
each discipline in analyzing and responding to individual,
social, economic, political and cultural institutions and
problems. Such breadth is viewed as indispensable
knowledge for educated persons who will function within–
and indeed provide the future leadership for–a society that
continues to be increasingly technological, complex,
racially and ethnically diverse, and evolving in terms of
roles of men and women.
Natural Sciences General Education Breadth Area
(B)
Goals and Objectives
CNS GE Breadth Area (B) Outcomes Assessment
Committee
David Polcyn, Biology
Brett Stanley, Chemistry
Judy Cestaro, Computer
Sally McGill, Geology
Science
Cindy Paxton, Health
Leo Connolly, Physics
Science
Natural Sciences Breadth Area (B) Courses (20 units)
B1. Mathematics
NOTE: The goals and objectives for Math are included in
the basic skills area of general education.
B2. Life Sciences. Five units chosen from
BIOL 100. Topics in Biology (5)
BIOL 202. Biology of Populations (5)
HSCI 120. Health and Society: An Ecological Approach
(5)
B3. Physical Sciences. A minimum of five units chosen
from
CHEM 100. Chemistry in the Modern World (5)
CHEM 205. Fundamentals of Chemistry I: General
Chemistry (5)
CHEM 215. General Chemistry I: Atomic Structure and
Chemical Bonding (6)
GEOG 103. Physical Geography (5)
GEOL 101. Introductory Geology (5)
PHYS 100. Physics in the Modern World (5)
PHYS 103. Descriptive Astronomy (5)
PHYS 121. Basic Concepts of Physics I (5)
PHYS 221. General Physics I (5)
B4. Special Topics in Science and Technology. Two
units chosen from
BIOL 216. Genetics and Society (2)
BIOL 217. Biology of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (2)
CHEM 105. Chemicals in Our Environment (2)
CSCI 121. Computer Technology and People (2)
CSCI 124. Exploring the Information Superhighway (2)
GEOL 210. Earthquakes: Science and Public Policy (2)
B5. Integrative Capstone in the Natural Sciences. Four
units chosen from
NSCI 300. Science and Technology (4)
NSCI 310. The Environment and Human Survival (4)
NSCI 314. Life in the Cosmos (4)
NSCI 320. Energy (4)
NSCI 325. Perspectives on Gender (also counts in category
G) (4)
NSCI 351. Health and Human Ecology (4)
NSCI 360. Legacy of Life (4)
NoteStudents may receive credit for only one of the
following courses
HUM 325. Perspectives on Gender
NSCI 325. Perspectives on Gender
SSCI 325. Perspectives on Gender
Goals and Objectives for Natural Sciences Breadth
Area (B)
Goal 1: Students who complete the General Education
Breadth Area B (Natural Sciences) will be able to
demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method.
Objectives:
1. Explain the use of the scientific method, including
observation, hypothesis, experimentation and
deductive reasoning as applied within the natural
sciences area.
2. Discuss the history of development and
philosophical presuppositions of the scientific
method (e.g., that the world is comprehensible, that
natural events follow basic, repeatable laws that
can be deduced by observation and
experimentation, and that one can (or will
eventually be able to) explain all events as results
of natural laws without reference to supernatural
causes).
3. Explain, with the use of one or more specific
examples, how scientists establish, evaluate and
modify theories through the use of the scientific
method (e.g., plate tectonics, genetics, disease
mechanisms, …).
4. Utilize appropriate quantitative methods to analyze
data and to test hypotheses (e.g., graphing and
interpreting data, comparing experimental results
with those predicted by theory, …).
5. Apply scientific laws and/or theories to
quantitatively solve problems using basic
mathematical skills (e.g., solving word problems).
Goal 2: After completion of a course in the B2 area,
students will be able to explain some of the most important
results of scientific inquiry in the life sciences. Students
will demonstrate a breadth of knowledge concerning a
major area in the life sciences, which also incorporates
supportive facts and concepts from other major areas in the
life and/or physical sciences. In particular, students will
Objectives:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the life forms in nature
and the rules governing their structure, function
and ecology.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the experimental
basis for current knowledge and future exploration
in the Life Sciences area.
3. Demonstrate familiarity with the usual techniques
and apparatus of the life sciences (e.g,
measurement techniques, sterile techniques,
microscopy, …).
4. Utilize the scientific method to design simple
experiments and to collect, analyze and evaluate
life science data in a lab or field setting.
Goal 3: After completion of a course in the B3 area,
students will be able to explain some of the most important
results of scientific inquiry in the physical sciences.
Students will demonstrate a breadth of knowledge
concerning a major area in the physical sciences, which
also incorporates supportive facts and concepts from other
major areas in the physical and/or life sciences. In
particular, students will
Objectives:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental
rules governing matter and energy in the universe
(e.g., some but not necessarily all of the
followingconservation of mass, 1st and 2nd laws of
thermodynamics, mass/energy equivalence, the
atomic makeup of matter, the subatomic particles,
the elements and periodic table of elements, the
basic rules of electricity and the electrical nature of
matter and energy, how the laws and theories of
physics describe how atoms combine to make
molecules, compounds, minerals, rocks, planets,
etc. and the physical properties of these substances,
how solid, liquid, and gaseous substances combine
to form the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and
atmosphere, or extraterrestrial objects, how
physical materials are naturally recycled (the rock
cycle, the hydrologic cycle), …).
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the experimental
basis for scientific inquiry in the physical sciences.
3. Demonstrate familiarity with the usual techniques
and apparatus of the physical sciences (e.g.,
measurement techniques, titration, …)
4. Utilize the scientific method to design simple
experiments and to collect, analyze and evaluate
physical science data in a lab or field setting.
Goal 4: After completion of a course in the B4 area,
students will be able to apply the principles, concepts and
methods of the natural sciences to everyday life.
Specifically, students will be able to examine, from a
scientific perspective, an important current scientific,
health-related, or technological issue and to relate
scientific principles to the societal impact of the issue
under examination. In particular, students will be able to
Objectives:
1. Find and evaluate information relevant to the
scientific understanding of a particular
contemporary issue
2. Identify the important principles in the natural
sciences underlying that particular issue
3. Recognize the limits of science when applied to
problems in the natural world.
4. Explain the societal impact and historical context
of the issue
5. Discuss the interdependence between science,
technology and modern society, including the
social, political and economic aspects of that
society (e.g., how modern society and the economy
depend on science and technology, and how the
development of science and technology are
influenced by social, economic and political forces;
how technology is the result of scientific
development, and how technology enables the
further development of science).
Goal 5 : Upon completion of a course in the B5 (natural
sciences capstone) area, students will be able to understand
the interrelationships among disciplines (within and across
breadth areas) and their applications to contemporary
complex environments.
Objectives:
1. Discuss the social and historical context of
scientific developments within the physical and life
sciences.
2. Explain the place of the natural sciences breadth
area within the broader context of human thought
and social development.
3. Integrate, develop and explore the implications of
the skills and knowledge acquired in the lowerdivision general education courses.
4. Engage in a higher level of analysis than in lower-
division general education courses.
5. Where appropriate, understand the impact of
human behavior, gender roles, human sexuality,
multicultural and/or international issues, and
technological and organizational developments on
a topic (or vice versa).
6. Students will broaden their knowledge of
fundamental laws, theories and facts that comprise
our understanding of the contemporary physical
world, of the origins of scientific discovery, and the
social and economic implications of scientific and
technological developments.
HUMANITIES GENERAL EDUCATION BREADTH
AREA (C)
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
CAL GE Breadth Area (C) Outcomes Assessment
Committee:
Salaam Yousif, English
William Peterson, Theater Arts
Larry McFatter, Music
Mirta Gonzalez, Foreign Languages
Susan Finsen, Philosophy
Kurt Collins, Art
Arts (C.1) Goals and Objectives
Courses:
1. Arts. Four units chosen from:
ART 200. Studies in Art (4)
HUM 180. The Art of Film (4)
MUS 180. Studies in Music (4)
TA 260. Introduction to Theatre (4)
Students who complete the arts breadth area C1 (Arts) will
GOAL 1: Demonstrate an awareness of the cultural and
social value and contributions of the arts (visual, music,
theatre, film, etc.) in sustaining life and nurturing human
development.
Objectives:
1. Articulate the value and contributions of the arts to
society;
2. Recognize and articulate the pervasiveness of the
arts in the student's own community;
GOAL 2: Describe the mechanics of artistic production.
Objectives:
1. Discuss and describe the basic techniques used in
at least one form of artistic expression (i.e., formal
structuring, artistic materials/media chosen, etc.);
2. In the case of the collaborative arts, be able to
identify and describe the contributions of key
artistic collaborators (i.e., composer and lyricist,
film writer and editor, etc.);
3. Recognize the financial, political and social forces
which impact and shape a particular art form;
GOAL 3: Reflect critically on significant works of the
human intellect and imagination through exposure to major
works of art emanating from more than one culture.
Objectives:
1. Articulate the differences between various systems
of cultural aesthetics (i.e., those of western
European and Asian musics, for example);
2. Objectively analyze artistic works from a cultural
perspective that differs from a student's own;
GOAL 4: Gain an overview of the concepts, forms and
historical development of a particular art form.
Objectives:
1. Use appropriate critical vocabulary to describe
artistic development over time in, for example, the
history of stylistic periods and genres in art (i.e.,
cubism, impressionism, etc.);
2. Describe and explain the historical context within
which a body of work was created (i.e., the
historical and cultural forces that shaped, for
example, 18th century western art and music);
GOAL 5: Learn to formulate, articulate and defend
aesthetic judgments based on an encounter with a work of
art or particular performance.
Objectives:
1. Understand some of the methods of studying,
perceiving and criticizing artistic phenomena (i.e.,
do background preparation for writing a review of
a performance of a play, art exhibition or concert);
2. Write critical evaluations of works of art or
particular performances taking into account their
cultural contexts;
GOAL 6: Experience art firsthand.
Objectives:
1. Attend plays or concerts, visit art galleries,
participate in theatre productions as an usher or
backstage crew, view assigned films, etc.
2. Critically evaluate that experience either orally or
in writing;
Literature (C.2) Goals and Objectives
Courses:
ENG 110: World Literature I
ENG 111: World Literature II
ENG 160: World Drama
ENG 170: Studies in Literature
TA 160: World Drama
TA 212: Oral Interpretation of Literature
Students who complete Humanities Breadth Area C. 2
(Literature) will be able to:
Goal 1: Construct and articulate clear and informed
interpretations of literary texts.
Objectives:
1. Read with clear understanding a variety of literary
texts from a range of cultures and time periods.
2. Discuss, interpret, and reflect critically on literary
works, using clear, coherent, and well-reasoned
analysis and appropriate support and evidence.
3. Understand that literary works can be analyzed
from more than one critical approach, and that two
or more critical approaches may be integrated to
achieve a fuller understanding of the text.
4. Find and make connections between literary works-thematic, stylistic, etc.
Goal 2: Demonstrate knowledge of the basic typology of
the forms and genres of literature and of the standard
critical terminologies for analyzing and describing these
literary forms and genres.
Objectives:
1. Identify the forms and genres of literature, both
written and oral, such as fiction, drama, poetry,
lyric, epic, novel, novella, short story, tragedy,
comedy, etc.
2. Use analytical skills when reading literary texts;
that is, show some familiarity with the techniques
of various genres and the critical vocabulary
appropriate for talking about those genres (e.g.,
point of view, setting, plot, climax, flashback,
rhyme, rhythm, imagery, irony).
3. Identify several of the various elements common to
all literary texts, such as theme, style, figures of
speech (metaphor, simile, paradox, hyperbole),
tone, etc., and recognize how the elements of form
and the various literary devices contribute to the
meaning and to the overall aesthetic effect of a
literary text.
4. Recognize and value the new and unfamiliar in
literature (e.g., epic theater, theater of the absurd,
magical realism).
Goal 3: Place the literary “text” in its intellectual, cultural,
social, and historical contexts, and take into account the
contextual implications of the text.
Objectives:
1. Identify and demonstrate some familiarity with a
range of major authors (female and male) and
major works from both Western and non-Western
literatures and from various time periods.
2. Recognize how literary works are related to the
cultures and historical epochs from which they
spring, understanding the ways in which literary
differences may reflect cultural differences and the
ways in which disparate works may share some
common human elements.
3. Understand why a particular literary text is
important to its own culture and epoch and what
can make it significant to us as well.
4. Recognize how literature makes use of culturallyspecific myths and symbols, and be able to identify
such myths and symbols in a diverse array of
literary texts.
Goal 4: Recognize literature’s capacity to cultivate
imagination and growth in self-knowledge, to nurture
empathy, and to provide insights into various fields of
knowledge and aspects of life.
Objectives:
1. Recognize literature’s capacity to illuminate and
impact personal experience, understanding, and
values.
2. Describe how literature can enable one to identify
with others by inhabiting fictional points of view
and thereby affect the nature of one’s own empathy
and knowledge of others.
3. Employ literature to expand one’s understanding of
contemporary society, past civilizations, and
cultural traditions different from their own.
4. Recognize and identify relationships between
literature and other disciplines, such as the visual
and performing arts, sociology, religion, law,
history, or philosophy.
Foreign Language or Literature in Translation (C.3)
Goals Objectives
Courses:
FLAN 102, Language Study
II
FLAN 150, Intermediate
Language Study
JAPN 102, College Japanese
II
JAPN 150, Intermediate
Japanese
MAND 102, College
FREN 102, College French II
Mandarin II
FREN 150, Intermediate
MAND 150, Intermediate
French
Mandarin
FREN 200, Culture and
SPAN 102, College Spanish
Communication
II
FREN 201, Conversation and SPAN 150, Intermediate
Composition I
Spanish
FREN 202, Conversation and SPAN 155, Interm. Span for
Composition II
Span Speakers
FREN 290, French Literature
SPAN 212, Composition
in English
SPAN 213, Composition for
GER 102, College German II
Span Speakers.
GER 150, Intermediate
German
SPAN 214, Conversation
GER 212, Composition
SPAN 290, Span. & Latin
Am. Lit. in English
GER 214, Conversation
GER 216, Introduction to the
Literary Text
GER 290, German Literature
in English
Students completing the Humanities Breath Area C-3 will
be able to do the following:
Goal 1. Communicate in the foreign language in a
culturally appropriate manner.
Objectives:
1. Engage in conversation, provide and obtain
information, express feelings and emotions, and
exchange opinions in the foreign language.
2. Understand and interpret written and spoken
language on a variety of topics.
3. Present information, concepts and ideas in the
foreign language to an audience of listeners or
readers on a variety of topics.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of
language through comparisons of the language
studied and English.
Goal 2. Enhance their critical thinking skills by
constructing a perspective of culture(s) other than their
own.
Objectives:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship
between the practices and perspectives of the
culture(s) studied.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship
between the products and perspectives of the
culture(s) studied.
3. Apply analytical skills in a language other than
their own.
4. Differentiate and integrate ways to appreciate
similarities and differences between cultures,
including gender and social issues.
5. Acquire information and recognize the distinctive
viewpoints only available through the foreign
language and its culture(s)
6. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of
culture through comparison with U.S. culture(s)
Students completing the Literatures in Translation 290
in the Humanities Breath Area C-3 will be able to do
the following:
Goal 1. Differentiate and integrate objective and subjective
responses to literature and the arts of non-English speaking
culture(s).
Objectives:
1. Comprehend a variety of literary texts translated in
English from other cultures;
2. Interpret meaning in literary texts translated from
other languages and cultures;
3. Situate literary texts as productions emanating from
specific social, historical, intellectual and cultural
settings;
4. Appraise the significance of the literary text to
contemporary life in the U.S.A.;
5. Differentiate and integrate ways to appreciate
similarities and differences between cultures,
including gender and social issues.
Philosophy (C.4) Goals and Objectives
Courses:
Phil 190: Introduction to Philosophical Issues
Phil 191: Introduction to Ethics
Phil 192: Introduction to Philosophy of Religion
Phil. 193: Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
Phil. 194: Introduction to Knowledge and Reality
Students who complete Humanities Breadth Area C4
(Philosophy) will be able to:
Goal 1: Develop the ability to reason and argue
philosophically; develop in students the skills and
dispositions of analysis and argument
Objectives:
1. Apply the basic skills of critical thinking, and in
particular argument analysis, to fundamental
problems in philosophy
2. Be able to write a coherent essay analyzing,
assessing and constructing cogent arguments for
and/or against philosophical positions.
3. Apply the basic skills of oral communication
through active well-reasoned philosophical
dialogue in classroom discussion.
Goal 2: Challenge students to question deeply held
assumptions and beliefs regarding the fundamental
philosophical issues of knowledge, reality and /or values;
Objectives:
1. Recognize assumptions and beliefs which
determine one's own philosophical perspective
2. Recognize and accurately describe the underlying
assumptions and beliefs inherent in some central
philosophical traditions
3. Distinguish questions of knowledge (epistemology)
from questions of reality (metaphysics);
4. Distinguish issues of faith from knowledge claims;
5. Distinguish questions of fact or theory from
questions of values
Goal 3: Introduce students to some of the major traditions
of philosophical ideas and analysis from either western or
nonwestern philosophy, from the ancient, modern or
contemporary period
Objectives:
1. Accurately describe the theories and arguments of
some major philosophers and philosophical
traditions
2. Be able to locate these traditions within the wider
context of the history of ideas (Describe how a
philosophical tradition developed within the
context of a particular historical period)
3. Cogently compare and discuss contrasting views in
some area(s) of philosophy
Integrative Capstone in the Humanities (C.5) Goals
Objectives
Courses:
C5. Integrative Capstone in the Humanities. Four units
chosen from:
HUM 319. Myth, Metaphor and Symbol (4)
HUM 325. Perspectives on Gender (also counts in
category G) (4)
HUM 330. Arts and Ideas (4)
HUM 335. The Origin and Contemporary Role of Latino
Culture (also counts in category G) (4) HUM 340.
Interpretation and Values (4)
HUM 344. Ideas in American Culture (4)
HUM 370. African Heritage in the Arts (also counts in
category G) (4)
HUM 380. Comparative Studies in the Arts: East and West
(also counts in category G) (4)
HUM 385. A Cultural History of Fashion (4)
Upon completion of the Integrative Capstone Requirement
in Humanities (C5), students will be able to:
Goal 1: Understand the interrelationships among
disciplines and their applications to contemporary complex
environments.
Objectives:
1. Recognize the relationships and dependencies
between two (or more) disciplines, such as the
relationship between developments in science and
those in the arts; developments in biology or
psychology and those in literature or philosophy;
2. Demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of the
discipline(s) in question to contemporary problems
and issues (for example: recognize the social and
moral implications of our current understanding of
global warming)
Goal 2: Extend, apply and integrate basic skills such as
critical thinking, composition, oral communication, and
mathematics.
Objectives:
1. Critically reason about the interrelationships among
the disciplines and their applications to
contemporary environments;
2. Construct well-reasoned essays discussing the
interrelations among the disciplines and
applications of the disciplines to contemporary
problems and environments;
3. Where appropriate, use mathematical skills
(numerical, graphical, symbolic) to support or
criticize arguments;
Goal 3: Consider timely (important) issues and subject
matter not encountered within lower division courses or
within the confines of upper division courses within
specific disciplines;
Objectives:
1. Recognize and be able to summarize and discuss
the issues presented;
Goal 4: Where appropriate to the specific theme of the
course, incorporate multicultural and/or international
issues from a comparative perspective that goes beyond a
single country, culture or social system;
Objectives:
1. Be able to identify and describe cultural and social
perspectives from those cultures and societies
discussed in the course;
Goal 5: Where appropriate to the specific theme of the
course, include perspectives on human behavior, gender
roles, and human sexuality as they relate to the theme
topic.
Objectives:
1. Recognize the diversity of perspectives and
behaviors as regards gender roles and human
sexuality in relation to the topics discussed in the
course;
2. Demonstrate ability to cogently and rationally
discuss the moral and social issues surrounding
gender and human sexuality
Goal 6: Where appropriate to the theme of the course,
consider cultural, technological and organizational
developments in relation to the theme topic.
Objectives:
1. Accurately describe technological and
organizational aspects of the topics covered in the
course;
2. Cogently discuss the ethical and practical
implications of the implementation of technological
developments in relation to the topic.
Note: These goals and objectives are written to express the
intent of the GE document (p. 22). As written, the criteria
suggest reinforcement of all basic skills, which include
writing, critical thinking and oral communication. Courses
taught in the large lecture format pose an interesting
dilemma for those who wish to genuinely reinforce these
skills. Thus, for those reading these goals and objectives, it
is important to think carefully about what we believe these
courses are to accomplish. How can courses taught in this
format achieve these goals? (C.2 Revised 11-02)
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
GENERAL
EDUCATION BREADTH AREA (D)
OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
CSBS GE Breadth Area (D) Outcomes Assessment
Committee
Lanny
American History and
Fields
Civilization (D1)
Scot
American Institutions
Zentner
(D2)
Jeff Hackel World Cultures (D3)
Carolyn
Discipline Perspectives
Aldana
(D4)
Michael Integrative Capstone
Lewin
(D5)
American History and Civilization (D.1) Goals and
Objectives
Courses
D1. American History and Civilization. Four units chosen
from
HIST 146. American Civilization (4)
HIST 200. United States History to 1877 (4)
HIST 201. United States History, 1877 to the Present (4)
After the completion of the American history and
civilization requirement (D1), students will be able to
Goal 1. Understand key social, economic, cultural, and
political themes in American history.
Objectives
1. Describe a significant social, economic, cultural, or
political theme in a two- decade or longer period of
American history.
2. Name three key figures in American cultural
history.
3. List three social consequences of industrialization
in American history. 4. List two causes and two
consequences of either the American Civil War, the
War for Independence, or World War I.
Goal 2. Understand the various contributions of ethnic and
gender groups in American history.
Objectives
1. Name two leaders of an ethnic minority group in
American history.
2. Describe the contributions of women to either the
abolition of slavery movement or the women's
suffrage movement in American history.
3. Compare two civil rights movements and their
political or constitutional issues in American
history.
Goal 3. Understand the historical contexts of contemporary
issues and conditions in America.
Objectives
1. Describe two foreign policy issues that echo a
current foreign policy issue.
2. Describe two domestic policy issues that echo a
current domestic issue.
3. Compare immigration policies in an earlier era with
immigration policies today.
4. Name two people who helped develop a particular
cultural movement or genre (jazz, blues,
impressionism, modernism, romanticism …).
American Institutions (D.2) Goals and Objectives
Courses
D2. American Institutions
PSCI 203. American Government (4)
Note: The American history, constitution, state and local
government requirement may be met by taking
PSCI 203. American Government and one of the following
HIST 146. American Civilization
HIST 200. United States History to 1877
HIST 201. United States History, 1877 to the Present
After the completion of the American Institutions
requirement (D2), students will be able to
Goal 1. Understand the foundation and development of
American political principles.
Objectives
1. Identify the key elements of the Declaration of
Independence and to evaluate the principles of the
American Revolution.
2. Identify the main parts of the U.S. Constitution and
to evaluate the principles of the American
Founding.
Goal 2. Understand the elements of democratic-republican
government and politics under the U.S. Constitution.
Objectives
1. Assess American national government institutions
(i.e., Congress, the president, and the federal courts
and bureaucracies).
2. Evaluate American national political institutions
(i.e., political parties, interest groups, and the
media).
3. Identify the rights and obligations of citizens in the
democratic-republican system established under the
U.S. Constitution.
4. Recognize the issues of race, religion, ethnicity,
and sex and their place within the development of
American political institutions and the
understanding of American political principles.
Goal 3. Understand the elements of California state and
local government.
Objectives
1. Assess the law- and policy-making process under
the California Constitution.
2. Evaluate the principal institutions of California
government, including state, county, and city
governments, and special districts.
3. Recognize the relationships between governments
and the resolution of conflicts in the American
federal system.
World Cultures (D.3) Goals and Objectives
Courses
D3. World Cultures. Four units chosen from
ANTH 140. World Civilizations I, the Rise of Civilization
(4)
HIST 140. World Civilizations I, the Rise of Civilization
(4)
HIST 142. World Civilizations II, the Civilizations of the
East and West (4)
HIST 144. World Civilizations III, the Expansion of
Europe (4)
SSCI 165. Regions and Peoples of the World (4)
After the completion of the World Cultures requirement
(D3), students will be able to
Goal 1. Understand the concepts of culture and
civilization.
Objectives
1. Define the terms culture and civilization.
2. Compare and contrast the concepts of culture and
civilization.
Goal 2. Understand the process of cultural change.
Objectives
1. Name and discuss the contribution of important
individuals who played key roles in the
development of a selected culture or civilization.
2. List possible consequences of cultural interaction.
3. Discuss why civilizations might rise or fall.
Goal 3. To recognize cultural variation.
Objectives
1. Describe how the "cultural landscape" of two
countries differ based on a selected factor (e.g.,
history, architecture, agricultural, economic
population density)
2. Discuss the role of art and artists in a selected
culture.
3. Examine class structure, gender and/or ethnic
roles in a selected culture.
Discipline Perspectives (D.4) Goals and Objectives
Courses
D4. Discipline Perspectives. Four units chosen from
ANTH 100. Introduction to AnthropologyHuman
Evolution (4)
ANTH 102. Introduction to AnthropologyCulture and
Society (4)
ECON 104. Economics of Social Issues (4)
ES 100. Ethnicity and Race in America (4)
GEOG 100. Introduction to Human Geography (4)
PSCI 100. Introduction to Political Science (4)
PSYC 100. Introduction to Psychology (4)
SOC 100. The Study of Society (4)
WSTD 200. Introduction to Women's Studies (4)
Upon completion of the discipline perspectives
requirement (D4), students will be able to
Goal 1. Identify prevailing theories, areas, principles, and
methods of inquiry of social science in one of the
disciplines (Anthropology, Economics, Ethnic Studies,
Geography, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology).
Objectives
1. Describe the basic approaches used in the chosen
discipline.
2. Identify the principle areas of the chosen discipline.
3. Restate the basic terms and concepts used in the
major theoretical approaches of that discipline.
Goal 2. Understand the approaches within the chosen
discipline to analyze social issues and evaluate solutions.
Objectives
1. Describe aspects of social issues that are analyzed
within the context of the various theories.
2. Evaluate aspects of social issues within the
contexts of the various theories.
3. Identify the factors related to the relevant issues of
race, ethnicity, or gender within the context of the
chosen discipline.
Social Science Integrated Capstone (D.5) Goals and
Objectives
Courses
D5. Integrative Capstone in the Social and Behavioral
Sciences. Four units chosen from
SSCI 300. Nonwestern World (4)
SSCI 304. Contemporary Latin America (4)
SSCI 315. Cultural Adaptation: The Quest for Survival (4)
SSCI 316. Race and Racism (also counts in category G)
(4)
SSCI 320. Understanding Capitalism (4)
SSCI 321. Urbanization and the Urban Environment (4)
SSCI 325. Perspectives on Gender (also counts in category
G) (4)
SSCI 343. Understanding Socialism (4)
SSCI 345. Religious Expression in America (4)
SSCI 350. Roots of Modern Racism in America (also
counts in category G) (4)
After the completion of the Social Science Integrated
Capstone (D5) requirement, students will be able to
Goal 1. Develop an understanding of the effects of
societal/inter-societal factors from the social sciences (e.g.,
anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography,
history, psychology, political science, sociology) as they
affect contemporary social issues.
Objectives
1. Identify specific factors from the social sciences
(e.g., anthropology, criminal justice, economics,
geography, history, psychology, political science,
or sociology) as they relate to contemporary social
issues.
2. Analyze a specific social science issue from a
multidisciplinary perspective.
3. Identify key historical sociopolitical events that
have influenced past and contemporary social
issues.
Goal 2. Develop an understanding of how cultural,
economic, religious, political, and social
structures/practices affect the standing of various groups in
the United States or in countries/cultures abroad.
Objectives
1. Identify key factors of social class, ethnicity, sexual
orientation, religion or gender that have affected
access in the opportunity structure of the United
States or countries/cultures abroad over time.
2. Analyze how these factors social class, ethnicity,
sexual orientation, religion or gender have affected
access in the opportunity structure of the United
States or countries/cultures abroad over time.
North Park University (Chicago)
General Education
The General Education program is the core of the curriculum, foundational for all students and all areas of study
and vocation. In its concern with ultimate questions, the development of the person, responsibility to society, and
the integration of understanding across disciplinary lines, the program reflects the distinctive values of the
Christian liberal arts university. In its concern with basic skills of thinking and communication, the program is
directed toward practical success in the wide variety of occupations and roles that our graduates enter.
In accordance with the stated Mission of North Park, we intend the entire student experience, including both
curricular and co-curricular activities to achieve the following learning outcomes. These are stated with the
understanding that learning outcomes can only be developed in a content-rich environment, and that academic
outcomes are best formed as students attempt to enter into the community of scholars in a variety of disciplines.
A list of learning outcomes is an inadequate way to convey the whole of a person’s formal education, let alone the
whole of one’s life. The arrangement of the learning outcomes as presented here is not to suggest a hierarchical
or sequential relationship. As one reflects on who one is, one should come to realize what one needs to know.
Acquiring that knowledge may prompt one to action, but it may also prompt further reflection.
A Life of Significance
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Introspection: examining who one is and who one should become.
Wellness: Physical and psychological well being.
Character: Moral and ethical maturity.
Faith: spiritual maturity.
A Life of Intellectual Growth
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Learning: a deep commitment to and pleasure in the acquisition of information and knowledge.
Responsibility: the ability to monitor, direct and take ownership for one’s own learning.
Inquiry: the ability to use a variety of means for acquiring knowledge and constructing meaning.
Analysis: the ability to evaluate information, knowledge claims and beliefs.
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Aesthetics: appreciation and understanding of different kinds of aesthetic experience.
A Life of Service
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Collegiality: ability to work respectfully with others, including people who are not like you.
Communication: the ability to convey your beliefs, ideas and feelings to others in a variety of ways and
media and the ability to understand others communicating with you.
Problem Solving: the ability to take one’s knowledge and skills and apply them to solving a problem.
Social Responsibility: Desire to work with others in creating a better world.
To see a list of general education requirements, please visit the
page that applies to you:
General education requirements for students entering prior to Fall 2002
General education requirements for students entering during the 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 academic year
General education requirements for students entering Fall 2004 and after
Montgomery College (see link to their online Gen Ed Competency Questionnaire)
GENERAL EDUCATION OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT
The Five Initial General Education Competencies
1.
Written and oral communication:
Competency in written and oral communication includes the ability to communicate effectively in
verbal and written language, the ability to use a variety of modern information resources and
supporting technologies, the ability to differentiate content from style of presentation, and the
ability to suit content and style to the purpose of communication.
2.
Scientific and quantitative reasoning:
Competency in scientific and quantitative reasoning includes the ability to locate, identify, collect,
organize, analyze and interpret data, and the ability to use mathematics and the scientific
method of inquiry to make decisions, where appropriate.
3.
Critical analysis and reasoning:
Competency in critical analysis and reasoning includes the ability to arrive at reasoned and
supportable conclusions using sound research techniques, including inference, analysis and
interpretation.
4.
Technological competency:
Technological competency includes the ability to use computer technology and appropriate
software applications to produce documentation, quantitative data presentations and functional
graphical presentations appropriate to various academic and professional settings.
5.
Information literacy:
Information literacy includes the ability to identify, locate and effectively use information from
various print and electronic sources.
Online General Education Competency Questionnaire at
http://www.montgomerycollege.edu/departments/outcomes/gen_ed.htm#timetable
California State, Los Angeles (see link to the General Education Assessment plan,
too)
http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/aa/ugs/geassess/geplan.htm
Goals and Objectives
Assessment of Learning Outcomes for General Education
Goal 1. Students can integrate and express ideas in written and oral forms in
English.
Objective 1. Students demonstrate mastery of basic written and oral
communication, including the ability to read and listen with understanding and
critical discernment.
Goal 2. Students can reason critically across a variety of disciplines.
Objective 1. Students develop habits of critical inquiry and mastery of critical
thinking skills.
Objective 2. Students demonstrate understanding of analysis, criticism, and
advocacy in the context of both deductive and inductive reasoning.
Objective 3. Students demonstrate the ability to identify relevant factors needed to
make a decision, solve a problem, or produce cogent reasoning.
Goal 3. Students understand basic mathematical concepts and apply quantitative
reasoning.
Objective 1. Students regard quantitative reasoning not simply as a set of
techniques, but as a way to think, reason, and conceptualize.
Objective 2. Students can perform computations and symbolic manipulations.
Objective 3. Students can apply quantitative reasoning to interpret information
and solve problems.
Goal 4. Students have the knowledge, abilities, and values necessary for
participation in American society and government.
Objective 1. Students demonstrate an understanding of the historical development
of American political and social institutions and ideals.
Objective 2. Students demonstrate the knowledge, abilities, and values relevant to
the democratic political systems established under the U.S. and California
constitutions.
Objective 3. Students demonstrate recognition of the contributions made by major
national, ethnic, and social groups to the historical development of American
ideals and the contexts in which those contributions were made.
Goal 5. Students understand the distinct perspectives and major achievements in
the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities.
Objective 1. Students demonstrate basic knowledge of the natural sciences, the
social sciences, and the arts and humanities, and an appreciation of their
interrelationships.
Objective 2. Students understand and apply the methodologies of the natural
sciences, the social sciences, and the arts and humanities.
Objective 3. Students demonstrate an understanding of how the distinct
perspectives of the major disciplines enrich their lives and foster intellectual
curiosity.
Goal 6. Students understand and appreciate diversity, and develop a greater
awareness of ethical and social concerns, and respect for others.
Objective1. Students can analyze similarities and differences among individuals
and groups, including those based upon race, ethnicity, class, gender and social
concerns.
Objective 2. Students develop greater sensitivity to perspectives and cultures
other than their own.
Objective 3. Students develop skill in recognizing, analyzing and resolving ethical
and social problems.
Goal 7. Students have knowledge and skills for lifelong understanding and selfdevelopment.
Objective 1. Students understand the relationship of self to others and their
environments.
Objective 2. Students demonstrate an understanding of the ways humans adapt to
a diverse and changing global environment.
Goal 8. Students understand the topic of an Upper Division Theme from the
perspectives of three different disciplines: the natural sciences and mathematics, the
social sciences, and the arts and humanities.
Objective 1. Students demonstrate how the disciplines applied together contribute
to a fuller knowledge of the theme topic.
Objective 2. Students demonstrate how study of the theme topic promotes the
goals of General Education.
Binghamton University (see link to assessment plan)
http://provost.binghamton.edu/assessment/
Learning Outcomes for General Education Requirements
(Revised 10/23/03)
C requirement - Composition
Students in C courses will demonstrate
1. The ability to write effectively and coherently, in ways appropriate to the
discipline and the level of the course.
2. The ability to revise and improve their writing in both form and content.
O requirement - Oral Communication
Students in O courses will demonstrate
1. Proficiency in oral presentations.
2. The ability to improve oral presentations in response to critiques.
3. Skill in listening to and critiquing oral presentations.
Foreign Language Requirement
Students who satisfy the Foreign Language requirement will demonstrate:
1. Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language.
2. Knowledge of the distinctive features of cultures(s) associated with the languages
they are studying.
G requirement - Global Interdependencies
1. Students in G courses will demonstrate knowledge of central characteristics of
western societies (i.e., those in Europe and North America) as they developed
and/or continue to develop in dynamic interaction with other regions of the world
and in the context of global systems of economic and/or cultural exchange.
2. For western societies, students will demonstrate knowledge of long-term patterns
of development or knowledge of broad issues or aspects that are foundational to
the West.
3. For nonwestern societies, students will demonstrate knowledge of central
characteristics of one or more nonwestern civilizations.
P requirement - Pluralism in the United States
Students in all P courses will demonstrate an understanding of
1. United States society from the perspective of three or more groups that constitute
that society, including at least three of the following groups: African Americans,
Asian Americans, European Americans, Latino Americans, and Native
Americans.
2. How these groups have affected and been affected by basic institutions of
American society, such as commerce, family, legal and political structures, or
religion.
In addition, students who have not scored 85 or above on the New York State Regents
examination in United States history (or its equivalent) must take a P course where they
also will demonstrate knowledge of:
3. An historical narrative of the United States and its institutions over a period of at
least a century, including connections to prior and subsequent periods, with this
narrative including several themes that have shaped the development of American
society, such as the struggle for democracy, citizenship, racial and gender
inequality, religious freedom, and civil rights; the conflicts that have erupted over
these issues; and the consensus, if any, that has been reached on each of them.
4. How the history of the United States relates to the history of at least two other
regions of the world, as a means of understanding America's evolving relationship
with the rest of the world.
A requirement - Aesthetics
Students in A courses will demonstrate an understanding of the creative process and the
role of imagination and aesthetic judgment in at least one principal form of artistic
expression in such fields as art, art history, cinema, creative writing, dance, graphic
design, music, and theater.
H requirement - Humanities
Students in H courses will demonstrate an understanding of human experience though the
study of literature or philosophy.
L requirement - Laboratory Science
Students in L courses will demonstrate
1. Understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena,
including the formulation and testing of hypotheses and the collection, analysis
and interpretation of data.
2. Knowledge of concepts and models in one of the sciences.
N requirement - Social Sciences
Students in N courses will demonstrate
1. Knowledge of major concepts, models, and issues (and their
interrelationships) of at least one of the social sciences: anthropology,
economics, geography, history, political science, or sociology.
2. An understanding of the methods used by social scientists to explore social
phenomena, including, when appropriate to the discipline, observation,
hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation,
evaluation of evidence, and analysis by mathematics or other interpretive
frameworks.
M requirement - Mathematics/Reasoning
Students in M courses will demonstrate competence in an area such as calculus, symbolic
logic, the logic of computers, the logic of deductive and inductive reasoning, or
probability and statistical inference.
S requirement - Wellness
Students in S courses will demonstrate knowledge of such topics as diet and
nutrition, physical development, substance abuse, human sexuality, stress and stress
reduction techniques, relaxation methods, or the characteristics that define physical,
mental or emotional fitness/wellness
Y requirement - Physical Activity
Students in Y courses will demonstrate one or more of the following attributes:
neuromuscular coordination, muscular strength and muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory endurance, or flexibility.
Minnesota State University—Mankato (You can access their General Education
booklet at http://www.mnsu.edu/acadaf/pdfs/04-05CDGenEd.pdf)
CATEGORY 1: COMMUNICATION
Goal: To develop writers and speakers who use the English
language effectively and who read, write, speak, and listen
critically. At a base, all students should complete introductory
communication requirements early in their college studies.
Writing competency is an ongoing process to be reinforced
through writing-intensive courses and writing across
the curriculum. Speaking and listening skills need reinforcement.
There are multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication,
public speaking and discussion.
Part A: English Composition
(requires one course, 3 credits or more, with a grade of at
least “P” or “C”)
Goal: To develop writers who use the English language
effectively and who read and write critically. This course
2 Cultural Diversity: * = Core, ^ = Related
will require faculty-critiqued writing. Writing competency
is an ongoing process which needs to be reinforced throughout
the curriculum.
Students will be able to:
(a) demonstrate and practice strategies for idea generation,
audience analysis, organization of texts, drafting, evaluation
of drafts, revision, and editing;
(b) write papers of varying lengths that demonstrate effective
explanation, analysis, and argumentation;
(c) become experienced in computer-assisted writing and
research;
(d) locate and evaluate material, using PALS, the Internet,
and other sources;
(e) analyze and synthesize source material, making appropriate
use of paraphrase, summary, quotation, and ci3 Cultural Diversity: * = Core, ^ = Related
tation conventions;
(f) employ syntax and usage appropriate to academic writing
and the professional world.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ENG 101
Part B: Speech and Oral Reasoning
(requires one course, 3 credits or more)
Goal: To develop skills necessary for reasoned communication.
Courses in this category will require individual public
speaking which is critiques by the instructor. Speaking and
reasoning competency is an ongoing process which needs to
be reinforced throughout the curriculum.
Students will be able to:
(a) understand/demonstrate communication processes
through invention, organization, drafting, revision, editing
and presentation;
(b) participate effectively in groups with emphasis on listening,
critical and reflective thinking, and responding;
(c) analyze, evaluate, and synthesize in a responsible manner
material from diverse sources and points of view.
(d) select appropriate communication choices for specific
audiences;
(e) construct logical and coherent arguments;
(f) use authority, point of view, and individual voice and
style in communications;
(g) employ syntax, usage and analytical techniques appropriate
to academic disciplines and the professional world.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
CDIS 201 SPEE 100 SPEE 102 SPEE 212
SPEE 233
Part C: Writing Intensive
(requires one course, 3 or more credits)
Goal: Students will continue to develop skills taught in Composition,
applying them in the context of a particular discipline.
Students will be able to:
(a) use writing to explore and gain a basic familiarity with
the questions, values and analytical or critical thinking
methods used in the discipline;
(b) locate, analyze, evaluate, and use source material or
data in their writing in a manner appropriate to intended
audiences (popular or within the discipline).
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ANTH 250^ BIOL 103 BIOL 105 COMS 202
ECON 314^ EEC 222* ENG 112^ ENG 113^
ENG 211* ENG 212^ ENG 213 ENG 242
ENG 301 ETHN 201* ETHN 202* ETHN 203*
ETHN 204* FREN 302 GEOG 210 HIST 170W^
HIST 171W HIST 180* HIST 190W HIST 191W
HUM 250 HUM 280 HUM 281* HUM 282^
KSP 220* PHIL 100 PHIL 115* PHIL 120*
PHIL 205^ PHIL 222^ PHIL 224^ PHIL 226
PHIL 240 PHIL 322 PHIL 334 PHIL 336
PHIL 358^ POL 103 POL 107 PSYC 103
REHB 110* SOC 101 SOWK 190^ SPEE 101
THEA 285* URBS 230 WOST 120
CATEGORY 2: CRITICAL THINKING
(requires completion of the rest of the Gen. Ed. Program
or one course)
Goal: To develop critical thinking, communication, and problem
solving skills. Courses in this category must focus on
skill development and throughout the course will provide
opportunities to exercise skills. Although the exercise of skills
requires a subject matter, the emphasis in this category will
be on skill development. The skills will not be ones that are
specific to the practice of a particular discipline or area of
inquiry but rather will be skills that are common to different
disciplines and different areas of inquiry.
Students will be able to:
(a) gather and analyze information of various kinds, employing
formal or informal tools to represent information in
ways useful for solving problems;
(b) weigh evidence for and against hypotheses;
(c) recognize, construct, and evaluate arguments;
(d) apply appropriate critical and evaluative principles to
texts, documents, or works--one’s own or others’--in
oral, visual, or written mediums.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
AST 115 CHEM 111 CHEM 133 CHEM 201
CSP 110 HLTH 212 PHIL 110 PHIL 112
PHIL 311 PHYS 211 PHYS 221 POL 103
PSYC 103
CATEGORY 3: NATURAL SCIENCE
(requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits
or more. At least one course must have a laboratory)
Goal: To improve students’ understanding of natural science
principles and of the methods of scientific inquiry, i.e., the
ways in which scientists investigate natural science phenomena.
Students should be encouraged to study both the biological
and physical sciences.
Students will be able to:
(a) develop understanding of scientific theories;
(b) formulate and test hypotheses in either laboratory,
simulation, or field experiences;
(c) communicate his/her experimental findings and interpretations
both orally and in writing;
(d) apply the natural science perspective to society issues.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ANTH 220^-L AST 101 AST 102 AST 104-L
AST 115 BIOL 100-L BIOL 102* BIOL 103
BIOL 105-L BIOL 270-L CHEM 100 CHEM 101
4 Cultural Diversity: * = Core, ^ = Related
CHEM 106 CHEM 111-L CHEM 131 CHEM 132
CHEM 134 CHEM 201-L EET 112-L FCS 140
GEOG 101 GEOL 100-L GEOL 121-L GEOL 122-L
PHYS 100^-L PHYS 101-L PHYS 102 PHYS 105-L
PHYS 107 PHYS 110-L PHYS 211-L PHYS 221-L
CATEGORY 4: MATHEMATICAL/LOGICAL REASONING
(requires one course, 3 credits or more, with a grade of at
least “P” or “C”)
Goal: To increase students’ knowledge about mathematical
and logical modes of thinking. This will enable students to
appreciate the breadth of applications of mathematics, evaluate
arguments, and detect fallacious reasoning. Students will
learn to apply mathematics, logic, and/or statistics to help
them make decisions in their lives and careers.
Students will be able to:
(a) illustrate historical and contemporary applications of
mathematical/logical systems;
(b) clearly express mathematical/logical ideas in writing;
(c) explain what constitutes a valid mathematical/logical
argument (proof);
(d) apply higher-order problem-solving and/or modeling
strategies.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
MATH 110 MATH 112 MATH 113 MATH 115
MATH 121 MATH 130 MATH 180 MATH 181
MATH 184 MATH 201 PHIL 110 PHIL 112
PHIL 311 SOC 202 STAT 154
CATEGORY 5: HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
(requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits
or more)
Goal: To increase students’ knowledge of how historians and
social and behavioral scientists discover, describe, and explain
the behaviors and interactions among individuals,
groups, institutions, events and ideas. To challenge students
to examine the implications of this knowledge and its interconnection
with action and living an informed life.
Students will be able to:
(a) employ the methods and data that historians and social
and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human
condition;
(b) examine social institutions and processes across a
range of historical periods and cultures;
(c) use and critique alternative explanatory systems or
theories;
(d) develop and communicate alternative explanations or
solutions for contemporary social issues.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ANTH 101^ ANTH 102 ANTH 240^ ANTH 250
CORR 106 CORR 132 CORR 255 ECON 100
ECON 201 ECON 202 ECON 314^ ETHN 100*
ETHN 101* ETHN 201* ETHN 203* ETHN 204*
ETHN 140* FCS 100 GEOG 103^ HIST 151*
HIST 153 HIST 154 HIST 155* HIST 170^
HIST 170W^ HIST 171^ HIST 171W^ HIST 180*
HIST 181 HIST 190* HIST 190W* HIST 191*
HIST 191W* HLTH 310 KSP 235 LAWE 132
MRKT 100 POL 100 POL 104 POL 111
PSYC 101 PSYC 206 SOC 100* SOC 101^
SOC 102 SOC 208* SOC 255 SOWK 190^
SOWK 255^ URBS 100^ URBS 150 WOST 110*
WOST 240
CATEGORY 6: HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS
(requires two courses from different disciplines, 6 credits
or more)
Goal: To expand students’ knowledge of the human condition
and human cultures, especially in relation to behavior,
ideas, and values expressed in works of human imagination
and thought. Through study in disciplines such as literature,
philosophy, the fine arts, students will engage in critical analysis,
form aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of
the arts and humanities as fundamental to the health and survival
of any society. Students should have experiences in
both the arts and humanities.
Students will be able to:
(a) demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of
works in the arts and humanities;
(b) understand those works as expressions of individual and
human values within an historical and social context;
(c) respond critically to works in the arts and humanities;
(d) engage in the creative process or interpretive performance;
(e) articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the
arts and humanities.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ART 100 ART 160^ ART 231 ART 260^
ART 261^ ART 275 ENG 110 ENG 112^
ENG 113^ ENG 114 ENG 211* ENG 212^
ENG 213 ENG 214 HUM 150^ HUM 151^
HUM 155^ HUM 156 HUM 250 HUM 280
HUM 281* HUM 282^ KSP 251* MUS 120^
MUS 125* MUS 126* PHIL 100 PHIL 115*
PHIL 120* PHIL 205^ PHIL 222^ PHIL 224^
PHIL 240 PHIL 321^ PHIL 322 PHIL 334
PHIL 336 PHIL 337 PHIL 358^ SPEE 310
THEA 100^ THEA 101 THEA 115 THEA 285*
URBS 110 WOST 251*
CATEGORY 7: HUMAN DIVERSITY
(requires one course, 3 credits or more)
Goal: To increase students’ understanding of individual and
group differences, emphasizing the dynamics of race, gender,
sexual orientation, age, class, and/or disabilities in the history
and culture of diverse groups in the United States; the contributions
of pluralism to United States society and culture; and
5 Cultural Diversity: * = Core, ^ = Related
issues--economic, political, social, cultural, artistic, humanistic,
and education traditions--that surround such diversity. Students
should be able to evaluate the United States’ historical
and contemporary responses to group differences.
Students will be able to:
(a) understand the development of and the changing meanings
of group identities in the
(b) demonstrate an awareness of the individual and institution
dynamics of unequal power relations between
groups in contemporary society;
(c) analyze and evaluate their own attitudes, behaviors,
concepts, and beliefs regarding diversity, racism, and
bigotry;
(d) describe and discuss the experience and contributions
(political, social, economic, artistic, humanistic, etc.)
of the many groups that shape American society and
culture, in particular those groups which have suffered
discrimination and exclusion;
(e) demonstrate communication skills necessary for living
and working effectively in a society with great
population diversity.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
CDIS 290* EEC 222* ENG 211* ETHN 100*
ETHN 101* ETHN 150* ETHN 200* ETHN 201*
ETHN 202* ETHN 203* ETHN 204* GERO 200*
HIST 151* HIST 155* HIST 190* HIST 190W*
HIST 191* HIST 191W* HUM 281* KSP 220*
KSP 251* MUS 125* MUS 126* PHIL 115*
POL 102* REHB 110* SOC 100* SOC 208*
SPEE 203* THEA 285* WOST 110* WOST 251*
CATEGORY 8: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
(requires one course, 3 credits or more)
Goal: To increase students’ understanding of the growing
interdependence of nations, traditions and peoples and develop
their ability to apply a comparative perspective to crosscultural
social, economic, and political experiences.
Students will be able to:
(a) describe, analyze, and evaluate political, economic, humanistic,
artistic, social and cultural elements which
influence relations of nations and peoples in their historical
and contemporary dimensions;
(b) demonstrate knowledge of cultural, social, religious
and linguistic differences;
(c) analyze specific international problems illustrating cultural,
economic, artistic, humanistic, social, and political
differences which affect their solution;
(d) understand the role of a world citizen and the responsibility
world citizens share for their common global
future.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ANTH 101^ ANTH 230^ ANTH 240^ ART 160^
ART 260^ ART 261^ BIOL 201^ CDIS 206
CDIS 207 ECON 314^ EET 125^ ENG 212^
ENVR 101 FREN 101 FREN 102 FREN 201
FREN 202 GEOG 100^ GEOG 103^ GER 101
GER 102 GER 201 GER 202 HIST 153
HIST 170^ HIST 170W^ HIST 171^ HIST 171W^
HIST 181 HUM 155^ HUM 156 HUM 282^
PHIL 205^ PHIL 358^ POL 106^ SCAN 101
SCAN 102 SCAN 111 SCAN 112 SOC 101^
SOWK 255^ SPAN 101 SPAN 102 SPAN 201
SPAN 202 SPEE 203* THEA 225* URBS 100^
WOST 220*
CATEGORY 9: ETHICAL AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY
(requires one course, 3 credits or more)
Goal: To develop students’ capacity to identify, discuss and
reflect upon the ethical dimensions of political, social, and
personal life and to understand the ways in which they can
exercise responsible and productive citizenship. While there
are diverse views of social justice or the common good in a
pluralistic society, students should learn that responsible citizenship
requires them to develop skills to understand their
own and others positions, be part of the free exchange of ideas,
and function as public minded citizens.
Students will be able to:
(a) examine, articulate, and apply their own ethical views;
(b) understand and apply core concepts (e.g. politics, rights
and obligations, justice, liberty) to specific issues;
(c) analyze and reflect on the ethical dimensions of legal,
social, and scientific issues;
(d) recognize the diversity of political motivations and interests
of others;
(e) identify ways to exercise the rights and responsibilities
of citizenship.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
BLAW 131^ CHEM 131 CORR 106 CORR 250
CORR 255 ENG 213 HIST 180* KSP 101
KSP 250 MASS 110^ PHIL 120* PHIL 222^
PHIL 224^ PHIL 226 PHIL 240 PHIL 321^
PHIL 322 POL 101 POL 107 POL 111
SOC 255 SOWK 190^ SPEE 300 URBS 230
WOST 120 WOST 220*
CATEGORY 10: PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
(requires one course, 3 credits or more)
Goal: To increase students’ understanding of today’s complex
environmental challenges. Students will examine the
interrelatedness of human society and the natural environment.
Knowledge of both bio-physical principles and psychosocial
cultural systems is the foundation for integrative
and critical thinking about environmental issues.
Students will be able to:
(a) explain the basic structure and function of various natu6
Cultural Diversity: * = Core, ^ = Related
ral ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within
those systems;
(b) discern and analyze patterns and interrelationships of
the bio-physical and psycho-social cultural systems;
(c) critically discern and analyze individual, social, and
ecological dimensions of health;
(d) describe the basic institutional arrangements (social,
legal, political, economic, health, ethical, religious) that
are evolving to deal with environmental and natural
resource challenges;
(e) evaluate critically environmental and natural resource
issues in light of understandings about interrelationships,
ecosystems, and institutions;
(f) propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental
problems;
(g) articulate and defend the actions they would take on
various environmental issues.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
ANTH 102 BIOL 201^ CHEM 133 EEC 205
ENVR 101 GEOG 100^ GEOG 101 GEOG 210
GEOL 100 GEOL 121 HLTH 101 PHIL 226
RPLS 282 URBS 150
CATEGORY 11: PERFORMANCE AND PARTICIPATION
(requires 2-3 credits)
Goal: To prepare students for responsible and effective participation
in groups and communities.
Students will be able to:
(a) participate effectively in a variety of artistic, education,
political, recreational, health and public service,
or social service settings;
(b) interact with others of another culture in its indigenous
setting through a structured experience;
(c) participate cooperatively in group athletic activity or
artistic performance.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
CDIS 205 EEC 222* ENG 242 HLTH 210
HP 101 HP 103 HP 104 HP 105
HP 114 HP 117 HP 130* HP 138
HP 139 HP 143 HP 145 HP 146
HP 147 HP 148 HP 149 HP 150
HP 152 HP 153 HP 154 HP 155
HP 156 HP 157 HP 158 HP 159
HP 161 HP 166 HP 174 HP 175
HP 176 HP 177 HP 178 HP 179
HP 182 HP 190 HP 241 HP 242
HP 245 HP 248 HP 250 HP 252
HP 257 HP 291 KSP 220* MSL 210
MUS 101 MUS 102 MUS 103 MUS 104
MUS 105 MUS 106 MUS 111 MUS 112
MUS 113 MUS 114 MUS 115 MUS 116
MUS 117 NURS 101 POL 101 RPLS 278
SOWK 214 SPEE 220 SPEE 310 THEA 102
THEA 103 THEA 105 THEA 107 THEA 108
THEA 109 THEA 115 THEA 123* THEA 125*
THEA 126 THEA 127 THEA 128 THEA 223*
THEA 225* THEA 226 THEA 227* THEA 228
THEA 229 THEA 328^ URBS 230
CATEGORY 12: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE
(requires 0-1 credits)
Goal: To promote further development of student success
skills, such as reading, writing and speaking; help students
gain intellectual confidence; build in the expectation of academic
success; and to provide assistance in making the transition
to the University.
Students will be able to:
(a) experience higher personal expectations of his/her ability
to meaningfully participate in academic life;
(b) define and give examples of critical thinking;
(c) interact with other students regarding academic matters;
(d) affirm that careful thinking is an important aspect of
the educational process;
(e) make a comfortable transition to college life.
Course(s) which satisfies this category include:
FYEX 100
CATEGORY 13: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(requires 0-2 credits)
Goals: To familiarize students with the tools, concepts and
societal impact of information technology and to develop the
skills necessary to use this technology critically and effectively.
Students will be able to:
(a) use electronic information technology ethically and responsibly;
(b) access and retrieve information through electronic media,
evaluating the accuracy and authenticity of that
information;
(c) create, manage, organize and communicate information
through electronic media;
(d) demonstrate a working knowledge of information technology
terms and concepts;
(e) understand how computers function and the limits of
computation and information technology;
(f) recognize changing technologies and make informed
choices in their use.
Course(s) which satisfy this category include:
COMS 100 COMS 110 EET 115 EET 116
POL 105
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