European Heritage Label Editorial Texts

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European Heritage Label Editorials
Short Versions
The European Heritage Label links heritage milestones on the road to the formation of
Europe’s history, culture and values.
Archaeological Park Carnuntum, Austria
The Archaeological Park Carnuntum is an important Roman settlement founded in the
middle of the 1st century AD at a crossing point of trade routes on the Danube.
Peace Palace, The Hague, the Netherlands
Built in 1913 the Peace Palace is the seat of the International Court of Justice and the
Permanent Court of Arbitration and embodies the values of peace and justice.
Great Guild Hall, Tallinn, Estonia
Commissionned in 1410 by an association of German Hanseatic merchants, this place
played a major role in the history of trade and cultural exchanges in medieval
northern Europe.
Camp Westerbork, Hooghalen, the Netherlands
As of 1939 Camp Westerbork served as a refugee camp, a transit camp and then an
imprisonment camp before hosting people returning to the Netherlands from former
Dutch colonies.
Medium Versions
The European Heritage Label links highly symbolic heritage sites which have played a
significant role in the history and culture of Europe or in the development of European
integration.
Archaeological Park Carnuntum, Austria (100 BC)
The Archaeological Park Carnuntum was an important Roman settlement founded in
the middle of the 1st century AD at a crossing point of trade routes on the Danube.
The 400 years of Roman life in Carnuntum reflect a period of history that deeply
influenced and shaped Europe’s development.
Peace Palace, The Hague, the Netherlands (AD 1913)
The Peace Palace hosted international peace conferences in the early 20th century
from 1913 onwards, which aimed at regulating the arms race and settling international
disputes by arbitration. This work continues today as the Peace Palace is the seat of
many judicial institutions (the International Court of Justice, the Permanent Court of
Arbitration, the Hague Academy of International Law) and embodies the values of
peace and justice.
Great Guild Hall, Tallinn, Estonia (AD 1410)
The Great Guild Hall was commissioned by the Great Guild, an association of German
Hanseatic merchants, one of most important trading organisations which played an
important role in the history of trade and cultural exchanges in medieval northern
Europe.
Today, the hall hosts the Estonian History Museum which presents Estonian history in
its European context.
Camp Westerbork, Hooghalen, the Netherlands (AD 1939)
Camp Westerbork served as a refugee camp for Jews persecuted by the Nazis until
1942, then became a transit camp from which Jews, Roma and Sinti were deported to
Nazi extermination and concentration camps. After World War II, Dutch nationals
suspected of collaborating with the Nazis were imprisoned in the camp. Later, it
hosted people returning to the Netherlands from the former Dutch colony of the East
Indies. Camp Westerbork has links to crucial topics in European history such as
occupation, persecution, migration, decolonisation and multiculturalism.
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Long Versions
Europe starts here!
Europe starts with you!
The European Heritage Label links outstanding heritage sites with a symbolic European
value. The four sites which were awarded this label in 2013 have played a significant
role in Europe’s history and culture or in European integration.
Started in 2006 as a joint initiative by national governments, the label is administered
today by the European Commission. European Heritage Label sites are carefully
selected at national and EU level for their symbolic value and the activities they offer,
which highlight their place and role in European history or in the development of
European integration.
For more information, please contact [email protected]
Archaeological Park Carnuntum, Austria
The Archaeological Park Carnuntum in the east of Austria brings Roman history to life.
Carnuntum was an important Roman settlement founded in the middle of the 1st
century AD at a crossing point of trade routes on the Danube. It became one of the
most important cities in the Roman Empire. The 400 years of Roman life in Carnuntum
reflect a period of history that deeply influenced and shaped Europe’s development.
Today visitors to the park can view reconstructed Roman houses and visit a museum
with educational programmes.
www.carnuntum.co.at
Peace Palace, The Hague, the Netherlands
The Peace Palace in The Hague traces the history of peace in Europe. Before the
palace opened in 1913, The Hague was host to the First World Peace Conference in
1899 – the culmination of the 19th century peace movement nurtured by many
European intellectuals. The Peace Palace hosted international peace conferences in the
early 20th century from 1913 onwards, which aimed at regulating the arms race and
settling international disputes by arbitration. This work continues today as the Peace
Palace is the seat of many judicial institutions (the International Court of Justice, the
Permanent Court of Arbitration, the Hague Academy of International Law) and
embodies the values of peace and justice. It is often called the seat of international
law.
www.vredespaleis.nl
Great Guild Hall, Tallinn, Estonia
The Great Guild Hall was built in 1410. It was commissioned by the Great Guild, an
association of German Hanseatic merchants,one of most important trading
organisations in medieval times, which played an important role in the history of trade
and cultural exchanges in medieval northern Europe.
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The Great Guild Hall, an example of typical Hanseatic architecture, is a public building
in which countless trade and social exchanges have taken place since the Middle Ages.
Today, the hall hosts the Estonian History Museum which presents Estonian history in
its European context.
www.ajaloomuuseum.ee
Camp Westerbork, the Netherlands
Camp Westerbork in the north-east of the Netherlands has a turbulent past. It served
as a refugee camp for Jews persecuted by the Nazis until 1942, and then became a
transit camp from which Jews, Roma and Sinti were deported to Nazi extermination
and concentration camps in Germany and occupied territories of Central and Eastern
Europe. After World War II, Dutch nationals suspected of collaborating with the Nazis
were imprisoned in the camp. Later, it hosted people returning to the Netherlands
from the former Dutch colony of the East Indies, among them a large group of
Moluccans. Thanks to its history, Camp Westerbork has links to crucial topics in
European history such as occupation, persecution, migration, decolonisation and
multiculturalism. A museum (providing, among other activities, educational
programmes) and monuments of remembrance (such as the National Westerbork
Memorial) can be nowadays found on the site of the former camp.
www.kampwesterbork.nl
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