Course Outline – Challenge and Change in Society Grade 12 (HSB

advertisement
Course Outline – Challenge and Change in Society Grade 12 (HSB 4M)
Kingston Collegiate & Vocational Institute
Date:
September, 2012
Department Head: Ms. S Howie
Teacher:
Credit Value:
Mr. Brennan
1.0
Department:
Prerequisite(s):
Social Sciences
HSP3M recommended
Policy Documents
The Ontario Curriculum: Grades 11 and 12: Social Sciences and Humanities (2000)
Ontario Secondary Schools 9 to 12 - Program and Diploma Requirements (1999)
Course Description
This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology, and sociology to investigate and explain
shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will analyse cultural, social, and biological
patterns in human societies, looking at the ways in which those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of
classical and contemporary social theorists, and will apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends.
Overall Curriculum Expectations and Summative Tasks
Strand: Social Change
By the end of this course, students will:
1 appraise the differences and similarities in the methodologies and strategies of anthropology, psychology, and sociology
applied to the study of change
2 describe key features of major theories from anthropology, psychology, and sociology that focus on change
3 analyse patterns of technological change from the perspectives of anthropology, psychology, and sociology
Strand: Social Trends
By the end of this course, students will:
4 appraise the differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of
trends relating to the baby boom, fertility and fecundity, and the life cycle
5 assess the importance of demography as a tool for studying social trends
6 demonstrate an understanding of the social forces that influence and shape trends
Strand: Social Challenges
By the end of this course, students will:
7 appraise the differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of
social challenges pertaining to health, social injustice, and global concerns
8 demonstrate an understanding of the social forces that shape such challenges
Strand: Research and Inquiry Skills
By the end of this course, students will:
9 define and correctly use anthropological, psychological, and sociological terms and concepts
10 demonstrate an understanding of the main areas of study in anthropology, psychology, and sociology, and of the similarities
and differences among them
11 demonstrate an understanding of the different research methods used by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to
investigate questions of importance within each field, and apply relevant skills correctly and ethically
12 demonstrate an ability to select, organize, and interpret information gathered from a variety of print and electronic sources
13 communicate the results of their inquiries effectively
70% Term Summative Assessment Tasks
Unit
Description
Unit 1
Introduction to Social Science
Unit 2
Social Change
Unit 3
Unit 4
Unit 5
Challenges in Health & Wellness
Social Change in Canada
Social Change in a Global Context
Summative Task
Social Scientist Coffee House
Unit Test
Changing Gender Roles Presentation
Unit Test
Community Visit & Unit Test
Unit Test
Unit Test
Overall Expectations
Evaluated
1,2, 3, 5, 9, 10
Level
Achieved
2, 3,6, 7,8
7, 8,
4, 5, 6, 8
4, 5, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13
Note: the tasks listed above may change over the course of the semester to allow for teachers to respond to evidence of student
learning. Students will be notified in advance of any changes to the summative assessment tasks. All summative tasks must be
submitted before a credit is granted.
30% Final Summative (or culminating) Activities
Summative
Assessment Task
Description
Culminating Task
15% Seminar Discussions
Final Exam
15%
Core Texts:
Overall Expectations
Evaluated
Level Achieved
6, 9-13
Written Exam
C. Bain, et. Al. Transitions in Society Oxford University Press, Toronto. 2002
Assessment and Evaluation Overview
Learning Skills/Work Habits:
Responsibility: Doing what you need to do, when it is asked.
Organization: Thinking ahead about finishing work and making sure you have what you need in place to get the job done.
Independent work: Completing your tasks without being asked to do so or disturbing others and by being resourceful when you find
ways to do your work.
Collaboration: Working positively with the teacher and with your peers so that the work is done as well as possible at all times.
Initiative: Showing a positive, open, curious attitude towards learning while taking care of yourself and others
Self-regulation: Thinking actively about your learning and making sure that your behaviour does not stop you from learning as much
as you can.
The Learning Skills and work habits are instructed, assessed and evaluated separately from your academic work. You will be
assessed frequently with observation rubrics, questionnaires, checklists, interviews with your teacher, self reflections about these
important skills and habits. This chart shows you what the levels of evaluation of the skills mean:
Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Needs Improvement
I fully use this learning
skill/work habit to reach my
potential in this course.
I use this learning skill/work
habit to reach my potential in
this course a lot of the time.
I know this skill/habit is
important for me to reach my
potential but I have to be
reminded about it.
I don’t show that I know
this skill/habit is
important for me to
reach my potential.
2. Achievement of Overall Course Expectations:
Please refer to your student agenda
Attendance and Punctuality
You have to come to school everyday and be on time because being at school helps you do well and learning to follow these rules
helps you for your future in the workplace. You must tell your teacher and the attendance secretary when you know you will be
absent. After an absence, you will need to do the work you missed. You attendance and any time you are late, will be on your
report card. Look in the student agenda for all the details about the attendance policy at the school.
Teaching and Learning Strategies:
The topics and issues covered in the social science and humanities curriculum are designed both to develop practical skills and to
promote reflective learning. The curriculum provides opportunities for students to undertake hands-on, practical activities , as
well as to conduct research and analysis. The diversity of materials devised to support the curriculum enables teachers to adopt a
variety of teaching approaches, including direct instruction, demonstration, and activity-based learning.
Education for Exceptional Students:
All students require support from teachers, classmates, family, and friends in order to thrive and to gain full benefit from their
school experience. Some students have special needs that require supports beyond those ordinarily received in the school setting.
These needs may be met through accommodations. Accommodations to meet the needs of exceptional students are set out in their
Individual Education Plans. There are three types of accommodations. Instructional accommodations are changes in teaching
strategies, including styles of presentation, methods of organization, or use of technology and multimedia. Environmental
accommodations are changes that the student may require in the classroom and/or school environment, such as preferential
seating or special lighting. Assessment accommodations are changes in assessment procedures that enable the student to
demonstrate his or her learning, such as allowing additional time to complete tests or assignment, or permitting oral responses to
test questions.
Related documents
Download