Beekeeping across the Curriculum

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

EST 643

Integrated Curriculum Unit:

The Traveling Bee Exhibit: An

Integrated Curriculum for

Beekeeping

Robert Nista

Graduate Student, Oakland University

August, 2010

Nista, 4/13/20, page 1

Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Table of Contents

Rationale 2

Desired Results 6

Content Standards 7

Science of Beekeeping Presentation 8

Process of Beekeeping 9

Student Rubric of Presenter 11

Teacher Rubric of Presenter 12

Presenter Rubric of students 13

Lesson 1 Work Sheets 17

Lesson 2 Work Sheets 20

Sources 23

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Rationale

I have been integrating beekeeping into the science and special education programs at

Reed City Middle School for the past two years. I have found this is a very rewarding and educational unit for the students. My position in the district has recently placed me outside of the traditional classroom teacher role. I have therefore developed a traveling beekeeping program for the fourth- and fifth-grade students in our district.

As we have over twenty classrooms in the elementary school, I have developed a twopart presentation; the science of bees and the process of beekeeping. Dividing the program into two separate presentations will allow me the ability to reach all of the classrooms two times throughout the year. Each presentation needs to be completed within a sixty-minute window.

A sign-up sheet will be given to all the teachers and each will sign-up for two dates. The

Science of Bees will be presented first and the Process of Beekeeping will be presented second. After students participate in the first program, they will be given handouts and permission slips if they are interested in visiting the hive.

Due to the nature of the informal intent of this program, students will not be given a pretest or post test. Students will conduct activities in groups and rubrics will measure their effort, participation and interest. I have also included a rubric for both the teacher and the students to conduct about my presentation. I have, however, included objectives and the

Michigan Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) with which the objectives align.

The classroom teachers will be welcome to further design rubrics if they choose.

There are four aspects of integrating beekeeping into the classroom that standout as reasons for implementation.

1.

The integration of beekeeping into a school is a great example of experiential education. Experiential education increases student academic learning and performance. a.

The Association for Experiential Education regards experiential education

"as a philosophy and methodology in which educators purposefully engage with learners in direct experience and focused reflection in order to increase knowledge, develop skills and clarify values" (Itin, C. M. 1999).

In short, experiential education is a process that occurs between a teacher and student that infuses direct experience with the learning environment and content. Learning by doing is a very simple way to explain this concept. b.

The first time I installed bees with some one of my classes is good example of the benefit of active student participation. The students in the class were divided into three groups. Group one participated in the installation process. Group two watched the installation process from behind a safety fence. Group three chose to stay inside and read and watch a short video about the installation process. After the installation the

Nista, 4/13/20, page 3

Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping groups were asked to write descriptive words about the experience and how to install bees. The third group used words like “boring, dumb, waste of time,” and was not able to have anyone correctly describe how to install the bees. The second group used descriptive words and phrases like “kind of cool, sweet but sort of boring, really hot.” A few of the students were able to correctly describe how to install the bees. The first group used words like “amazing, life changing, exhilarating, terrifying, awesome” to describe their experience. A majority of the students in the first group were able to accurately describe how to install bees.

2.

Bees are in danger and struggling to survive. a.

Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is a phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or European honey bee colony abruptly disappears. Colony collapse is economically significant because bees pollinate many agricultural crops worldwide. In the past few years nearly one third of the honeybees have died off. Many believe the plight is due to pesticides, herbicides, land development, dwindling food supply and a new virus that seems to evade the immune system of honeybees. Bees don’t just make honey; they play a vital role in the pollination of our fruits and vegetables.

According to the US Department of Agriculture, approximately. one third of our diet comes from insect pollinated plants and honeybees are responsible for more than 80% of that pollination (Stanford 2008).

3.

Beekeeping is a very rewarding hobby to participate in and a valuable lifelong skill for people to posses. a.

Stress is a major symptom of a complex and fast-paced society. These symptoms can include depression and anxiety. Medical science has documented the adverse effects of stress on our mental, physical and emotional health. The information age and the ever-increasing change in technology add to our stress levels. Medical science has provided medications to help treat the symptoms of stress. These medications are important and potentially beneficial, but they are not without their side effects. A less evasive and more satisfying solution to dealing with life's stress is to find a hobby. b.

Hobbies can provide many hours of relief from stress (Malone 2005).

Besides the reduction of stress and worry, hobbies can aid in the battle of depression. One of the simplest means to reduce the effects of depression is to do something fun and enjoyable. Susan M. McHale, Ph.D. of Penn

State University conducted a government study that showed, "Structured activities such as hobbies and sports are the most development-enhancing ways for children to spend their time" (citation). How children spend spare time can make a real difference to their academic, emotional, and behavioral development. Researchers have found that kids who spend the bulk of their free time participating in supervised, structured sports and hobbies are more likely to be well-adjusted teens a few years down the road.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

4.

Students need to get outside and reconnect with nature. a.

According to Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods: Saving

Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder, research suggests that a connection to nature is biologically innate; as humans, we have an affinity for the natural world. When children spend most of their time indoors, they miss out. Problems associated with alienation from nature include familiar maladies: depression, obesity, and attention deficit disorder. Kids who have direct access to nature are better learners (Louv, 2005).

Exposure to nature has been shown to reduce stress and increase attention spans. When a child is out in nature, all the senses get activated. They are immersed in something bigger than their own self, rather than focusing narrowly on one thing, such as a computer screen. They are seeing, hearing, touching, even tasting. Out in nature, a child's brain has the chance to rejuvenate, so the next time he or she has to focus and pay attention, perhaps in school, (s)he'll do better. But even if kids don't have any of the specific problems mentioned above, kids who don't get out much lack the sense of wonder that only nature can provide. I've taken kids into the woods who've never been there. At first, they're scared because it's unfamiliar, but then you can see them open up and start exploring. b.

In my own teaching experience I have noticed a trend over the last few years. Although many students excel in school, many students do not. In my experience, five to seven years ago many of the students who did not excel in school had many other interests and skills. They rode and worked on motorbikes, pedal bikes, four-wheelers, fished, hunted, worked on lawn mowers, etc. Basically they just did stuff. I have noticed in recent years that students have replaced these skills and activities with playing video games and using the internet. This is a worrisome and detrimental trend that will mostly likely affect our country in the years to come.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Desired Results

In a school setting, a majority of academic outcomes should be measurable and achievable. However not all of the outcomes I hope the students will have can be measured in such a short time. I would especially hope that through this presentation students see the importance and enjoyment of activities beyond the walls of their homes.

Hopefully the students gain a better understanding and interest in the natural world around them that they will be able to act upon.

Non-Academic Outcomes

During the Lessons Students will:

1.

Demonstrate an interest in the subject matter.

2.

Maintain a positive attitude while participating in lessons.

3.

Put forth a high level of effort during presentation.

Academic Outcomes

After Completing “The Science of Bees Presentation”

Students will:

1.

Generate an interest and excitement about bees.

2.

Use a model to demonstrate the process of a bee pollinating a flower.

3.

Learn how to use stereoscopes and make observations.

4.

Describe Colony Collapses Disorder and what can be done to help honeybees.

5.

Generate questions based on observations.

After Completing “The Process of Beekeeping” Presentation students will:

1.

Demonstrate how to use safety equipment and tools of beekeeping.

2.

Enjoy learning how to become a beekeeper.

3.

Use senses to identify and describe different types of honey.

4.

Correctly use and read a refractometer.

5.

Identify the importance of beekeeping and its benefits.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Content Standards and Cross Curricular Integration

Although this program is geared more toward an informal educational experience, I have included a variety of the Michigan content standards, statements and expectations that will be covered. I have identified three main subject areas: Science, Physical Education and Social Studies. These area cover basic overviews of using equipment properly and safely, generating questions and working well together. All of these skills are very valuable in and out of a classroom setting.

Michigan Science Content Expectations

S.IP.00.11 Make purposeful observation of the natural world using the appropriate senses.

S.IP.00.12 Generate questions based on observations.

S.IP.00.14 Manipulate simple tools that aid observation and data collection.

S.IP.00.15 Make accurate measurements with appropriate (non-standard) units for the measurement tool.

Content Standards and Integration

Physical Education Concepts and Benchmarks

K.OP.01.03 Identify selected aspects of types of equipment associated with outdoor pursuits.

Students will identify what types of beekeeping tools are needed.

K.OP.03.04 Identifies selected safety features of outdoor pursuits. - Students will discuss the importance and identify safety equipment for beekeeping.

M.OP.04.03 Demonstrate use of non-locomotor skills in outdoor pursuits with self and equipment in isolated settings. Students will model working on a hive.

Social Studies Standards

Standard II.I Diversity of People, Places, and Cultures

All students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of cultures. Students will be exposed to a brief history of beekeeping and the types of beehives used during different times in history.

Standard II.2 Human/Environment Interaction

All students will describe, compare, and explain the locations and characteristics of ecosystems, resources, human adaptation, environmental impact, and the interrelationships among them. Students will discuss how can humans impact the plight of the bees.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

The Science of Beekeeping Presentation

Objectives

Generate an interest and excitement about bees.

Use a model to demonstrate the process of a bee pollinating a flower.

Learn how to use stereoscopes and make observations

Describe Colony Collapses Disorder and what can be done to help honeybees.

Materials

1.

Poster of Bee lifecycle

2.

Stereoscopes with frozen samples of drones and worker bees

3.

Observation Hive

4.

Various bees and hive parts in sealed petri- dishes for students to observe during lecture

5.

Flower and Bee model

6.

Various essential oil scents and cotton balls

7.

Bee presentation power point

Lesson

1.

5 minute Introduction of myself and a begin KWL on board

2.

15 minute lecture discussing using the poster and power point to give a brief overview of the biology of bees.

3.

5-minute description of each activity center students may visit. a.

Observation Hive- students will observe the hive and record/ draw/ label observations. b.

Bee Anatomy- students will look through stereoscopes and use a guided sheet to locate, identify and draw various adaptations and parts of the honeybee anatomy. c.

Pollination Model- students will use the flower model and the honeybee to demonstrate to each other how a bee pollinates a flower. d.

Pheromones- students will smell 1 of six cotton balls. They will then try to find which “hive” they are part of (which hive has the matching scent).

4.

15-20 minutes students may visit various centers based on choice and number of students at each area. (Classroom teacher will assist with evaluation an organization of part of the program).

5.

5-10 minute conclusion. Discussion about Colony Collapse Disorder and how it is affecting bees and people alike.

6.

Complete KWL

7.

Give out small samples of honey (probably honey sticks).

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

The Process of Beekeeping Presentation

Objectives:

Demonstrate how to use safety equipment and tools of beekeeping.

Enjoy learning how to become a beekeeper.

Use senses to identify and describe different types of honey.

Correctly use and read a refractometer.

Identify the importance of beekeeping and its benefits.

Materials

1.

Bee keeping tools (hive tool, bee brush, smoker, frame grabber)

2.

Beekeeping safety equipment (suit, veil and gloves).

3.

A complete hive (minus the bees)

4.

Observation Hive

5.

Variety of 4-5 types of local and store bought honey.

6.

Tasting equipment including stir sticks, cups, napkins, crackers, and plate

7.

Three Refractometers with samples of different types of honey

Lesson

1.

Classroom teacher should have students divided into 4 groups.

2.

Introduce beekeeper and begin KWL

3.

Introduce beekeeping and discuss a little of its history.

4.

Discuss beekeeping safety.

5.

Present tools and demonstrate how they are used in the hive. (Then pass them around).

6.

Discuss and show parts to the hive.

7.

Demonstrate how to check a beehive.

8.

Discuss how to use senses to make observations/ judge honey. a.

Make predictions before you try any honey. b.

Smell- what does it smell like? c.

Texture- how it feels in your mouth d.

Taste- how does the honey taste? e.

Appearance- color, clarity, etc

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

9.

Show students how to prepare a sample and read a refractometer.

10.

Review the four learning centers. a.

Dresses in equipment- have students keep equipment on until they work the hive. b.

Work the Hive- all groups but one will have equipment on while they work the hive. c.

Prepare and use refractometer to identify sugar percentage vs. moisture percentage in 3-4 honey samples d.

Complete honey tasting

11.

Have groups rotate through each station.

12.

Meet for five-minute conclusion and complete the KWL and answer any questions.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Rubrics

I have included three rubrics. One is for the students to evaluate the presenter. The second is for the classroom teacher to evaluate the presenter and the third is for the classroom teacher to evaluate the student’s interest level and attitude toward the subject matter.

Although the rubrics are not created in a traditional manner, I feel this current set-up will allow the teacher and the students to quickly and effectively evaluate the presentation. I am quite sure in my setting very few teachers would be interested in administering a pre and posttest for a one-hour presentation. Likewise, I would want to spend fifteen minutes of my time. These quick and easy tools will give the program good feedback and place to start as far as the rubrics are concerned.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Student Evaluation of Presenter

Teacher’s name: ________________________

The number rating stands for the following: 1 = rarely 2 = once in a while 3 = sometimes

4 = most of the time 5 = almost always

Teacher is prepared for class.

Teacher knows his/her subject.

1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

Teacher is organized and neat. 1 2 3 4 5

Teacher is flexible in accommodating for individual student needs. 1 2 3 4 5

Teacher is clear in giving directions.

Teacher manages the time well.

1 2 3 4 5

Teacher allows you to be active in the classroom-learning environment. 1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

I have learned a lot from this teacher about this subject. 1 2 3 4 5

Additional Comments

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

______________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Teacher Evaluation of Presenter

Please rate the following from 1 to 5 where 1=strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3= neutral,

4=agree, and 5=strongly agree.

1. The presenter was very organized.

3. The presenter was extremely clear.

1 2 3 4 5

2. The presenter began on time and used the time well. 1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

4. The presenter was well prepared. 1 2 3 4 5

5. The presenter was responsive to questions.

6. The presenter had good presentation skills.

7. The presenter held the attention of the audience.

1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

1 2 3 4 5

9. Presenter/participant interaction was sufficient. 1 2 3 4 5

10. This presentation was well tailored to the audience. 1 2 3 4 5

Comments and recommendations for change:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Bees and Beekeeping Student Group Evaluation

Teacher Name____________

Group ______

CATEGORY

Focus on the task

Attitude

Date_______

Working with Others

4

Consistently stays focused on the task and what needs to be done.

Very self-directed.

Never is publicly critical of the project or the work of others.

Always has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.

3

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done most of the time.

Other group members can count on this person.

Rarely is publicly critical of the project or the work of others.

Often has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause

"waves" in the group.

2

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done some of the time. Other group members must sometimes nag, prod, and remind to keep this person on-task.

Occasionally is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group.

Usually has a positive attitude about the task(s).

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes are not a good team member.

1

Rarely focuses on the task and what needs to be done. Lets others do the work.

Often is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group.

Often has a negative attitude about the task(s).

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

The Science of Bees Worksheets

Appendix A

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Observation Hive Form

1.

What do you see? Draw and write what you observe. Develop two questions based on your observations.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

Q1__________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

Q2__________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Honey Bee Anatomy

Use this diagram to locate labeled items on slide.

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Pollination

Use the pictures and diagrams below to assist your demonstration of a model bee pollinating a model flower.

Arriving at the flower

Bees pollinating Flowers

Diagram of a Flower

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Bee Hive

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Appendix B

The Process of Beekeeping Worksheets

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Parts to a Beehive

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Honey Tasting

Use the following sheet to rate your honey samples. Use expressive adjectives to describe the clarity and color, texture (how it feels in your mouth), smell, and taste.

Give the honey an overall grade.

Honey

Sample Clarity

1

2

3

4

5

6

Texture Smell Taste

Overall

Grade

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Traveling Bee Exhibit: An Integrated Curriculum for Beekeeping

Sources

Caron, D. M. (1999). Honey Bee Biology and Beekeeping . Chesire, CN: Wicwas Press.

Diagram of Beehive (2010, August 10)

<http://trianglewins.com/sam/bees/uploaded_images/Parts-of-a-beehive-

799513.gif&imgrefurl

Drake, S., and Burns, R. (2004). Meeting Standards through Integrated Curriculum .

Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Honey Bees, Beekeeping and the Middle School Curriculum . Ed. Beth Moeller. 2009.

Apiary Science in Schools. 8/10/2009 < http://www.oakland.edu/?id=9905&sid=239 />

Itin, C. M. (1999). Reasserting the Philosophy of Experiential Education as a Vehicle for

Change in the 21st Century. The Journal of Experiential Education , 22 (2), 91-98.

Louv, R. (2005). Last child in the woods . Chapel Hill NC: Algonquin Books.

Malone, B. Get Into a Hobby

It’s Good for You!

(2010, August 10) http://www.canville.net/malone/getahobby.html

Michigan Department of Education Content Expectations by Grade Span. Science K-7

Grade Level Content Expectations. (2010, August 10) http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/LSElem_225547_7.pdf

Stanford, M. The Root Causes of CCD: Beyond

Disappearing Disease Disease

Dr.

Malcolm T. Sanford. Retrieved from Apes Enterprises http://apisenterprises.com/papers_pdf/The%20Root%20Causes%20of%20CCD.pdf

What is experiential education? Association for Experiential Education. (2010, Aug. 10) http://www.aee.org/about/whatIsEE

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