Employment, Organizational Memberships, and Relationships

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INFLUENCES ON STUDENT TIME MANAGEMENT: EMPLOYMENT,
ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIPS, AND RELATIONSHIPS
Barbara L. Stewart*, Susan Miertschin, Carole Goodson, University of Houston
Abstract
Time management has historically been a critical component of FCS curricula. Hence, the purposes
of this study were to investigate the impact on time management of:
a)
Student employment
b)
Student participation in campus organizations
c)
Student anxiety regarding spending time with friends and family
One-hundred-ninety-one students were measured using an inventory which included demographic,
time management, and lifestyle items. The time management inventory items were compiled to
create a single time management score (TMS) for each student. Time Management Scores were
cross-analyzed with the factors: employment, campus organization involvement, and anxiety
regarding time with friends and family. The composite TMS was derived from sub-inventory items
involving:
 Keeping a time-based schedule planner or calendar
 Using a schedule planner or calendar to schedule course study and homework
 Scheduling time to complete long-term assignments
 Scheduling time for course assignments in a time-based schedule planner
 Having a study routine
 Adhering to a study schedule
 Planning extra time for study before tests
 Transferring dates from a syllabus to a time-based schedule planner
Using this composite score, the following relations were found:
 Students not employed or employed on a part-time basis were more likely to have a high
TMS
 Among students employed full-time, there was an equal distribution of low and high TMS
 Among students who participated in two or more organizations, the majority had strong
TMS
 Among students who participated in one organization, the majority had strong TMS
 The greatest percentage of students who were anxious about spending time with family and
friends had slightly stronger TMS.
Since this study suggests a relationship between time management and employment, membership in
campus organizations, and anxiety about spending time with friends and family, it appears that both
students and university educators may benefit by consideration of these factors in enrolling in and
designing courses.
Category: Family Economics and Resource Management
Corresponding author: *[email protected]
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