the delegate pack - Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat

advertisement
East of England Event
Friday 4th July
Newmarket
36
2
Message from the Chair,
‘I am delighted to introduce the urgent care concordat to our region. I hope that
today we can facilitate a productive and useful discussion on how we can work
with the concordat team regionally and locally to plan improvements for
patients, families and carers over the next few years. The regions’ clinical
commissioning groups and the wider communities in the East of England have
shown a strong interest in increasing access and developing outcomes in this
area, which is great need of improvement.
I look forward to hearing people's views and am keen to find out how the East
of England Strategic Clinical Network can help you take them forward.’
Dr Caroline Dollery
Clinical Director,
East of England Strategic Clinical Network for Mental Health, Dementia,
Neurological Conditions, Learning Disability and Autism
Page 2 of 25
Agenda
9.30am
Coffee and Registration
10.00am
Opening from Chair
Caroline Dollery, Clinical Director of the East of England Strategic Clinical Network for Mental Health,
Dementia, Neurological Conditions, Learning Disability and Autism
10.10am
Video from Ministers
Normal Lamb MP, Minister of State for Care and Support
Rt Hon Damian Green MP, Minister of State for Policing, Criminal Justice and Victims
10.20am
Speaker from the Department of Health
Sarah McClinton, Director of Mental Health and Disability
10.35am
An overview of the Crisis Care Concordat
Jim Symington and Naomi Phillips
followed by a Question and Answer session
10.55am
The Social Care Perspective
Pam Garraway, Corporate Director, Housing, Community Living and Adult Social Care, Luton Borough
Council
followed by a Question and Answer session
11.20am
Refreshment Break
11.40am
The North West London Urgent Care Programme
Michael Doyle, Head of Urgent Care Programme
12.00pm
The Policing Perspective
Mark Smith, Head of Suicide Prevention and Mental Health, British Transport Police.
Dr Dorothy Gregson, Chief Executive, Cambridgeshire Police and Crime Commissioner.
12.25pm
Crisis Care and Emergency Medicine
Matt Fossey, Senior Associate at the Centre for Mental Health.
Dr Caroline Meiser-Stedman, Liaison Psychiatry Consultant, Addenbrookes Hospital.
12.50pm
Question and Answer session for the speaker panel
13.00pm
Lunch
13.45pm
Strategic Clinical Network plenary and setting the afternoon task
Led by the Caroline Dollery, Chair
14.05pm
Facilitated table top work – progressing the local Declarations
To include a feedback and sharing session
15.15pm
Closing remarks and next steps
Caroline Dollery, Chair
Page 3 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Opening from the Chair – Caroline Dollery
Video from Ministers – Norman Lamb and Damian Green
Page 4 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Speaker from the Department of Health – Sarah McClinton
An Overview of the Crisis Care Concordat – Jim Symington and Naomi
Phillips
Page 5 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Local declarations - who needs to improve
outcomes ?
(Statutory responsibility or duty of care)
Page 6 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Support before crisis point
Urgent and emergency access to
crisis care
Access to support
before crisis point
Tele triage and tele
health
Early Intervention
Services
Suicide prevention
Quality of treatment and care when
in crisis
Urgent and
emergency access to
crisis care
‘Parity’ between
responses to physical or
Mental Health
emergencies
Single point of access to
specialist mental health
services
Recovery and staying well /
preventing future crises
Quality of treatment
and care when in
crisis
Physical assessment and
treatment
Mental state assessment
Getting a life back
Recovery and staying
well / preventing
future crises
Crisis Plan
(NICE)
Safe, competent
treatment at home
wherever possible
Self management and
family involved crisis
plan
Timely ambulance
transport to appropriate
NHS Facility
All utilities working, food
in house, debts and
benefits sorted
Access to Liaison &
Diversion from police
custody or Court
Transition to GP led care
24/7
Personalised care budget
Crisis Home Treatment
team
Crisis and respite house
Helplines
Peer Support
Help at Home
Hospital Admission
See Effective Bed
Management Pathway
Supported Housing
Adult placement
(with ‘fast track’ access
back)
Care and treatment
(inc MHA, MCA,CPA)
Page 7 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
The Social Care Perspective - Pam Garraway
Page 8 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Page 9 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Page 10 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
The North West London Urgent Care Programme – Michael Doyle
Page 11 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
NWL Mental Health Single Point of Access
Page 12 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Page 13 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Page 14 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
The Policing Perspective – Mark Smith and Dr Dorothy Gregson
Page 15 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Suicides and Injurious Attempts – 2009 – 14 (1891 incidents in total)
Page 16 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Page 17 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
HOT SPOTS
Page 18 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Crisis Care and Emergency Medicine – Matt Fossey and Dr Caroline
Meiser-Stedman
Page 19 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Strategic Clinical Network Plenary – Caroline Dollery
Contact Details for the East of England Strategic Clinical Network for Mental
Health, Dementia, Neurological Conditions, Learning Disability and Autism
Caroline Dollery
Clinical Director
[email protected]
Mary Emurla
Network Manager
[email protected]
Helen Hardy
Sally Donaghey
Clinical Commissioning Lead Consultant
& Leadership Programme Manager
Quality Improvement Lead, Dementia,
Learning Disability & Autism
[email protected]
[email protected]
Sam Lane
Quality Improvement Lead, Mental Health [email protected]
Victoria Doyle
Quality Improvement Lead, Neurological
Conditions
[email protected]
Gemma Emsden
Network Senior Administrator
[email protected]
General enquiries
[email protected] / 0113 825 4949
Page 20 of 25
Session Hand-outs and Notes
Workshop – Progressing the local declarations
1. What work has been done in your area so far?
What progress has been made on the declarations and action plans?
Are all the key concordat signatories involved? (If not, who is missing?)
2a. What are the next steps?
2b. What support do you need/want to take these steps effectively?
Both from each other and from the Strategic Clinical Network
Page 21 of 25
The Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat
An Overview
The Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat is a national agreement between services and agencies involved
in the care and support of people in crisis. It sets out how organisations will work together better to make
sure that people get the help they need when they are having a mental health crisis. The Crisis Care
Concordat challenges local areas to make sure that:
 Health-based places of safety and beds are available 24/7 in case someone experiences a mental
health crisis
 Police custody should not be used because mental health services are not available and police vehicles
should also not be used to transfer patients. We want to see the number of occasions police cells are
used as a place of safety for people in mental health crisis halved compared 2011/12
 Timescales are put in place so police responding to mental health crisis know how long they have to
wait for a response from health and social care workers. This will make sure patients get suitable care
as soon as possible.
 People in crisis should expect that services will share essential ‘need to know’ information about them
so they can receive the best care possible. This may include any history of physical violence, self-harm
or drink or drug history
 Figures suggest some black and minority ethnic groups are detained more frequently under the Mental
Health Act. Where this is the case, it must be addressed by local services working with local
communities so that the standards set out in the Concordat are met.
 A 24-hour helpline should be available for people with mental health problems and the crisis resolution
team should be accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
This statement was made and agreed by:
• Association of Ambulance Chief Executives
• Association of Chief Police Officers
• Association of Directors of Adult Social
Services
• Association of Directors of Children’s
Services
• Association of Police and Crime
Commissioners
• British Transport Police
• Care Quality Commission
• College of Emergency Medicine
• College of Policing
• The College of Social Work
• Department of Health
• Health Education England
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Home Office
Local Government Association
Mind
NHS Confederation
NHS England
Public Health England
Royal College of General Practitioners
Royal College of Nursing
Royal College of Pediatrics and Child
Health
• Royal College of Psychiatrists
Third sector and charity supporters of the Concordat are:
• Centre for Mental Health
• Mental Health Foundation
• Mental Health Providers Forum
• National MIND
• National Survivor User Network
• Rethink Mental Illness
• Stonewall
• Turning Point
Page 22 of 25
• Young Minds
What people who use crisis services expect from the Concordat
the Core Principles and Outcomes
Access to support before crisis point
Making sure people with mental health problems can get help 24 hours a day and that when they
ask for help, they are taken seriously.
“When I need urgent help to avert a crisis I, and people close to me, know who to contact at any
time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. People take me seriously and trust my judgement when
I say I am close to crisis, and I get fast access to people who help me get better.”
Urgent and emergency access to crisis care
Making sure that a mental health crisis is treated with the same urgency as a physical health
emergency.
“If I need emergency help for my mental health, this is treated with as much urgency and respect
as if it were a physical health emergency. If the problems cannot be resolved where I am, I am
supported to travel safely, in suitable transport, to where the right help is available.”
“I am seen by a mental health professional quickly. If I have to wait, it is in a place where I feel
safe. I then get the right service for my needs, quickly and easily.”
“Every effort is made to understand and communicate with me. Staff check any relevant
information that services have about me and, as far as possible, they follow my wishes and any
plan that I have voluntarily agreed to.”
“I feel safe and am treated kindly, with respect, and in accordance with my legal rights.”
“If I have to be held physically (restrained), this is done safely, supportively and lawfully, by people
who understand I am ill and know what they are doing.”
“Those closest to me are informed about my whereabouts and anyone at school, college or work
who needs to know is told that I am ill. I am able to see or talk to friends, family or other people
who are important to me if I so wish. I am confident that timely arrangements are made to look
after any people or animals that depend on me.”
Quality of treatment and care when in crisis
Making sure that people are treated with dignity and respect, in a therapeutic environment.
“I am treated with respect and care at all times.”
“I get support and treatment from people who have the right skills and who focus on my recovery,
in a setting which suits me and my needs. I see the same staff members as far as possible, and if I
need another service this is arranged without unnecessary assessments. If I need longer term
support this is arranged.”
“I have support to speak for myself and make decisions about my treatment and care. My rights
are clearly explained to me and I am able to have an advocate or support from family and friends if
I so wish. If I do not have capacity to make decisions about my treatment and care, any wishes or
preferences I express will be respected and any advance statements or decisions that I have
Page 23 of 25
made are checked and respected. If my expressed wishes or previously agreed plan are not
followed, the reasons for this are clearly explained to me.”
Recovery and staying well
Preventing future crises by making sure people are referred to appropriate services.
“I am given information about, and referrals to, services that will support my process of recovery
and help me to stay well.”
“I, and people close to me, have an opportunity to reflect on the crisis, and to find better ways to
manage my mental health in the future, that take account of other support I may need, around
substance misuse or housing for example. I am supported to develop a plan for how I wish to be
treated if I experience a crisis in the future and there is an agreed strategy for how this will be
carried out.”
“I am offered an opportunity to feed back to services my views on my crisis experience, to help
improve services for myself and others.
Page 24 of 25
Page 25 of 25
Download