Civics and Citizenship LAP

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Civics and Citizenship
P-6
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
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CONTENTS
1. Community Profile
3
2. Learning Area Rationale
4
3. Broad Subject Aims
5
4. Cross Curriculum Priorities
9
5. General Capabilities
13
6. Sequence and Scope
17
7. Learning and Teaching
21
8. Resources
25
9. Assessment and Reporting
29
10. Evaluation
34
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
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1. COMMUNITY PROFILE
To be inserted by each school
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2. LEARNING AREA RATIONALE
DEFINITIONS
Civics is defined broadly as an identifiable body of knowledge, skills and understandings relating to the
organisation and working of society, including Australia’s federal system of government, political and
social heritage, democratic processes, public administration and judicial system; that includes local,
state, national, regional and global perspectives.
Citizenship can be formally defined as the legal relationship between an individual and a state. More
broadly, citizenship is the condition of belonging to social, religious, political or community groups,
locally, nationally and globally. Being part of a group carries with it a sense of belonging or identity
which includes rights and responsibilities, duties and privileges. These are guided by the agreed values
and mutual obligations required for active participation in the group. In the Australian Curriculum
citizenship incorporates three components – civil (rights and responsibilities), political (participation and
representation) and social (social values, identity and community involvement).
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P2 (October 2012)
Civics and Citizenship is essential in enabling students to become active and informed citizens who
participate in and sustain Australia’s democracy. Through the study of Civics and Citizenship, students
investigate political and legal systems, and explore the nature of citizenship, diversity and identity in
contemporary society.
The Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship provides opportunities to develop students’ knowledge
and understanding of Australia's representative democracy and the key institutions, processes, and roles
people play in Australia’s political and legal systems. Emphasis is placed on Australia's federal system of
government, derived from the Westminster system, and the liberal democratic values that underpin it
such as freedom, equality and the rule of law. The curriculum explores how the people, as citizens,
choose their governments; how the system safeguards democracy by vesting people with civic rights
and responsibilities; how laws and the legal system protect people’s rights; and how individuals and
groups can influence civic life.
The curriculum recognises that Australia is a secular nation with a multicultural and multi-faith society,
and promotes the development of inclusivity by developing students’ understanding of broader values
such as respect, civility, equity, justice and responsibility. It acknowledges the experiences and
contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and their identities within contemporary
Australia. While the curriculum strongly focuses on the Australian context, students also reflect on
Australia’s position, obligations and the role of the citizen today within an interconnected world.
Through the study of civics and citizenship, students can develop skills of inquiry, values and dispositions
that enable them to be active and informed citizens; to question, understand and contribute to the
world in which they live. The curriculum also offers opportunities for students to develop a wide range
of general skills and capabilities, including an appreciation of diverse perspectives, empathy,
collaboration, negotiation, self-awareness and intercultural understanding.
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
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The Civics and Citizenship curriculum aims to reinforce students’ appreciation and understanding of
what it means to be a citizen. It explores ways in which students can actively shape their lives, value
their belonging in a diverse and dynamic society, and positively contribute locally, nationally, regionally
and globally. As reflective, active and informed decision-makers, students will be well placed to
contribute to an evolving and healthy democracy that fosters the wellbeing of Australia as a democratic
nation.
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences / Civics and Citizenship v7.0 Rationale
Diocesan Learning Framework
The Diocesan Learning framework is reflected in how we teach Civics and Citizenship in the following
ways;
● Community Contributor – to be active and informed citizens, learning from, reflecting and
acknowledging past and present contributions, becoming active participants in the community
beyond school.
● Leader and Collaborator –Promote team work and cooperative learning and accept individual
and collective responsibility.
● Effective Communicator – Students become literate as they develop the knowledge, skills and
dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out
of school and for participating effectively in society.‘
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/General
Capabilities/Literacy
● Quality Producer – Become informed, responsible, ethical, active and resourceful citizens who
make informed decisions and positive choices.
● Designer and Creator –Through knowledge and skills, students participate in democratic
processes to improve sustainability locally and within a global context for the wellbeing of all life
into the future.
● Active Investigator – Students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they learn to
generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider
alternatives and solve problems.
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/General
Capabilities/Critical and Creative Thinking
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3. BROAD SUBJECT AIMS:
The Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship aims to ensure students develop:
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a lifelong sense of belonging to and engagement with civic life as an active and informed citizen
in the context of Australia as a secular democratic nation with a dynamic, multicultural and
multi-faith society
knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the values, principles, institutions and practices of
Australia’s system of democratic government and law, and the role of the citizen in Australian
government and society
skills − including questioning and research; analysis, synthesis and interpretation; problem
solving and decision making; communication and reflection − to investigate contemporary civics
and citizenship, and foster responsible participation in Australia’s democracy
the capacities and dispositions to participate in the civic life of their nation at a local, regional
and global level.
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Science / Civics and Citizenship v7.0 Aims
YEARS 3 TO 4 (TYPICALLY 8–10 YEARS OF AGE)
During these years of schooling, students are progressively engaging with a wider breadth of ideas. They
begin to understand and recognise different points of view and can maintain engagement with tasks for
longer periods of time. Students become more aware of different perspectives and draw upon a broader
range of experiences to inform their thinking and decision-making. Students increasingly engage with
and value learning that helps explain broader aspects of their civic world.
In Years 3 and 4, students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of concepts of law,
rules, power, government, freedoms, cooperative decision-making, rights and responsibilities, media
and other Civics and Citizenship concepts at an appropriate level. They are able to develop the skills and
values associated with Civics and Citizenship.
YEARS 5 TO 6 (TYPICALLY 10–12 YEARS OF AGE)
During these years, students continue to develop a better awareness and appreciation of different
points of view and of justice and fair play. They increasingly engage in discussions about community and
national issues, with a focus on contemporary issues, in order to consider why and for whom decisions
are made. They have a broader awareness of global issues, such as human rights and Australia’s
relationships with other countries.
In Years 5–6, students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of civics concepts in the
context of local, national, regional and global communities and the skills that enable active citizenship in
these contexts. The content will provide opportunities for students to develop knowledge and
understanding of the processes of government and democracy and to examine civic issues. It will also
provide opportunities for students to engage in practical civics and citizenship activities.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P12-13 (October 2012)
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
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4. CROSS CURRICULUM PRIORITIES
Cross-curriculum priorities are addressed through learning areas and are identified wherever they are
developed or applied in content descriptions. They are also identified where they offer opportunities to
add depth and richness to student learning in content elaborations. They will have a strong but varying
presence depending on their relevance to the learning area.
Australian Curriculum : Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Cross Curriculum Priorities
The Australian Curriculum across all learning areas gives special attention to three cross-curriculum
priorities:
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia
Sustainability
As a Catholic Diocese, we have added the following areas:
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Catholic Ethos
Inclusive Education
Social Emotional Learning
The Australian Curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students by delivering a relevant,
contemporary and engaging curriculum that builds on the educational goals of the Melbourne
Declaration. The Melbourne Declaration identified three key areas that need to be addressed for the
benefit of individuals and Australia as a whole. In the Australian Curriculum these have become
priorities that provide students with the tools and language to engage with and better understand their
world at a range of levels. The priorities provide dimensions which will enrich the curriculum through
development of considered and focused content that fits naturally within learning areas.
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Cross Curriculum Priorities
CATHOLIC ETHOS
The overarching purpose of Catholic schools of the past, as well as the future, is to bring the Good News
of Jesus to all who hear it. In the midst of a world of educational, social and economic change, the focus
on the holistic growth of the individual remains the surest ways Catholic schools can prepare students
for the uncertainties of the future. Defining Features, Diocese of Cairns
The curriculum provides opportunities for young people to connect their curriculum experiences to a
living Christian faith.
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship, students will experience opportunities to demonstrate
respect for:
● diversity and difference
● freedom of speech and religion
● the rule of law
● human rights in a global community
● care and compassion
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social justice
inclusiveness
sustainability
peace
rights and views of others
commitment to civil behaviour
giving and contributing to the common good
INCLUSIVE EDUCATION
Catholic schools are committed to the development of a high-quality curriculum that promotes
excellence and equity in education for all Australian students.
It is by the quality of interactions and relationships that all students learn to understand and appreciate
difference, to value diversity and learn to respond with dignity and respect to all through mutually
enriching interactions.
The curriculum provides equitable access for and/or positive interactions with students from different
backgrounds and with diverse needs and abilities.
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship students will experience opportunities to:
● provide opportunities for the recognition of Australia’s first peoples and for students to develop
awareness and understanding of the diverse society in which they live
● develop inclusive attitudes and beliefs and liberal democratic values and challenge stereotypes
based on difference
● understand the context of Australia as a multicultural, secular, and multi-faith society, governed
through a well-established representative parliamentary process and based on liberal
democratic laws, values, principles and practices.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P6 (October 2012)
SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING
Catholic Schools will encourage individuals, people and communities towards Christian wholeness by
implementing evidence-based Social and Emotional Learning to nurture wellbeing, invigorate learning
and develop cultures of connectedness.
Social and emotional competencies are integral to academic and work success and are the basis of
resilience, relational quality and social capital.
The curriculum provides opportunities to develop:
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Self-Awareness
Social Awareness
Responsible Decision Making
Self-Management
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● Relationship Management
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship students will experience opportunities to:
● Nurture and celebrate God’s presence in people, community and creation.
● Bring together faith, culture and life to make meaning of the world.
● Form the basis for personal and social transformation.
● Holistically promote the growth and development of the human person as an individual in
relation to others and within communities.
Source: Social and Emotional Learning Policy 2010
ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER HISTORIES AND CULTURES
Across the Australian Curriculum, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures priority
provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the
world’s oldest continuous living cultures. Students will understand that contemporary Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, resilient, rich and diverse. The knowledge and
understanding gained through this priority will enhance the ability of young people to participate
positively in the ongoing development of Australia.
The Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories,
cultures and perspectives. Students are introduced to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customary
law and develop an understanding of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’
experiences of Australia’s legal system. They examine the unique identities of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Peoples and how they shape national Australian identity. They consider how these
communities are maintaining and developing their identities and what this means for Australia as a
whole.
Australian Curriculum : Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Cross Curriculum Priorities
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship students will experience opportunities to:
● recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and recognise them as having the longest
continuous histories and cultures in the world.
● recognise the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures priority
for its capacity to create more informed citizens and contribute to social cohesion and inclusion.
● the means of law and governance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and of
cultural diversity and how that shapes identity and citizenship.
● enhance their understanding of contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences
of Australia’s political and legal system and citizenship.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P15 (October 2012)
ASIA AND AUSTRALIA’S ENGAGEMENT WITH ASIA
Across the Australian Curriculum, this priority will ensure that students learn about and recognise the
diversity within and between the countries of the Asia region. Students develop knowledge and
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understanding of Asian societies, cultures, beliefs, and environments, and the connections between the
peoples of Asia, Australia, and the rest of the world. Asia literacy provides students with the skills to
communicate and engage with the peoples of Asia so they can effectively live, work and learn in the
region.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship, the priority of Asia and Australia’s engagement with
Asia provides rich and engaging opportunities for developing students’ civics and citizenship knowledge,
understanding and skills. In particular, the curriculum recognises that Australia’s engagement with Asia
has the capacity to build understanding and appreciation of diversity within Australian society and
contribute to harmonious local, regional and global communities. In examining what shapes personal
and national identity, students are encouraged to investigate the cultural or religious groups to which
Australians of Asian heritage belong. In studying Australian citizenship, students have an opportunity to
explore the experiences of people of Asian heritage who have migrated to Australia and taken up
Australian citizenship. Students can also have opportunities to reflect on how Australians can participate
in the Asia region as active and informed citizens.
Australian Curriculum : Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Cross Curriculum Priorities
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship students will experience opportunities to:
● recognise the importance of the Asia Region in the world today.
● identify the significance of Australia’s engagement with Asia.
● explore the significant contributions that the peoples and cultures of the Asia Region make to
our political, social and economic world and the impact that Australia’s involvement in the region
has upon Asian societies.
● develop knowledge and skills to systematically engage with Asia today and for the future.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P16 (October 2012)
SUSTAINABILITY
Across the Australian Curriculum, the Sustainability priority allows young Australians to develop the
knowledge, skills, values and worldviews necessary for them to act in ways that contribute to more
sustainable patterns of living. Education for sustainability enables individuals and communities to reflect
on ways of interpreting and engaging with the world. The Sustainability priority is futures-oriented,
focusing on protecting environments and creating a more ecologically and socially just world through
informed action. Actions that support more sustainable patterns of living require consideration of
environmental, social, cultural and economic systems and their interdependence.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship, the priority of Sustainability can provide a context
for developing students’ civics and citizenship knowledge, understanding and skills. In the knowledge
and understanding strand, students have the opportunity to explore sustainability issues as they relate
to government services and the different levels of government. They develop the understanding that
sustaining a resilient democracy depends on the informed participation of its citizens, and develop skills
and dispositions to support active citizenship. They explore contemporary issues and develop action
plans and possible solutions to local, national and global issues which have social, economic and
environmental perspectives.
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Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Cross Curriculum Priorities
Through the teaching of Civics and Citizenship students will experience opportunities to:
● develop knowledge and skills to understand and participate in democratic processes to improve
sustainability across local, state, national, regional and global levels, for the well being of all life
into the future.
● become active participants, improving sustainability through both individual and collective
endeavours across local and global communities.
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship P15 (October 2012)
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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
STUDENT DIVERSITY
All students are entitled to rigorous, relevant and engaging learning programs drawn from the
Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship. Teachers take account of the range of their students’
current levels of learning, strengths, goals and interests and make adjustments where necessary. The
three-dimensional design of the Australian Curriculum, comprising learning areas, general capabilities
and cross-curriculum priorities, provides teachers with flexibility to cater for the diverse needs of
students across Australia and to personalise their learning.
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Disability Standards for Education 2005 require education
and training service providers to support the rights of students with disability to access the curriculum
on the same basis as students without disability.
Many students with disability are able to achieve educational standards commensurate with their peers,
as long as the necessary adjustments are made to the way in which they are taught and to the means
through which they demonstrate their learning.
In some cases curriculum adjustments are necessary to provide equitable opportunities for students to
access age-equivalent content in the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship. Teachers can draw
from content at different levels along the Year 3 to Year 6 sequence. Teachers can also use the extended
general capabilities learning continua in Literacy, Numeracy and Personal and social capability to adjust
the focus of learning according to individual student need.
GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS
Teachers can use the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship flexibly to meet the individual
learning needs of gifted and talented students.
Teachers can enrich learning by providing students with opportunities to work with learning area
content in more depth or breadth; emphasising specific aspects of the general capabilities learning
continua (for example, the higher order cognitive skills of the Critical and creative thinking capability);
and/or focusing on cross-curriculum priorities. Teachers can also accelerate student learning by drawing
on content from later levels in the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship and/or from local state
and territory teaching and learning materials.
STUDENTS FOR WHOM ENGLISH IS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE OR DIALECT
Students for whom English is an additional language or dialect (EAL/D) enter Australian schools at
different ages and at different stages of English language learning and have various educational
backgrounds in their first languages. Whilst many EAL/D students bring already highly developed literacy
(and numeracy) skills in their own language to their learning of Standard Australian English, there are a
significant number of students who are not literate in their first language, and have had little or no
formal schooling.
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While the aims of the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship are the same for all students, EAL/D
students must achieve these aims while simultaneously learning a new language and learning content
and skills through that new language. These students may require extra time and support, along with
teaching that explicitly addresses their language needs. Students who have had no formal schooling will
need extra time and support in order to acquire skills for effective learning in formal settings.
Ref: Australian Curriculum : Civics and Citizenship Student Diversity
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5. GENERAL CAPABILITIES
In the Australian Curriculum, the general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and
dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross-curriculum
priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century.
There are seven general capabilities:
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Literacy (LIT)
Numeracy (NUM)
Information and communication technology capability (ICT)
Critical and creative thinking (CCT)
Personal and social capability (PSC)
Ethical understanding (EU)
Intercultural understanding (ICU).
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship, general capabilities are identified wherever they are
developed or applied in content descriptions. They are also identified where they offer opportunities to
add depth and richness to student learning through content elaborations. Teachers may find further
opportunities to incorporate explicit teaching of the capabilities depending on their choice of activities.
LITERACY
Across the Australian Curriculum, students become literate as they develop the knowledge, skills and
dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out of
school and for participating effectively in society. Literacy involves students in listening to, reading,
viewing, speaking, writing and creating oral, print, visual and digital texts, and using and modifying
language for different purposes in a range of contexts.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship students develop literacy capability as they research,
read and analyse sources of information on aspects of Australia’s political and legal systems and
contemporary civics and citizenship issues. They learn to understand and use language to discuss and
communicate information, concepts and ideas related to the subject. This involves learning to recognise
how language can be used to manipulate meaning, distinguish between fact and opinion on political and
social issues, and communicate ideas, concepts and plans to a variety of audiences. Communication is
critical in Civics and Citizenship, in particular for articulating, debating and evaluating ideas and
participating in group discussions.
NUMERACY
Across the Australian Curriculum, students become numerate as they develop the knowledge and skills
to use mathematics confidently across all learning areas at school, and in their lives more broadly.
Numeracy involves students in recognising and understanding the role of mathematics in the world and
having the dispositions and capacities to use mathematical knowledge and skills purposefully.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship students develop and apply numeracy knowledge
and skills to analyse, interpret and present information in numerical and graphical form. This includes
investigating the voting process, researching and using statistics on civics and citizenship topics and
issues, conducting surveys among community members and representing findings in graphs and charts.
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INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (ICT) CAPABILITY
Across the Australian Curriculum, students develop ICT capability as they learn to use ICT effectively and
appropriately to access, create and communicate information and ideas; solve problems; and work
collaboratively in all learning areas at school, and in their lives beyond school. ICT capability involves
students in learning to make the most of the technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of
doing things as technologies evolve, and limiting the risks to themselves and others in a digital
environment.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship students develop the knowledge and skills to use
digital technologies to research and source information on civics and citizenship, including critically
analysing that information. Students learn about and have opportunities to use social media to
collaborate, communicate, share information and build consensus on political, legal and social issues.
Students develop and apply ICT skills through organising and presenting information digitally using
multimodal elements.
CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING
Across the Australian Curriculum, students develop capability in critical and creative thinking as they
learn to generate and evaluate knowledge, clarify concepts and ideas, seek possibilities, consider
alternatives and solve problems. Critical and creative thinking are integral to activities that require
students to think broadly and deeply using skills, behaviours and dispositions such as reason, logic,
resourcefulness, imagination and innovation in all learning areas at school and in their lives beyond
school.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship students develop critical thinking skills in their
investigation of Australia’s democratic system of government. They learn to apply decision making
processes and use strategies to negotiate and resolve differences. Students develop critical and creative
thinking through the examination of political, legal and social issues that do not have obvious or
straightforward answers and that require problem solving and innovative solutions. Students consider
multiple perspectives and alternatives, think creatively about appropriate courses of action and develop
plans for action. The Civics and Citizenship curriculum stimulates students to think creatively about the
impact of civic issues on their own lives and the lives of others, and to consider how these issues might
be addressed.
Critical and creative thinking throughout Civics and Citizenship is supported by insert school’s name
whole school Thinking Plan. The sequence and scope of thinking tools and strategies for Year 3-6
support the development of higher order thinking as students learn to engage, explore, explain,
elaborate and evaluate.
PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY
Across the Australian Curriculum, students develop personal and social capability as they learn to
understand themselves and others, and manage their relationships, lives, work and learning more
effectively. The personal and social capability involves students in a range of practices including
recognising and regulating emotions, developing empathy for and understanding of others, establishing
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positive relationships, making responsible decisions, working effectively in teams and handling
challenging situations constructively.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship students are encouraged to develop and apply
personal, interpersonal and social skills, behaviours and dispositions, through working collaboratively
and constructively in groups, developing their communication, decision making, conflict resolution and
leadership skills, and learning to appreciate the insights and perspectives of others.
ETHICAL UNDERSTANDING
Across the Australian Curriculum, students develop ethical understanding as they identify and
investigate ethical concepts, values, character traits and principles, and understand how reasoning can
assist ethical judgment. Ethical understanding involves students in building a strong personal and
socially oriented ethical outlook that helps them to manage context, conflict and uncertainty, and to
develop an awareness of the influence that their values and behaviour have on others.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship, students discuss and apply ethical concepts such as
equality, respect and fairness, which underpin Australia’s democracy. They explore and analyse
democratic values in particular contexts; for example, evaluating the fairness of voting systems or
particular government policies. Students explore different beliefs about civics and citizenship issues and
the consequences of particular decisions. They examine shared beliefs and values which support
Australian democracy and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Students develop the skills to
recognise different perspectives and have opportunities to explore ambiguities and ethical
considerations related to political, legal and social issues.
INTERCULTURAL UNDERSTANDING
Across the Australian Curriculum, students develop intercultural understanding as they learn to value
their own cultures, languages and beliefs, and those of others. They come to understand how personal,
group and national identities are shaped, and the variable and changing nature of culture. The capability
involves students in learning about and engaging with diverse cultures in ways that recognise
commonalities and differences, create connections with others and cultivate mutual respect.
In the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship, students investigate diverse cultural contexts and
develop skills in being able to see common issues through diverse cultural lenses. They explore the
notion of citizenship, the contribution of diverse cultural influences, and the critical role of shared
beliefs and values in an evolving Australian identity. They recognise similarities as well as differences
within and across cultural groups, and the importance of practising empathy and facilitating dialogue to
understand different perspectives. They explore how people interact across cultural boundaries and
consider how factors such as group membership, traditions, customs and religious and cultural practices
impact on civic life.
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6. SEQUENCE AND SCOPE
Year 3
Key Inquiry
Questions
Year 4
How are decisions made
democratically?
How can local government contribute
to community life?
Why do we make rules?
What is the difference between rules
and laws and why are they important?
How can I participate in my
community?
How has my identity been shaped by
the groups to which I belong?
Year 5
Year 6
What is democracy in Australia and
why is voting in a democracy
important?
What are the roles and responsibilities
of the different levels of government in
Australia?
How do laws affect the lives of
citizens?
How are laws developed in Australia?
How and why do people participate in
groups to achieve shared goals?
What does it mean to be an Australian
citizen?
Government and
Democracy
How and why decisions are made
democratically in communities
The purpose of government and some
familiar services provided at the local
level
The key values that underpin
Australia’s democratic system of
government
The roles and responsibilities of
electors and representatives in
Australia’s democracy
Content
Descriptions
The key institutions of Australia’s
democratic system of government
based on the Westminster system,
including the monarchy, parliaments,
and courts
The roles and responsibilities of the
three levels of government, including
shared roles and responsibilities within
Australia’s federal system
The key features of the Australian
electoral process
Law and Citizens
How and why people make rules.
The differences between ‘rules’ and
‘laws’
How laws affect the lives of citizens,
including experiences of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
Why laws are Important?
The roles and responsibilities of key
personnel in law enforcement and in
the legal system
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
How state/territory and federal laws
are initiated and passed through
parliament
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Citizenship, diversity and
Identity
Why people participate within
communities and how students can
actively participate and contribute
How a person’s identity can be
shaped by the different cultural,
religious and/or social groups to which
they may belong
Why people work in groups to achieve
their aims, and how they can express
their shared beliefs and values and
exercise influence
Who can be an Australian Citizen; the
formal rights and responsibilities, and
shared values of Australian
Citizenship
The obligations citizens may consider they
have beyond their own national borders as
active and informed global citizens
Questioning and Research
Pose questions about the society in which they live
Analysis, synthesis and interpretation
Facts from opinions in relation to civics and citizenship topics and issues
Use information to develop a point of view
SKILLS
Problem-solving and decision-making
Interact with others with respect, share views and recognise there are different points of view
Work in groups to identify issues, possible solutions and a plan for action
Communication and reflection
Present ideas and opinions on civics and citizenship topics and issues using civics and citizenship terms
Reflect on their cultural identity and how it might be similar and different from others
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As part of a broader social inquiry please see the below table for alignment of skills between Learning Areas.
Civics and Citizenship
Questioning and research
Analysis and synthesis
Interpretation
Communication
Collaborative problem-solving and decisionmaking
Year 3
Catholic
Education Units
History
Chronology, terms and concepts
Historical questions and research
Analysis and use of sources
Perspectives and interpretations
Explanation and communication
Geography
Observing, questioning, planning and collecting
Evaluating, processing and analyzing
Interpreting and concluding
Communicating
Reflecting and responding
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
If only one person makes a
rule, is it fair?
What does local government
do for me?
How do Laws affect the lives
of citizens and why do people
participate in groups to
achieve shared goals?
Australian Citizenship
What makes someone a good
community member?
Rules verses Laws
What is democracy in
Australia and why is voting
important?
What are the rules and
responsibilities of
government?
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7. TEACHING AND LEARNING
PHILOSOPHY
The Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship takes an integrated approach to the study of ‘civics’
with the study of ‘citizenship’ and provides opportunities to develop teaching and learning programs
that cater for local needs and interests. It emphasises inquiry-based teaching and learning.
Students’ interest in and enjoyment of civics and citizenship can be enhanced through active
participation in school and community activities, for example, student governance, community service
programs, parliamentary education programs, and the work of non-government organisations (including
at the regional and international level).
Teachers use the Australian Curriculum content and achievement standards first to identify current
levels of learning and achievement and then to select the most appropriate content (possibly from
across several year levels) to teach individual students and/or groups of students. This takes into
account that in each class there may be students with a range of prior achievement and that teachers
plan to build on current learning.
Australian Curriculum: Humanities and Social Sciences/Civics and Citizenship/Implications for
teaching, assessment and reporting
PLANNING REQUIREMENTS
When planning for Civics and Citizenship, teachers are required to complete documents as per insert
school name agreed practice for planning and/or The Curriculum Place/Civics and Citizenship/Planning
Template, Assessment Task and Criteria Sheet.
Time allocation (Per week)
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
YEAR 5
YEAR 6
30 MINS
30 MINS
30 MINS
30 MINS
Curriculum Activity Risk Assessment Guidelines and supporting documents are available through the
Curriculum Place/General Curriculum.
Please attach Agreed Practice for Planning as an appendix if necessary.
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PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS
When planning teaching and learning programs in Civics and Citizenship, teachers should ensure that
learning experiences draw on content descriptions from across sub-strands and, where appropriate,
include content from both strands. In teaching Civics and Citizenship, creating opportunities for practical
application will enhance the development of knowledge, understanding and skills across a range of
relevant and meaningful focus areas.
The content descriptions in the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship Year 3-6 enable teachers to
develop a variety of learning experiences that are relevant, rigorous and meaningful.
In any given classroom, students may demonstrate a wide range of strengths, abilities and needs.
Teachers should plan programs that recognise this diversity and provide students with multiple means
of demonstrating their abilities and what they have learnt through the teaching and learning process.
A range of support materials are available as identified in the Resource Section.
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INQUIRY BASED LEARNING
A critical inquiry approach directs the Civics and Citizenship curriculum towards both content and
pedagogies that are consistent with experiential learning and the Australian Curriculum‘s general
capabilities, cross-curriculum priorities and recognition of learner diversity.
Inquiry Model: 5E’s
Phase
Focus of Inquiry
Assessment Focus
ENGAGE
Engage students and elicit prior
knowledge.
Diagnostic AssessmentThis assessment is to elicit student’s prior knowledge so
that the teacher can take account of this when planning
how the Explore and Explain lessons will be implemented.
Assessment For Learning
Provide hands-on experience of the
phenomenon.
EXPLORE
Formative AssessmentThis enables the teacher to monitor students’ developing
understanding and provide feedback that can extend and
deepen students’ learning.
Assessment As Learning
Develop s explanations for observations
and represent developing conceptual
understanding.
EXPLAIN
Formative Assessment
Assessment As Learning
Consider explanations.
ELABORATE
Extend understanding to a new context or
make connections to additional concepts
through a student planned investigation.
Summative Assessment
Assessment of student achievement developed
throughout the learning process.
Elaborate Phase – Skills/ Evaluate Phase - Understandings
Assessment Of Learning
EVALUATE
Students re-represent their understanding
and reflect on their learning journey and
teachers collect evidence about the
achievement of content descriptions.
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
Summative Assessment
Self Assessment
Assessment of Learning
22
8. RESOURCES
To be inserted by the school. You may choose to insert the link to your school’s online library catalogue.
DIGITAL RESOURCES
Teaching and Learning Activities For Middle School
How to Run and Election in Schools
Parliamentary Education Office
Parliamentary Education Services (NT)
Student Guide to Legislative Assembly (NT)
Democracy Rules
Australian Citizenship
Documenting a Democracy
A Brief History of Democracy
Discovering Democracy Units
Voting and Belonging
Local Government
Australians as Global Citizens
Voting…Choosing your parliamentary representatives
Understanding the common good in democracy
Freedom Rides
Rules for games, schools and in the community
Teaching and Learning for Middle School
Digital Resources for Middle Primary
Digital Resources for Upper Primary
Professional Learning Opportunities
Civics and Citizenship Education
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QCAA Band Plans
Glossary
Please insert any digital resources at school level.
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9. ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING
ASSESSMENT
Teachers use the Achievement Standards, at the end of a period of teaching, to make on-balance
judgments about the quality of learning demonstrated by the students. To make these judgments,
teachers draw on assessment data that they have collected as evidence during the course of the
teaching period. These judgments about the quality of learning are one source of feedback to students
and their parents and inform formal reporting processes.
Assessment of the Australian Curriculum takes place in different levels and for different purposes,
including:
●
ongoing formative assessment within classrooms for the purposes of monitoring learning and providing
feedback, to teachers to inform their teaching, and for students to inform their learning
●
summative assessment for the purposes of twice-yearly reporting by schools to parents and carers on
the progress and achievement of students
HOW AND WHEN WE USE ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES
Assessment is the process of gathering and interpreting information about student progress for a variety
of purposes including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
To direct future planning and teaching
To inform teachers, students and parents about current understandings or misconceptions
To identify strengths and weaknesses
To create a ‘point in time’ snapshot of a student’s performance
To create a record of a student’s learning
To enable teachers to report
Assessment criteria, standards and a variety of assessment tasks are all crucial to assessing student
achievement. Teachers make formal judgments about some of a student’s work against assessment
criteria and standards. In an assessment task the student’s work reveals the demonstration of their
learning.
Assessment criteria are the characteristics of properties by which student work is judged or appraised.
These criteria should be evident in student work. It is important to identify suitable assessment criteria
for making judgments about student achievement when creating Assessment Tasks. These criteria must
align with the Geography Content Descriptions for the appropriate year level and explicit teaching
experiences included in the Geography Unit Overview.
Planning identifies a number of learning activities that can be used to gather information about the
nature and extent of student learning. As these activities form an integral part of the teaching and
learning sequence, the alignment of the Assessment with the Curriculum expectations should be
ensured. The Assessment Task should be recognized by the learners as being both relevant and
worthwhile. The Insert schools name School’s Assessment Task Sheet and Criteria Sheet are to be
included with the Unit Planning.
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Quality assessment criteria should
• be appropriate to the assessment task
• allow all facets of the assessment tasks to be judged
• relate back to the major assessment criteria specified for the learning area
• give meaning to the standards
• use words that are descriptive and comparative
• describe what a student can do, and not what the student cannot do
• use language that is meaningful to the student
• inform the student of what is expected in the task
A standard is a description of the quality of a criterion in a continuum from highest to lowest or
lowest to highest. Standards should support the alignment of curriculum planning, assessment and
reporting and help teachers to develop a common language to describe the qualities that are
evident in student work.
An identified Assessment Task provides opportunities for students to demonstrate both Civics and
Citizenship Knowledge and Understanding and the Inquiry Skills. Both of these components must be
incorporated into the Assessment Program for it to provide a valid measure of the valued student
learning. The Assessable Elements and the descriptors of quality are used to link the content
descriptions and achievement standards to assist teachers to make judgments concerning student
achievement.
Students will be provided with the appropriate knowledge by the teacher (e.g. Criteria Sheet/ Checklist)
to develop knowledge and understandings and skills as components of the curriculum.
At insert school name assessment will be undertaken collaboratively; it will involve the teacher along
with the student, and the opportunity for moderation between teachers from other Diocesan schools
during Consistency of Teacher Judgment day. At a school level, it is recommended that teacher
moderation should occur at least once each term.
Assessment needs to occur on a continuing basis during the teaching and learning of Civics and
Citizenship and will involve:
Assessment for Learning is a regular part of learning and teaching and the information gained is used to
shape the learning and teaching process.
Assessment as Learning enables students to learning more. Its main purpose is self- monitoring. When
assessment as learning principles are employed, students come to understand what it means to be
responsible for their own learning – the foundation of lifelong learning.
Assessment of Learning is assessment for accountability purposes, to determine a student’s level of
performance on a specific task or at the conclusion of a unit of learning. The information gained from
this kind of assessment is often used in reporting.
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Formative Assessment
Formative assessment is an ongoing collection of information that occurs throughout the day/unit/term
that enables teachers to track, support and guide students' continuous progress and improvement
towards achievement of the expectations. It is this ongoing assessment that determines what the
student knows and is able to do and can apply, and points to the next steps for teaching and learning.
Summative Assessment
Summative assessment occurs at the end of a period of learning and provides students with
opportunities to demonstrate their achievement of the important/enduring learning addressed during
that period of time. It is used in combination with data from formative assessment.
REPORTING
The information provided in reports should be constructive and should encourage parents and students
to reflect on the progress and areas of strength and weakness, encouraging students to set future goals
for their learning. Teachers are encouraged to communicate frequently through a formal and/or
informal basis with parents and students identifying concerns and areas requiring praise in relation to
the student’s achievements. If teachers have serious concerns about a student’s progress, they should
arrange a formal meeting with parents to discuss their concerns. Teachers are encouraged to discuss
with the student, parents and the Learning Support teacher the progress of gifted and talented students
and how these students might be extended. Teachers should ensure that parents are kept up to date
with levels of student achievement.
Reporting communicates information that has been obtained from a variety of assessment processes
and involves a professional judgement on behalf of the teacher. Teachers maintain an assessment
schedule in their term program to highlight the timing of significant assessment tasks.
Teacher professional judgement is fundamental to assessment and reporting processes, decisions
should be based on explicit criteria using a range of evidence to determine achievement level.
Materials and processes to support the consistency of teacher judgements between schools can be
developed through:
●
●
●
●
●
Shared understandings
Criteria sheets
Common planning and assessment tasks
Examination of students portfolios
Moderation process (formal & informal)
Assessment task sheets provide a detailed summary of the assessment task.
Criteria Sheets accompany all task Assessment Sheets.
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WRITTEN AND ORAL REPORTS
Reporting the progress of students to parents occurs on a formal basis in the following ways:
School to insert
Reporting in Civics and Citizenship from Year 3 to Year 6 will follow the schools current reporting format.
Reporting in Year 3 requires teachers to make judgements of standards based on a five point scale of
Very High to Support Required. Reporting in Years 4 – 6 requires teachers to make judgements of
standards based on a five point scale of A – E. Civics and Citizenship teachers formally report on student
achievement at the end of Semester 1 and at the end of Semester 2.
The overall achievement in Civics and Citizenship is based on the following strands;
● Knowledge and Understandings
● Skills
The information provided in these reports should be constructive and should encourage parents and
students to reflect on progress and areas of strength and weakness, and encourage students to set
future goals for their learning.
Teachers are encouraged to communicate frequently on an informal basis with parents about concerns
or to praise student achievements. This may be done through notes on homework, class notes, awards,
informal discussions etc.
If teachers have serious concerns about a student’s progress, they should arrange a formal meeting with
parents to discuss their concerns. They should also discuss these concerns with learning support staff.
Teachers are also encouraged to discuss with parents, learning support staff and peers, the progress of
gifted students and how these students might be extended.
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10. EVALUATION
Evaluation occurs in three ways:
● Evaluation of planning by the teacher/learning area coordinator
● Evaluation of learning and teaching strategies/resources etc.
● Evaluation of the school curriculum document to ensure it reflects current understandings and
practices.
Evaluation is the process of making judgements about the effectiveness of curriculum documents,
teaching programs, procedures and resources. Evaluation is an inherent part of our professional lives as
teachers and as a school.
EVALUATION OF PLANNING BY THE TEACHER/LEARNING AREA COORDINATOR
At insert name of school the ultimate stage of evaluation is the integration of the evaluation information
into a modified and improved program that will lead to:
● more appropriate teaching strategies;
● more effective assessment/evaluation;
● more efficient and effective use of resources.
The process of school-level evaluation highlights the need for reflection and provides opportunities for:
● identifying areas of need;
● addressing the professional growth of teachers;
● recognising school/system achievements.
The evaluation of a particular area of the school’s operation will provide a starting point for a cycle of
future action.
EVALUATION OF LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES/RESOURCES ETC
At insert school name the ultimate stage of evaluation is the integration of the evaluation information
into a modified and improved program that will lead to:
● more appropriate teaching strategies;
● more effective assessment/evaluation;
● more efficient and effective use of resources.
EVALUATION OF THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM DOCUMENT TO ENSURE IT REFLECTS CURRENT
UNDERSTANDINGS AND PRACTICES
This document will be reviewed insert review date in consultation with school leadership, school
representatives and representatives from the CES Curriculum Team (Primary).
The Accreditation Process of this document will be scheduled for October 2015.
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CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP, Year level # Term #
UNIT TITLE
Critical Inquiry Approach – Inquiry question?
Achievement
Standard
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP
CONTENT STRANDS
Government and Democracy
CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS
Knowledge and Understandings
ASSESSMENT
Assessment For Learning
Assessment As Learning
Laws and Citizens
Assessment Of Learning
Citizenship, diversity and
identity
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Civics and Citizenship
Skills
Key Questions
Yr 3 and 4
Questioning and Research
Yr 5 and 6
Analysis
Synthesis and Interpretation
Problem Solving and Decision Making
Communication and Reflections
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Learning Framework
Cross Curricula
Priorities
General Capabilities
Community Contributor
Active Investigator
Designer and Creator
Leader and Collaborator
Effective Communicator
Quality Producer
Catholic Ethos
Social Emotional Learning
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Histories and Cultures
Asia and Australia’s Engagement with
Asia
Inclusive Education
Sustainability Education
Literacy
ICT
Personal and Social Competence
Numeracy
Critical and Creative Thinking
Ethical Understanding
Intercultural Understanding
Links to other Learning Areas
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Learning and Teaching Strategies
Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cross Curricular
Priorities
General Capabilities
Engage ⇒
Explore ⇒
Explain ⇒
Elaborate ⇒
Evaluate
Engage
Resources
Student Resources
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Teacher Resources
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP METALANGUAGE
Assessment
Opportunities
Glossary Link
For
Of
As
Reflection
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Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cross Curricular
Priorities
General Capabilities
Engage ⇒
Explore ⇒
Explain ⇒
Elaborate ⇒
Evaluate
Explore
Resources
Student Resources
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Teacher Resources
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP METALANGUAGE
Assessment
Opportunities
Glossary Link
For
Of
As
Reflection
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Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cross Curricular
Priorities
General Capabilities
Engage ⇒
Explore ⇒
Explain ⇒
Elaborate ⇒
Evaluate
Explain
Resources
Student Resources
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Teacher Resources
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP METALANGUAGE
Assessment
Opportunities
Glossary Link
For
Of
As
Reflection
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Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cross Curricular
Priorities
General Capabilities
Engage ⇒
Explore ⇒
Explain ⇒
Evaluate
Elaborate ⇒
Elaborate
Resources
Student Resources
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
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Teacher Resources
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP METALANGUAGE
Assessment
Opportunities
Glossary Link
For
Of
As
Reflection
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Week
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Cross Curricular
Priorities
General Capabilities
Engage ⇒
Explore ⇒
Explain ⇒
Elaborate ⇒
Evaluate
Evaluate
Resources
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Student Resources
Teacher Resources
CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP METALANGUAGE
Assessment
Opportunities
Glossary Link
For
Of
As
Reflection
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Planning for Differently Abled Students
Student/s
Different Ability
Australian Curriculum
Content Descriptions
being addressed
Catholic Education Services Diocese of Cairns
Learning and Teaching Strategies
Assessment Strategies
43
Assessment Task Sheet
Student Name:
Year Level:
Name of Task:
Teacher:
Learning Area/s:
Date Commenced:
Date Due:
Type of Task:
Oral
Written
Other
Task Conditions:
Individual
Pair
Group Work
In Class
Homework
Other
Opportunity to
Access:
Books
Notes
Library
Assessed By:
Self
Peer
Teacher
Technology
Task Description
Procedure
Resources:
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CRITERIA SHEET TITLE
Criteria
A
B
C
D
E
The student work
demonstrates
evidence of:
Feedback
Signed:
Date:
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