GE-10-231. SOC 273. Sociology of Gender

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St. Cloud State University
General Education Goal Area 5 Designation
History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences
Academic Affairs Use Only:
Response Date: ______________________
Effective Date: ______________________
1.
Proposal Number: _________________
Prepared by: Sandrine Zeribib
Phone: 320 308-3046
Email: [email protected]
2.
Requesting Unit: Sociology/Anthropology
3.
Department, Course Number, Title: Sociology/Anthropology, SOC 273, Sociology of Gender
4.
New Course
5.
Will this course be flagged as a diversity course?
Already Designated as Diversity
6.
Will this course also satisfy another General Education Goal Area?
If “Yes” specify which goal area.
8
Existing Course
No
Diversity Proposal Accompanying This Form
No
Yes
7.
Course bulletin description, including credits and semesters to be offered:
Social construction of gender. Impact of social-economic constraints on gendered relations and
how changes in socio-economic circumstances help transform or deconstruct gender. 3 Cr. DEMAND.
8.
Indicate the clientele for whom this course is designed. Is the course for general education only, or
does it fulfill general education and other program needs for this or another department? Obtain
signatures from any affected departments.
General education and elective in the Sociology major/minor. Elective for Women's Studies and
Social Studies departments. No changes impacting other departments.
9.
Indicate any changes that must be made in offerings or resources in your department or other
departments by offering this course.
None
10.
For new courses or courses not yet approved for General Education, indicate any other SCSU departments
or units offering instruction that relates to the content of the proposed course.
N/A
11.
Courses designated as General Education are included in the assessment plan for the Goal Area(s)
10/15/2009
for which they are approved. Courses for which assessment is not included in the annual GE
assessment report for two years will be removed from the General Education Program.
The Requesting Unit understands and recognizes the above conditions.
12.
Provide a concise explanation of how the following goal is a “significant focus” of the proposed course.
Goal Area 5: History and the Social & Behavioral Sciences
Develop understanding of human societies and behaviors, and of the concepts, theories, and methods of
history and the social sciences.
Sociology of Gender is the study of gendered relations and gendered social constructions within
society. Students explore the various ways gender (as well as race, class, sexuality, nationality, etc)
shapes their everyday life within our social institutions.
13. In order for a course to be designated as fulfilling Goal Area 5, it must address at least 4 of the 5 student learning
outcomes (SLOs) below. Check the SLOs below that are focused on in the proposed general education course.
1. Describe or use the methods and data by which historians, social scientists, or behavioral scientists investigate
human conditions.
2. Analyze human behavior, cultures, and social institutions and processes from the perspectives of history or the
social and behavioral sciences.
3. Develop explanations for and explore solutions to historical or contemporary social problems.
4. Reflect upon themselves in relation to family, communities, society, culture, and/or their histories.
5. Apply and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories about human societies and behaviors.
14.
Discuss how each Student Learning Outcome checked above is achieved in this course. (Note: Although
descriptions of typical assignments or types of assignments may be part of this discussion, it is not
appropriate to submit copies of actual assignments.)
SLO 1 - Describe or use the methods and data by which historians, social scientists, or behavioral
scientists investigate human conditions.
This class is introduced by explaining why gender is an issue of interest for social scientists, but in
particular to sociologists. Students are taught about the sociological imagination and its use in
uncovering issues of gender. Students are also taught about some of the research methods used to
produce knowledge and challenge taken for granted assumptions and myths about gender.
SLO 2 - Analyze human behavior, cultures, and social institutions and processes from the perspectives
of history or the social and behavioral sciences.
Constructions of gender and systems of power are explored within various social institutions, such as
media, the economy, the law, the state, family, education, etc. Using a sociological perspectives,
students learn about social structures that are embedded in those social institutions.
SLO 3 - Develop explanations for and explore solutions to historical or contemporary social problems.
10/15/2009
This class explores particular contemporary topics that are either controversial or often marginal in
newspaper and magazines. This class then addresses the way sociologists and other social scientists
attempt to respond to those issues and invite students to respond as well. Specific issues that can be
used to foster learning can be: sex work, paid and unpaid women's work, transnational families, politics
of the headscarf, effects of globalization on the body, world poverty and literacy, etc.
SLO 4 - Reflect upon themselves in relation to family, communities, society, culture, and/or their
histories.
Students learn about the patterned gender relations that exist within families, work places, schools,
media programs and press, religious organizations, social justice organization, etc. The goal of this
class is to render visible various taken for granted gender patterns that are present in their everyday life
as well as in their way of seeing the world.
SLO 5 - Apply and critique alternative explanatory systems or theories about human societies and
behaviors.
An important component of this class is to address the way various social theories have explained and
challenged us to see our society in gendered terms. Students learn to view some of the advantages
and limitations of those theories, as well as learn to make use of those theories on both national and
global aspects of their social environment.
15.
List or attach the Course Outline (adequately described and including percentage of time to be allocated
to each topic). Curriculum Committees may request additional information. Topics larger than 20% need
to be broken down further. Indicate in your course outline where the Student Learning Outcomes
checked above are being met.
see attached
10/15/2009
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