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MSc01-URB F2011
Study Guide
Study Board for Architecture and Design
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Østerågade 6 - 9000 Aalborg
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
List of Content
List of Content ......................................................................................................................................... 2
1
Welcome letter to students and lecturers ........................................................................................ 3
2
The modular construction of the Semester ..................................................................................... 4
3
The modular execution of the Semester ......................................................................................... 5
4
Semester Calendar 2011 ................................................................................................................ 7
5
List of Contacts................................................................................................................................ 8
6
Project module 1: Designing Urban Mobility ................................................................................... 9
7
6.1
Formalities ............................................................................................................................... 9
6.2
Literature ................................................................................................................................. 9
6.3
Submission ............................................................................................................................ 11
6.4
Assessment ........................................................................................................................... 12
6.5
Project Description: Designing Urban Mobility ...................................................................... 12
Course module 1: Theories of the Network City ........................................................................... 15
7.1
8
Course module 2: Performative Architecture and Instant Urbanism ............................................. 23
8.1
9
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................................. 17
Kursusbeskrivelser ..................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
Course module 3: From Form to Flow – Intelligent technologies of the Network City .................. 29
9.1
10
Course Descriptions .............................................................................................................. 30
Free Study Activities and Study Trips ....................................................................................... 36
10.1
11
Free Study Activity 1: Study Trip to Copenhagen and Malmö .............................................. 36
Enclosures...................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
11.1
Enclosure 1: Plagiarism and correct referencing ....................Error! Bookmark not defined.
11.2
Enclosure 2: Guidelines for difficulties in cooperation ............Error! Bookmark not defined.
11.3
Enclosure 3: Re-examinations ................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.
11.4
Enclosure 4: Generel submission requirements .....................Error! Bookmark not defined.
2
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
1
Welcome letter to students and lecturers
Welcome to the 1st Semester.
This Study Guide is valid for the 1st semester in the Urban Design M.Sc. program at
Architecture and Design.
It is preconditioned that this guide is read before or immediately after the opening of
the semester by all involved students, supervisors and lecturers. The Study Guide is a
supplement and elaboration of the existing curriculum’s specifications concerning the
project module and the course modules.
The Study Guide is a support for students, supervisors, and lecturers in relation to the
planning and implementation of the project work and the individual course. The Study
Guide elaborates the learning goals that are established in the curriculum related to
the project module. Practical rules concerning plagiarism, exclusion of group
members- re-examination and general requirements for assignment submission are
placed at the end of this document as appendixes.
In times of vastly increasing global and local flows of goods, vehicles and people I
need not spend too much time arguing for the relevance of the theme of this
semester; Designing Urban Mobility/The Transit Systems of the Network City. Even
though this is very topical I should like to refer to a ‘classic text’ within urban design
and city planning to motivate why urban designers should pay attention to transit and
mobility. I am thinking of the seminal book ‘Site Planning’ by Lynch and Hack in which
the issue is pointed at very precisely when they say:
“Access is the prerequisite to using any space. Without the ability to enter or
to move within it, to receive and transmit information or goods, space is of no
value, however vast or rich in resources. A city is a communication net, made
of roads, paths, rails, pipes, and wires. The economic and cultural level of a
city is in some proportion to the capacity of its circulation system”
(Lynch & Hack (1984) Site Planning, p. 193)
So I want to welcome you to a fascinating topic that will be dealt with in relationship to
the theoretical and analytical as well as the design-oriented dimensions of Urban
Design. The theme is nested centrally within the core research of the Urban Design
Research Group at AAU, and we shall explore the real world issues of transit systems
on our study trip. Therefore there is all the reason to meet this semester with high
expectations from students as well as from lectures. Let us together build a
stimulating research and design environment around the topical theme of Designing
Urban Mobility/Transit Systems of the Network City.
I wish you a fruitful semester!
Kind regards
Ole B. Jensen, Semester Coordinator
3
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
2
The modular construction of the Semester
This semester focuses on Designing Urban Mobility and Transit Systems of the
Network City. The semester consists of a project module (15 ECTS) and three course
modules (3 x 5 ECTS).
The work load for one semester is 30 ETCS corresponding 900 hours of study work
for each student. The semester is conducted qua a series of project- and course
modules further described in this document.
The work load may vary throughout the semester and in the individual project- and
course modules. It is the semester coordinator’s responsibility in cooperation with the
steering committee to assure the total work load does not exceed 900 hours. Please
note, free study activities are offered as a supplement to each student and does not
take part of the approved curriculum.
The semester consists of four modules that will be examined individually. The course
modules are principally independent but together they establish a significant
foundation for the semester. The planning of the semester aims to support the
progression of the project module in the course modules.
Project module 1:
Designing Urban
Mobility
Course module 1:
Theories of the
Network City
15 ECTS
5 ETCS
5 ETCS
5 ETCS
7-point marking
scale
Pass/Fail
7-point marking
scale
Pass/Fail
Further information
at page 9
Further information
at page 15
Further information
at page 23
Further information
at page 29
Course module 2: Performative
Course module
Architecture
3: Fromand
Form
Instant
to Flow
Ur
Henceforth, course module 1 will be named TNC, course module 2 PAIU, course
module 3 FFF and project module 1 DUM.
This semester the following free study activities are announced:
Free Study Activity 1:
Study Trip to Copenhagen
and Malmö
2 ECTS
Pass/Fail
Further information at page
36
4
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
3
The modular execution of the Semester
The activities of the semester will be prosecuted by the following procedure:
September
3
6
3
7
3
8
3
9
October
40
41
42
43
4
4
Novembe
r
December
4
5
4
8
4
9
M
M
4
6
4
7
5
0
5
1
5
2
January
1
2
3
4
5
Project module 1: Designing Urban Mobility
M
S
A
Course
module 1:
Theories of
the
Network
City
S
A
Course
module
2:
Perform
ative
Architec
ture and
Instant
Urbanis
m
S
Course module 3: From Form to Flow – Intelligent technologies of the Network City
S
3
6
3
7
3
8
3
9
ST
40
41
42
43
W: Workshop
M: Midterm review
S: Submission
A: Assessment
S T: Study Trip: Free Study Activity 1: Study Trip to Copenhagen and
4
4
4
5
4
6
4
7
4
9
5
0
5
1
5
2
1
2
3
4
Malmö
Modular work load for the student. Total for a semester are 900 hours:
Course module 1: Theories of the Network City
5
4
8
5
ET
CS
150
hou
rs
Lecture
s
Teoretic
al
assign
ments
Prepara
tion
Worksh
op
Excurtio
10
lectu
res
5
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Course module 2: Performative Architecture and Instant
Urbanism
5
ET
CS
150
hou
rs
n
Project
work
Total
Lecture
s
Teoretic
al
assign
ments
Prepara
tion
Worksh
op
Excurtio
n
Project
work
Total
5
Lecture
ET
s
Course module 3: From Form to Flow – Intelligent technologies of the Network City
CS
150 Teoretic
hou al
rs
assign
ments
Prepara
tion
Worksh
op
Excurtio
n
Project
work
Total
Project module 1: Designing Urban Mobility
15
Lecture
ET
s
CS Teoretic
450 al
hou assign
rs
ments
Prepara
tion
Worksh
op
Excurtio
n
Project
work
Total
6
150
9
lectu
res
150
10
lectu
res
150
450
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
4
Semester Calendar 2011
Subject to changes. Always check the semester calendar online.
Minutes are required from all meetings in the steering group. A student
(typically the deputy chairman) takes minutes the semester coordinator
approves them before sending to the semester secretary and Study Board for
Architecture and Design ([email protected]).
Date
Subject, deadline, etc.
Room
02 August 2011
Steering group meeting 0 – Semester evaluations of
previous semester and planning of the semester
Gammel Torv 6,
room 206
02 Sep.
Semester Start
09 Sep. 9:00
Formation of groups
28 October,
2 December,
9 December
Mid term review (3 pinups)
5-7 October
Study Trip
23 September,
28 September,
30 September
Submission: Course module 1 (’running evaluation’)
18 November
Submission: Course module 2
24 October
Submission: Course module 3 (digital upload)
13 January 2012
Submission: Project module 1
30 January 2012
Steering group meeting 4 – Semester evaluation
Week 4 2012
Assessment: Project module
‘Running Eval’ (see
above)
Assessment: Course module 1
Assessment: Course module 2
Assessment: Course module 3
7
Semester
secretary
Semester
secretary
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
5
List of Contacts
Function
Person
E-mail
Professor, Ole B. Jensen
[email protected]
Kristina Wagner Røjen
[email protected]
ECTS
Coordinator
E-mail
15
Professor, Ole B. Jensen
[email protected]
Semester coordinator
Semester secretary
Project module 1:
Designing Urban
Mobility
Contact
Supervisors
Professional competencies
Professor, Ole B. Jensen
Urban mobility studies and urban
design research
[email protected]
http://personprofil.aau.dk/pro
fil/104214
Coordinator
E-mail
Professor, Ole B. Jensen
[email protected]
Lecturers
E-mail
PhD Student, Ditte Bendix Lanng
[email protected]
PhD Student, Simon Wind
[email protected]
Coordinator
E-mail
Course module 1:
Theories of the
Network City
ECTS
5
ECTS
5
Professor, Gitte Marling
[email protected]
Course module 2: Performative Architecture and Instant Urbanism
ECTS
Lecturers
E-mail
Professor, Hans Kiib
[email protected]
Associate Professor, Shelley Smith
[email protected]
PhD Student, Line Bruun Jespersen
[email protected]
Coordinator
E-mail
5
PhD Student, Esben S. Poulsen
[email protected]
Course module 3: From Form to Flow – Intelligent technologies of the Network City
Lecturers
E-mail
PhD Student, Anne-Marie S. Knudsen [email protected]
Post-Doc, Jens-Christian Overgaard
Madsen (Dept. 20)
8
[email protected]
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
6
Project module 1: Designing Urban Mobility
15 ETCS
Design af Urban Mobilitet
At first the objectives regarding this project module from the curriculum are outlined.
These objectives define the framework of the module and the examination thereof. It
is a prerequisite for a successful completion of the semester that the student works
systematically and focused to achieve the knowledge, skills and competencies
defined in the curriculum.
Following (in section 6.5) the project module is further described with respect to
theme, procedure and expectations.
6.1
Formalities
Curriculum p. 20
Prerequisites
A BSc degree (Bachelor) i Architecture and Design or similar
Objective
The objective is to strengthen the students ability to functional and aesthetic urban
design in the contemporary network city covering a range from urban mobility
systems (e.g. metros and subways) and their relation to the city to urban spaces and
their linkages to the transit network or large scale urban architecture and transit
terminals and their function as urban flow spaces.
Students who complete the module:
Knowledge
 Must develop knowledge of the importance of contemporary transit systems
to the functionality of cities
 Must be able to understand the technical and societal factors shaping and
forming the contemporary urban transit system
Skills


Must be able to apply the theories and methods relevant to the design and
development of urban transit and mobility
Must be able to evaluate the solutions presented in the field and assess their
values seen in the light of urban design theories, methods and reference
projects
Competencies
 Must have competencies to create design proposals and concepts for urban
mobility and assess their implementation effects
6.2
Literature
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2011) KBH Metroscape – om iscenesættelser af levet mobilitet i
Københavns Metro, in Koffoed, L., J. Larsen & M. Freudendal-Pedersen (red.) Byen
I bevægelse, Roskilde: Samfundslitteratur (In press) + English translation will be
provided
Jensen, O. B. (2008) European Metroscapes - the production of lived mobilities
within the socio-technical Metro systems in Copenhagen, London and Paris, paper
for the 'Mobility, the City and STS' conference, The Technical University of Denmark
(DTU), Copenhagen, November 20-22, 2008
Secondary Literature
9
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Appleyard, D., K. Lynch & J. R. Myer (1964) The View from the Road, Cambridge
Mass.: MIT Press
Artgineering (2007) N4 Towards a Living Infrastructure!, Brussels: A16
Augé, M. (2002) In the Metro, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press
Butcher, M. (2011) Cultures of Commuting: The mobile negotiation of space and
subjectivity, Mobilities, Vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 237-254
Castells, M. (2005) Space of Flows, Space of Places: Materials for a Theory of
Urbanism in the Information Age, in B. Sanyal (ed.) (2005) Comparative Planning
Cultures, London: Routledge, pp. 45-63
Cresswell, T. (2006) On the Move. Mobility in the Modern Western World, London:
Routledge
daab (2006) Traffic Design, Cologne: daab gmbh
Finizio, G. (2006) Architecture & Mobility. Tradition and Innovation, Milano: Skira
Editore
Foster, N. (2007) Norman Foster Works 3, Munich: Prestel
Gordon, E. & A. de Souza e Silva (2011) Net Locality. Why Location Matters in a
Networked World, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell
Graham, S. (ed.) (2010) Distrupted Cities. When Infrastructure Fails, London:
Routledge
Graham, S. & S. Marvin (2001) Splintering Urbanism. Networked infrastructures,
technological mobilities and the urban condition, London: Routledge
Halprin, L. (1966) Freeways, New York: Reihnhold Publishing
Hoete, A. (ed.) (2003) ROAM. Reader on the Aesthetics of Mobility, London: Black
Dog Publishing, pp. 8-20
Hovgesen, H. H. (et al) (2005) The City, the Road and the Landscape, English
versions to be found at:
http://www.bvl.aau.dk/dansk/publikationer/BVL_report_1_english.pdf
http://www.bvl.aau.dk/dansk/publikationer/BVL_report_2_english.pdf
Houben, F. & L. M. Calabrese (eds.) (2003) Mobility: A room with a view, Rotterdam:
NAi Publishers
Ingold, L. & F Tammaro (2010) Highwaying, Wien: Springer Verlag
Jensen, O. B. and T. Richardson (2004) Making European Space. Mobility, Power
and Territorial Identity, London: Routledge
Jones, W. (2006) New Transport Architecture, London: Michael Beazley
Koolhaas, R. (1995) The Generic City, in R. Koolhaas & B. Mau (eds.) (1995) S, M,
L, XL, New York: The Monacelli Press, pp. 1239-1264
Koolhaas, R. (1995) Quantum Leap. Euralille: Centre International d’Affaires, Lille,
France, in R. Koolhaas & B. Mau (eds.) (1995) S, M, L, XL, New York: The Monacelli
Press, pp. 1156-1209
Latour, B. (1996) Aramis or the love of technology, Cambridge Mass.: Harvard
University Press
Lynch, K. & G. Hack (1984) Site Planning, Cambridge Mass.: The MIT Press
Maas, W. (ed.) (2002) The Five Minutes City. Architecture and [Im]Mobility,
Rotterdam: Episode Publishers
Maas, W., A. Graafland, B. Batstra, A. Bilsen & C. Pinilla (eds.) (2007) Space
Fighter. The Evolutionary City (Game:), Barcelona: Actar-D
Shane, D. G. (2005) Recombinant Urbanism. Conceptual Modelling in Architecture,
Urban Design, and City Theory, Chichester: Wiley, pp. 198-229
Urry, J. (2007) Mobilities, Oxford: Polity
Vanderbilt, T. (2008) Traffic. Why we drive the way we do (and what that says about
us), London: Allen Lane
Venturi, R., D. S. Brown & S. Izenour (1977) Learning from Las Vegas: The forgotten
symbolism of Architectural Form, Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press
Virilio, P. (1991) The Overexposed City, in Leach, N. (ed.) (1997) Rethinking
Architecture – A Reader in Cultural Theory, London: Routledge, pp. 382-390
Von Gerken, M. (1997) Architecture for Transportation, Basel: Birkenhäuser
Votolato, G. (2007) Transport Design. A Travel History, London: Reaktion Books
Technical Guides
10
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Danish Road Directorate (1991) Urban Traffic Areas. Part 0. Road Planning in Urban
Areas, Copenhagen: Vejdirektoratet – Vejregeludvalget
Danish Road Directorate (1991) Urban Traffic Areas. Part 7. Speed Reducers,
Copenhagen: Vejdirektoratet – Vejregeludvalget
Danish Road Directorate (1993) Urban Traffic Areas. Part 4. Intersections,
Copenhagen: Vejdirektoratet – Vejregeludvalget
Danish Road Directorate (1993) Urban Traffic Areas. Part 10. The Visual
Environment, Copenhagen: Vejdirektoratet – Vejregeludvalget
Danish Road Directorate (2000) Collection of Cycle Concepts, Copenhagen: Ministry
of Transport, (http://www.trm.dk)
Danish Road Directorate (2001) The State Road Network. A survey of current status
and development, Copenhagen: Ministry of Transport, (http://www.trm.dk)
Danish Road Directorate (2002) Beautiful Roads. A Handbook of Road Architecture,
Copenhagen: Ministry of Transport, (http://www.trm.dk)
Marshall, S. (2005) Streets and Patterns, Oxon: Spon Press
Neuftert, E. & P. Neuftert (2000) Architect’s Data, Oxford: Blackwell, Third Edition,
(pp. 212-225 + 422-451)
Statistics Denmark (2005) Key Figures for Transport 2005, Copenhagen: Statistics
Denmark (http://www.dst.dk/)
Public Websites
Copenhagen Metro (http://www.m.dk/)
Malmö Municipality (http://www.malmo.se/English/About-the-City-of-Malmo.html)
Local committees Bispebjerg and Nørrebro www.bispebjerglokaludvalg.kk.dk and
www.noerrebrolokaludvalg.kk.dk
The Ministry of Environment (http://www.mim.dk/)
The Ministry of Transport (http://www.trm.dk)
The Danish Road Directorate (http://www.vejdirektoratet.dk)
The Danish National Bureau of Statistics (http://www.dst.dk/)
Municipality of Copenhagen (http://www3.kk.dk/)
The Ørestad Company (http://www.orestadsselskabet.dk/)
The Sustainable Urban Transport Project (http://www.sutp.org/)
Manuals for Streets (http://www.manualsforstreets.org.uk)
Shared Space (http://www.shared-space.org/)
Move Observatory on Sustainable Mobility (www.move-forum.net)
Urban Rail Net (http://www.urbanrail.net/eu/euromet.htm)
Metro Bits (http://mic-ro.com/metro/index.html)
Copenhagen Metro (http://www.m.dk/)
ArchDaily (http://www.archdaily.com/category/infrastructure/)
Research Centre and Project Websites
The Centre for Mobility and Urban Studies, C-MUS (http://www.c-mus.aau.dk/)
The Mobilites Research and Policy Centre (http://mcenterdrexel.wordpress.com/)
The Cosmobilities Research Newtork (http://www.cosmobilities.net/)
Centre for Mobilities Research (Lancaster University)
(http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/sociology/cemore/cemorehome.htm)
The City, The Road, The Landscape (BVL) Research project (http://www.bvl.aau.dk/)
Statistics, Data and Indicators
http://www.publicpurpose.com/ut-eu15-jtwtime2001.htm
http://www.dtu.dk/centre/modelcenter/TU/TU-Notitser.aspx
http://www.dst.dk/Statistik/seneste/Transport.aspx
http://www.bizigate.dk/search.tkl?field_query1=su&query1=Transport
http://www.trafikbogen.dk/ramme.html
http://www.worldmapper.org/posters/worldmapper_map141_ver5.pdf
http://www.youtube.com
6.3
Submission
11
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
The project is divided into two main parts: a report part with emphasis on the written
presentation and a presentation part with emphasis on the graphic presentation. The
former seeks to integrate theoretical and methodological reflections whereas the
latter is emulated over the urban design competition/portfolio. By this is meant that
the latter is aiming at a more graphic representation form as for example would be
the case if the project was a design competition entry.
The project report must contain:
 Maximum 35 pages
 Description of the regional and urban context for the project site
 Site Analysis
 Design process reflection
 Theoretically anchored design concept
 Reflections on the applied Methods
 Site specific traffic counting and traffic calculations
 Site specific calculations concerning infrastructure dimensioning
 Site specific microclimate mappings and calculations (e.g. sun, wind, energy
consumptions)
 Appendix containing a selection of draft designs and concepts from the
project period documenting the working process
The graphical presentation must contain:
 200 word abstract (lay term explanation of the key issue in the project)
 Concept diagram
 Plan for the site area in 1:500 (additionally also in 1:1000 if agreed with
supervisors)
 1-2 ‘needle pin’ design proposals within the site area in 1:50-1:100
 Spatial visualizations of the design solution
 Maps and representations in section and plan
For the oral examination:
 Power Point Presentation
 Model in 1:500
 A0 poster containing name, semester, year, project title, abstract,
visualizations
Date
13. January 2012 at the semester secretary.
6.4
Assessment
Evaluation format version E1
(see Curriculum for the Master’s Program in Architecture and Design, page 71).
The module is assessed by an oral exam based on written material, typically a jointly
prepared (or in exceptional cases, prepared by the individual student) project module
report (containing the report/analyses/posters/drawings/models or similar). It is
further presumed that the student has regularly and actively participated in
evaluation seminars and the like. The assessment is an internal oral examination
based on the 7 point scale
6.5
Project Description: Designing Urban Mobility
Content and
Theme
The main project of this semester is themed ‘Designing Urban Mobility’ as a general
theme. This is made concrete in the subtheme of ‘Transit Systems of the Network
City’. Under this theme the aim is for the student to learn how to design functionally
and aesthetically for the transit systems of the network city. The students will work
with design of urban mobility in the context of the network city based upon a specific
12
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
case (the Metro in Copenhagen). The point of departure is an understanding of the
increasing importance of mobility within and between contemporary cities to urban
design and planning. The main project is carried out on the background of an
understanding that breaks with the notion of cities as isolated and bounded entities.
The contemporary city is seen as a node in a network spanning from the local to the
global. Therefore it is important to leave concepts of the bounded and monocentric
city and instead conceptualise how the urban is a set of functional, technical, cultural
and aesthetical transformations happening within a network of transit. By
understanding the relational dimension to the contemporary city the importance of
designing for flows of goods, vehicles, people, signs and ideas is highlighted. The
basic idea behind the semester is therefore to qualify the student in understanding
and designing the network city. The design must be anchored in a conceptually and
analytically well-qualified frame for ‘thinking mobilities’. Equally the aim is to make
physical design proposals for urban interventions in the network city that is
‘designing for flows’. None of these dimensions can do without the other in the
project since it is in the crossing between the ‘thinking mobilities’ and the ‘designing
for flows’ that high-quality urban design projects materialise. Furthermore it is very
important that the project capture the link from the local metro station to the city and
the wider regional network system in its conceptualisation and design. It is therefore
necessary to move beyond urban space design of squares and the immediate metro
station environment. The project must ‘challenge the box’ (the existing Metro design)
by developing an alternative concept for metro mobility (flow). The project must be
theoretically informed, conceptually innovative and exploratory in its design. The task
of re-designing the Site area (Nørrebro Metro station and the urban context within a
maximum perimeter of 500 meters) can be made with a special emphasis on one of
the following themes:



The Transit System of the Network City
The Social Geography and Social multiplicity
Public Domain and social interaction
Site Introduction
Nørrebro Station in Copenhagen is a traffic hub on the border between the city
quarters, Nørrebro and Bispebjerg. With its 75.000 inhabitants Nørrebro is the most
populous quarter of Copenhagen. Bispebjerg is inhabited by approx. 50.000 people.
Both quarters used to be working class neighborhoods. Today many young people
and students live in the areas and nearly 30 % of the inhabitants in both quarters are
immigrants or descendants of immigrants. This shows vividly in the city life in the
area of Nørrebro Station.
Nørrebro Station is located where the elevated ring rail road (the local “S-trains”)
crosses Nørrebrogade/Frederikssundsvej. The S-trains depart from here every 5 to
10 minutes. The preserved, functionalistic station building is from 1930.
Cars, busses, bikes and pedestrians flow through the station area and cross each
other here. The 5A bus line is the busiest bus line of Copenhagen with approx.
60.000 daily passengers. Nørrebrogade is the busiest bicycle street of Copenhagen
with 30.000 daily cyclists.
When the metro ‘City Ring’ opens (projected 2018) Nørrebro Station will also be the
site for a metro station. The city ring will supplement the existing metro lines with an
underground metro ring with 17 underground stations and expected 240.000 daily
passengers. The Nørrebro Metro Station will be located at Folmer Bendtsen Plads
(east of the S-train station) and is expected to have 17.000 daily passengers. With
the ‘City Ring’, there will only be a short travel time from the Nørrebro Station to
major destinations in Copenhagen, such as the main train station (København H),
Kongens Nytorv, and the airport.
Housing and shops are the main functions in the near surroundings of the station.
Many small shops are facing the street from the ground floors of the 5-6 storeys high
13
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
residential blocks. The proximity of the station area are also characterized by e.g. a
large grocery store (Føtex), an alternative cinema (Filmstationen), an indoor
shopping centre (Nørrebro Bycenter), a green belt park (Nørrebroparken), an
infamous social housing area (Mjølnerparken), and a huge piece of empty land
previously occupied by the rail road.
Many urban development initiatives are in these years contributing to a remarkable
transformation of the area. For example the Urban Regeneration projects of
Nørrebro and Nordvest, another is the test of reducing car traffic at Nørrebrogade,
and new parks (e.g. on the former rail road area), new buildings (e.g. a mosque in
Bispebjerg) and building rehabilitations are characteristic of the area.
Learning goals and PBL
Students will work in project groups applying the PBL perspective to their work in
order to obtain ability to functional and aesthetic urban design in the contemporary
network city. They must develop knowledge of the importance of contemporary
transit systems to the functionality of cities, and be able to understand the technical
and societal factors shaping and forming the contemporary urban transit system.
They must be able to apply the theories and methods relevant to the design and
development of urban transit and mobility, and be able to evaluate the solutions
presented in the field and assess their values seen in the light of urban design
theories, methods and reference projects. They must have competencies to create
design proposals and concepts for urban mobility and assess their implementation
effects
Methods
The main project is based on urban design theories of urban mobility, urban design
site analysis and mapping methods within the tool box of urban design field work.
Qualitative methods will be applied (e.g. interview, observations etc.) as well as
quantitative (municipal statistics, traffic counting and calculations etc.). Literature
studies and the study of international reference projects illustrating urban mobility
design.
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
7
Course module 1: Theories of the Network City
5 ETCS
Theories of the Network City
Coordinator
Professor, Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
Formalities
Curriculum p.
17
Prerequisites
A BSc degree (Bachelor) i Architecture and Design or similar
Objective
The objective is to strengthen the students’ ability to comprehend and understand
the technical and societal factors shaping contemporary network cities by
introducing state-of-the-art scientific theories relating to the development of the
network city within the fields of urban theory, mobility theory, network theory and
related theoretical fields.
Students who complete the module:
Knowledge
 Must have knowledge about the social and technical forces shaping the
network city
 Must be able to understand the basic factors behind the creation of the
network city
Skills


Must be able to apply the relevant scientific theories and methods related
to an analysis of the network city
Must be able to evaluate proposals for intervention and design of the
network city in light of state-of-the-art theories
Competencies
 Must acquire competencies in analyzing the network city on a theoretical
and methodologically reflective level
Literature
Primary Literature (see below)
Secondary Literature (see below)
Submission
Content
 Part I: Written paper of max. 2000 words and/or a detailed diagram
 Part II: 2 A3 pages, mapping results in e.g. diagrams and maps +
maximum 200 words.
 Part III: 2 A3 pages, re-design results in e.g. sketches and diagrams +
maximum 200 words.
Requirements
 Part I: The written paper/diagram must be submitted in two copies.
 Part II: The 2 A3 pages must be presented at the pin-up in one copy.
 Part III: The 2 A3 pages must be presented at the pin-up in one copy.
Date



Part I:September 23 2011
Part II: September 28 2011
Part III: September 30 2011
All three parts are to be physically handed in to the semester secretary at the
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
above mentioned submission deadlines.
Assessment
Evaluation format version B
(see Curriculum for the Master’s Program in Architecture and Design, page 71).
The module is passed with approval of the three course parts.
Part I is passed by the student´s individual submission and approval of a written
paper of maximum 2000 words and/or diagrams.
Part II is passed by the student´s active participation in an individual pin-up
presentation of mapping results (2 A3 pages per students + short oral
presentation).
Part II is passed by the student´s active participation in an individual pin-up
presentation of re-design results (2 A3 pages per students + short oral
presentation).
Instruction
Content
The module will be carried out as 12 course units, consisting of lectures
supplemented with group work and workshops.
The purpose of the course is to establish conceptual and theoretical framework for
analyzing and understanding the flows within and between the nodes of the
Network City.
The module comprises three parts. Part I is titled ‘Theories of the Network City’
and contain contemporary urban theory of the Network City. Part II is titled ‘Critical
Point of Contact Analysis’ and contains lectures of networks, urban design, and
architectural theories of infrastructural development, in addition to a hands-on
mapping workshop (Workshop A). Part III is titled ‘Critical Point of Contact Redesign’ and contains a hands-on design workshop (Workshop B).
Part I: The course contains a general introduction to the theme of mobility in the
contemporary Network City as well as there are more case based and in-depth
lectures. Each session contains a lecture, a group work session and a plenary.
Part II: In contemporary urban societies multiple networks and systems interact,
overlap, exist in parallel, converge, conflict etc. creating unforeseen complexity and
less transparency. By exploring how layered networks of physical movement,
service information, goods delivery, commercial communication etc. are connected
(and disconnected) we get a much better understanding of how to design and
intervene regardless if we are thinking about public spaces in the city or new
systems of service design. The many networks orchestrating and facilitating
contemporary everyday life are dependent on the strategic sites where the
networks meet and establish contact. The notion of ‘Critical Point of Contact’
(CPC) draws upon theories within as diverse realms such as interaction design,
service design, geography, and mobility studies. The framing of CPC aims at
transgressing divisions of structure/agent, micro/macro, system/actor, and
subject/object. Part II ends with Workshop A aiming at applying the central
concepts of CPC and network city theories in the context of everyday mobility in
Aalborg East. The workshop consists of empirical ´mapping in motion´ of technical,
social and aesthetic dimensions of an identified CPC, and of the analytical
judgement of the CPC.
Part III: The ‘Critical Point of Contact Re-design´ contains Workshop B, a design
workshop that continues the work with the CPC of Workshop A. It aims at
identifying potentials for social and economic value that has not been fulfilled by
the CPC (e.g. a service not catered for, a user group not included etc.), and at the
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
making of first tentative proposals for re-design catering for the identified potential.
7.1
Course 1
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Course Descriptions
Thinking Mobilities
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
In this introduction lecture the theme of the semester is presented. The analytical
dimension of ‘thinking mobilties’ will be discussed with an eye to the operational
questions that becomes relevant to the design of urban mobility.
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2009) Flows of Meaning, Cultures of Movements – Urban Mobility
as Meaningful Everyday Life Practice, Mobilities, vol. 4, no. 1, March 2009, pp.
139-158
Secondary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2010) In search of the ‘Wild Contemporary’ – exploring the potential
of the techno utopian urban imaginary to contemporary mobility challenges, paper
for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Geographers, Washington
DC, April 13-18, 2010
Course 2
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Facework, Flow and the City – urban mobility and Simmel, Goffman and
Lynch
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This lecture focuses on the micro level of daily mobility by looking at three urban
scholar’s classic work. The lecture is divided into two sections. The first part
contains a re-reading of two sociological thinkers; Georg Simmel and Irving
Goffman. Re-reading the two ‘classics’ is done with the purpose of applying basic
concepts on the phenomenon of flow, interaction and mobility in the contemporary
city. In the second part the work of Lynch is discussed in the light of daily mobility
and the meaning of urban transport.
Primry Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2006) Facework, Flow and the City – Simmel, Goffman and mobility
in the Contemporary City, Mobilities, Vol. 2. No. 2, pp. 143-165
Secondary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2010) Negotiation in Motion: Unpacking a Geography of Mobility,
Space and Culture, vol. 13 (4), pp. 389-402
Jensen, O. B. (2007) Pleasure, Fun and Flow - urban travel in the works of Kevin
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Lynch, Paper for the research seminar ‘Contemporary receptions of Kevin Lynch’
Department of Architecture and Design, Aalborg University, March 12th 2007
Course 3
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Networked Mobilities and Performative Urban Spaces
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This lecture takes point of departure in an understanding of mobility as an
important cultural dimension to contemporary life. The movement of objects, signs,
and people constitutes material sites of networked relationships. In understanding
the importance of mediation, global-local interactions, networks, and the
distributions of meaning and mediated discourses this way of thinking about
mobilities argues for the importance of including pervasive computing and situated
technologies. The lecture investigates the meaning of mobility and the potential in
mediation and technologies to enhance the experiences and interaction in urban
transit spaces.
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2008) Neworked mobilities and new sites of mediated interaction, in
K. Terzidis (ed.) (2008) What Matter(s)? First International Conference on Critical
Digital, conference proceedings, Boston: Harvard Graduate School of Design, pp.
279-285
Secondary Literature
Jensen, O. B. & B. S. Thomsen (2008) Performative Urban Environments:
Increasing Media Connectivity, in F. Eckardt et al. (eds.) (2008) Mediacity:
Situations, Practices and Encounters, Berlin: Frank & Timme, pp. 407-429
Course 4
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Mobility Tales of the Network City
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This lecture uses the theoretical frames from the two first lectures to show
empirical examples of everyday life mobility in Thailand and USA. Hereafter we will
see the movie Contested Streets documenting the disputes over traffic planning in
New York City, as well as examples from London, Copenhagen and Paris. The
movie contain in-depth interviews with a number of planners and urban designers.
The aim is to apply the theories and concepts discussed in the course in student
group work and in the final plenary session
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2007) Biking in the land of the Car – Clashes of mobility cultures in
the USA, Paper for the conference ‘Trafikdage 2007’, Aalborg, August 27-28 2007
Jensen, O. B. (2007) City of Layers - Bangkok’s Sky Train and how it works in
socially segregating mobility patterns, Swiss Journal of Sociology, vol. 33, no. 3,
pp. 387-405
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Secondary Literature
Contested Streets. Breaking with New York City Gridlock, Transportation
Alternatives, New York, 2006 (VIDEO)
Jensen, O. B. (2010) Mobility Charters and Manifestos – exploring normative
discourses and codes of ‘correct’ mobility, Paper for the ‘Nordic Interdisciplinary
Conference on Discourse and Interaction’, Aalborg, Denmark, 17-19 November
2010
Mikkelsen, J. B., S. Smith & O. B. Jensen (2011) Challenging the ’King of the
Road’ – exploring mobility battles between cars and bikes in the USA, paper for the
4th Nordic Gepographers Meeting, Roskilde, Denmark, May 24-27 2011
Course 5
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Thinking Mobilities/Designing for Flows – get operational!
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This lecture presents analytical framings of two key issues of relevance to urban
mobility: semiotics and the body. Furthermore the lecture aim to discuss the
theories and concepts from the earlier lectures in order to become operational in
relation to analysis (thinking mobilities) and design (designing for flows). The
lecture is organized as a workshop session where all groups participate in
discussing how they can apply the theories in the design of urban mobility.
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2011) Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities, Paper for the
conference ‘Mobilities in Motion: New Approaches to Emergent and Future
Mobilities’, The Center for Mobilities Research and Policy at Drexel University,
Philadelphia, March 21st-23rd, 2011
Jensen, O. B. (2010) Embodied Cultures of Mobilities, Paper for the 6th
International Cosmobilities Conference ‘Cultures of Mobilities: Everyday Life,
Communication, and Politics’, Aalborg, Denmark, October 27-29, 2010
Secondary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2011) If Only It Could Speak: Narrative Explorations of Mobility and
Place in Seattle, in Vannini, P., L. Budd, C. Fisker, P. Jiron & O. B. Jensen (eds.)
Mobilities and Technoculture in the Americas, New York: Peter Lang (in press)
Course 6
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
‘Where the rubber meets the road’ – introduction to the notion of Critical
Point of Contact
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This is the first lecture in part II of the course. The course explores and qualifies
the design work related to central concept of ‘Critical Points of Contact’. The
course presents theories related to CPC, notions of networked architectures and
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
the idea of ‘digital ground’ and a new sense of place. The purpose of the course is
to provide a new theoretical vocabulary. The notion of ‘Critical point of Contact’ is
the topic for the first lecture. In particular the focus is on the ‘moment of truth’
whereby connectivity becomes crucial (critical) to particular design outcomes. In
the lecture a number of analytical models are presented. Students are working with
the concept in relation to an empirical focus. The lecture is a mix of teacher
presentation, student presentation, and discussion about concept operationlization.
Literature
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. & N. Morelli (2011) Critical Points of Contact – exploring networked
relations in urban mobility and service design, Special issue of The Danish Journal
of Geoinformatics and Land Managament, (in press)
Secondary Literature
Jensen, Wind & Lanng (2011) Critical Point of Contact - between urban networks
and flows (forthcoming in Urban Design AD:MT book)
Kempf, P. (2009) You Are the City. Observation, Organization and Transformation
of Urban Settings, Baden: Lars Müller Publishers (16 pages)
Scollon, R. (2008) Geographies of Discourse: Action Across Layered Spaces,
paper for the ‘Space Interaction Discourse’ conference, Aalborg University, 12-14
November 2008
Course 7
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Swithces and Terminals - Contemporary Network Thinking I
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
The notion of ‘network thinking’ is the topic for this lecture. In particular notions of
‘switches’ and ‘terminals’ are discussed. Students are working with the concepts in
relation to an empirical focus. The lecture is a mix of teacher presentation, student
presentation, and discussion about concept operationlization.
Primary Literature
Easterling, K. (1999) Organisation Space. Landscapes, Highways, and Houses in
America, Cambridge Mass.: MIT Press, pp. 1-11 and 98-111
Secondary Literature
Easterling, K. (2011) Fresh Field, in N. Bhatia, M. Przybylski, L. Sheppeard & M.
White (2011) Coupling. Strategies for Infrastructural Opportunism, New York:
Princeton Architectural Press, pp. 10-13
Course 8
Instruction
Lecturer
Buildings and Intersections - Contemporary Network Thinking II
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Content
Literature
The notion of ‘network thinking’ is the topic for this lecture. In particular we discuss
the transformed understanding of ‘buildings’ and ‘intersections’ in relation to a
network perspective. The lecture is a mix of teacher presentation, student
presentation, and discussion about concept operationlization.
Primary Literature
Sumrell, R. & K. Varnelis (2007) Blue Monday. Stories of Absurd realities and
natural philosophies, Barcelona: ACTAR, pp. 48-83 and 144-170
Secondary Literature
Graham, S. (ed.) (2010) Distrupted Cities. When Infrastructure Fails, London:
Routledge, pp. 1-27
Course 9
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Situated Types and Digital Grounding - towards a new sense of Place
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
The lecture focus on notions of ‘digital grounding’, ‘situated types’, and ‘service
ecologies’ to present an operational way of thinking about ‘place’ in relation to sites
of interaction and mediated networks. The lectures are a mix of teacher
presentation, student presentation, and discussion about concept operationlization.
Primary Literature
McCullough, M. (2004) Digital ground: architecture, pervasive computing, and
environmental knowing, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, pp. 117-144 (Chapt. 6)
Secondary Literature
McCullough, M. (2004) Digital ground: architecture, pervasive computing, and
environmental knowing, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, pp. 171-191 (Chapt. 8)
Course 10
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Geosemiotics – strategic places and semiotic aggregates
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Ole B. Jensen
This lecture presents the analytical framework of ‘geosemiotics’. In particular the
lecture will focus on how places are embedded in semiotics systems and
discourses, and how strategic points become ‘semiotic aggregates’ with strong
affinity to the notion of CPC. The lectures are a mix of teacher presentation,
student presentation, and discussion about concept operationlization.
After lecture 10 this part of the course is evaluated by submission of a (maximum)
2000 word individual essay containing presentation of selected theoretical
concepts and a discussion of their empirical application for analysis and re-design
of CPC. The essay must also contain a diagram presenting the framework. The
paper is part of the ‘running assessment’ and will be graded passed/not passed.
Literature
Primary Literature
Scollon, R. & S. Scollon (2003) Discourses in Place. Language in the Material
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
World, London: Routledge, pp. 166-196 (Chapt. 9)
Secondary Literature
Gordon, E. & A. de Souza e Silva (2011) Net Locality. Why Location Matters in a
Networked World, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 85-104 (Chapter 4)
Course 11
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Course 12
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
NW City Workshop A: Mapping in Motion
Workshop
PhD Student,
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology,
Ditte Bendix Lanng
The first Workshop is ‘Mapping in Motion’ and contains an introduction to the site
area in Aalborg East. The assignment is presented (a pre-chosen CPC) and
mapping methodology is presented. Hereafter the student will be mapping the site.
The mapping is organized in such a manner that there will be a project group
member mapping each mode of transport (car, walking, cycling). After the mapping
there will be a plenary of mapping presentation and knowledge sharing as well as
beginning work in the project groups. The students will hereafter develop individual
mapping documentation and there will be an evaluation based on an individual pinup presentation of mapping results (2 A3 pages per students + short oral
presentation).
It is a precondition of the workshop that the student has read the course literature
for lecture 1-10 and is familiar with central concepts of network city theory and
CPC.
NW City Workshop B: Critical Point of Contact Re-Design
Workshop
PhD Student,
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology,
Ditte Bendix Lanng
This part of the workshop contains an introduction to a design assignment of the
site (identification of potentials and proposal for re-design). Hereafter there will be
an individual preparation of a proposal for re-design of the CPC site, followed by
an evaluation based on an individual pin-up presentation (2 A3 pages and short
oral presentation).
It is a precondition of the workshop that the student has read the course literature
for lecture 1-10 and is familiar with central concepts of network city theory and
CPC.
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
8
Course module 2: Performative Architecture and
Instant Urbanism
5 ETCS
Performativ arkitektur og instant urbanisme
Coordinator
Professor, Gitte Marling
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Formalities
Curriculum p.
18-19
Prerequisites
A BSc degree (Bachelor) in Architecture and Design or similar
Objective
The objective is:
- To strengthen the students’ ability to comprehend and understand the role and
function of performative urban design and architecture in order to create an urban
environment, which produce experiences, meaning and reflections.
- To provide the students with an understanding of historic instant urbanism
projects and the theoretical and artistic / architectonic movements in the field
- To strengthen their analytic ability and conceptual understanding of instant city
projects and performativ urban design
Students who complete the module·
Knowledge
 The student must have knowledge about theories on Performative
Architecture and Instant Urbanism from the 20th and 21st century
 The student must be able to understand the relationship between event
design, city life and the use of urban scenography
Skills

The student must be able to apply theories and analytical methods in small
case stories
Competencies
 The student must be able to evaluate the quality of the design and the
obtained city life in selected cases
 The student must be able to qualify the analytical results in new or
supplementary design concepts.
The student must be able to communicate results and concepts in a professional
way equivalent to architectural and urban design practice.
Literature
Primary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Festival. Aalborg University
Press 2011
Hans Kiib (ed): Performative Urban Design. Aalborg University Press. 2010
Secondary Literature
Simon Sadler, 1999, The Situationist City
S AM # 02: Instant Urbanism: Tracing the Theories of the Situationists in
Contemporary Architecture and Urbanism. Swiss Architecture museum (HG./ED.)
Christoph Merian Verlag 2002.
Submission
Requirements
 The evaluation is based on a 5-day assignment on a set subject:
The students will have to write an essay, where they analyze a case and
describe city life as an integrated product of temporary urban scenography
and performative technologies.
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
The essay must demonstrate theoretical knowledes in the field.

The essay should come up with critical evaluation of the case, and
propose a redevelopment of the concept behind the event.
Content
The urban design essay must include for groups with one person
 7.000 – 10.000 characters of text (no space)
 diagrams,
 architectural drawings and maps

The urban design essay must include for groups with two persons
 10.000- 14.000 characters of text (no space)
 diagrams,
 architectural drawings and maps

Essay Submission: 18 November 2011, to semester secretary
Assessment
Version B – Course module
(see Curriculum for the Master’s Program in Architecture and Design, page 71).
The module is passed with approval of one or more written papers submitted. The
papers must be based on selected parts of the individual student’s course module
work and/or the syllabus for the course module (containing the
report/analyses/posters/drawings/models or similar).
Grading the written assignment according to the 7-point scale. The grading is
based on the written assignment. The product examination should demonstrate
that the student has fulfilled the objectives outlined above. In the evaluation of the
examination performance, the grade 12 will only be awarded to students who
demonstrate that they have fulfilled the objectives for the subject
exhaustively or with only few insignificant omissions.
Instruction
Content
The module will be carried out as 9 lectures including a minor seminar, and a 5
days assignment in individual essay writing. Supervision in the essay writing
process will be provided.
The module presents theories and projects on performative architecture, instant
urbanism and city life.
Furthermore it presents related analytic methods.
The module will also present different approaches to the re-design of present
projects.
Students will work with methods for the analysis of event scapes, performative
architecture and urban space design in a cross-disciplinary way.
8.1
Course 1
Instruction
Lecturer
Course Descriptions
Instant City - Introduction
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
24
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Media Technology
Gitte Marling
Content
Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Introduction to the module, rising the question on how we as urban designers can
cope with event design, festivals and temporary urban space design?
Different discourses on instant city design are presented including constrains and
possibilities on temporary use.
Assignment: discussion in groups and plenum
Literature
Primary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Roskilde Festival. Aalborg University
Press 2011. Page 16 – 29 & 46 - 62
Course 2
Theory of Instant City
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Different theoretical positions related to the term ‘Instant City’, including the
Situationists, the modern Unitarian Urbanism, Instant Architecture (Archigram,
Metabolism), up to postmodern critical practice.
Theories and ideas form the Situationist International from 1950´s and 60´s
compared with urban projects and installations of today. The main idea behind the
situationist movement and urban action is to create ‘situations/situation construit’
which can enhance the audience in reflecting and acting and become a milestone
for social or mental change.
Assignment: Analyzing selected projects – discussion in groups and plenum
Literature
Primary Literature
Primary literature: Simon Sadler, 1999, The Situationist City, page 105-110 and
117- 122
Secondary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Roskilde Festival. Aalborg University
Press 2011. 46 – 62
Simon Sadler, 1999, The Situationist City, page 122 – 147, MIT Press, ISBN 9780-262-19392-4
Course 3
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
City Life Theory
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Gitte Marling
City Life theories from Simmel to Sennet in relation to temporary transformation of
private spaces and informal spaces into public domains.
Assignment: analyses of cases
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Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Literature
Primary Literature
Gitte Marling: Performative Urban Spaces. Page 106 – 122 In: Hans Kiib:
Performativ Urban Design, Aalborg University Press 2010.
Secondary Literature
P. Kasinitz (ed): Metropolis – Center and Symbol of our Times. New York
Publisher 1995
Maartin Haajer & Arnold Reijndorph: In Search of New Publich Domains: NAi
Publisher. Rotterdam 2001
Course 4
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
‘The Useful Fool’ - Grotesque Realism
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Gitte Marling
The theories related to ‘carnival and the grotesque realism’ (Mikhail Bakhtin) – the
ambivalent use of ‘the clown’ in urban city life.
Assignment: Analyzes of cases from Roskilde Festival
Primary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Roskilde Festival. Aalborg University
Press 2011. Page 260 - 315
Secondary Literature
M. Bakhtin: Karneval og latterkultur. Det lille forlag. Frederiksberg 2001
Course 5
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Urban Scenography
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Gitte Marling
Post Millennium theories and cases related to Urban Detournment, Urban Catalyst,
Urban Guerrilla Design, Urban Interventions (e.g. Permanent breakfast, Guerrilla
Gardening), Urban Nomads (e.g. The future is now, Urban Nomad Shelter…)
Assignment: 2 hours: Parking day exercise
Literature
Primary Literature
S AM # 02: Instant Urbanism: Tracing the Theories of the Situationists in
Contemporary Architecture and Urbanism. Swiss Architecture museum (HG./ED.)
Christoph Merian Verlag 2002. Page 1-7; 16-19; 60-62; 77-78
Course 6
Urban art installations and street art
Instruction
Lecture with assignment
26
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Lecturer
Assistant professor
Department of Architecture Design and Media Technology
Line Marie Brunn Jespersen
Content
Theories and cases related to urban installations and performative street art.
Assignment: analyses of selected projects / situations (You Tube – films)
Literature
Primary Literature
Line Marie Bruun Jespersen: Creating Places through Arts. IN Hans Kiib:
Performative Urban design. Aalborg University Press. 2010 p. 136 - 146
Secondary Literature
Line Marie Bruun Jespersen: Ph.d.Thesis. Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology. August 2011 – Selected parts. Further informations follows
Course 7
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Performative Architecture
Lecture with assignment
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Gitte Marling
Theories on Performative Architecture and Technologies; cases related to
architectural interventions working with performative technologies.
Discussions in groups
Primary Literature
Hans Kiib: Performativ Urban Design. Aalborg University Press 2010. Page 10 –
18; 40 – 54; 30-40
Gitte Marling: Performative Urban Design & Behaviour in Public Places. Paper for
AAG Conference, Seattle, april 2011.
Secondary Literature
Anna Klignmann: Brandscapes. Architecture in the Experience Economy.
Cambridge, CA: MIT Press, 2007
Course 8
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Seminar on methods
Seminar
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Gitte Marling
Methods for analysis - Methods for the analysis of Instant City Projects, event
scapes, fun parks and festivals
Assignment: Write up an analysis template.
Literature
Primary Literature
27
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Dorthe Skot-Hansen: New Stages New Experiences IN: Hans Kiib: Performativ
Urban Design. Aalborg University Press 2010. Page 122-136
Course 9
Instruction
Lecturer
Methods II
Seminar
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Hans Kiib
Professor
Department of Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Gitte Marling
Content
Methods on Concept Design - Methods for the design of Instant City Projects.
Assignment: Write up a design template
Literature
Primary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Festival: Aalborg University
Press. Chapter 6 page 315 - 367
Secondary Literature
Gitte Marling & Hans Kiib: Instant [email protected] Festival: Aalborg University
Press. Chapter 7 page 373 -388
28
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
9
Course module 3: From Form to Flow – Intelligent
technologies of the Network City
5 ETCS
Fra Form til Flow – Intelligent Technologies of the Network City
Coordinator
PhD student Esben Skoubo Poulsen,
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Formalities
Curriculum p.16
Prerequisites
A BSc degree (Bachelor) i Architecture and Design or similar.
Objective
The objective is to strengthen the students ability to functional and aesthetic urban
design based on mobility and flows in the contemporary network city applying a
wide field of new information technologies such as interactive media, mediated
surface design, mobility tracking technologies (GPS/ RFID), mobile and digital
networks, ICT software for urban flow simulation and design, mobile robotics and
intelligent cybernetics systems design.
Students who complete the module:
Knowledge
 Must have knowledge about contemporary information technologies and
their practical design and implementation in the contemporary network city
 Must be able to understand the technical and societal potentials in
applying intelligent technologies in urban design
Skills


Must be able to create design proposals and experiments applying new
information technologies and software to mobility and flows in urban
design of the network city
Must be able to evaluate the solutions presented in the field and assess
their values seen in the light of intelligent technologies
Competencies
 Must have competencies to create design proposals and concepts for
urban mobility/flow and assess their implementation effects
Literature
Primary Literature
Course literature is specified below
Secondary Literature
Course literature is specified below
Submission
Content
Phase 1 (Lecture: 1-6+ data collection in Copenhagen)
 Data: Result in a digital documentation of raw data.




Phase 2 (lecture 7-10)
Information: Mapping Flow system (A1 Poster)
Time-based diagram of flow system.
Rhizomatic diagram of flow relations.
Descriptive text (max. 250 word)

Phase 3 (Lecture 11-15)
Form and Flow: Design solution (A1 Poster)
29
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011




Project statement (max. 50 words)
Concept model 1:300 (5 model photo)
Illustration of predicted network relations and situated flow systems.
Description of flow system (max. 250 words)
The material is collected in a digital project portfolio. (Upload)
Requirements
 Digital project portfolio uploaded to public server.
 Concept model 1:300
 A1 Poster: Mapping Flow system
 A1 Poster: Design solution
24 October: Upload of digital project portfolio
Assessment
Evaluation format version B
(see Curriculum for the Master’s Program in Architecture and Design, page 71).
The module is passed by the student‟s regular and active participation in one or
more evaluation seminars, one pin-ups and one oral exam.
Instruction
Lecture & design workshop
10 lectures method and theory and 5 lectures for design workshop
Content
The course is made up of 15 modules. It is the objective of the course assemblage,
to present interdisciplinary quantitative as well as qualitative tools and methods to
analyze urban flow systems in the network city.
The workshop is related to the theoretical framework presented in the course:
Theories of the Network City and through a analytic approach to data gathering
and visualization the students will translate flow data from the life of the city into
significant drivers to inform conceptual architectural design scenarios for the flow
system at Nørrebro station.
The course presents theoretical as well as practical models for traffic planning of
car, truck, bike and pedestrian flow. 4-step sequential models/area based model as
well as observation and tracking tools to access regional economic and social flow
patterns. To approach regional flow patterns the students will employ GPStracking techniques, which enables the students to map data that is tacit and
qualitatively as well as qualitatively attuned. Thereby the method introduces an
awareness and sensitivity to embodied experiences of the urban environment.
Thus, the method addresses elemental questions regarding ways of collecting data
and what constitutes data, information and knowledge.
The last 5 sessions is organized as a design workshop that synthesizes the
collected data into design relevant information. The information will constitute the
driving design factor. As a product of the temporary data structures the student will
go through a process where data is turned into information and transformed into
morphological time-based design scenarios.
9.1
Note
Course Descriptions
It is recommended that students participate in the study trip to Copenhagen and
Malmø, where data collection is carried out in Nørrebro Station
Basic parametric modeling skills is a prerequisite: Secondary reading:
30
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Grasshopper Primer 2nd edition by Issa Rajaa
Course 1
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Course 2
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Form and Flow and introduction
Lecture
PhD student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Esben Skoubo Poulsen
In this introduction lecture the theme of the course is presented. The
methodological framework of analysing urban flow systems will be discussed in
relation to contemporary diagrammatic time based planning strategies.
Primary Literature
Koolhaas, R. Mau B., 1998, S, M, L, XL, New York, The Monacelli Press,: Article:
"The generic city" (p. 132 – 142)
Traffic flow determinants and traffic models
Lecture
Post-Doc
Department of Development and Planning
Jens Chr. Overgaard Madsen
This lecture provides an introduction to urban traffic flows and the determinants of
traffic flows. What are the primary determinants of travel activity (trip activity),
modal split and routing? Furthermore the lecture provides an introduction to fourstep sequential traffic models for modelling traffic flows in urban areas.
Literature
Primary Literature
Pacione, Michael, 2002, Urban Geography – a global perspective, Routledge
(Chapter 13)
Wright, P. H., Ashford, N. J. and Stammer Jr., R. J., 1998, Transportation
Engineering – Planning and Design, John Wiley and Sons (Chapter 7)
Course 3
Measuring and describing traffic flows
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Lecture
Post-Doc
Department of Development and Planning
Jens Chr. Overgaard Madsen
The lecture introduces selected tools for measuring, describing and obtaining data
on relevant aspects of urban traffic flows. This includes an introduction to design
and execution of questionnaires in order to obtain information on traffic flow
determinants.
Primary Literature
Taylor, M. A. P., Bonsall, P. W. and Young, W., 2000, Understanding Traffic
Systems: Data, Analysis and Presentation
31
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
CROW, 1998, Recommendations for Traffic Provisions in Built-up Areas, record 15
Course 4
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Networked locality - Methods for flow tracking using GPS
Lecture
PhD Student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Anne-Marie Sanvig Knudsen
This lecture introduces the theoretical and methodological implications of working
with location-aware technologies as a method for describing the network city
empirically.
Primary Literature
Gordon, E. & e Silva, A.S. 2011, Net Locality: Why Location Matters in a
Networked World, Wiley-Blackwell. Chapters 1 and 2
Secondary Literature
Knudsen, Anne-Marie Sanvig & Harder, Henrik 2011, "Employing smart phones as
a planning tool: The Vollsmose case", Nordic Geographers Meeting 2011,
Roskilde, May 24-27
Course 5
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Flow relations in the network city
Lecture
PhD Student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Anne-Marie Sanvig Knudsen
The lecture looks at global flow dependencies and at expressions of how the global
is localized. How might we map these networks and what are their implications for
the places and spaces we design? The lecture takes it point of departure in actual
examples of visualizations and mappings of global flows and networks.
Primary Literature
Massey, D. 1991, "A global sense of place", Marxism today, vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 2429.
Sassen, S. 2008, "New York city's two geographies of talk" in NYTE. New York
Talk Exchange, eds. F. Rojas M., C. Celdesi Valeri, K. Kloeckl & C. Ratti, SA+P
Press, , pp. 9-14.
Secondary Literature
Farías, I. & Bender, T. 2010, Urban assemblages: how actor-network theory
changes urban studies, Routledge, London.
MacKenzie, A. 2006, "From Café to Park Bench: W-Fi and technological Overflows
in the City" in Mobile technologies of the City, eds. M. Sheller & U. John,
Routledge, Oxon, pp. 137-151.
Course 6
Instruction
Method for observation: social environments
Lecture
32
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Lecturer
Content
Literature
PhD student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Esben Skoubo Poulsen
This lecture focuses on a methodological approach to ethnographic field study, i a
discussion of the three different scholar’s: Erving Gofmann, Edward T. Hall and
Alex Pentlan. The lecture present a practical method to capture non-verbal signals
and social cues. The cause will further present Erwing Goffman´s concepts of
Interaction order, personal front, mobile ‘With´ and mobile ´single´
Primary Literature
Goffman E. (1959) Presentation of self in everyday life, Peter Smith Pub. (p. 1-50)
Hall, Edward T (1973) The hidden Dimension, Doubleday, New York, Anchor
Books (p.1-70)
Secondary Literature
Albrecht, K, (2006), Social intelligence : the new science of success, Calif, San
Francisco.(p 20 40)
Pentlannd, Axel (2007) Human Computing and Machine Understanding of Human
Behavior: A Survey, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (p. 47- 71)
Course 7
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Diagrammatic mapping of Flow systems 1
Lecture + assignments
PhD student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Esben Skoubo Poulsen
This lecture will present diagrammatic time-based visualizing techniques for
networked and social behaviors.
The student will employ field data from observations and transform them into
information structures, which present social and environmental dynamisms over
time. with cases form Edward R. Tufte the lecture present visualization techniques
that explain quantitative as well as narrative data structures.
Primary Literature
Garcia, Mark, (2010) The Diagrams in architecture, Chichester, John Wiley.
Spuybroek, Lars (2010) Nox, Diamrams (P. 270 - 281)
Tufte, E, (2005) Visual Explanations Graphics press LLc, USA (p.13 - 55 )
Secondary Literature
Garcia, Mark, (2010) The Diagrams in architecture, Chichester, John Wiley. Taylor,
M (2010) Diagramming the Interior (p. 134 - 141)
Malner Monice Joy, 2010, Diagrams in Multisensory and Phenomenological
Archtiecture (P: 112 - 121)
Course 8
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Diagrammatic mapping of Flow systems 2
Lecture + assignments
PhD Student
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology
Anne-Marie Sanvig Knudsen
How to make sense of all the data we have collected?
33
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
- ways to process, draw and make synthesis
This lecture will look at the theory and practice of the map as representation and its
relevance for informing design solutions. In a workshop based session the
collected data will be processed, visualized and synthesized through different
types of mappings.
Literature
Primary Literature
Kitchin, R. & Dodge, M. 2007, "Rethinking maps", Progress in Human Geography,
vol. 31, no. 3, pp.
Secondary Literature
Pickles, J. 2004, A history of spaces: cartographic reason, mapping, and the geocoded world, Routledge. Pages 27-59
Course 9
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Diagrammatic mapping of Flow systems 3
Lecture + assignments
Post-Doc
Department of Development and Planning
Jens Chr. Overgaard Madsen
How to make sense of all the data we have collected?
- ways to process, draw and make synthesis
Literature
Primary Literature
Taylor, M. A. P., Bonsall, P. W. and Young, W., 2000, Understanding Traffic
Systems: Data, Analysis and Presentation
Course 10
Diagrammatic mapping of Flow systems (Pin - up)
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
Literature
Course 11-15
Workshop
PhD Student, Anne-Marie
Sanvig Knudsen,
Department of
Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Post-Doc, Jens Chr.
Overgaard Madsen,
Department of
Development and
Planning
PhD student Esben
Skoubo Poulsen,
Department of
Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
As a part of the interdisciplinary data synthesis the student are to hand in and
present a poster (A1).
The poster has to present a synthesized flow analyses in one of the selected flow
studies:
pedestrian + bike traffic, environmental factors, economic, social and cultural flows,
pedestrian mobility and social signals.
The session is a discussion and sharing of potential findings, which is open to the
whole group in the forthcoming workshop.
No literature
Design workshop Form and Flow
34
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Instruction
Lecturer
Content
5 day workshop
PhD Student, Anne-Marie
Sanvig Knudsen,
Department of
Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
Post-Doc, Jens Chr.
Overgaard Madsen,
Department of
Development and
Planning
PhD student Esben
Skoubo Poulsen,
Department of
Architecture, Design and
Media Technology
It is vital that the project captures the link from the local metro station to the city
and the wider regional network system in its conceptualization and design. It is
therefore necessary to move beyond urban space design of squares and the
immediate metro station environment. The project must ‘challenge the box’ (the
existing Metro design) by developing an alternative concept for metro mobility
(flow).”
The data collected in Copenhagen will feed into a design workshop, bringing
different types of data together from the teams. This should stimulate reflections
and discussions among students on what type of data are appropriate for informing
a design intervention.
These flow analyses and design statements will be the foundation for an
experimental diagrammatic design approach to Nørrebro station. Through an
analogous as well as digital sketching process the groups will develop strategies
for time-based planning strategies, that address Nørreport’s local as well as
regional and global social, economic and physical infrastructures.
The design workshop abstract using analogue diagrammatic modeling and employ
parametric modeling technique in the 3d application: Rhinoceros using the visual
programming software: Grasshopper. The students will present relational
morphogenetic patterns together with time-based adaptive architectural structures
that challenge the traditional modernistic box.
As final hand-in the students have to present a model in 1:300 and a A1 poster.
Note: All software has to be installed before workshop start.
Literature
No Literature
35
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
10
Conditions:
Free Study Activities and Study Trips
Completion of free study activities requires enrollment of minimum 25 students.
10.1 Free Study Activity 1: Study Trip to Copenhagen and Malmö
(2 ECTS)
Coordinator
Lecturers
Purpose
Objectives
PhD Student, Ditte Bendix Lanng
PhD Student
Department of Architecture, Design
and Media Technology
Ditte Bendix Lanng
The purpose of the study trip is to support the main project by visiting the Metro in
Copenhagen. As the Nørrebro Station of the Copenhagen Metro is the project
site for the main project, the study trip aims at providing opportunity for the
students to make site mappings. Furthermore the Metro Company in the Ørestad
will be visited. Finally the new Metro in Malmö, Sweden will be visited to present
a different perspective on Metro design
Knowledge of the design and engineering principles behind the Metro in
Copenhagen as well as an insight into one alternative way of conducting Metro
design.
Students who complete the module:
Knowledge
 Gain knowledge of urban metro design as part of the contemporary
Network City
Skills
 Aquire skills of mapping urban metro spaces and transit areas
Competencies
 Develop competencies for proposing re-design proposals for selected
elements of contemporary metro spaces and transit areas
Literature
Primary Literature
Jensen, O. B. (2011) KBH Metroscape – om iscenesættelser af levet mobilitet i
Københavns Metro, in Koffoed, L., J. Larsen & M. Freudendal-Pedersen (red.)
Byen I bevægelse, Roskilde: Samfundslitteratur (In press) + English translation
will be provided
Jensen, O. B. (2008) European Metroscapes - the production of lived mobilities
within the socio-technical Metro systems in Copenhagen, London and Paris,
paper for the 'Mobility, the City and STS' conference, The Technical University of
Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, November 20-22, 2008
Secondary Literature
Trip, J. J. (2007) What makes a city? Planning for Quality of Place. The case of
high-speed train station area development, Delft: TU Delft (PhD dissertation)
Copenhagen Metro (http://www.m.dk/)
Malmö Municipality (http://www.malmo.se/English/About-the-City-of-Malmo.html)
Submission
36
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Assessment
Requirements
 The criterion for successful assessment of this study trip (‘free study
activity’) is active participation, contributing to reflexive dialogues with
fellow students, supervisor and people we meet on site as well as
mapping on location.
 The course will be evaluated by Pass/Fail
Date
October 5 to October 7 2011
Instruction
Content
The Study trip is carried out as a mix of on-site mapping at Nørrebro Station,
visits to the Metro Company, and visits to Malmö
The purpose of the study trip is to support the main project by visiting the Metro in
Copenhagen. As the Nørrebro Station of the Copenhagen Metro is the project
site for the main project, the study trip aims at providing opportunity for the
students to make site mappings. Furthermore the Metro Company in the Ørestad
will be visited. Finally the new Metro in Malmö, Sweden will be visited to present
a different perspective on Metro design.
October 5
Lecture by the Metro Company Chief Architect at Forum Station
Visit at the Metro Company in the Ørestad and lecture
Visit at the Municipality of Copenhagen Planning Dept.
October 6
Visit to the New Metro in Malmö
Visit at the Municipality of Malmö Planning Dept.
October 7
Mapping at Nørreport Station (input for project module)
Data gathering for form and flow
 In groups of two the students will collect data focused on a flow theme
introduced in the course: Form and Flow. The data gathering will take 24
hours and can be done over two days. The assignment is to map the
social, economic and physical infrastructures of the site.
Questionnaires
 The assignment is to produce a questionnaire designated to reveal
determinants of flow amongst users of/visitors to Nørrebro Station and to
execute the survey at the site. Data must be processed and analyzed in
terms to identify determinants of flows that are significant for the design
phase.
Data


Gps-tracking
Environmental data.
Observations [Photo]
 Personal front
 Interaction order
 Inter-human Distances: (Intimate, personal, social and public)
 Front stage/Backstage regions
 Main flow paths (car, truck, bike, pedestrian)
37
Study Guide MSc01-URB F2011
Flow dependencies
 Product flow (close tracking “made in China”)
 Food flow (“made in ?”)
 Cultural flows
 Social flows
Destination
Preparation
Materials
Copenhagen and Malmö
A travel program is developed in an organizing group before the study trip
Students must bring digital cameras and other relevant site mapping tools
38
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