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FCS304, Spring 2014
FCS304-Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood in Socio-Cultural Context
Section .01 - Course Syllabus - Spring 2014
Monday, 5:30-8:20 --- 208 Turner
Instructor: Bill Anderson, PhD., CFLE
Office: 203E Turner
Phone:
438-3256
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours: Tuesday 1:30-2:30, Wednesday 3:00-4:00, and Thursday 11:00-noon
Required Texts: Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach - Arnett
Choose one of the following: Ophelia Speaks by S. Schandler –or- Our Boys Speak by J. Nikkah
Other materials on Library Course Reserve and e-reserve
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
1. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Theories, historical background, and research regarding adolescent
development and emerging adulthood as they relate to society and culture.
________________________________________________________________________________
2. COURSE OBJECTIVES: By the end of this course successful students will demonstrate ability to:
 Describe, compare, and apply multiple theories of adolescent development
 Compare and contrast physical, social, cognitive, and moral development from child to adolescent,
and from adolescent to adult
 Identify, analyze, and discuss current issues in adolescence and emerging adulthood
 Evaluate the likely impact current social issues may have upon adolescent development and
emerging adulthood
 Identify multiple ways in which adolescence and emerging adulthood can differ with culture
 Synthesize theoretical perspectives and course material with real life situations and experience
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3. REQUIREMENTS:
 Read required material prior to class and participate consistently in class discussions
 One quick thought (QT) for each class
 Article Discussions
 Three tests, one of which will be during finals week
 In-class presentations
 Critical book review
 Critical Reflection essay
Throughout the semester, I will assume that you have read the day’s materials prior to class and any inclass assignment will reflect this assumption. In order to excel in this course, students will need a good
working knowledge of both lecture/class discussion and text material.
Students are expected to attend, arrive on time, and stay the full time. Also, please turn off and put away
all unnecessary electronics, repeated reminders will result in your being asked to drop the class.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________-
4. TESTS: Tests will cover the topics from the scheduled readings and class lectures/discussions. All
exams may be cumulative, consist of essay, true/false, and multiple-choice questions, and may involve both
in-class and out-of-class work.
4.1 Mini-Quizzes: Mini-quizzes cover specific areas of the week’s reading assignments, and will consist of
T/F and multiple-choice questions only. Approximately 85% of the quiz will come from the noted
selections of text.
4.2 Quiz and Assignment Make-up Policy: Make up for missed work will be considered on an individual
basis and will require appropriate documentation by the student. If possible, notify me prior to a regularly
scheduled test that you will not attend. If this is not possible, notify me as soon as possible afterwards.
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FCS304, Spring 2014
5. ASSIGNMENTS:
5.1 Quick Thoughts: QT’s are complete thoughts, conclusions, questions etc. that came to you as a direct
result of that day’s class. For instance -- What challenged you or struck you as completely original? Did
you change your mind about an existing conclusion that you held, or, become more certain in your existing
belief? Be open to your own ideas. One QT after each class, due within 24 hours.
5.2 Assignments:
Article Discussions: Using at least the minimum number of articles indicated, submit two firm conclusions
after reading the articles and the text, and at least two questions to present to your group, or the class as a
whole. These should also reflect a connection to the text and be submitted using the appropriate Assignment
function in ReggieNet no later than 9:30am the day of the class. Be prepared for small group/class
discussion. Remember, when you read non-academic publications you are responsible for providing the
professional’s viewpoint.
Graduate students will have an additional article assigned for each of the 8 article discussions. These are
marked in the schedule to follow and will require the written response to 2-4 provided questions. This
article should also be reflected in your article discussion submission introduced above. Submit this
assignment via ReggieNet by noon on class day.
5.3 Taking-Sides Teaching: Students will work in small groups of 2-3 to present two separate TakingSides topics. Presentations will be approximately 25-30 minutes in length and consist of (a) a thorough
overview of the question – your conclusion should not become evident until revealed, present both sides
without bias, (b) a detailed process of consensus explaining your individual beginning positions, (c) a
detailed presentation of the group’s conclusion on the issue (as it specifically relates to this class) and the
process, (d) anticipate what the future may hold for your specific topic (consider changes in society and
cultural expectations), (e) some form of involvement appropriate for upper college level students, and (f) an
appropriate handout sent to all class members through ReggieNet. Presentations are intentionally scheduled
on class dates with relevant material, please draw from the week’s material to augment your presentation.
Presentation Topics:
Topics- see course calendar for presentation dates
1) Are character/moral education programs effective? (Source 5, Issue 18)
2) Are contemporary young adults more selfish than previous generations? (Source 3, Issue 13)
3) Do boys worry about an ideal body image as much as girls do? (Source 1, Issue 4)
4) Is gender identity innate? (Source 2, Issue 2)
5) Are male teens more aggressive than female teens? (Source 4, Issue 15)
7) Do online friendships hinder adolescent well-being? (Source 1, Issue 14)
8) Are social networking sites such as Facebook, a cause for concern among adolescents? (Source 1, Issue 19)
9) Does sex on TV negatively impact adolescent sexuality? (Source 1, Issue 17)
10) Is pornography harmful to teenagers? (source 6, Issue16)
10) Does dating impede developmental adjustment for adolescents? (Source1, Issue 13)
11) Has the middle school concept failed? (Source 5, Issue 3)
12) Should contemporary adolescents be engaged in more structured activities? (Source 3, Issue 11)
13) Are college graduates unprepared for adulthood and the world of work? (Source 3, Issue 14)
14) Does a violent medium cause teenage aggression? (Source 3, Issue 12)
15) Do video games impede adolescent cognitive development? (Source 1, Issue 18)
Above sources on library reserve:
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1) Taking-Sides: Clashing Views in Adolescence --- 2nd Edition HQ796 .T35
2) Taking-Sides: Clashing Views in Gender --- 3rd Edition HQ1075.5.U6 T34
3) Taking-Sides: Clashing Views in Lifespan Development --- 2nd Edition BF712 .T35
4) Taking-Sides: Clashing Views in Childhood and Society --- 8th Edition HQ767.9.T34
5) Taking-Sides: Clashing views on controversial issues in teaching and educational practice --- 3rd Edition
LB1607.5 .T35
6) Taking-Sides: Clashing Views in Family and Personal Relationships --- 8th Edition HQ536 .T35
5.4 Book review: This review should be a critical reflection on the contents and overall emphasis of the
book as it specifically relates to this class. By incorporating a minimum of five specifically identified points
from class materials and discussions, present an organized, informed judgment of the current relevance of
the book. In no more than 6 pages, discuss the role this book could play in counseling or educating
adolescents or parents of your generation. Be open, concise, and thorough; a book review is not a book
report. Some class time may be allowed for this.
5.5 Critical Reflection essay: Review your work from this semester. As you reflect on your work what
trends do you see, what have you changed your mind about, what did you say particularly well? What does
your work say about you? Your work should be organized into a solid introduction, at least 5 specifically
identified points (each point supported by multiple examples from your QT’s, readings, article discussions,
presentation, etc.), and a thorough conclusion. No more than 5 pages.
General instructions for all assignments: Work may be discussed with classmates; however, each student
must submit independently produced assignments. If your name is on the assignment I will conclude that
all work is wholly original with you. Written submissions are to be typed and double-spaced with a 12point font. Place your name and class section number (FCS309) on all assignments, i.e. Anderson FCS309
Essay #1. Oddly enough, grammar, spelling, organization etc, will also be reflected in the grade.
---Late assignments will be reduced by 15%. --________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
6. SPECIAL ACCOMODATIONS: Illinois State University seeks to provide each individual with ways
of functioning independently within the University community and offer equal access and opportunity in
accomplishing educational, professional and personal goals.
---Office of Disability Concerns: Disability Concerns provides approved accommodation services, in
confidence, for students with disabilities. It is located at 350 Fell Hall (438-5853 or [email protected]).
More information available at http://www.disabilityconcerns.ilstu.edu/fac_faq/.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
7. POLICY ON ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: All acts of dishonesty in any work constitute academic
misconduct. This includes, but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabricating information,
misrepresentations, making up false excuses for absences, and assisting any of the above. Any of the above
will result in notification of Student Dispute Resolution Services and a grade of F in the course.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
8. COURSE GRADES: Based on a total of 625 possible points (820 for graduate students):
 Exams (3 exams at 40 possible points each)
 Mini-Quizzes (14 at 15 points each)
 Taking Sides presentation (2 at 40 possible points each)
 Critical book review (70 possible points)
 Article Discussion responses (8 at 10 possible points each)
 Quick Thoughts (1 per class for 30 possible points)
 Critical Reflection Essay (30 possible points)
 Research article responses – graduate students only (13 at 15 points each)
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FCS304, Spring 2014
%
93-100
82-92.99
72-81.99
65-73.99
Below 65
%
93-100
84-92.99
75-81.99
Below 75
Undergraduate Grading
Points
A – Exceptional
581-625
B – Above Average 525-580.99
C – Average
468.75-524.99
D – Below Average 406.25-468.74
F – Failed
406.24 and below
Graduate Grading
Points
A – Exceptional
762.60-820
B – Above Average 688.80-762.59
C – Average
615-688.79
F – Failed
614.999 and below
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9. SCHEDULE: READINGS, ASSIGNMENTS, & EXAMS
01/13
1-Course Introduction – Syllabus and Rubrics
Books for Review
Presentation Topics and student choices
Learning, Stereotypes, Bloom, and Reflective Judgment
01/20
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, no class meeting
01/27
1-Intro to Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood (Arnett, pp. 1-28)
Mini-Quiz 1: Adolescence around the world
 Sub-Saharan Africa
 North and Middle-East Africa
 Asia
 India
 Latin America
 The West
Book review selections
Article Discussion #1 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
Required for all students-- A peaceful adolescence. B. Kantrowitz & K. Springen, Newsweek, April 25, 2005
(Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 8ff – at Floor 2 Circulation
Desk)
All choose one of the following:
 On (not) “Coloring in the outline” Transformations from youth through relationships
L.C. Powell, Journal of Social Issues, 2003 (Available in ReggieNet - Resources
file)
 What makes teens tick, C. Wallis, Time, May 10, 2004 (Available in ReggieNet Resources file)
 The future of adolescence: Lengthening ladders to adulthood. R. Larson, The
Futurist, 2002 (Electronic Course reserves at Milner web site)
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FCS304, Spring 2014

Trashing teens. H.E. Marons, Psychology Today, 2007 (Annual Editions, Adolescent
Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 2ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Supporting youth during parental deployment: Strategies for professionals and
families. A. Huebner & J. Mancini. The Prevention Researcher, 2005 (Annual
Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 53ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students-- Adolescence in literature, biography, and history. G. S. Hall (1904), Adolescence: it's
psychology and its relation to physiology, anthropology, sociology... 1904
02/03
2-Biological Foundations (Arnett, pp. 30-55)
Mini-Quiz 2:
 Endocrine system
 Physical growth during puberty
 Social and personal responses to puberty
 Early and late pubertal timing
Article Discussion #2 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
Required for all graduate students-- Is psychopathology associated with the timing of pubertal development? J.A. Braber
et al. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 1997
All choose two of the following:
 Prescription for disaster. B. Smithouser, Plugged In, 2006 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 159ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Healthier students, better learners. B. Pateman. Educational Leadership, 2004
(Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 19ff – at Floor 2 Circulation
Desk)
 The biology of risk taking. L. F. Price, Educational Leadership, 2005 (Available on
ReggieNet - Resources file)
 Medicating young minds, J. Kluger, Time, November 2, 2003 (Available on
ReggieNet - Resources file)
Book Jigsaw groups (you should be at least 30 pages into you chosen book at this point)
02/10
3-Cognitive Foundations (Arnett, pp. 58-89)
Mini-Quiz 3:
 Stages of cognitive development
 Formal operations
 Development of critical thinking
 Perspective taking
Article Discussion #3 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
Required for all students-- Character and academics. J.S. Benninga. Phi Delta Kappan. 2006 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 119ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students-- Words speak louder than actions: Understanding deliberately false remarks. A.
Demorest et al. Child Development, 1984
All choose one of the following:
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FCS304, Spring 2014

Stories from tween classrooms. B. Morgan & D. Odom, Educational Leadership,
2005 (Electronic Course reserves at Milner web site)
 The consequences of insufficient sleep for adolescents: Links between sleep and
emotional regulation. R.E. Dahl. Phi Delta Kappan. 1999 (Available on ReggieNet Resources file)
 Adolescent stress: The relationship between stress and mental health problems. K.E.
Grant et al. The Prevention Researcher, September 2005 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 47ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Immigrant youth in US schools: Opportunities for prevention. M.B. Greene. The
Prevention Researcher. 2007 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp.
101ff (at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Mental assessment test. E. Ramirez. US News and World Report. 2008 (Annual
Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 22ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Exam #1 handed out
Exam #1 due via ReggieNet assignment by noon on 02/14
02/17
4-Influence of Cultural Beliefs (Arnett, pp. 92-118)
Mini-Quiz 4:
 Sources of socialization
 Piaget
 Kohlberg
Presentation 1 & 2
Article Discussion #4 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
Required for all students-- Influence of music on youth behaviors. The Brown University Child and Adolescent
Behavior Letter, 2005 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 32ff – at
Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students-- A congregation of one: Individualized religious beliefs among emerging adults. JJ
Arnett, 2001, unpublished manuscript
Choose one of the following:
 The cultural plunge. J. Nieto. Teacher Education Quarterly, 2006 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 113ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Terrorism, the media, and distress in youth. R.L. Pfefferbaum et al., The Prevention
Researcher, April 2003 (Electronic Course reserves at Milner web site)
 In an era of school shootings, lockdowns are the new drill. T. Kelley. The New York
Times, 2008 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 97ff – at Floor 2
Circulation Desk)
 Supporting youth during parental deployment: Strategies for professionals and
families. A. Huebner & J. Mancini. The Prevention Researcher, 2005 (Annual
Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 53ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
02/24
5-Gender Issues (Arnett, pp. 120-143)
Mini-Quiz 5:
 Gender Intensification Hypothesis
 Cultural beliefs about gender
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FCS304, Spring 2014
 Gender socialization: Family, peers, and school
 Gender socialization as a source of problems
 Cognition and gender
Required for all graduate students-- Dilemmas of desire: Representations of sexuality in two teen magazines. M.G.
Durham, Youth and Society, 1998
Presentation 3 & 4
Book Jigsaw groups (you should be at least 75 pages into you chosen book at this point)
03/03
6-Self, Culture, and Identity (Arnett, pp. 147--173)
Mini-Quiz 6:
 Self-esteem from preadolescence through adolescence
 Self-esteem and physical appearance
 Self-conceptions
Presentation 5 & 6
Article Discussion #5 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
Required for all students
 A nation of wimps. H.E. Marano. Psychology Today. 2004 (Available on ReggieNet
- Resources file)
Required for all graduate students-- The development of multiple role-related selves during adolescence. S. Harter et al.
Development and Psychopathology, 1997
Choose one of the following:
 Adolescent stress. K.E. Grant. The Prevention Researcher, 2005 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 37ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Body dissatisfaction in adolescent females and males: Risk and Resilience. K
Presnell et al. The Prevention Researcher, 2007 (Annual Editions, Adolescent
Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 24ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Risky business: Exploring adolescent risk-taking behavior, T.J. Wyatt & L. F.
Peterson, Journal of School Health, August 2005
 Parental illness and adolescent development. N.L. Worsham & E.K. Crawford, The
Prevention Researcher, 2005 (Electronic Course reserves at Milner web site)
 Students who self-injure: School counselor ethical and legal considerations. A.
Costin. Professional School Counseling, 2006
 A warning to college profs from a high school teacher. V. Strauss. Washington Post,
2013 (Available on ReggieNet - Resources file)
 Are We Raising a Generation of Helpless Kids? M. Goodman. Huff Post Parents,
2012(Available on ReggieNet - Resources file)
03/17
7-Friends and Peers I (Arnett, pp. 211-238)
Mini-Quiz 8:
 Emotional states with friends
 Intimacy and adolescent development
 Friends influence: Support and nurturance
 Youth culture
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FCS304, Spring 2014
Required for all graduate students-- Segregating the popular from the unpopular. D. Eder, School Talk, 1995
Presentations 7 & 8
Critical Book Review Discussion
03/22
Critical Book Due 03/22 by noon via Assignment function on ReggieNet
03/24
8-Friends and Peers II (Arnett, pp. 211-238)
Mini-Quiz 9:
 Sarcasm and ridicule in cliques
 Relational aggression
 Interventions for unpopularity
 Bullying
Required for all graduate students-- Casting crowns in a relational perspective: Caricature, channel, and context. B.B.
Brown et al. Advances in adolescent development, volume 6, 1994
Presentation 9
Exam #2 handed out
Exam #2 due via Assignment function in ReggieNet by noon on 03/28
03/31
9-Love and Sexuality (Arnett, pp. 241-274)
Mini-Quiz 10:
 Rates of adolescent sexuality
 Cultural beliefs and adolescent sexuality
 Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual adolescents
 Contraceptive use and nonuse
All students choose one of the following
 Teens, porn in the digital age: From shame to social acceptability. T. Melby,
Contemporary Sexuality, September 2010, (Annual Editions, Adolescent
Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 87ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
 Violence in adolescent dating relationships. Jouriles et al. The Prevention
Researcher, February 2009 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp.
147ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students-- Concepts of romance in 15-year-old adolescents. C. Feiring, Journal of Research on
Adolescents (6), 1996
Presentation 10
04/07
10-Education: High School and College (Arnett, pp. 277-306)
Mini-Quiz 11:
 Changes in schooling for adolescents
 Junior High, Middle School, or Neither
 Cultural beliefs and school
 Improving the school experience of adolescents
Required for all students
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FCS304, Spring 2014

Why teenagers find learning a drag. J. Hamzelou, New Scientist, 2010, (Annual
Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 117ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students-- How college makes a difference: A summary. E.T. Pascarella & P.T. Terenzini, 1991
Presentation 11 &12
04/14
11-Work (Arnett, pp. 309-333)
Mini-Quiz 12:
 Work and psychological functioning
 Work and problem behavior
 School-to-work- programs in the United States
 The development of occupational goals
Presentation 13
Article Discussion #6 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
All students choose two of the following:
 The perils of higher education. S. Kotler. Psychology Today, 2005 (Available on
ReggieNet-Resources file)
 The new college dropout. Psychology Today, 2005 (Available on ReggieNet Resources file)
 The Cheating Epidemic: How School Climates Affect Student Choices. D. Allyn.
Huff Post Education. 2012 (Available on ReggieNet - Resources file)
Required for all graduate students-- How to prior experiences in the workplace set the stage for transitions to adulthood?
J.T. Mortimer et al., from Transitions to Adulthood in a cab changing Economy,
1999
04/21
12-Media Influence on Socialization (Arnett, pp. 337-360)
Mini-Quiz 13:
 Media and other sources of socialization
 New internet forms
 Mobile phones and text messaging
Presentations 14 & 15
Article Discussion #7 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
All students choose two of the following:
 The overdominance of computers, L.W. Monke, Educational Leadership, December
2005/January 2006 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 133ff)
 Teaching kids to kill, T. Neven, Plugged In, July 2006
 Video game violence. E. Sohn. Science, 2007 (Annual Editions, Adolescent
Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 131ff)
 Goodbye to girlhood. S. Weiner. The Washington Post, February 20, 2007 (Annual
Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 7th ed., pp. 29ff)
 When play turns to trouble: Many parents are now wondering how much is too
much? J. Wegner, US News and World Report, May 19, 2008 (Annual Editions,
Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 63ff – at Floor 2 Circulation Desk)
Required for all graduate students---
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FCS304, Spring 2014

Adolescent room culture: Studying media in the context of everyday life. J.D. Steele
and J.D. Brown, Journal of Youth & Adolescence (24), 1995
04/28
13-Problems in Emerging Adulthood Research (Arnett, pp. 363-391)
Mini-Quiz 14:
 Substance use
 Depression
 Eating disorders
Article Discussion #8 (See assignment 6.4 for instructions)
All students choose one of the following:
 Passage to adulthood, F.F. Furstenburg, The Prevention Researcher, April 2010,
2007 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 2ff)
 The independence of young adults, M.J. Rosenfeld, Family Therapy Magazine, will
May/June 2010 (Annual Editions, Adolescent Psychology, 8th ed., pp. 8ff)
Required for all graduate students-- The perceived social context of adolescent misconduct: A comparative study of
youths in three cultures. Greenburger, Journal of Research on Adolescents (10),
2000.
Exam #3 handed out
TBA
Exam #3 submitted to assignment dropbox by 9:00am
05/08
Critical Reflection Essay due to assignment dropbox by 8:00am
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