Unpacked K.OA.A.3

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K.OA.A.3
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction
as taking apart and taking from.
3. Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by
using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g.,
5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
Unpacked
Decomposing (splitting) a number is a foundational skill in number sense. The mastery of
this skill helps students understand that a quantity can be composed of two smaller
quantities in different ways. Further, these sets can be arranged in a variety of ways and
the sum total is always the same; for example, we can reorder addends and the sum will
be the same (4 + 2 = 2 + 4). Students will begin to develop the ability to record the results
of compositions and decompositions of sets using numbers, objects and pictures. This
skill lays a firm foundation for understanding of operations and algebraic thinking.
Students develop an understanding of part-whole relationships as they recognize that a set
of objects (5) can be broken into smaller sub-sets (3 and 2) and still remain the total
amount (5). In addition, this objective asks students to realize that a set of objects (5) can
be broken in multiple ways (3 and 2; 4 and 1). Thus, when breaking apart a set
(decompose), students use the understanding that a smaller set of objects exists within
that larger set (inclusion).
Example: “Bobby Bear is missing 5 buttons on his jacket. How many ways can you
use blue and red buttons to finish his jacket? Draw a picture of all your ideas.
Students could draw pictures of:
4 blue and 1 red button, 3 blue and 2 red buttons, 2 blue and 3 red buttons, 1 blue and 4
red buttons
In Kindergarten, students need ample experiences breaking apart numbers and
using the vocabulary “and” & “same amount as” before symbols (+, =) and
equations (5= 3 + 2) are introduced. If equations are used, a mathematical
representation (picture, objects) needs to be present as well.
Students may use drawings to show different number pairs for a given number. For
example, students may draw 5 objects, showing how to decompose in several ways.
Examples of what this work might look like for students:
Speaking
Level 2
Emerging
Demonstrate
an
understandin
g of
decomposing
numbers less
than or equal
to 10 into
pairs in more
than one way,
Level 3
Developing
Demonstrate
an
understandin
g of
decomposing
numbers less
than or equal
to 10 into
pairs in more
than one way,
Level 4
Expanding
Demonstrate
an
understandin
g of
decomposing
numbers less
than or equal
to 10 into
pairs in more
than one way,
Level 5
Bridging
Demonstrate
an
understanding
of
decomposing
numbers less
than or equal
to 10 into
pairs in more
than one way,
e.g., by using
objects or
drawings,
and recording
each
decompositio
n using a 5
frame and
explaining to
the teacher.
e.g., by using
objects or
drawings,
and recording
each
decompositio
n using a 5
frame and
explaining to
a partner.
e.g., by using
objects or
drawings,
and recording
each
decompositio
n on a chart
while
explaining to
a partner.
e.g., by using
objects or
drawings,
and recording
each
decompositio
n
on a chart
and
explaining to
a cooperative
group.
e.g., by using
objects or
drawings, and
recording
each
decomposition
and teaching
the concept to
a small group.
ELD Standard #3: English Language Learners communicate information, ideas,
and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of
Mathematics.
Level 6 Reaching
Level 1
Entering
Demonstrate
an
understandin
g of
decomposing
numbers less
than or equal
to 10 into
pairs in more
than one way,
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