Year 4 - Group 5

advertisement
Year 4 Homework – Term 3
Remember to READ EVERY NIGHT! Practice your reading goal
Reading Eggs - http://app.readingeggs.com/login
Week
6
7
8
9
English
Spelling
Narratives have the
following:
a title, an orientation, a
complication and a
resolution.
In a story you have read,
write down the main
characters, when and
where the story took
place,the complication and
how the story ends.
Text connectives and
pronouns bind text
together to give it unity.
(eg. however)
From a book you are
reading, write down 3 text
connectives and 3
pronouns used in the text.
From a book you are
reading, choose a section
of text, write 3 interesting
noun and verb groups that
were used.
Look Say Spelling Cover
Write Check
From a book you are
reading, choose a section
of text, write the direct
speech that was
used.Direct speech has
“Quotation marks” around
it
Look at the word, say the
word, spell the word out
loud, cover the word up,
write the word next to
the word you were
looking at.
Mathematics
Measurement Length
Measure the length of
your bed using a) your
hands b) your parents
hands
Why might this not be an
appropriate
measurement device?
Other Handed
If you are right handed,
write your spelling
words with your left
hand and vice versa.
Grams vs Kilograms.
Pyramid Words
Writethe first 5 of your
spelling words in a
pyramid shape eg: T
TH
THE
THEM
What is the difference
between a basic and a
compound shape. Draw
and label an example of
each.
Rhyming Words
Write each of your
spelling words. Next to
each word, write a
rhyming word (can be
nonsense words)
Place the following numbers
on a place value chart
1000gms = 1kg
500gms = ___ kg
2250gms = ____kg
5.2kgs = _____gms
- 6 tenths
- 8 ones
- 4 hundreds
Ones Parts of One Thousandths
HTO
HTO
H T O
●
10
Explain why it is
important to have a
series of events in a story
leading to a conclusion.
(eg. to build excitement)
Online
Learning
Science
Sentences
Write sentences using
at least 5 of your
spelling words from
Weeks 6 to 9 (underline
your spelling words)
Partitioning
Spelling City
Study Ladder
http://www.spellingcity.com/
http://www.studyladder.com.au/?l
c_set=
Express 3 different ways
of writing the f number.
98 639
(eg. 55,150 =
55 thousands, 1 hundred
and 50 ones)
List some
alternatives to
plastic for:
- water bottles
- lunchboxes
- packaging
food in lunches
Is plastic natural
or processed?
Explain your
reasoning.
SPELLING FOR GROUP FIVE TERM 3 2015
WEEK 1 Consolidation
Yr 4 Unit 1 Week 5 & Unit 2
Week 1
Complex Consonants – ‘dge’ ‘str’
‘tch’ ‘squ’
Silent letters - ‘tch’ ‘kn’ ‘gn’ ‘wr’
sketch
squirt
stretch
squawk
hutch
squirrel
catch
squeeze
latch
knotted
knuckle
square
knitting
gnocchi
knead
gnashing
knowledge
wrinkle
edge
wrapped
judge
The ‘tch’ pattern is most often
following a short vowel (pitch) while
‘ch’ is often after another consonant
or vowel pattern (lunch, reach).
LEM rules –
‘wr’and ‘kn’ may only be used to
represent ‘r’ at the beginning of a
base word.
‘tch’ is usually used to represent the
sound ch after a single vowel in a
one syllable word. The vowel does
not always say its first sound.
‘gn’ may be used to represent the
sound ‘n’ at the beginning or at the
end of a base word.
‘dge’ may only be used to represent
the sound ‘j’ at the end of a word
after a single vowel which says its
first sound – a, e, i, o or u.
WEEK 3 Focus Area AFFIXES
Yr 6 Unit 1 Week 2
Suffixes — ‘ance’, ‘ence’
Yr 4 Unit 4 Wk 4
Suffix – ‘ous’
WEEK 2 Consolidation
Yr 4 Unit 2
Week 2 Vowels
– diphthongs
‘oi’ ‘oy’ and ‘ou’
Yr 4 Unit 1
Week 4
Doubling Final
Consonant
disloyal
allow
voice
amount
moisture
doubt
dough
through
employ
ground
voyage
avoid
wrapping
trapped
shopping
hottest
quitting
spotty
dragged
knotty
stopped
tripped
WEEK 3 Focus Area –
WEEK 4 Focus Area –
WEEK 5 Focus Area -
Unaccented final syllables
Yr 4 Unit 3 Week 3
Unaccented final syllables — ‘le’
and ‘el’
Unaccented final syllables
Yr 4 Unit 3 Week 4
Unaccented final syllables — ‘il’
and ‘al’
Unaccented final syllables
Yr 4 Unit 4 Week 3
Final syllables — ‘er’, ‘ar’ and ‘or’
principle
candle
example
double
miracle
staple
handle
vehicle
couple
tremble
council
pencil
nostril
April
civil
tonsil
stencil
pupil
fossil
principal
another
border
answer
reporter
gather
whether
rather
burglar
collar
lunar
jewel
fuel
caramel
level
quarrel
novel
hotel
tunnel
cancel
funnel
normal
journal
animal
material
social
equal
festival
special
dental
hospital
solar
popular
regular
similar
familiar
mirror
meteor
cursor
editor
visitor
Unit 2 - A diphthong is a vowel sound that
glides from one sound to another in a
quick, smooth movement.
Ambiguous vowels can be challenging to
spell as the same pattern can make
different sounds, such as ‘ou’ in ‘dough’
and ‘through’ Unit 1 - Doubling
consonants at the syllable juncture
preserves the short vowel sound e.g.
‘hŏp’ becomes ‘hŏp/ping’. If the consonant
is not doubled the syllable becomes open
and the vowel can become long e.g. ‘hŏp’
– ‘hō/ping’.
Exceptions to this generalisation include
most words that end in ‘w’ (draw) or ‘x’
(wax).
LEM Rules –
‘oi’ – may not be used at the end of word.
English words don’t end in ‘I’. Can be
used within a syllable.
‘oy’ is used to represent the sound ‘oy’ at
the end of a syllable if a vowel follows
(voyage, foyer, royal, disloyal)
Words with the final syllables ‘le’, ‘el’, ‘il’
and ‘al’ can be challenging to spell as
the difference cannot always be heard.
For example, ‘principle’, ‘level’, ‘pencil’
and ‘dental’. The syllables are
unaccented or have less stress. The
vowel sound is neither short nor long.
It is useful to remember that the ending
‘le’ is far more common than ‘el’. Use
your visual spelling knowledge to learn
the shape and spelling of these words.
Words with the final syllables ‘le’, ‘el’,
‘il’ and ‘al’ can be challenging to spell
as the difference cannot always be
heard. For example, ‘principle’, ‘level’,
‘pencil’ and ‘dental’. The syllables are
unaccented or have less stress. The
vowel sound is neither short nor long.
It is useful to remember that the ending
‘le’ is far more common than ‘el’. Use
your visual spelling knowledge to learn
the shape and spelling of these words.
The final syllables ‘er’, ‘ar’ and ‘or’ are
usually unaccented (unstressed)
syllables making it difficult to hear the
difference in the vowel sound. There are
a few generalisations that may assist in
remembering these words:
•comparatives are always spelt ‘er’
•the final syllable ‘er’ is more common
than ‘ar’ or ‘or’
•adding a suffix may help to hear the
difference e.g. similar – similarity.
Use visual spelling knowledge.
WEEK 4 Focus Area AFFIXES
Yr 4 Unit 4 Week 4
Suffixes — ‘tion’, ‘ous’, ‘y’ and
‘ish’
WEEK 5 Focus Area –
AFFIXES
Yr 4 Unit 3 Week 5
Prefixes — ‘un’, ‘re’, ‘dis’ and
‘mis’
WEEK 3 Focus Area –
AFFIXES
Yr 5 Unit 7 Week 5
Suffixes — ‘able’, ‘ible, ‘ous’ and
‘eous’
WEEK 4 Focus Area –
AFFIXES
Yr 5 Unit 2 Week 3
Suffixes — ct + ‘ion’, ss + ‘ion’, t +
‘ion’ and ‘e’ drop + ‘ion’
acceptance
anxious
appearance
famous
guidance
jealous
defiance
disastrous
instance
dependence
confidence
patience
intelligence
difference
The suffix ‘tion’ changes words into
nouns, for example educate (verb)
– education (noun). The suffix
‘ous’, ‘y’ and ‘ish’ form adjectives,
for example fame (noun) – famous
(adjective); thirst (noun) – thirsty
(adjective); child (noun) – childish
(adjective).
The suffixes ‘tion’ and ‘ish’ mean
‘state of being’. The suffix ‘ous’
means ‘full of’ and the suffix ‘y’
means ‘like’.
education
cloudy
collection
thirsty
illustration
hungry
concentration
fussy
separation
nosey
anxious
childish
famous
foolish
jealous
stylish
disastrous
longish
dirty
selfish
The suffix ‘tion’ changes words into
nouns, for example educate (verb) –
education (noun). The suffix ‘ous’, ‘y’
and ‘ish’ form adjectives, for example
fame (noun) – famous (adjective);
thirst (noun) – thirsty (adjective);
child (noun) – childish (adjective).
The suffixes ‘tion’ and ‘ish’ mean
‘state of being’. The suffix ‘ous’
means ‘full of’ and the suffix ‘y’
means ‘like’.
unusual
disagree
unclean
dishonest
unable
discovery
unhappy
disappear
uncommon
disobey
research
mistrust
recharge
mistook
recycle
misspell
refill
misprint
remind
misbehave
Prefixes change the meaning of
the base word.
The prefixes ‘un’ and ‘dis’ mean
not; ‘re’ means again; and ‘mis’
means wrong.
Knowing the meanings of prefixes
helps with word building and
making meaning.
For example: ‘unbelievable’ means
not believable; ‘disagree’ means to
not agree; ‘refill’ means to fill again
fashionable
suitable
comfortable
favourable
agreeable
changeable
responsible
horrible
eligible
incredible
possible
edible
visible
joyous
dangerous
mysterious
humorous
famous
gorgeous
courteous
Suffixes are morphemes that are
placed at the end of words (or base
words). Suffixes change the base word
and how it is used. Suffixes can turn
words into nouns, adjectives, adverbs
or verbs.
The suffix ‘able’ is usually added to
base words (for example,
fashion/able), while the suffix ‘ible’ is
usually added to root words (for
example, horr/ible). The suffixes ‘able’
and ‘ible’ sound the same. Sometimes
it can be difficult to work out which
suffix to use based on sound alone.
The suffix ‘able’ is usually found at the
end of a whole word. For example,
‘comfort’, ‘fashion’ and ‘favour’ are
whole base words. Adding the suffix
‘able’ makes the words ‘comfortable’,
‘fashionable’ and ‘favourable’.
The suffix ‘ible’ is usually found at the
end of a root word.
For example, ‘incred’, ‘horr’ and ‘elig’.
These are not
whole words. The suffix ‘ible’ is used to
make the words ‘incredible’, ‘horrible’
and ‘eligible’.
An easy way to remember the
difference is ‘able’ is a whole word,
while ‘ible’ is not!
The suffixes ‘able’ and ‘ible’ are usually
adjective-forming (e.g. comfortable,
incredible).
The suffixes ‘ous’ and ‘eous’ are
usually adjective-forming (e.g. joyous,
courteous).
These suffixes mean ‘like, full of’ or
‘relating to’.
introduction
interruption
direction
suggestion
selection
prevention
correction
exception
instruction
communication
expression
illustration
submission
location
transmission
frustration
discussion
decoration
profession
pollution
Suffixes are morphemes placed at
the end of words to change how the
word is used.
The suffix ‘ion’ changes words into
nouns. This suffix has been added
to base words ending in ‘ct’
(selection), ‘ss’ (express) and ‘t’
(exception).
Explore the base words and how
some endings change. Base words
that end in ‘e’ will usually drop the
‘e’ before adding the suffix ‘ion’ (e.g.
frustrate - frustration); the final ‘t’
changing to ‘ss’ in words such as
‘submit’ and ‘transmit’. This suffix
makes a /shun/ sound when added
to base words.
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards