LN434

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MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE
MODULE DETAILS
Module title
General Linguistics 3: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics
Module code
LN434
Credit value
20
Level
Level 4 X Level 5
Level 6
Level 7
Level 8
Mark the box to the right of the Level 0 (for modules at foundation
appropriate level with an ‘X’
level)
Entry criteria for registration on this module
Pre-requisites
Specify in terms of module
codes or equivalent
Co-requisite modules
Specify in terms of module
codes or equivalent
None
Module delivery
Mode of delivery
Taught
Other
X
Distance
Placement
Pattern of delivery
Weekly
X
Block
Other
Online
When module is delivered
Semester 1
Semester 2
X
Throughout year
Other
Brief description of module This module is an introduction to the study of meaning in linguistics. It
content and/ or aims
explores the key concepts in semantics – the study of word and sentence
meaning – and pragmatics – the study of language in use. These
Overview (max 80 words)
concepts include: the nature of context and the difference between
context-dependent and context-independent meaning; the notions of
sense and reference; truth-conditions; lexical semantics; ‘saying versus
‘implicating’. The module is designed to provide a solid foundation for
students who wish to study these aspects of linguistics at a more complex
level.
Module team/ author/
Dr Jelena Timotijevic, Dr Tim Wharton
coordinator(s)
School
School of Humanities
Site/ campus where
Falmer
delivered
Course(s) for which module is appropriate and status on that course
Course
BA (Hons) Linguistics
Module descriptor template: updated Aug 2012
Status (mandatory/ compulsory/
optional)
Compulsory
MODULE AIMS, ASSESSMENT AND SUPPORT
Aims
The aims of this module are set into the context of the QAA Framework
for Higher Education Qualifications and they relate to the SEEC level
descriptors for level 4 study:



Learning outcomes
To provide students with the foundational building blocks in
semantics and pragmatics necessary for further, more complex
linguistic study
To develop students’ understanding of key terminology and key
concepts related to the study of meaning in language and
language use
To develop students’ ability to apply key notions in semantics
and pragmatics to natural language examples
In relation to the QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
and the SEEC level descriptors for level 4 study, by the end of the
module students should be able to:
1. Describe a range of basic and key concepts specific to the
study of semantics and pragmatics
2. Understand key differences between different levels of
meaning and how these inform the study of word and sentence
meaning on the one hand and utterance meaning on the other
3. Demonstrate ability to describe and explain different
phenomena specific to semantics and those specific to
pragmatics using natural language examples
Content
Learning support
Students will explore and examine the following essential linguistic
concepts: Sentences vs. utterances, Semantics vs. pragmatics,
Ambiguity, Linguistic meaning and sentence meaning,
Cognitivism, internalism, intension, Sense relations:
homonymy, polysemy, synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy,
meronymy, Lexical composition, Speech acts, Sentences,
utterances, propositions, Truth-conditions and truth-conditional
semantics, Entailment, Logical vs. natural languages.
Aitchison, J. (2003) Words in the Mind. Oxford: Blackwell.
Blakemore, D. (1992) Understanding Utterances. Oxford: Blackwell.
Brown, P. & S. Levinson (1987) Politeness: Some Universals on
Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Carston, R. (2002) Thoughts and Utterances: The Pragmatics of
Explicit Communication. Oxford: Blackwell.
Chierchia, G. & S. McGonnell-Ginet (1990) Meaning and Grammar: an
introduction to semantics. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Cruse, A. (2000) Meaning in Language. Oxford: Oxford University
Press.
Cutting, J. (2008) Pragmatics and Discourse: A Resource Book for
Students. 2nd edn. London: Routledge.
Davis, S. (ed.) (1991) Pragmatics: A Reader. Oxford: Oxford University
Press.
Green, G. (1996) Pragmatics and Natural Language Understanding. 2nd
Module descriptor template: updated Aug 2012
edn. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Grice, P. (1989) Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, MA:
Harvard.
Grundy, P. (2000) Doing Pragmatics. 2nd edn. London: Arnold.
Kasher, A. (ed.) (1998) Pragmatics: Critical Concepts, vols. I-VI.
London: Routledge.
Horn, L. and G. Ward (eds.) (2004) The Handbook of Pragmatics.
Blackwell: Oxford.
Larson, R. & G. Segal. (1995) Knowledge of Meaning: an introduction
to semantic theory. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Levinson, S. (1983) Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press.
Mey, J. (1993) Pragmatics: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.
Saeed, J. (1997) Semantics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Verschueren, J. (1999) Understanding Pragmatics. London: Arnold.
Wharton, T. (2009) Pragmatics and Non-Verbal Communication.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Teaching and learning activities
Details of teaching and
learning activities
Contact Time: Tutor-led weekly lectures, and seminars in which the
tutors’ presentation is designed to promote themed student discussion
around the area covered.
Tutorial support is given for assessment.
Non-contact Time: Students’ independent study is guided by lists of
questions, bibliographies and specified tasks.
Allocation of study hours (indicative)
Where 10 credits = 100 learning hours
Study hours
SCHEDULED
This is an indication of the number of hours students
can expect to spend in scheduled teaching activities
including lectures, seminars, tutorials, project
supervision, demonstrations, practical classes and
workshops, supervised time in workshops/ studios,
fieldwork, external visits, and work-based learning.
40
GUIDED INDEPENDENT
STUDY
All students are expected to undertake guided
independent study which includes wider reading/
practice, follow-up work, the completion of assessment
tasks, and revisions.
160
PLACEMENT
The placement is a specific type of learning away from
the University that is not work-based learning or a year
abroad.
Module descriptor template: updated Aug 2012
TOTAL STUDY HOURS
200
Assessment tasks
Details of assessment for
this module
General criteria for assessment are framed by the SEEC descriptors for
level 4. Against specific criteria, credit will be awarded for:
1. Successful description of a range of basic and key concepts
specific to the study of semantics and pragmatics
2. An ability to describe key differences between different levels
of meaning and show how these inform the study of word and
sentence meaning on the one hand and utterance meaning on
the other
3. Successful explanation of different phenomena specific to
semantics and those specific to pragmatics using natural
language examples
Task: Written Exam (100%) (LOs 1-3)
Types of assessment task1
Indicative list of summative assessment tasks which lead to the award of credit or
which are required for progression.
% weighting
(or indicate if
component is
pass/fail)
WRITTEN
Written exam
100%
COURSEWORK
Written assignment/ essay, report, dissertation,
portfolio, project output, set exercise
PRACTICAL
Oral assessment and presentation, practical skills
assessment, set exercise
EXAMINATION INFORMATION
Area examination board
English language and Linguistics
Refer to Faculty Office for guidance in completing the following sections
External examiners
Name
Position and institution
Date appointed
Date tenure
ends
Professor Maggie Tallerman
Professor of Linguistics,
Newcastle University
Sept. 2011
Aug. 2015
1 Set exercises, which assess the application of knowledge or analytical, problem-solving or evaluative skills, are included
under the type of assessment most appropriate to the particular task.
Module descriptor template: updated Aug 2012
QUALITY ASSURANCE
Date of first approval
Date of last revision
n/a
Date of approval for this
version
Version number
1
Modules replaced
Specify codes of modules for
which this is a replacement
n/a
Available as free-standing module?
Module descriptor template: updated Aug 2012
Yes
X
No
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